Registration and Enrollment

Although course requirements are essential components of any degree, the central focus of Berkeley’s academic programs is scholarship. Students become familiar with the intellectual boundaries of a discipline, study particular aspects of that discipline in depth, and develop competence in the fundamental skills and methodologies related to it.

The Office of the Registrar supports every registered student, as well as all faculty and staff who interact with them. Specifically, they are responsible for:

  • Assisting special populations such as US veterans and service members
  • Class enrollment and registration
  • Determining residency for tuition purposes
  • Diplomas
  • Fee assessment
  • Preservation and privacy of student records
  • Reservations for more than 200 classrooms
  • Schedule of classes
  • Transcripts
  • Verifying registration and graduation

For additional information about registration and enrollment, please access the tabbed information on this page, or visit registrar.berkeley.edu

Registration

CalCentral

Use CalCentral to enroll in classes. For information on how to use CalCentral, please see the CalCentral Enrollment Guide for Students. You may also wish to consult the Student Information Systems Enrollment FAQ.


Paying Tuition and Registration Fees

Use CalCentral My Finances for billing activities, including viewing new charges, account balances, transaction history, and paying your bills.

Tuition and Fee Payment Plan

Eligible students will have the option to sign up for the “Tuition and Fee Payment Plan” (FPP), formerly known as Deferred Payment Plan. Through FPP, you will be able to pay your fees in five installments; an additional fee will apply.


Criteria for Being an Officially Registered Student

In order to be officially registered at Berkeley, you must meet three criteria:

  1. You must be enrolled in at least one course.
  2. Your tuition and registration fees must have been paid, either in full or at least the first installment if you are on the Tuition and Fee Payment Plan.
  3. Balances from prior terms must be paid.
  4. You must have no blocks against your registration.

Note: You must be officially registered to use campus services (e.g., the library, RSF).

Cancellation & Withdrawal

Cancellation or Withdrawal of Registration

If you do not wish to attend the University for a semester and instruction has not yet begun, you must submit a withdrawal form via CalCentral > My Dashboard > Student Resources > Add a Withdrawal Request. Tuition and fees will be removed from your account if completed before instruction begins. If instruction has already begun and you find it necessary to stop attending classes, you must submit the Withdrawal form via CalCentral > My Dashboard > Student Resources > Add a Withdrawal Request. Tuition and Fees will be pro-rated depending on the withdrawal date. Health Insurance, Class Pass, and Document Management Fee will remain assessed at 100% if withdrawn after instruction begins.

Whether you cancel or withdraw, any classes in which you are enrolled will be dropped from your schedule, and you will no longer be eligible to attend for that semester or any future semester until you are readmitted.

For further information on Cancellation and Withdrawal, please see the Office of the Registrar website.


Tuition and Registration Fee Adjustments

The amount of tuition and registration fees that you may be responsible for at the time of your withdrawal or cancellation is prorated based on the effective date of your withdrawal or cancellation, according to the tables published on the Office of the Registrar website.

Note: The Health Insurance, Class Pass, and Document Management fees are nonrefundable and, therefore, remain assessed at 100 percent for all withdrawals, regardless of the date of withdrawal.

Returning to Berkeley

Returning to UC Berkeley After Cancellation

New Students

If you cancelled your registration and wish to attend Berkeley in a future semester, you must submit a new application for admission. Your previous admission status will have no bearing on the decision for admission in the future.

Continuing Students

If you cancelled your registration and wish to attend Berkeley in a future semester, you must submit an “Application for Readmission."


Returning to Berkeley After Withdrawal

If you withdrew from the University and wish to return in a future semester, you must submit an “Application for Readmission." 

California Residency

California Residency and the Non-Resident Supplemental Tuition

A resident is a person who has been determined to have satisfied all University of California (UC) residency requirements to be classified as a California resident for tuition purposes. A non-resident is a person who has been determined to not meet all UC residency requirements and is assessed non-resident supplemental tuition (NRST) in addition to the mandatory resident fees. For more in-depth information on UC Residency requirements, you can also either visit the Office of the Registrar website or review the UC policy here.


Law Governing Residence

The rules regarding legal residence for tuition and fee purposes at the University of California are governed by the California Education Code as adopted by Standing Order 110.2 and Regents Policy 3105 of The Regents of the University of California. Under these rules, adult citizens, permanent resident card holders, or certain classes of immigrants and non-immigrants can establish residency for tuition and fee purposes. There are also particular rules that apply to the residency classification of minors (under the age of 18 years).


Who Is a California Resident?

If you are an adult — 24 years and older — or a graduate student and want to be classified as a resident for tuition and fee purposes, you must be in an eligible immigration status for at least 366 days prior to the residence determination date for the term for which you seek a resident classification. The residence determination date is the day instruction begins at UC Berkeley. Eligible immigration statuses include U.S. citizen, permanent resident, and certain non-immigrant visas. However, some non-immigrant visas may preclude you from establishing residency (i.e. B, F, J, TD/TN). You must also have established your continuous physical presence in California for at least 366 days prior to the residence determination date for the semester during which you would like a resident classification, and relinquished ties to any previous residence. Additionally, you must present objective evidence that you intend to make California your permanent home. Physical presence within the state solely for educational purposes does not constitute the establishment of California residency under state law, regardless of the length of your stay. Your residency cannot be derived from your spouse, nor a registered domestic partner. If you are an undergraduate student under the age of 24 and you are financially dependent on a parent who has met the requirements to be considered a California resident for tuition and fee purposes, you may be eligible for a resident classification.


Establishing Intent to Become a California Resident

Indications of your intent to make California your permanent residence can include obtaining a California driver’s license or, if you did not previously have a driver’s license from any state, a California State Identification Card; obtaining a California vehicle registration if you own and operate a vehicle in the state; registering to vote in California; paying California income taxes as a resident or part-year resident; designating California as your permanent address on all school and employment records, including military records if you are in the military service; establishing a California residence in which you keep your permanent belongings; licensing for professional practice in California; and the absence of these indications in other states during any period for which you claim California residency. Documentary evidence is required. All relevant indications will be considered in determining your classification. Your intent will be questioned if you return to your prior state of residence when the University is not in session.


Financial Independence Requirement

Effective Fall 1993, if your parents do not meet the requirements to be considered California residents for tuition and fee purposes, you will be required to demonstrate financial independence, along with physical presence and intent, when seeking a resident classification for tuition and fee purposes. You must also be in an eligible immigration status. You are considered “financially independent” if one or more of the following applies:

  • You are a graduate or professional student, regardless of age
  • You are at least 24 years of age by December 31 of the Academic Year you request a resident classification
  • You are a married or registered domestic partner
  • You are serving in the U.S. Armed Forces
  • You are a veteran of the US Armed Forces
  • You are a ward of the court, foster youth, or both of your parents are deceased
  • You have a legal dependent other than a spouse or registered domestic partner
  • You have been declared by a court to be an Emancipated Minor
  • You have been determined to be an unaccompanied youth who was homeless pursuant to federal financial aid rules
  • You are a single undergraduate student who was not claimed as an income tax deduction by your parents or any other individual for the tax year immediately preceding the term for which you are requesting a resident classification, and you can demonstrate complete self-sufficiency for one year immediately preceding the residence determination date. This means you must have supported yourself with your own resources (employment, commercial/institutional loans in your name only, financial aid, and savings from earnings, all of which require documentation), and should be able to cover your basic expenses (tuition, rent, food, and vehicle) for one full year prior to the term for which you are requesting a resident classification
  • You are a student who turned 18 years of age in California while your parents were residents for tuition purposes of the state AND your California resident parents left the state to establish residence elsewhere AND you, the student, continued to reside in California after your parents' departure

General Rules Applying to Minors

If you are an unmarried minor (under age 18), the residence of the parent with whom you live is considered your residence. If you have a parent living, you cannot change your residence by your own act, by the appointment of a legal guardian, or by the relinquishment of a parent’s right of control. If you live with neither parent, your residence is that of the parent with whom you last lived. If you are a minor with an eligible immigration status, you may establish your own residence when both your parents are deceased, and a legal guardian has not been appointed. In order to derive California residence from a parent, that parent must satisfy all the applicable residence requirements.


Specific Rules Applying to Minors

Divorced/Separated Parents

If your parents are separated, divorced, or were never married, the residence of the parent with whom you spend the majority of your time will be considered your residence. If you want to derive California residency from a California resident parent, you must provide clear and convincing evidence that you moved to that parent's home prior to your 18th birthday and remain in California until school begins. The parent must satisfy all applicable residency requirements.  

Parent of Minor Moves from California

If you are a minor whose parent was a resident of California but who moved to establish residence elsewhere, you are entitled to a resident classification if you remain in California and enroll full-time in a postsecondary institution within one year of your parent’s departure. Your resident classification will continue as long as you maintain continuous full-time attendance at the postsecondary institution.

Self-Support

If you are a minor who has been totally self-supporting and physically present in California for at least 366 days immediately prior to the residence determination date, with the intention of establishing residence, you may be eligible for a resident classification so long as you continue to be self-sufficient. You must provide clear and convincing evidence of complete self-sufficiency.

Two-Year Care and Control

If you are a student who has not reached age 19 as of the residence determination date, you may be eligible for a resident classification if, immediately prior to enrolling in a postsecondary institution, you've been living with and been under the continuous direct care and control of a California-resident adult, other than a natural or adoptive parent, for a period of not less than two years. This exception continues until you turn 19 and have resided in the state long enough to become a resident, as long as you continuously attend a California public post-secondary institution.


Temporary Absences

If you or a parent is temporarily absent from California, you will not necessarily lose resident status. However, the Residence Deputy will determine whether the absence was temporary in nature and consistent with an intent to remain permanently domiciled in California. Qualifying temporary absences are defined as of limited duration, evidenced by a start and end date, and are purpose-based to include a temporary employment assignment, medical treatment, and qualifying educational programs, all of which require objective documentation.  You and your parents have the burden of providing clear and convincing evidence of maintaining their continuing California residence during all absences from the state. Steps that you or your parent should take to retain a California residence during a temporary absence include, but are not limited to:

  1. Satisfy California resident income tax obligations. Individuals claiming California residency for tuition purposes are taxable on their total income from the date they establish California residence, which may include income earned elsewhere. California also does not recognize Foreign Earned Income Exclusion.

  2. Continue to use a California permanent address on all records.

  3. If attending an out-of-state public institution, attend as a nonresident for the entire period of enrollment.

  4. Maintain a California voter registration (voting by absentee ballot).

  5. Maintain a California driver's license and vehicle registration when possible. If it is necessary to change a driver's license and/or vehicle registration while temporarily residing in another state, these documents should be changed back to California as soon as possible.

  6. Maintain a residence in California.

  7. Store belongings in California.

  8. Return to California for leaves and vacations.


Exemptions from Non-Resident Supplemental Tuition (Proof of Eligibility Is Required)

Current Member of the Military (and Dependent Children, Spouses, Registered Domestic Partners)

The Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008 provides that any student who is a member of the Armed Forces of the United States on active duty for a period of more than 30 days and whose domicile or permanent duty station is in California, or the spouse, registered domestic partner, or dependent child of such a member, may be  entitled to an exemption from nonresident supplemental tuition.

Domicile, for purposes of applying the federal law, is the one location where a person is considered to have the most settled and permanent connection; the place where s/he intends to remain; and whenever temporarily absent, s/he has the intention of returning to. Evidence of domicile during the entire period of absence includes but is not limited to listing California as the permanent state of residence (i.e. DD 2058 with the military) or listing California as the permanent state of residence on the most recent Leave and Earnings Statement.

Permanent duty station, for purposes of applying the federal law, is defined as the post of duty or official station to which a member of the Armed Forces is assigned or attached. A member of the Armed Forces assigned to a military base or installation in California would meet the requirements of having a permanent duty station in California. Evidence of permanent duty station includes official documentation from the commanding officer or personnel officer verifying the military member is on active duty for more than 30 days and whose permanent duty station is in California.

If the active duty member is not domiciled in California or is not permanently stationed in California, the individual will be considered a nonresident for tuition purposes.

The Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act (VACAA) provides that any spouse or dependent child of an active duty member of the U.S. Armed Forces who is using Chapter 30, 31, or 33 benefits, and lives in California, may also be eligible for an exemption from nonresident supplemental tuition.

For additional information on the most current exemptions for active duty military members, please refer to page 18 of the UC Residence Policy and Guidelines.

Former Member of the Military (and Dependent Children, Spouses, Registered Domestic Partners)

In compliance with the Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014 and 2017 (Public Laws 113-146 Section 702 and 114-315 Section 417), the University may provide a waiver of nonresident supplemental tuition to veterans or their dependents if they meet the conditions of either one of the following scenarios:

A. The student is eligible for Chapter 33 Post 9/11 GI Bill benefits as a Fry Scholarship Recipient .

OR

B. The veteran and student (if a dependent) meet BOTH of the following requirements:

  • They will be, or are currently receiving VA educational benefits under either Chapter 30 (Montgomery) or Chapter 33 (Post 9/11 GI Bill) after June 30, 2015, while enrolled at the University of California

        AND

  • The student or their military sponsor separated from a period of at least 90 days of active duty in the U.S. military within 36 months (including terminal leave) of the start of their first term of enrollment after June 30, 2015.

If the former member of the military does not meet both requirements as listed above, the individual will be considered a nonresident for tuition purposes.

Child, Spouse, or Registered Domestic Partner of a Faculty Member

The spouse, registered domestic partner, or unmarried, dependent child of a member of the University of California faculty, who is a member of the Academic Senate, may be eligible for a resident classification. Verification from the University’s Academic Senate office confirming the faculty member’s membership must be sent to the Residence Affairs office each semester before a waiver can be issued.

Child, Spouse, or Registered Domestic Partner of a University Employee (Whose Assignment is Outside California)

If you are an unmarried dependent child, spouse or registered domestic partner of a full-time University employee whose assignment is outside California (i.e. the University of California Washington, DC Center), you may be eligible for a contingent resident classification. The UC employment status of your parent/spouse/registered domestic partner must be provided each semester in order for the continuation of the contingent resident classification.

Child, Spouse, or Registered Domestic Partner of a Deceased Public Law Enforcement or Fire Suppression Employee

If you are the child, spouse, or registered domestic partner of a deceased public law enforcement or fire suppression employee who was a California resident and was killed in the course while on active duty, you may be entitled to an exemption from non-resident supplemental tuition and mandatory systemwide fees.

Dependent Child of a California Resident Parent

If you have not lived in California for at least 366 days since arriving in the state or since reaching the age of 18, and you are the dependent child (natural or adopted) of a parent who is considered a California resident for tuition purposes, you may be entitled to a conditional resident classification so long as you maintain continuous attendance at an educational institution. This exemption expires after one full year, or once the student has resided in California for 366 days. To maintain a residence classification once the exemption expires, you must have satisfied the physical presence and intent requirements to establish your own residence during that year.

Graduate of a California High School (AB 540)

You may be entitled to an exemption from non-resident supplemental tuition if you do not hold a non-immigrant visa and have satisfied both the Time and Coursework and Degree or Unit requirements:

  1.  Time and Coursework requirements:

Three or more years of full-time total attendance or attainment of credits at any of the following:

  • California high schools

  • California adult schools (full-time attendance is a minimum of 420 hours per school year which may completed on a part-time basis and includes non-credit courses at a California Community College)

  • California Community Colleges (full-time attendance is defined as a minimum of 12 credit units per semester or quarter equivalent, not to exceed a total of two years total full-time attendance)

        OR

Three years of California high school coursework completed while in California and three years of total attendance in California elementary schools, California secondary schools, or any combination of the two

  2.  Degree or Unit Requirements - You must meet one of the following requirements:

       a. Graduation from a California high school (or attainment of the equivalent):**

  • A diploma from a California high school; or
  • A High School Equivalency Certificate Issued by the California State GED Office; or

  • A Certificate of Proficiency resulting from a California High School Proficiency Examination (CHPSE).

       b. Attainment of an associate’s degree from a California Community College while in California

       c. Fulfillment of minimum transfer requirements from a California community college to a UC or CSU campus while in California

**A California high school diploma or High School Equivalency Certificate (GED) obtained after graduating high school in another state or country is not eligible for this provision. The above requirements cannot be fulfilled concurrently while attending a UC campus. All coursework must be complete while physically present in California.

T or U Visa Holders

If you hold a T or U non-immigrant visa but would otherwise meet the requirements of AB 540, you are exempt from paying nonresident supplemental tuition until you are eligible to establish a resident classification. You are required to submit documents confirming your current immigration status each semester before a waiver is issued.

For more information, please refer to page 10 of the UC Residence Policy and Guidelines.


Form and Documentation Deadlines

Please see the Office of the Registrar's website for information on all deadlines for new and continuing students. Additionally, there is a documentation deadline for each semester. If you do not provide the requested documents within the deadline, you may be held responsible for the non-resident supplemental tuition.


Incorrect Classification

If you were incorrectly classified as a resident, you are subject to reclassification and to the payment of all non-resident supplemental tuition not paid. If you concealed information or furnished false information and were classified incorrectly as a result, you are also subject to University discipline and may be referred to the Center for Student Conduct. Resident students who become non-residents must immediately notify the campus residence deputy.


Inquiries and Appeals

Inquiries regarding residence requirements, determination, and/or recognized exemptions should be directed to:

Residence Affairs Unit, Office of the Registrar, 120 Sproul Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-5404; (510) 642-7209; orres@berkeley.edu

At the campus level, residence deputies are the only individuals authorized to answer residency questions or make residency determinations. No other office, entity, or individual is authorized to provide residence information on behalf of the University of California.

No other University personnel is authorized to supply information relative to residence requirements for tuition and fee purposes.

If you are classified as a nonresident at the campus level, you have an opportunity to appeal the decision. All appeals are handled by the Office of the General Counsel, not by the campus. In order to appeal, you must complete the Appeal Application and submit it with a copy of your nonresident letter to the Office of the General Counsel within 30 days of your nonresident decision. The Office of the General Counsel will contact you upon receipt of your documents.

Be aware that if you received a nonresident classification, it is unlikely that the decision can be reversed on appeal. You may submit the Appeal Application and a copy of your nonresident letter via postal mail, email, or fax:

Attn: Residency Analyst, University of California Office of the General Counsel, 1111 Franklin St., 8th Floor, Oakland, CA 94607-5200; residency.appeal@ucop.edu; (510) 987-9981

Caution: This summary is not a complete explanation of the law regarding residence for tuition and fee purposes. Additional information is available from the Office of the Registrar's website. Additionally, the UC Office of the President, Office of the General Counsel provides more information including the UC Residence Policy and Guidelines.

Note: Changes may be made in the residence requirements since the publication date of this statement.

Course Number Guide

For an explanation of the prefixes, suffixes, and course numbering system used in UC Berkeley's course listings, please see the guide provided below.

Prefixes to Course Numbers

C = Course is cross-listed with another department
H = Honors course
N = Summer-only course not equivalent to a regular session course with the same number
R = Satisfies Reading and Composition (R & C) requirement
W = Offered fully or predominantly online


Suffixes to Course Numbers

AC = Satisfies American Cultures requirement

Students should check with their major or minor advising unit to verify which courses will satisfy curriculum requirements.


Key to Course Numbers

1-99 = Lower division (undergraduate) courses
100-199 = Upper division (undergraduate) courses
200-299 = Graduate courses
300-399 = Professional courses for teachers and prospective teachers
400-499 = Other professional courses (acceptable toward academic degrees only within limitations prescribed by a college, school, or the Graduate Division)
601 = Special study for graduate students in preparation for master's examination
602 = Special study for graduate students in preparation for doctoral qualifying examination


Courses Numbered 24, 39, & 84

Freshman and Sophomore Seminars
For further information, please see the Freshman and Sophomore Seminars at Berkeley website.

Courses Numbered 97

Field Studies (lower division)
You may use no more than 16 semester units of courses numbered 97, 98, 99, 197, 198, and 199 to meet requirements for the bachelor's degree. You may aggregate no more than 4 units of credit for courses numbered 97, 98, 99, 198, and 199 for a single semester. Courses with this number are restricted to passed/not passed grading. To take them you must be in good academic standing (2.00 GPA or better). A written proposal for each Field Studies Course, signed by the faculty sponsor, must receive approval by the Chair of the Department. In certain cases, exceptions to these rules may be granted by the dean of your college or school.

Courses Numbered 98

Organized Group Study (lower division) 
You may use no more than 16 semester units of courses numbered 97, 98, 99, 198, and 199 to meet requirements for the bachelor's degree. You may aggregate no more than 4 units of credit for courses numbered 97, 98, 99, 198, and 199 for a single semester. Each section of a 98 course must receive approval by the chair of the department, based upon a written proposal submitted by the instructor who is to supervise the course that describes the matter to be studied, the methods of instruction, the number of units to be credited, and methods of evaluation of student performance. A copy of the approved proposal must be submitted for information to the Committee on Courses of Instruction. Only a grade of passed/not passed is to be assigned. In certain cases, the dean of your college or school may authorize exceptions to these limitations.

Courses Numbered 99

Supervised Independent Study by academically superior students (lower division)
You may use no more than 16 semester units of courses numbered 97, 98, 99, 197, 198, and 199 to meet requirements for the bachelor's degree. You may aggregate no more than 4 units of credit for courses numbered 97, 98, 99, 198, and 199 for a single semester. You must have a 3.3 GPA and prior consent of the instructor who is to supervise the study, and you must submit a written proposal to the chair of the department (or equivalent) for approval. The proposal must specify the nature of the study, number of units to be credited, and the basis for grading. Only a grade of passed/not passed is to be assigned. In certain cases, the dean of your college or school may authorize exceptions to these limitations.

Courses Numbered 197

Field Studies (upper division)
You may use no more than 16 semester units of courses numbered 97, 98, 99, 197, 198, and 199 to meet requirements for the bachelor's degree. Courses with this number are restricted to passed/not passed grading. To take them you must be in good academic standing (2.00 GPA or better). A written proposal for each Field Studies Course, signed by the faculty sponsor, must receive approval by the Chair of the Department. In certain cases, exceptions to these rules may be granted by the dean of your college or school.

Courses numbered 198

Organized Group Study (upper division)
You may use no more than 16 semester units of courses numbered 97, 98, 99, 197, 198, and 199 to meet requirements for the bachelor's degree. You may aggregate no more than 4 units of credit for courses numbered 97, 98, 99, 198, and 199 for a single semester. Each section of a 198 course must receive approval by the chair of the department, based upon a written proposal submitted by the instructor who is to supervise the course that describes the matter to be studied, the methods of instruction, the number of units to be credited, and methods of evaluation of student performance. A copy of the approved proposal must be submitted for information to the Committee on Courses of Instruction. To enroll in 198 courses, you must be in good academic standing (2.00 GPA or better). Only a grade of passed/not passed is to be assigned. In certain cases, exceptions to these rules may be granted by the dean of your college or school.

Courses numbered 199

Supervised Independent Study (upper division)
You may use no more than 16 semester units of courses numbered 97, 98, 99, 197, 198, and 199 to meet requirements for the bachelor's degree. You may aggregate no more than 4 units of credit for courses numbered 97, 98, 99, 198, and 199 for a single semester. You must have prior approval of your major adviser, the instructor who is to supervise the study, and the chair of the department. Approval must be based on a written proposal that you submit to the chair that specifies the nature of the study, the number of units to be credited, and the basis for grading. To enroll in 199 courses, you must be in good academic standing (2.00 GPA or better). Only a grade of passed/not passed will be assigned. In certain cases, the dean of your college or school may authorize exceptions to these limitations.

Courses Numbered 601 & 602

Individual Study (601 – master level, 602 – doctoral level)
You may enroll in no more than 8 semester units of courses numbered 601 or 602 to meet the requirements for a master’s or doctoral degree, up to 4 units per summer session. Only a grade of satisfactory/unsatisfactory will be assigned. Enrollment in these courses must be approved by the student’s graduate advisor. Units earned in these courses may not be used to meet academic residence of unit requirements towards a degree.

Nonmatriculating Students

Berkeley Concurrent Enrollment

UC Berkeley Extension's Concurrent Enrollment program provides an opportunity to enroll in UC Berkeley campus courses on a space-available basis without formal admission to the University. Concurrent Enrollment is available only for spring and fall terms. International students may also enroll in various UC Berkeley Extension International Programs which offer concurrent enrollment programs of study and certificate options that meet full-time student eligibility requirements for F-1 visa status.
UC Berkeley degree students have enrollment priority in all courses, and not all UC Berkeley courses are open for Concurrent Enrollment applicants (e.g., classes in the School of Law are not eligible). Approval of class applications is at the sole discretion of the campus academic departments.

Students interested in attending UC Berkeley campus courses during summer should visit the Summer Sessions website.

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