East Asian Languages and Cultures (EA LANG)

Courses

EA LANG R1B Reading and Composition on topics in East Asian Humanities 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017
The arts of reading a text, summarizing its argument, questioning its suppositions, generating balanced opinions, and expressing those opinions with clarity and effectiveness lie at the center of university life and educated human endeavor. EA Lang R1B is designed to help inculcate those skills, paying particular attention to East Asian humanistic topics. This four-unit course focuses on how to formulate questions and hone observations into well reasoned
, coherent, and convincing essays. Attention will be paid to the basic rules of grammar, logical construction, compelling rhetorical approaches, research techniques, library and database skills, and forms of citation.
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EA LANG 24 Freshman Seminar 1 Unit

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
The Freshman Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered in all campus departments and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to fifteen freshmen.

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EA LANG 39 Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 2 Units

Terms offered: Not yet offered
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

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EA LANG C50 Introduction to the Study of Buddhism 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This introduction to the study of Buddhism will consider materials drawn from various Buddhist traditions of Asia, from ancient times down to the present day. However, the course is not intended to be a comprehensive or systematic survey; rather than aiming at breadth, the course is designed around key themes such as ritual, image veneration, mysticism, meditation, and death. The overarching emphasis throughout the course will be on the hermeneutic
difficulties attendant upon the study of religion in general, and Buddhism in particular.
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EA LANG 84 Sophomore Seminar 1 or 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2012
Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses offered by faculty members in departments all across the campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for close, regular intellectual contact between faculty members and students in the crucial second year. The topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sophomores.

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EA LANG 101 Catastrophe, Memory, and Narrative: Comparative Responses to Atrocity in the Twentieth Century 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Summer 2015 10 Week Session, Summer 2015 First 6 Week Session
This course will examine comparative responses to and representations of violent conflict. We will pay attention to how catastrophic events are productive of new forms of expression--oral, written, and visual--as well as destructive of familiar ones. We will examine the ways in which experience and its representation interact during and in the aftermath of extreme violence. Our empirical cases will be
drawn from our research on responses to WWII atrocities, and on the post-Cold War civil wars in Africa.
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EA LANG 105 Dynamics of Romantic Core Values in East Asian Premodern Literature and Contemporary Film 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2017
This course explores representation of romantic love in East Asian cultures in premodern and post-modern contexts. Students develop a better understanding of the similarities and differences in traditional values in three East Asian cultures by comparing how canonical texts of premodern China, Japan and Korea represent romantic relationship. This is followed by the study of several contemporary East Asian films, giving
the student the opportunity to explore how traditional values persist, change, or become nexus points of resistance.
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EA LANG 106 Expressing the Ineffable in China and Beyond: The Making of Meaning in Poetic Writing 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012, Spring 2010, Spring 2006
This course will explore how the Chinese and English-language literary traditions (broadly defined) delineate the realm of the ineffable, and how cultural notions of the inexpressible shape the writing and reading of poems, songs, and a selection of prose pieces, from the uses of figurative language and prosody to genre and canon formation. In addition, in order to deepen our understanding of how writing achieves its aims, some attention will
be given to nonverbal modes of expression, including calligraphy and painting--and attempts to render them in writing. Over this course of study, students will not only refine their sensitivity to the power of artistic modes of indirection, but will also hone their skills in close reading, analytical writing, and oral expression. All readings will be in English.
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EA LANG 107 War, Empire, and Literature in East Asia 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2013, Fall 2008
This course will examine war, empire, and the writing and memorialization of history through an eclectic group of literary, graphic, and cinematic texts from China, Japan, Europe, and the U.S.

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EA LANG 108 Revising the Classics: Chinese and Greek Poetry in Translation 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2006, Spring 2006
This course will explore poetic translation, across languages, across cultures, and across historical ages, not merely from the perspective of the "accuracy" with which a classic text is represented in the translation, but as a window into the nature of poetic tradition and poetic writing itself. Works will be primarily drawn from the Chinese tradition, but in the interest of allowing a comparative discussion of the course's central
themes, a significant amount of reading from ancient and modern Greek poetry will be included as well. The goal of the class is not simply to gain familiarity with Chinese poetry and poets, but more fundamentally to gain skill and sophistication in reading, responding to, and thinking about poetry.
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EA LANG 109 History of the Culture of Tea in China and Japan 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2016 First 6 Week Session, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
In this course we compare the cultural traditions of tea in China and Japan. In addition, using tea as the case study, we analyze the mechanics of the flow of culture across both national boundaries and social practices (such as between poetry and the tea ceremony). Understanding the tea culture of these countries informs students of important and enduring aspects of both cultures, provides an opportunity to discuss the role
of religion and art in social practice, provides a forum for cultural comparison, and provides as well an example of the relationship between the two countries and Japanese methods of importing and naturalizing another country's social practice. Korean tea traditions are also briefly considered.
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EA LANG 110 Bio-Ethical Issues in East Asian Thought 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
This course will explore some of the most difficult bioethical issues confronting the world today from the perspective of traditional values embedded in the cultural history of India, China, and Japan as evidenced in their religions, legal codes, and political history. Possible topics include population control, abortion, sex-selection, euthanasia, suicide, genetic manipulation, brain-death, and organ transplants.

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EA LANG 111 Reading Global Politics in Contemporary East Asian Literature 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016
This class examines the global dynamics and local distinction of literary writings from contemporary East Asia. Beginning with the colonial connections among Tokyo, Shanghai and Seoul during the 1920s-1940s, and moving on to texts composed since 2000 in Manila, Hong Kong, India and elsewhere, the course considers how literary writers have grappled with an increasingly integrated global marketplace in which culture, ideas and people circulate alongside (and as) capital.
Discussions will reflect on the confluence of culture and politics in literary writings that treat race tension, ecological crisis, capitalist catastrophe and other themes. Primary readings will be supplemented by iconic essays of cultural criticism and recent films.
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EA LANG 112 The East Asian Sixties 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2014
The 1960s were a time of historical transformation and upheaval in East Asia. It saw the overthrow of political regimes, the consolidation of communism, unprecedented capitalist expansion, and the emergence of new technologies that affected aesthetic production and consumption. This course explores the multiple aspects of culture, aesthetics, and politics that defined this moment. It asks how and why we can define the 1960s as a period, while considering
the significance of defining East Asia (a term which denotes an imagined space of relations) as a particular region at this time.
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EA LANG 114 Illness Narratives, Vulnerable Bodies 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016
The course will introduce students to narratives about illness, disease and healing written by patients, physicians, caretakers, and others. These narratives report an experience. They reveal the interactions between the unfolding life of the patient and the shifting social meanings attached to illness. We will study the relationships between illness and society through readings of fiction, memoir, films, essays and graphic novels in order to understand how
these varied forms of storytelling organize and give meaning to crucial questions about embodiment, disability and emergent forms of sociality enabled by our bodily vulnerabilities.
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EA LANG 115 Knowing Others, and Being Known: The Art of Writing People 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017
What does it mean to use the medium of writing to “know” a person, and precisely how does one avail oneself of that medium to make oneself—or someone else— “known”? This course will guide students in writing about one of the most challenging of subjects: people. Students will have the opportunity to (a) read deeply in a selection of writings drawn from a range of genres and cultures, to acquaint themselves with a range of rhetorical tools employed in the portrayal
of human lives and character, (b) identify the aims of their own writings, and (c) develop competency in applying what they have learned as readers to their own writing.
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EA LANG 116 Modern East Asian Fiction 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017
Comparative analysis of modern literature from China (including Hong Kong and Taiwan), Korea, and Japan with an emphasis on the short story and the novel. We will think about both the specificities of the literatures of the region as well as shared and interconnected experiences of modernity that broadly connect the cultures of East Asia during the twentieth century. Thematic concerns will include: modernism and modernity; nostalgia and homesickness; empire and its
aftermath; and the cultures of globalization.
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EA LANG 117 Lu Xun and his Worlds 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018
This course provides a forum for reading and discussing East Asia’s greatest and most iconic modern writers, Lu Xun. We will closely read Lu Xun’s major works , discuss his role in the reinvention of the Chinese language and literary tradition, explore the global literary and intellectual currents with which he was deeply engaged, as well as situating him within the tumultuous era of colonialism, modernization, and revolution. All readings will be available in English
translation.
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EA LANG 118 Sex and Gender in Premodern Chinese Culture 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015
This course explores Chinese cultures of sex and gender from antiquity to the seventeenth century. We concentrate on three interconnected issues: women’s status, homoeroticism, and the human body. Our discussion will be informed by cross-cultural comparisons with ancient Greece, Renaissance England, and Contemporary America. In contrast to our modern regime of sexuality, which collapses all the three aforementioned issues into the issues of desire and identity intrinsic
to the body, we will see how the early Chinese regime of sexual act evolved into the early modern regime of emotion that concerned less inherent identities than a media culture of life-style performance.
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EA LANG 119 The History of Heaven 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018
Higher Learning begins with the study of heaven. As the source of orientation in space and time, heaven provides humanity the foundation for its knowledge and political order. To understand what knowledge is or how politics function, we need a basic understanding of the ways of heaven. This course examines the function heaven serves in the founding of order against the void in nature through the formation of conventional systems of time and space and the role heaven
has played in the promulgation of governments. From a cross-cultural, interdisciplinary perspective that covers the course of Eurasian history and using primary sources in translation, we will see heaven unfold through the developments that leave us with the world we know today.
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EA LANG C120 Buddhism on the Silk Road 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course will discuss the social, economic, and cultural aspects of Buddhism as it moved along the ancient Eurasian trading network referred to as the “Silk Road”. Instead of relying solely on textual sources, the course will focus on material culture as it offers evidence concerning the spread of Buddhism. Through an examination of the Buddhist archaeological remains of the Silk Road, the course will address specific topics, such as the symbiotic
relationship between Buddhism and commerce; doctrinal divergence; ideological shifts in the iconography of the Buddha; patronage (royal, religious and lay); Buddhism and political power; and art and conversion. All readings will be in English.
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EA LANG C126 Buddhism and the Environment 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Fall 2009, Spring 2008
A thematic course on Buddhist perspectives on nature and Buddhist responses to environmental issues. The first half of the course focuses on East Asian Buddhist cosmological and doctrinal perspectives on the place of the human in nature and the relationship between the salvific goals of Buddhism and nature. The second half of the course examines Buddhist ethics, economics, and activism in relation to environmental issues in contemporary Southeast
Asia, East Asia, and America.
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EA LANG C128 Buddhism in Contemporary Society 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
A study of the Buddhist tradition as it is found today in Asia. The course will focus on specific living traditions of East, South, and/or Southeast Asia. Themes to be addressed may include contemporary Buddhist ritual practices; funerary and mortuary customs; the relationship between Buddhism and other local religious traditions; the relationship between Buddhist institutions and the state; Buddhist monasticism and its relationship to the
laity; Buddhist ethics; Buddhist "modernism," and so on.
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EA LANG C130 Zen Buddhism 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2013, Spring 2010, Summer 2007 Second 6 Week Session
This course will introduce students to the Zen Buddhist traditions of China and Japan, drawing on a variety of disciplinary perspectives (history, anthropology, philosophy, and so on). The course will also explore a range of hermeneutic problems (problems involved in interpretation) entailed in understanding a sophisticated religious tradition that emerged in a time and culture very different from our own.

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EA LANG C132 Pure Land Buddhism 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course will discuss the historical development of the Pure Land school of East Asian Buddhism, the largest form of Buddhism practiced today in China and Japan. The curriculum is divided into India, China, and Japan sections, with the second half of the course focusing exclusively on Japan where this form of religious culture blossomed most dramatically, covering the ancient, medieval, and modern periods. The curriculum will begin with a reading
of the core scriptures that form the basis of the belief system and then move into areas of cultural expression. The course will follow two basic trajectories over the centuries: doctrine/philosophy and culture/society.
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EA LANG C135 Tantric Traditions of Asia 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2010
The emergence of the tantras in seventh and eighth-century India marked a watershed for religious practice throughout Asia. These esoteric scriptures introduced complex new ritual technologies that transformed the religious traditions of India, from Brahmanism to Jainism and Buddhism, as well as those of Southeast Asia, Tibet, Mongolia, China, Korea, and Japan. This course provides an overview of tantric religion across these regions.

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EA LANG C175 Archaeology of East Asia 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2015
Prehistoric and protohistoric archaeology in China, Japan, and Korea.

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EA LANG 180 East Asian Film: Directors and their Contexts 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Spring 2008
A close analysis of the oeuvre of an East Asian director in its aesthetic, cultural, and political contexts.

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EA LANG 181 East Asian Film: Special Topics in Genre 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Fall 2014, Spring 2014
The study of East Asian films as categorized either by industry-identified genres (westerns, horror films, musicals, film noir, etc.) or broader interpretive modes (melodrama, realism, fantasy, etc).

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EA LANG 191 Tools and Methods in the Study of East Asian Philosophy and Religion 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2015
This course is a capstone experience that centers on the philosophies and religions of East Asia examined from multiple theoretical perspectives. It comprises several thematic units within which a short set of readings about theory are followed by chronologically arranged readings about East Asia. Themes will alternate from year to year but may include: ritual and performance studies; religion and evolution; definitions of religion and theories
of its origins; and the role of sacrifice.
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EA LANG H195A Honors Course 2 - 5 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Directed independent study and preparation of senior honors thesis. Limited to senior honors candidates in the East Asian Religion, Thought, and Culture major (for description of Honors Program, see Index).

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EA LANG H195B Honors Course 2 - 5 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Directed independent study and preparation of senior honors thesis. Limited to senior honors candidates in the East Asian Religion, Thought, and Culture major (for description of Honors Program, see Index).

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EA LANG 198 Directed Group Study 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2010, Fall 2009, Spring 2009
Small group instruction in topics not covered by regularly scheduled courses.

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EA LANG 199 Independent Study 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2007, Spring 2007
Independent study in topics not covered by regularly scheduled courses.

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EA LANG 200 Proseminar: Approaches to East Asian Studies 2 or 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2012
This course is a pro-seminar required for all entering graduate students in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures no matter their particular areas of interest. Its purpose is to introduce graduate students in the program to the major theoretical concerns, academic issues, and interpretive methodologies relevant to humanistic studies more generally and to the study of East Asian literature, thought, religion, and culture in particular.
Supervising faculty change from year to year, as does the focus of the seminar.
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EA LANG 202 Close Reading Area Studies: China and Japan in the World 2 or 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2009
This course will consider alternative strategies and modes of close reading that can be relevant to the study of East Asia with a focus on China and Japan. As we concentrate on the historical role of philological research, translation studies, interdisciplinary scholarship and ask how "knowledge" about East Asia is produced in our fields, our readings on "close reading" will help us question the common sense of "civilization," culture
," and "tradition," and explore new ways of asking questions about text and context, aesthetics and politics, cultural memory, historical narratives, and regimes of knowledge.
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EA LANG 204 Topics in East Asian Studies 2 or 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2016
This course provides a place for graduate-level seminars in East Asian Studies that rely primarily on secondary scholarship and texts in translation. Content will vary between semesters but will typically focus on a particular theme. Themes will be chosen according to faculty and student interests, with an eye toward introducing students to the breadth of available western scholarship on that subject, from classics in the field to the latest
publications.
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EA LANG C220 Seminar in Buddhism and Buddhist Texts 2 or 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
Content varies with student interests. The course will normally focus on classical Buddhist texts that exist in multiple recensions and languages, including Chinese, Sanskrit, and Tibetan.

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EA LANG 291 Teaching East Asian Philosophy and Religion 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015
This course is taught in parallel with the EA LANG 191 capstone course on the philosophies and religions of East Asia examined from multiple theoretical perspectives. It comprises several thematic units within which a short set of readings about theory are followed by chronologically arranged readings about East Asia. Themes will alternate from year to year but may include: ritual and performance studies; religion and evolution; definitions of religion and theories
of its origins; and the role of sacrifice. Graduate students will additionally attend five “teaching East Asia thought” lectures and also produce an original syllabus in a related area of their interest.
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