Global Urban Humanities

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

The Graduate Certificate in Global Urban Humanities provides an academic structure for the study of contemporary and historical cities using methods from the environmental design disciplines, the arts and humanities, and the interpretive social sciences. Global Urban Humanities is an emerging interdisciplinary field in which hybrid methods of investigation including artistic and interpretive as well as analytical approaches are applied to the study of urban form and experience.

Through a three-course series, the Certificate offers PhD and master's degree students the opportunity to supplement their major areas of study with courses that explore cities through a variety of disciplinary approaches. In particular, the Certificate emphasizes the intersection of interpretive approaches from the arts and humanities (including close reading, formal analysis, discourse analysis and the making of artistic work products) with methods from the environmental design disciplines (including spatial analysis, representation, and iterative design interventions as a means of research).

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Admissions

Any UC Berkeley graduate student in good standing (GPA of 3.0 or better) may apply. To apply, students should send a Statement of Interest, their Berkeley course transcript, and their completed Graduate Certificate Application form to the Global Urban Humanities Initiative. Applications are accepted twice a year during the Fall and Spring semesters.

Application forms and the student handbook can be found here.

Certificate Requirements

There are three required courses for the Global Urban Humanities Certificate: 

  • a Core Seminar 

  • a Core Interdisciplinary Research Studio

  • an Elective

Core Seminar

The Core Seminar will introduce you to theories and methods for investigating urban form and the human experience in cities through readings, discussion, written assignments, and exercises that may include ethnographic interviewing, mapping, and visual representation. You will be helping shape the emerging field of urban humanities through readings that may include authors including de Certeau, Lefebvre, Debord, Harvey, Sennett, and Lynch.

CY PLAN 291Special Projects Studio in Planning4-6
THEATER 266Special Topics: Theater Arts1-4

Core Interdisciplinary Research Studio

The Core Interdisciplinary Research Studio will give you an opportunity to conduct a fieldwork-based investigation of a city. In 2018 through 2020, this will be a city overseas. The course is inspired by the tradition of studio pedagogy in architecture and urban planning and results in work products that often take the form of visual products as well as written essays. This research studio is designed to provide a unique experience that allows students without a background in design to fully participate in the studio experience along with students who do have that background. No previous design experience or ability to produce visual products is required,

Elective Courses

The elective course is an opportunity for further exploration of topics or methods in the study of cities. For the elective requirement, you are required to take a course outside your home discipline and division. (Exceptions will be considered by petition. For the purposes of this requirement, History will be counted as a Humanities discipline even though it is in the Social Sciences Division.) You may petition to count courses not on this list using the program’s Elective Petition form

College of Environmental Design

ARCH 211Theory and Methods in the Social and Cultural Basis of Design3-4
ARCH 219Special Topics in the Social and Cultural Basis of Design1-4
ARCH 239Special Topics in Architecture Design Theory and Criticism1-4
ARCH 279Special Topics in the History of Architecture1-4
CY PLAN 284Urban Theory3
LD ARCH C242Citizen Involvement in the City Planning Process3

Arts & Humanities Division, College of Letters & Science

ANTHRO 250ASeminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Psychological Anthropology (Any letter may be accepted if the course is urban-focused and approved via an elective petition.)4
FILM 240Graduate Topics in Film4
FRENCH 265AModern Studies4
FRENCH 265BModern Studies4
HISTORY 290Historical Colloquium1
ITALIAN 248Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Italian Studies2,4
PORTUG 275Critical and Stylistic Studies of a Single Author or Period4
SPANISH 280Seminar in Spanish American Literature4
THEATER 201AFoundations in Performance Theory4
THEATER 201BCurrent Topics in Performance Study4

Other Divisions and Schools

ETH STD 240Series in Comparative Transnational Theories and Methods4
NWMEDIA 290Special Topics in New Media1-4
POL SCI C203Urban and Subnational Politics in Developing Countries4
S,SEASN 250Seminar in South and Southeast Asian Studies1-4

Research Resources

Global Urban Humanities-Townsend Fellowships

The Global Urban Humanities-Townsend Fellowships for PhD students at UC Berkeley support research on contemporary and historical cities that engages approaches from the arts and humanities and the humanistic social sciences and from the disciplines of of architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban planning. GUH-Townsend Fellowships are awarded to PhD students who will have advanced to candidacy by Spring 2018. GUH-Townsend Graduate Student Fellows receive up to $18,000 in a stipend, which may be used to cover fees and other expenses.

Global Urban Humanities Initiative Student Publication Grants

Global Urban Humanities Initiative Student Publication Grants support the development of innovative student publications with stipends of $5,000 per student for interdisciplinary editorial teams, plus $4,000 for production costs. Each team must include one graduate student from the College of Environmental Design and one from the Arts & Humanities Division. In the past, we have supported publications that present their material in both written and web-based formats.

 

Teaching Opportunities

Each year, the Global Urban Humanities Initiative (GUH) employs one GSI (graduate student instructor) to lead the Fall Colloquium Speaker Series. GUH encourages graduate students to apply.

Program Benefits

Intellectual Community

The Global Urban Humanities Graduate Certificate provides a unique opportunity for making connections with students from across the campus with a shared interest in global cities, including urban areas in the United States. Participation in the Certificate program makes you part of an active community of scholars and urban practitioners and artists engaged in developing new methods of research and teaching.

Global Perspective

The Certificate is based on the notion that learning occurs in many directions and that cities in the Global South are important sources of knowledge and not just objects of study. The same is true of diverse neighborhoods within global cities in North America.

Interdisciplinary Approach

The certificate offers a framework for incorporating theories and methods for interrogating urban places from disciplines both within and outside students’ home departments. For students planning to enter the design and planning professions, the Certificate will provide an opportunity to incorporate critical approaches from the humanities in their work. For students in the humanities and social sciences, the Certificate will facilitate their participation in coursework that addresses both urban form and urban experience, and provide a chance to experience the research studio method, a pedagogy central to environmental design education.

Enhancement of Employability

For PhD students, the Certificate will demonstrate not only your knowledge of cities but your exposure to methods of experiential, project-based learning that may be valued by academic employers. GSI opportunities may give you a chance to build your pedagogy portfolio. For students in professional programs, the Certificate shows your interest in the human dimension of cities and your ability to interpret urban culture and experience through ethnography, storytelling, mapping, visual representation and other methods.

Related Courses

CY PLAN 200 History of City Planning 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The history of city planning and the city planning profession in the context of urban history. Principal focus on the evolution of North American planning practice and theory since the late 19th century; some comparative and earlier material.

History of City Planning: Read More [+]

ARCH 200A Introduction to Architecture Studio 1 5 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Introductory course in architectural design and theories for graduate students. Problems emphasize the major format, spatial, material, tectonic, social, technological, and environmental determinants of building form. Studio work is supplemented by lectures, discussions, readings, and field trips.

Introduction to Architecture Studio 1: Read More [+]

ARCH 200B Introduction to Architecture Studio 2 5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Introductory course in architectural design and theories for graduate students. Problems emphasize the major format, spatial, material, tectonic, social, technological, and environmental determinants of building form. Studio work is supplemented by lectures, discussions, readings, and field trips.

Introduction to Architecture Studio 2: Read More [+]

ARCH 200C Representational Practice in Architectural Design 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course will address three distinct levels of representational practice in architectural design: 1) cultivate an understanding of the foundational discourse and diversity of approaches to architectural representation; 2) develop a fluency in the canonical methods found in architectural practice; 3) encourage the development of a personal relationship to forms of modeling and formats of drawing.

Representational Practice in Architectural Design: Read More [+]

ARCH 201 Architecture & Urbanism Design Studio 5 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The design of buildings or communities of advanced complexity. Each section deals with a specific topic such as housing, public and institutional buildings, and local or international community development. Studio work is supplemented by lectures, discussions, readings, and field trips.

Architecture & Urbanism Design Studio: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 201A Planning Methods Gateway: Part I 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Two-semester course sequence that introduces first-year students in the Master of City Planning (MCP) program to a suite of data collection, data analysis, problem solving, and presentation methods that are essential for practicing planners. 201A focuses on supporting integrated problem solving, using a case-based approach to introduce methods in sequenced building-blocks. 201B prepares MCP students for more advanced courses in statistics, GIS
, observation, qualitative methods, survey methods, and public participation.
Planning Methods Gateway: Part I: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 201B Planning Methods Gateway: Part II 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Second course in two-semester course sequence that introduces first-year students in the Master of City Planning (MCP) program to a suite of data collection, data analysis, problem solving, and presentation methods that are essential for practicing planners. 201B prepares MCP students for more advanced courses in statistics, GIS, observation, qualitative methods, survey methods, and public participation.

Planning Methods Gateway: Part II: Read More [+]

ARCH 202 Graduate Option Studio 5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Focused design and research for graduate students.

Graduate Option Studio: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 202 Practice Gateway: Introduction to Planning Practice 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Using challenging real-world cases, this course introduces first year MCP students to the persistent dilemmas, the power and limits of planning action, the multiple roles in which planners find themselves in communities around the globe, and the political and other constraints that planners face as they try to be effective, and the key issues facing planning practice. In all these ways, our focus is on planning action, not the history of urban
development or urban social theory, though we will explore the ways in which planning ideals and cities have shaped each other as society evolves.
Practice Gateway: Introduction to Planning Practice: Read More [+]

ARCH 203 Integrated Design Studio 5 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The Integrated Design Studio is the penultimate studio where students incorporate their accumulated knowledge into architectural solutions. The students demonstrate the
integrative thinking that shapes complex architectural design and technical solutions. Students will possess an understanding to classify, compare, summarize, explain and/or interpret information. The students will also become proficient in using specific information to accomplish
a task, correctly selecting the appropriate information and accurately applying it to the solution of a specific problem while also distinguishing the effects of its implementation.
Integrated Design Studio: Read More [+]

ARCH 204 Final Project Studio: Studio Thesis Option 5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Spring 2010
Focused design research as the capstone project for graduate students.

Final Project Studio: Studio Thesis Option: Read More [+]

ARCH 204A Thesis Seminar 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Focused design research as the capstone project for graduate students.

Thesis Seminar: Read More [+]

ARCH 204B Thesis Studio 5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Focused design research as the capstone project for graduate students.

Thesis Studio: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 204B Analytic and Research Methods for Planners: Research Methods for Planners 2 or 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2014
Research methods for planning, including problem definition, observation, key informant interviewing, causal modeling, survey design and overall design of research, as well as memorandum writing and presentation skills. Students work in teams with clients on actual research problems and learn professional skills as well as practical ways of conducting usable research. With permission of the instructor, students who wish to complete only half
of the assignments for their individual research may take the course for 2 units.
Analytic and Research Methods for Planners: Research Methods for Planners: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 204C Analytic and Research Methods for Planners: Introduction to GIS and City Planning 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Introduction to the principles and practical uses of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). This course is intended for graduate students with exposure to using spreadsheets and database programs for urban and natural resource analysis, and who wish to expand their knowledge to include basic GIS concepts and applications. Prior GIS or desktop mapping experience not required.

Analytic and Research Methods for Planners: Introduction to GIS and City Planning: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 204D Analytic and Research Methods for Planners: Multivariate Analysis in Planning 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2013, Spring 2010
Theory and application of advanced multivariate methods in planning. Emphasis on causal modeling of cross-sectional data. Topics include: multiple regression analysis; residual analysis; weighted least squares; non-linear models; path analysis; log-linear models; logit and probit analysis; principal components; factor and cluster analysis. Completion of two computer assignments, using several microcomputer statistical packages, is required.

Analytic and Research Methods for Planners: Multivariate Analysis in Planning: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 205 Introduction to Planning and Environmental Law 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
An introduction to the American legal process and legal framework within which public policy and planning problems are addressed. The course stresses legal methodology, the basics of legal research, and the common-law decisional method. Statutory analysis, administrative law, and constitutional interpretation are also covered. Case topics focus on the law of planning, property rights, land use regulation, and access to housing.

Introduction to Planning and Environmental Law: Read More [+]

ARCH 205A Studio One, Fall 5 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The first semester of a one-year, post-professional design studio intended for those students who have a professional architecture degree and wish to explore current design issues in a stimulating, rigorous, and highly experimental studio setting.

Studio One, Fall: Read More [+]

ARCH 205B Studio One, Spring 5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course is the second semester of a one-year, post-professional studio intended for those students who have a professional architecture degree and wish to explore current design issues in a stimulating, rigorous, and highly experimental studio setting.

Studio One, Spring: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 207 Land and Housing Market Economics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Using microeconomics as its platform, course explores the process and pattern of land utilization from a variety of perspectives: the neighborhood, the city, and the metropolis. The approach blends real estate, descriptive urban geography, and urban history with economics.

Land and Housing Market Economics: Read More [+]

ARCH 207A Architecture Lectures Colloquium 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course accompanies the required introductory design studio in the three-year option of the Master of Architecture program. It is the first in a series of three one-unit colloquia, scheduled consecutively for the first three semesters of the program. Students will attend all Wednesday evening lectures of the College of Environmental Design lecture series. Every third week, they will meet with the instructor for a one-hour discussion.

Architecture Lectures Colloquium: Read More [+]

ARCH 207B Architecture Research Colloquium 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course accompanies the second semester of the required introductory design studio in the three-year option of the Master of Architecture program. It is the second in a series of three one-unit colloquia, scheduled consecutively for the first three semesters of the program. For a one-hour session each week, faculty in the department of architecture and other departments of the College of Environmental Design will present lectures on their
research and design practice.
Architecture Research Colloquium: Read More [+]

ARCH 207C Professional Practice Colloquium 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course accompanies the required comprehensive design studio in the three-year option of the Master of Architecture program. It is the third in a series of three one-unit colloquia, scheduled consecutively for the first three semesters of the program.

Professional Practice Colloquium: Read More [+]

ARCH 207D The Cultures of Practice 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
The nature of architectural practice, how it has evolved and how it is changing in today's world is the theme of the class. The course considers how diverse cultures--both anthropological and professional--contribute to practice, and how the culture of practice evolves. The class has three five-week modules, devoted to the following themes: traditions of practice, research in the culture of the profession, and innovations in practice.

The Cultures of Practice: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 208 Plan Preparation Studio 5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
An introductory laboratory experience in urban plan preparation, including the use of graphic communication techniques appropriate to city planning and invoking individual effort and that of collaborative student groups in formulating planning policies and programs for an urban area. Occasional Friday meetings are required.

Plan Preparation Studio: Read More [+]

ARCH 209 Special Topics in Architectural Design 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Topics deal with major problems and current issues in architectural design. For current offerings, see departmental website.

Special Topics in Architectural Design: Read More [+]

ARCH 211 Theory and Methods in the Social and Cultural Basis of Design 3 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2013, Spring 2011
Explores a variety of theories which explain and document the relationship between humans and the environment they build; outlines the research methods appropriate to each theory.

Theory and Methods in the Social and Cultural Basis of Design: Read More [+]

ARCH 212 Body-Conscious Design: Shoes, Chairs, Rooms, and Beyond 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This seminar prepares students to evaluate and design environments from the point of view of how they interact with the human body. Tools and clothing modify that interaction. Semi-fixed features of the near environment, especially furniture, may have greater impact on physical well being and social-psychological comfort than fixed features like walls, openings, and volume. Today, designers can help redefine and legitimize new attitudes toward
supporting the human body by, for example, designing for a wide range of postural alternatives and possibly designing new kinds of furniture. At the urban design scale, the senses of proprioception and kinesthetics can be used to shape architecture and landscape architecture. This course covers these topics with special emphasis on chair design and evaluation. The public health implications of a new attitude toward posture and back support are explored. The course heightens students' consciousness of their own and others' physical perceptions through weekly experiential exercises. Students produce three design exercises: shoe, chair, and a room interior.
Body-Conscious Design: Shoes, Chairs, Rooms, and Beyond: Read More [+]

CY PLAN C213 Transportation and Land Use Planning 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Examination of the interactions between transportation and land use systems; historical perspectives on transportation; characteristics of travel and demand estimation; evaluation of system performance; location theory; models of transportation and urban structure; empirical evidence of transportation-land use impacts; case study examinations.

Transportation and Land Use Planning: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 214 Infrastructure Planning and Policy 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
Survey of basic knowledge and technology of physical infrastructure systems: transportation, water supply, wastewater, storm water, solid waste management, community energy facilities, and urban public facilities. Environmental and energy impacts of infrastructure development; centralized vs. decentralized systems; case studies.

Infrastructure Planning and Policy: Read More [+]

ARCH 215 Landscape, Architecture, Infrastructure, and Urbanism 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
This seminar aims to explore how the physical and conceptual understanding of landscape can enrich current forms of architectural and urban design practice. At the junction of landform, infrastructure, urban design, and architecture lies a rich field of possibilities that is increasingly superseding the narrower field of each of the disciplines by themselves. In the past century, contemporary culture and technology-automobiles, televisions
, cell phones, and the internet have socially, culturally, environmentally, and physically reshaped the urban fabric, calling into question the very definition of urbanity. The course will explore the implications for public space in an era of increased security and risk mitigation and how designers may direct the various invisible forces which give form to the world around us.
Landscape, Architecture, Infrastructure, and Urbanism: Read More [+]

ARCH 216 The Sociology of Taste in Environmental Design 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2012, Fall 2011
Taste is at work in the way we display our things as much as in the qualities of things themselves. A performance-oriented model of taste observes that objects fall into two broad categories: pragmatic (that support behavior) and symbolic (that identify a person). People visually organize these two categories of objects using both explicit and subconscious aesthetic rules to produce visually unified displays. Depending on how it is used, how it
is placed in relation to other things, an object's meaning can vary. The display of taste is where objects take on--and shed--meanings, depending on how they are combined with one another. This seminar reviews the extensive body of 20th-century theory and empirical research on taste and considers the implications of theories about taste for design creation, design education, and for client-professional relations.
The Sociology of Taste in Environmental Design: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 216 Active Transportation 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016
Covers pedestrian and bicycle transportation planning including benefits of active transportation, importance of urban design and network connectivity, and facility design. Examines policies and programs to support active transportation and the processes to create, implement, and evaluate bicycle and pedestrian plans.

Active Transportation: Read More [+]

ARCH 217 Social Aspects of Housing Design: Mid-Rise Urbanism 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012, Fall 2011
The course explores strategies to bring coherence and continuity back to the city focusing on mid-rise, higher density urbanism and the potential and difficulties of this scale of urban fabric to contribute to the form of cities, without losing the potential of choice and diversity. The seminars are organized in case studies revolving around four cities: Amsterdam, Barcelona, Beijing, and New York. Design exercises parallel the case studies as a way to test
and challenge the potentials of mid-rise urbanism.
Social Aspects of Housing Design: Mid-Rise Urbanism: Read More [+]

CY PLAN C217 Transportation Policy and Planning 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Policy issues in urban transportation planning; measuring the performance of transportation systems; the transportation policy formulation process; transportation finance, pricing, and subsidy issues; energy and air quality in transportation; specialized transportation for elderly and disabled people; innovations in transportation policy.

Transportation Policy and Planning: Read More [+]

ARCH 218 Housing, Urbanization, and Urbanism: Design, Planning, and Policy Issues in Developing Countries 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This seminar is concerned with the study of housing, urbanization, and urbanism in developing countries, studying not only the physical landscapes of settlements, but also the social, economic, political, and cultural dimensions. This course's focus will be on housing, its lens will be their processes of urbanization, and its intent will be to investigate the space for action by the professionals of the "urban" in the arena of housing. While the emphasis
of the course will be on the diverse trajectories of developing countries, "First World" experiences will also be used to illuminate the specific transnational connections and their use in the making of housing theory and policy. The seminar complements the series of lectures offered in 111 and City Planning 111.
Housing, Urbanization, and Urbanism: Design, Planning, and Policy Issues in Developing Countries: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 218 Transportation Planning Studio 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Studio on applying skills of urban transportation planning. Topics vary, focusing on specific urban sites and multi-modal issues, including those related to planning for mass transit and other alternatives to the private automobile. Recent emphasis given to planning and designing for transit villages and transit-based housing.

Transportation Planning Studio: Read More [+]

ARCH 219 Special Topics in the Social and Cultural Basis of Design 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2014
Topics include the sociology of taste, personal and societal values in design, participatory design, semantic ethnography, environments for special popultions such as the elderly, and building types such as housing, hospitals, schools, offices, and urban parks. For current offerings, see departmental website.

Special Topics in the Social and Cultural Basis of Design: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 219 Comparative International Topics in Transportation 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2014, Fall 2011
Covers comparative planning and policy topics in urban, regional, and rural transportation that are transnational in nature. Builds policy lessons on planning for mobility, accessibility, and sustainability in different political and contextual settings. Case studies are drawn from both developed and developing countries.

Comparative International Topics in Transportation: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 220 The Urban and Regional Economy 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Analysis of the urban, metropolitan, and regional economy for planning. Economic base and other macro models; impact analysis and projection of changing labor force and industrial structure; economic-demographic interaction; issues in growth, income distribution, planning controls; interregional growth and population distribution issues.

The Urban and Regional Economy: Read More [+]

ARCH 221 Graduate Seminar in Digital Design Theories and Methods 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2010, Fall 2009
This seminar is intended to help graduate students develop a coherent research agenda in the area of digital design theories and methods. In addition, it is intended to serve as a forum for the exchange of ideas (e.g., work in progress, potential directions for research, etc.) in the area of shared interest. The course provides students with a set of questions as guides, readings, and guest lectures.

Graduate Seminar in Digital Design Theories and Methods: Read More [+]

ARCH 222 Principles of Computer Aided Architectural Design 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2009
This course introduces students to Architecture's New Media; why and how computers are being used in architecture and what are their current and expected impacts on the discipline and practice of architecture. Topics include presentation and re-presentation (including sketching, drafting, modeling, animating, and rendering); generating design solutions (generative systems, expert systems,genetic algorithms, and neural networks); evaluation and prediction (using examples
from structures, energy, acoustics, and human factors); and the future uses of computers in architectural design (including such topics as construction automation, smart buildings, and virtual environments). The laboratories introduce students to a REVIT, a state-of-the-art architectural software, including drafting, modeling, rendering, and building information modeling. This course is co-listed with 122. Graduate students will have a discussion section instead of the laboratory that 122 students undertake.
Principles of Computer Aided Architectural Design: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 223 Economic Development Planning 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2011, Spring 2009
Strategy and tools for developing employment attracting investment and improving the standard of living in regional, state, and local economies. Organization of economic development activities, with a focus on current practices.

Economic Development Planning: Read More [+]

ARCH 226 Collaboration by Digital Design 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This project-based seminar studies the problem of multi-disciplinary and cross-cultural collaboration in the building industry. It employs two complementary approaches: 1) a theoretical approach, which examines the nature of collaboration in general and in architecture in particular, looks at the methods that have been used to foster and support it, and interrogates their advantages and shortcomings; and 2) a practical approach, which use a web-based multi-person
design 'game' that allow students to play different roles (architect, clients, engineer, builder, etc.) while collaborating in the design of a building.
Collaboration by Digital Design: Read More [+]

ARCH 227 Workshop in Designing Virtual Places 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2010
This course introduces students to designing web-accessible, Multi User, Virtual Environments (MUVEs), inhabited through avatars. Such worlds are used in video games and web-based applications, and are assuming their role as alternative 'places' to physical spaces, where people shop, learn, are entertained, and socialize. Virtual worlds are designed according to the same principles that guide the design of physical spaces, with allowances made for the absence of gravity
and other laws of nature. The course combines concepts from architecture, film studies, and video game design. It uses a game engine software and a modeling software to build, test, and deploy virtual worlds.
Workshop in Designing Virtual Places: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 228 Research Workshop on Metropolitan Regional Planning 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2014
Field problem in major phases of metropolitan or regional planning work. A collaborative student-group effort in formulating policy or plan recommendations within specific governmental framework.

Research Workshop on Metropolitan Regional Planning: Read More [+]

ARCH 229 Special Topics in Digital Design Theories and Methods 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Selected topics in digital design theories and methods. For current offerings, see departmental website.

Special Topics in Digital Design Theories and Methods: Read More [+]

ARCH 229A Introduction to Construction Law 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2009, Spring 2008, Spring 2007

Introduction to Construction Law: Read More [+]

ARCH 230 Advanced Architectural Design Theory and Criticism 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Seminar in the analysis and discussion of contemporary and historical issues in architectural design theory and criticism.

Advanced Architectural Design Theory and Criticism: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 230 U.S. Housing, Planning, and Policy 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Theory of housing markets and empirical methods for measuring market conditions and performance: housing consumption, housing supply and production, and market performance. Empirical analysis and applications to policy issues.

U.S. Housing, Planning, and Policy: Read More [+]

ARCH 231 Research Methods in Architectural Design Theory and Criticism 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2004, Spring 2003, Spring 2002
Seminar in methods and use of research in contemporary and historical architectural design theory and criticism. Required for doctoral students in this study area.

Research Methods in Architectural Design Theory and Criticism: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 231 Housing in Developing Countries 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2011, Spring 2009
This course covers issues of housing policy and housing form in the urbanizing developing world from a comparative and cross-cultural perspective. Using case studies from Latin America, Asia, and the Middle East, it highlights the role of physical planners as community activists involved in practices like squatter development slum upgrading, sites and services, and self-help.

Housing in Developing Countries: Read More [+]

ARCH 233 Architectures of Globalization: Contested Spaces of Global Culture 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2010, Fall 2009
This seminar examines the relationship between architecture and the processes associated with globalization. The social and spatial changes connected to the global economic restructuring of the last four decades are explored in relation to distinctive national conditions and their connection to historical forces such as colonization and imperialism. Theoretical arguments about international urban political economy, uneven development, deindustrialization
and the growth of tourism and service industries, are grounded in specific urban and architectural contexts. Case studies explore issues such as urban entrepreneurialism and the branding of cities and nation-states; heritage practices and the postcolonial politics of place; border cities, and the urbanism of transnational production; cities, terrorism and the global architecture of security; critical regionalism, localism and other responses to debates on place and placelessness. Readings and class discussions examine course themes in a comparative framework and consider their implications for architectural design, education and professional practice.
Architectures of Globalization: Contested Spaces of Global Culture: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 235 Methods of Project Analysis 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Using case studies, this course acquaints students with the techniques of project feasibility; analysis of project proposals and overall project compatibility assessment. Case studies will be based on a variety of public and private sector developments, in central city and suburb locations.

Methods of Project Analysis: Read More [+]

ARCH 236 The Literature of Space 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
The concept of space as it is applied to the fields of architecture, geography, and urbanism can be understood as a barometer of the condition that we call "modernity." This course explores connections between the larger cultural frameworks of the past century, and the idea of space as it has been perceived, conceived, and lived during this period. Readings include key essays from the disciplines of philosophy, geography, architecture
, landscape, and urbanism, and short works of fiction that illustrate and elucidate the spatial concepts. The readings are grouped according to themes that form the foundation for weekly seminar discussions. Chronological and thematic readings reveal the force of history upon the conceptualization of space, and its contradictions.
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ARCH 237 Ulterior Speculation: Monographs and Manifestos 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2012, Spring 2011
An examination and analysis of architectural manifestos and monographs from the first half of the 20th century to today. The class analyzes the possibilities and limits of grounding a discourse in practice as well as theory. The seminar complements thesis preparation or can serve as an introduction to critical thinking in architecture.

Ulterior Speculation: Monographs and Manifestos: Read More [+]

ARCH 238 The Dialectic of Poetics and Technology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2014
This seminar examines the relationship between technology and design philosophy in the work of architects through analysis of individual buildings within the cntext of the complete oeuvre and an examination of the architect's writings and lectures. The seminar poses the following questions: What is the role of technology in the design philosophy of the architect and how is this theoretical position established in the architect's writings, lectures
, interviews? How is this position revealed through the work moves to the developing world? How is this position negotiated in the design and construction of an individual building? Is this a successful strategy for achieving technical performance? Is this a successful strategy for achieving a coherent theoretical statement? A series of lectures explores these questions in relation to the architect and a set of required readings introduces the work of the architect and explores the relationship between technology and design philosophy. Students choose one building to investigate in parallel with the methods and issues discussed in class. These studies are presented in class as completed and assembled for submission as a final project.
The Dialectic of Poetics and Technology: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 238 Development--Design Studio 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Studio experience in analysis, policy advising, and project design or general plan preparation for urban communities undergoing development, with a focus on site development and project planning.

Development--Design Studio: Read More [+]

ARCH 239 Special Topics in Architecture Design Theory and Criticism 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Selected topics in contemporary and historical architectural design theory and criticsm. For current offerings, see departmental website.

Special Topics in Architecture Design Theory and Criticism: Read More [+]

ARCH 240 Advanced Study of Energy and Environment 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Minimizing energy use is a cornerstone of designing and operating sustainable buildings, and attention to energy issues can often lead to greatly improved indoor environmental quality. For designers, using computer-based energy analysis tools are important not only to qualify for sustainability ratings and meet energy codes, but also to develop intuition about what makes buildings perform well. This course will present quantitative and qualitative
methods for assessing energy performance during design of both residential and commercial buildings. Students will get hands-on experience with state-of-the-art software -- ranging from simple to complex -- to assess the performance of building components and whole-building designs.
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CY PLAN C240 Theories of Urban Form and Design 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Theories and patterns of urban form throughout history are studied with emphasis on the role of planning and design in shaping cities and the relationship between urban form and social, economic, and geographic factors. Using a case study approach, cities are evaluated in terms of various theories and performance dimensions.

Theories of Urban Form and Design: Read More [+]

ARCH 241 Research Methods in Building Sciences 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2013
Required for doctoral students in the area of environmental physics.

Research Methods in Building Sciences: Read More [+]

CY PLAN C241 Research Methods in Environmental Design 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
The components, structure, and meaning of the urban environment. Environmental problems, attitudes, and criteria. Environmental survey, analysis, and interview techniques. Methods of addressing environmental quality. Environmental simulation.

Research Methods in Environmental Design: Read More [+]

ARCH 242 Sustainability Colloquium 1 or 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Presentations on a variety of topics related to sustainability, offering perspectives from leading practitioners: architectural designers, city planners, consultants, engineers, and researchers. Students can enroll for one unit (required attendance plus reading) or two units (with additional assignments.

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ARCH 243 Natural Cooling: Sustainable Design for a Warming Planet 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
Course focuses on zero- and no-energy climate responsive cooling strategies for both residential and commercial scale buildings. The course reviews designs and technologies that include low- and high-tech solutions, dynamic high performance facades, natural ventilation, and a range of other innovative cooling strategies. The course also explores the relationship between building design and operation, energy use, and climate change.

Natural Cooling: Sustainable Design for a Warming Planet: Read More [+]

CY PLAN C243 Shaping the Public Realm 5 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This interdisciplinary studio focuses on the public realm of cities and explores opportunities for creating more humane and delightful public places. Problems will be at multiple scales in both existing urban centers and in areas of new growth. Skills in analyzing, designing, and communicating urban design problems will be developed. Studio work will be supplemented with lectures, discussions, and field trips. Visiting professionals will present
case studies and will serve on reviews.
Shaping the Public Realm: Read More [+]

ARCH 244 The Secret Life of Buildings 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
This exploratory seminar addresses a secret life of buildings related to physical performance. Students examine architectural, lighting, and mechanical systems in existing buildings with attention to energy use, occupant well-being, and architectural spacemaking. The seminar applies a collection of measurement techniques, often involving novel approaches, to reveal operating patterns in the complex environment of contemporary buildings. The personal
experience students gain in performing the evaluations contributes to the students' experiential base at a formative time. Analysis of data collected in the field and the comparison of these data to values given by simulation tools provides a foundation for understanding the more abstract tools and standards used by designers in practice. The juxtaposition of design intention and post-occupancy performance can be a powerful learning experience now, as well as preparation for evaluating building performance in the future.
The Secret Life of Buildings: Read More [+]

ARCH 245 Daylighting 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2014, Fall 2012
This seminar introduces theories, technologies, design strategies and analytical methods of architectural daylighting, including issues of visual experience, integration with electrical lighting and energy use. The course provides foundation for intelligent daylighting design by developing frameworks for thinking about design, performance and tools. The work examines two archetypal daylighting conditions: a toplighted (roof-lighted) space and
a side-lighted (window-lit) space with range of methods including readings, on-site observation and measurement, case studies, design exercises and analysis through models and simulation. This is a graduate seminar: attendance, pin-ups, readings and engaged participation are required each week.
Daylighting: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 248 Advanced Studio: Urban Design/Environmental Planning 5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Advanced problems in urban design and land use, and in environmental planning. Occasional Friday meetings are required.

Advanced Studio: Urban Design/Environmental Planning: Read More [+]

ARCH 249 Special Topics in the Physical Environment in Buildings 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016

Special Topics in the Physical Environment in Buildings: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 249 Urban Design in Planning 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2009, Fall 2007, Fall 2005
This seminar will focus on urban design in the planning process, the role of environmental surveys, methods of community involvement, problem identification, goal formulation and alternatives generation, environmental media and presentation, design guidelines and review, environmental evaluation and impact assessment. Case studies.

Urban Design in Planning: Read More [+]

CY PLAN C251 Environmental Planning and Regulation 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
This course will examine emerging trends in environmental planning and policy and the basic regulatory framework for environmental planning encountered in the U.S. We will also relate the institutional and policy framework of California and the United States to other nations and emerging international institutions. The emphasis of the course will be on regulating "residuals" as they affect three media: air, water, and land.

Environmental Planning and Regulation: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 252 Land Use Controls 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2014
An advanced course in implementation of land use and environmental controls. The theory, practice and impacts of zoning, growth management, land banking, development systems, and other techniques of land use control. Objective is to acquaint student with a range of regulatory techniques and the legal, administrative-political equity aspects of their implementation.

Land Use Controls: Read More [+]

ARCH 253 Seismic Design and Construction 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012, Summer 2012 10 Week Session, Fall 2011
Contemporary design and construction techniques for improving the performance of new and existing buildings in earthquakes. Topics will include 1) basic principles of seismic design and building performance, 2) retrofit of existing buildings and evaluation techniques, 3) design and planning for disaster recovery and rebuilding. The course will use Bay Area and campus buildings as case studies.

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CY PLAN 254 Sustainable Communities 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2014, Spring 2014
This course examines and explores the concept of sustainable development at the community level. The course has three sections: (1) an introduction to the discourse on sustainable development; (2) an exploration of several leading attempts to incorporate sustainability principles into plans, planning, and urban design; (3) a comparative examination of several attempts to modify urban form and address the multiple goals (social, economic, environmental)
of sustainable urbanism.
Sustainable Communities: Read More [+]

ARCH 255 Structure, Construction, and Space 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
In profound buildings, the structural system, construction materials, and architectural form work together to create an integrated work of art. Current practice segregates these three areas by assigning separate and rigid roles to 1) an engineer, 2) a contractor, and 3) an architect. The goal of this class is to blur these traditional boundaries and erase the intellectual cleft through hands-on experience. Students are given weekly assignments which focus on one
or more of the three areas. They may be asked to analyze a structure, to construct something from actual materials or research a case study and present it to the class. Each assignment is geared to help students integrate construction and structural issues into their architectural design so that they can maintain control of the entire design process.
Structure, Construction, and Space: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 255 Urban Planning Applications of Geographic Information Systems 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course introduces students to the relatively new and rapidly expanding field of Geographical Information Systems (GIS). The course focuses on GIS and its application to both city and regional problems in the San Francisco Bay Area and offers students a toolkit for integrating spatial information into planning solutions. The laboratory sessions will mainly employ a vector model to solving problems. Topics include problem identification, data
discovery, database design, construction, modeling, and analytical measurement.
Urban Planning Applications of Geographic Information Systems: Read More [+]

ARCH 256 Structural Design in the Studio 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2013
Teaching structures to architecture students on their own turf: in a design studio. The course is organized around weekly desk reviews and assignments for students enrolled in a 201 design studio or thesis. The reviews and assignments focus on the structural issues of the students' projects. A central goal of the course is to help students understand structural issues as they relate to design and to help them become comfortable with structural
concepts so that they can begin to integrate the structure and architecture. The course can be taken for 1 unit, 2 units, or 3 units depending on the amount of time a student wishes to commit to it. A final report showing the evolution of each student's project with clear reference to how structural understanding influenced design decisions is required of all students regardless of units taken. Enrollment strictly limited to 10 students.
Structural Design in the Studio: Read More [+]

CY PLAN C256 Healthy Cities 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Exploration of common origins of urban planning and public health, from why and how the fields separated and strategies to reconnect them, to addressing urban health inequities in the 21st century. Inquiry to influences of urban population health, analysis of determinants, and roles that city planning and public health agencies - at local and international level - have in research, and action aimed at improving urban health. Measures, analysis
, and design of policy strategies are explored.
Healthy Cities: Read More [+]

ARCH 259 Special Topics in Building Structures 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Selected topics in building structures such as experimental structures and architectural preservation. For current offerings, see departmental website.

Special Topics in Building Structures: Read More [+]

ARCH 259X Special Topics: Building Structures 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2009, Fall 2008, Spring 2008
Special topics such as experimental structures and architectural preservation.

Special Topics: Building Structures: Read More [+]

ARCH 260 Introduction to Construction, Graduate Level 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course addresses the methods and materials of construction. While students will not be experts at the end of the semester, the course should give students the confidence to feel comfortable on a construction site or when designing a small building for a studio. The course will focus on four major territories: structural materials, building envelope, built elements such as stairs and cabinets, and costs, labor conditions, conventional practices
, and the regulatory environments that control design.
Introduction to Construction, Graduate Level: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 260 Theory, History, and Practice of Community Development 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
This course will explore the theory, history, methods, and practice of local community development. The course will begin by examining the historical roots of community involvement and action. It will present alternative explanations for different paths of neighborhood and community change.

Theory, History, and Practice of Community Development: Read More [+]

CY PLAN C261 Citizen Involvement in the City Planning Process 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
An examination of the roles of the citizens and citizen organizations in the city planning process. Models for citizen involvement ranging from advising to community control. Examination of the effectiveness of different organizational models in different situations.

Citizen Involvement in the City Planning Process: Read More [+]

ARCH 262 Architecture in Detail 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2014
This seminar will reevaluate the material nature of buildings by studying and understanding construction details and the new technologies that are revolutionizing design construction and labor relations in architecture.

Architecture in Detail: Read More [+]

ARCH 264 Off-Site Fabrication: Opportunities and Evils 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2010, Fall 2009, Fall 2008
This seminar looks at the implications of off-site fabrication in architecture: consistent, protected environments; worker efficiency and safety; coordination of trades; cheaper, semi-skilled labor; construction periods shortened; and completion dates more predictable. Off-site fabrication can allow for increased refinement and trial assemblies. However, it may also create monotonous sameness when the processes and results are not considered with
care.
Off-Site Fabrication: Opportunities and Evils: Read More [+]

ARCH 265 Japanese Craft and Construction 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Spring 2009, Spring 2005
The class addresses the role craft and construction play in Japanese architecture and applies these lessons to the evaluation of an exemplary recent building having unusual technical features. Buildings are expressions of theoretic and technical intent and a response to cultural and economic forces; Japanese architecture is regarded as particularly innovative. In studying a system where there is an emphasis on collaboration, students also
see the values of North American systems of architectural production.
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CY PLAN 268 Community Development Studio/Workshop 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
Studio experience in analysis, policy advising, and implementation in an urban setting. Students will engage in group work for real clients (e.g., community-based organizations or local government agencies), culminating in a final report or proposal.

Community Development Studio/Workshop: Read More [+]

ARCH 269 Special Topics in Construction and Materials 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Selected topics in construction and materials. For current offerings, see departmental website.

Special Topics in Construction and Materials: Read More [+]

ARCH 270 History of Modern Architecture 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course examines developments in design, theory, graphic representation, construction technology, and interior programming through case studies of individual buildings. Each lecture will delve deeply into one or sometimes two buildings to examine program, spatial organization, critical building details, and the relationship of the case study building with regard to other parallel works and the architect's overall body of work.

History of Modern Architecture: Read More [+]

ARCH 271 Methods in Historical Research and Criticism in Architecture 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2011

Methods in Historical Research and Criticism in Architecture: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 271 Development Theories and Practices 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
This course covers the theory and praxis of international development. It studies the project of development, from its Cold War launching to its metamorphosis into the current era of economic globalization and liberalization. And it examines the theoretical models and discursive debates that have accompanied each phase, including the recent critiques put forth by feminism and postcolonialism. The course also locates development in the industrialized
world, "here" rather than "elsewhere," thereby unsettling the normalized hierarchy of First and Third Worlds.
Development Theories and Practices: Read More [+]

ARCH 273 Case Studies in Modern Architecture 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2010
This course examines developments in design, theory, graphic representation, construction technology, and interior programming through case studies of individual buildings. Our survey technique will be highly focused rather than panoptic. Each lecture will delve deeply into one or two buildings to examine program, spatial organization, graphic representation, critical building details, construction technology, and the relationship of the case study building with regard
to other contemporary structures and the "architect's overall body of work". From this nucleus, we will spiral outward to consider how the case study is embedded within a constellation of social and economic factors crucial to its design and physical realization. This survey of "modernism's built discourses" provides multiple perspectives on the variety of architectural propositions advanced to express the nature of modernity as a way of life.
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ARCH 275 Introduction to Architectural Theory 1945 - Present 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This seminar provides an introduction to architectural theory since 1945, with emphasis on developments over the last three decades. Class readings, and discussions explore the post-World War II crisis within modernism, postmodernism within and beyond architectural culture, and more recent developments around issues such as rapid urbanization, sustainability, the politics of cultural identity and globalization. Transformations in architectural theory are examined
in relation to historical forces such as the economy, the growth and transformation of cities, and the changing relationship between design professions and disciplines. The influences of digital media, new materials and production techniques on architectural education and practice are explored and the implications for architectural theory assessed. Key issues are anchored in case studies of buildings, urban spaces, and the institutions and agents or architectural culture.
Introduction to Architectural Theory 1945 - Present: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 275 Comparative Analysis of Urban Policies 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2011
Description, analysis, and evaluation of urban policies in a variety of social and spatial contexts, with references to state-planned societies. Main topics: national and local public policies in regional development, housing, transportation, urban renewal, citizen participation, social services, and decentralized urban management.

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ARCH 276 Spaces of Recreation and Leisure, 1850-2000 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2012, Spring 2010
A reading and research seminar surveying the building types, social relations, and cultural ideas of recreation in the American city, including the tensions between home, public, and commerical leisure settings.

Spaces of Recreation and Leisure, 1850-2000: Read More [+]

ARCH 278 Visionary Architecture 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This course explores architectural visions as historical windows, examining them from a number of angles. Using a variety of cases studies drawn from different media (architectural theory, film, advertisements, architectural projects, and so on) and periods (turn of the century, the Modern Movement, Depression, World War II, 1860's, etc.) It provides a sampling of possibilities and models for the final student project, an in-depth, original research paper. Several
themes thread their way through the course, including the role of the "unbuilt" in architectural history and architectural practice; the uses of the future in the construction of national and personal identities, cultural narratives, and modern mythologies; the importance of the future as cliche, and the role of play in cultural production.
Visionary Architecture: Read More [+]

ARCH 279 Special Topics in the History of Architecture 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Selected topics in the history of architecture. For current offerings, see department website.

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CY PLAN 280A Doctoral Seminars: Research Design for the Ph.D 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course is designed for students working on their dissertation research plan and prospectus. Weekly writing assignments designed to work through each step of writing the prospectus from problem framing and theoretical framework to methodology. At least one oral presentation to the class is required of all students.

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CY PLAN 280C Doctoral Seminars: Doctoral Colloquium 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Presentation and discussion of research by Ph.D. students and faculty.

Doctoral Seminars: Doctoral Colloquium: Read More [+]

ARCH 281 Methods of Inquiry in Architectural Research 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
This is the introductory course in methods of inquiry in architecture research to be required of all entering Ph.D. students in all areas of the program. The purpose is to train students in predissertation and prethesis research strategies, expose them to variety of inquiry methods including the value of scholarly research, the nature of evidence, critical reading as content analysis and writing, presenting and illustrating scholarship in the various
disciplines of architecture.
Methods of Inquiry in Architectural Research: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 281 Theories of Planning Practice 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
Focuses on theory and practice of planning, with emphasis on the role of different types of knowledge in different kinds of practice. Compares positivist, interpretive, and critical theory views of knowledge and links these to policy analysis, interactive planning, group processes, and emerging models of critical planning practice.

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CY PLAN 284 Urban Theory 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 1999, Spring 1997
The investigation of modern cities has presented great challenges for social theory. For over a century, scholars have debated about how to read and explain the modern industrial city. This course traces the main ways in which these debates have unfolded since the middle of the nineteenth century to the present. To follow these debates is to understand how scholars have struggled to make cities legible, to fix them as objects of analysis, and
simultaneously to capture their processes of transformation.
Urban Theory: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 290 Topics in City and Metropolitan Planning 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Analysis of selected topics in city and metropolitan planning with emphasis on implications for planning practice and urban policy formation. In some semesters, optional five-week, 1-unit modules may be offered, taking advantage of guest visitors. Check department for modules at start of semester.

Topics in City and Metropolitan Planning: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 291 Special Projects Studio in Planning 4 - 6 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Spring 2014
Studio on special projects in planning. Topics vary by semester.

Special Projects Studio in Planning: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 295 Supervised Research in City and Regional Planning 1 - 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2008, Spring 2008, Spring 2007
Supervised experience on a research project in urban or regional planning. Any combination of 295, 297 courses may be taken for a total of 6 units maximum towards the M.C.P. degree.

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CY PLAN 297 Supervised Field Study in City and Regional Planning 1 - 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2007, Spring 2007
Supervised experience relative to specific aspects of practice in city or regional planning. Any combination of 295, 297 courses may be taken for a total of 6 units maximum toward the M.C.P. degree. A maximum of 3 units of 297 can be used for degree requirements.

Supervised Field Study in City and Regional Planning: Read More [+]

ARCH 298 Special Group Study 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Special group studies on topics to be introduced by instructor or students.

Special Group Study: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 298 Group Studies 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Topics to be announced at beginning of each semester. No more than 3 units may be taken in one section.

Group Studies: Read More [+]

ARCH 299 Individual Study and Research for Master's and Doctoral Students 1 - 12 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2014
Individual studies including reading and individual research under the supervision of a faculty adviser and designed to reinforce the student's background in areas related to the proposed degree.

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CY PLAN 299 Individual Study or Research 1 - 12 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2014
Individual study or research program; must be worked out with instructor in advance of signing up for credits. Maximum number of individual study units (295, 297, 299) counted toward the M.C.P. degree credits is 9.

Individual Study or Research: Read More [+]

CY PLAN N299 Individual Study or Research 1 - 6 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2015 10 Week Session, Summer 2009 10 Week Session, Summer 2007 10 Week Session
Individual study or research program; must be worked out with instructor in advance of signing up for credits. Maximum number of individual study credits counted toward the MCP degree is 9.

Individual Study or Research: Read More [+]

ARCH 375 Seminar in the Teaching of Architecture 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This class is intended for first-time graduate student instructors, especially those working in studio and lab settings. The class covers a range of issues that normally come up when teaching, offers suggestions regarding how to work well with other graduate student instructors and faculty, and how to manage a graduate student instructor's role as both student and teacher. The greatest benefit of this class comes from the opportunity to explore
important topics together. Using a relatively light, but provocative set of readings, the seminar will explore the issues raised each week. There will be one assignment intended to help students explore their own expectations as educators.
Seminar in the Teaching of Architecture: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 375 Supervised Teaching in City and Regional Planning 1 - 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2013
Supervised teaching experience in courses related to planning. Course may not be applied toward the M.C.P. degree.

Supervised Teaching in City and Regional Planning: Read More [+]

ARCH 602 Individual Study for Doctoral Students 1 - 8 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
Individual study in consultation with the major field adviser, intended to provide an opportunity for qualified students to prepare themselves for the various examinations required of candidates for the Ph.D. This course may not be used for units or residence requirements for the doctoral degree.

Individual Study for Doctoral Students: Read More [+]

CY PLAN 602 Individual Study for Doctoral Students 1 - 8 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
Individual study in consultation with the major field adviser, intended to provide an opportunity for qualified students to prepare themselves for the various examinations required of candidates for the Ph.D. May not be used for unit or residence requirements for the doctoral degree. Students may earn 1-8 units of 602 per semester or 1-4 units per summer session. No student may accumulate more than a total of 16 units of 602.

Individual Study for Doctoral Students: Read More [+]

Faculty and Instructors

Faculty

Charisma Acey, Assistant Professor. Water, sanitation, basic services delivery, poverty alleviation, environmental sustainability, environmental justice, urban governance, participatory planning, community-based development, international development, development planning, sustainable development, African studies.
Research Profile

Weihong Bao, Assistant Professor. Film theory and history, media archaeology, critical theory, visual and performance culture, Chinese language cinema, transnational genre cinema, comparative media history and theory.

Teresa Caldeira, Professor. Comparative urban studies, urbanization in the global south, social theory, ethnography. qualitative methodology.

Anthony J. Cascardi, Dean of Humanities. English, comparative literature, literature, Spanish, Portuguese, philosophy, aesthetics, early modern literature, French, Spanish Baroque.
Research Profile

Danika Cooper, Assistant Professor. Practice, theory, and representation of landscape architecture; water management and weather patterns in the world's deserts.

Margaret Crawford, Professor. Everyday urbanism, evolution, uses and meanings of urban space and therapid physical and social changes on villages in China’s Pearl River Delta.

C. Greig Crysler, Associate Professor. Architecture, geopolitics of architectural discourse, globalization and social production of the built environment, architecture and identity.
Research Profile

Nicholas de Monchaux, Associate Professor. Architecture, urban design and organization, natural and manmade systems.
Research Profile

Nadia Ellis, Assistant Professor. African diasporic, Caribbean, and postcolonial literatures and cultures.

Julia Fawcett, Assistant Professor. Performance Studies and Theater History .

Daniel Fisher, Assistant Professor. Social Cultural Anthropology; Anthropology of Media; Aboriginal Australia; Music and Sound; Art and Expressive Practice; Photography; Ethnographic Film and Video; Citizenship and the State; Bureaucracy.

Catherine Flynn, Assistant Professor. Modernism, Irish, British, comparative literature, critical theory, Avant-Gardes, James Joyce, Flann O'Brien.
Research Profile

Mia Fuller, Associate Professor. Anthropology, Italy, fascism, urban design, architecture, Italian colonialism.
Research Profile

David Henkin, Professor. History, US History, urban history, cultural history, History of Time.
Research Profile

Walter J. Hood, Professor. Urban design, community development, landscape architecture, environmental planning, landscape design, citizen participation, design of architecture and landscape.
Research Profile

Shannon Jackson, Professor. Rhetoric, performance studies, American studies, 20th century art movements and critical theory, local culture and intercultural citizenship in turn-of-the-century United States, history and theory of theatre and performance art.
Research Profile

Lauren Kroiz, Assistant Professor. History and theory of photography and new media, race and ethnic studies, the relationships between regionalism, nationalism and globalism.

Angela Marino, Assistant Professor. Theatre and performance studies, Latin American and US Chicana/Latino performance, festivals and carnival, political cultures.
Research Profile

Nicholas Mathew, Associate Professor. Beethoven, Haydn, music in Vienna, music and politics, music and urban culture, aesthetics, piano performance, historical performance practices.
Research Profile

Susan Moffat, Project Director. Cities, mapping, storytelling, cartography, public space.
Research Profile

Louise A. Mozingo, Professor.

Greg Niemeyer, Associate Professor. Art, film studies, digital media installations, photography.
Research Profile

Ronald L. Rael, Associate Professor. 3D printed buildings, additive manufacturing, earth architecture, mud, dirt, dust, U.S.-Mexico border wall, arid landscapes, ranching, acequias, alipne deserts, ceramics, rural architecture, ruralism, animation, digital modeling, furry buildings, unnatural materials, rasquachetecture.
Research Profile

Harsha Ram, Associate Professor. Russian and European romanticism and modernism, Russian and European avant-gardes, Russian, European, Near Eastern and South Asian poetic traditions, Indian literature, Italian literature, Georgian history and literature, theories of world literature, literary theory, comparative poetics, genre theory, literary history, comparative modernisms and modernities, vernacular and high culture, cultural and political history of Russia-Eurasia and the Caucasus, postcolonial studies, theories of nationalism, imperialism and cosmopolitanism, the city and literature.
Research Profile

Scott Andrew Saul, Professor. English, African American studies, 20th century American literature and culture, performance studies, jazz studies, histories of the avante-garde.
Research Profile

Andrew Shanken, Professor. Memory, visionary architecture, the unbuilt, paper architecture, heritage conservation, architectural representation, urban representation, diagrams, history of professions, historiography, world's fairs, expositions, California architecture, themed environments.
Research Profile

Alan Tansman, Professor. Modern Japanese Literature, literary and cultural theory, aesthetics and politics, Comparative Responses to Violence, literary history.
Research Profile

Anne Walsh, Associate Professor. Video, performance, audio, photography, text.

Laurie Wilkie, Professor. Anthropology, historical archaeology, oral history, material culture and ethnic identity, family and gender relations; North America, Northern California, Caribbean. Bahamas, African consumerism, creolization, multi-ethnic community.
Research Profile

Jennifer Wolch, Dean of the College of Environmental Design. Sustainable urbanism, urban design and public health, poverty and homelessness, human-animal studies.
Research Profile

Winnie Won Yin Wong, Assistant Professor. Labor and creativity, modern and contemporary art, intellectual property, China studies, consumer cultures.

Lecturers

Ghigo Di Tommaso, Lecturer. Landscape architecture, urban design, cities.

Jason Luger, Lecturer. Cities, art activism, urban planning, public space.

Emeritus Faculty

Michael James Dear, Professor Emeritus. Social theory, disability studies, urban theory, comparative urbanism.
Research Profile

Contact Information

Global Urban Humanities

230 Wurster Hall #1820

Phone: 510-664-4077

globalurbanhumanities@berkeley.edu

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Director

Susan Moffat

230 Wurster Hall #1820

Phone: 510-926-2771

susanmoffat@berkeley.edu

Program Coordinator

Tina Novero

230 Wurster Hall #1820

Phone: 510-664-4077

tinanovero@berkeley.edu

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