Earth and Planetary Science

University of California, Berkeley

Overview

UC Berkeley's Department of Earth and Planetary Science (EPS) was the first major center of academic geology in the western United States. Berkeley geologists made the first detailed study of a major earthquake, developed potassium-argon dating, brought the rigor of thermodynamics into geology, and discovered the evidence that a comet impact killed the dinosaurs.

With growing concerns over environmental deterioration and depletion of resources, focus has broadened to include issues of urgent social relevance. Many departments at Berkeley are involved in environmental questions, ranging from policy, management, economics, and engineering to social concerns, but all have to base their conclusions upon a sound scientific understanding of Planet Earth. It is up to geologists, geochemists, and geophysicists to provide that background.

The interests of the faculty cover a broad range of earth sciences. The traditional fields of petrology, mineralogy, mineral resources and structural geology are represented. A rapidly growing field is micro-biogeochemistry. Solid earth geophysics includes a unique combination of expertise in seismology, mineral physics, and geodynamics. The earthquake and tectonics programs benefit from the resources made available through the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL). A vigorous program in geomorphology and surface processes attracts many students. Recently, the department has added expertise in marine, atmospheric, and planetary sciences, with links to related programs in the Departments of Chemistry, Astronomy, Geography and Environmental Science, and Policy Management. Additional resources for research are available through the Berkeley Atmospheric Science Center (BASC) and the Center for Integrated Planetary Science (CIPS). Resources for Geochemists include the Center for Isotope Geochemistry and the Berkeley Geochronology Center. Some faculty members have strong collaborations with the Earth Science Division at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (ESD-LBNL) and make extensive use of the Advanced Light Source (ALS).

Research Facilities

Center for Isotope Geochemistry (CIG), directed by Professor Donald DePaolo, is a joint research center of UC Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. CIG provides state-of-the-art analyses for measuring concentrations and isotopic compositions of elements in rocks, minerals, fluids, and gases in the earth's crust, oceans, and atmosphere. CIG has seven mass spectrometers that provide high-precision isotopic and isotope dilution analyses of Rb, Sr, Nd, Sm, Ca, K, Re, Os, Fe, U, Th, Pb, Ba, La, Ce; clean laboratories; and clean mineral separation and rock preparation laboratories. Materials analyzed are rock, ocean and ground waters, and naturally occurring noble gases.

The Center for Atmospheric Sciences is a new multidisciplinary academic group at Berkeley. It focuses on the processes that maintain and alter the atmosphere's chemical composition and circulation. It also examines the climatic effects of changes in these processes. A special emphasis is the interaction between the geosphere-biosphere and climate, with the atmosphere as the synthesizer of changes at its boundaries, and the communicator of these changes to the other spheres. Center members and associates are from the Departments of Earth and Planetary Science; Chemistry; Environmental Science, Policy and Management; Mechanical Engineering; as well as the Space Sciences Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, among others. Research approaches are multifaceted, and include global three-dimensional circulation models; satellite observations; high-precision instrumentation for atmospheric chemistry; aircraft measurements of stratospheric-tropospheric exchange; and measurements and simulations of atmosphere-biosphere exchange of trace gases. This diversity permits the center to pose and attack new questions about past and future climate change.

Berkeley Geomorphology Group prospers because of the diversity of strong research programs across the campus and because of a commitment to undergraduate teaching and graduate training. The core faculty consist of Kurt Cuffey (Geography), William Dietrich, Jim Kirchner, and Michael Manga (Earth and Planetary Science). Their research programs tackle a wide range of topics, including glacier mechanics; paleoclimate analysis; hydrology; environmental geochemistry; landscape evolution; hillslope erosion mechanics; fluvial processes; restoration geomorphology; and biologic extinctions and evolutionary processes. These faculty and their students interact and collaborate with many other related groups on campus.

Active Tectonics Group uses an interdisciplinary approach to investigate active tectonic processes and the rheology of the earth's lithosphere. This approach integrates geodetic, seismologic, geomorphic, and geologic observations with theoretical models to improve scientific understanding of fault-zone processes and crustal deformation. Of particular value in this endeavor are space geodetic observations employing the Global Positioning System and Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry to precisely measure deformation near active faults, volcanoes, and landslides. Members of the group, led by Roland Bürgmann, often interact closely with colleagues in the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory and the Geomorphology Group.

The Berkeley Geochronology Center is a nonprofit research institution dedicated to establishing the evolution of the earth, its various inhabitants, and its interactions with the rest of our solar system, throughout the 4.6 billion years of the planet's existence. BGC scientists determine the ages of rocks and other materials to date important events in geological and biological history. Through understanding such information in geologic context, BGC research provides key insights into such processes as plate tectonics; volcanism; mountain building; mass extinctions; climate change; interactions between the earth and solar system; and the evolution of life, including humankind.

The Berkeley Seismological LaboratoryThe University operates several networks of geophysical instruments in Northern California to study earthquakes and tectonic processes at the regional scale; a network of 26 broadband seismometers, regionally distributed and linked by continuous telemetry to UC Berkeley, forms the core of the monitoring program. In addition, a network of permanent GPS stations and a network of borehole seismometers are maintained and operated by the lab as well as an online archive for earthquake-related data in Northern California. Research includes the study of earthquake wave-propagation through complex structures, the nature of earthquake sources, eigenvibrations of the earth, and global tomography.

Center for Computational GeoscienceWithin the Earth Sciences Division at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a facility for modern seismological research which relies heavily upon intensive computational analysis (e.g., acoustic imaging, 3D wave propagation, high-resolution inverse earthquake analyses) or large database manipulations. The center is used in a number of PhD and postdoctoral research studies.

The Engineering Geoscience Group teaches and researches Applied Geophysics. It is an integral part of the Geological Engineering Group within the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at UC Berkeley. Originally, the group formed in 1962 to study and encourage the use of geophysical methods in mineral and petroleum exploration programs. Recently attention has shifted to the more general topic of subsurface mapping and imaging. While research in resource exploration topics is still actively pursued, the group's activities now include work on methodology and instrument development for a variety of near surface applications related to the resolution of geotechnical and environmental problems. In this area, the group works jointly with the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering on site remediation, near surface hydrology, and soil stability projects. Incidentally, geophysical technology developed for use in shallow subsurface regions can also be used as an aid to archaeological searches. The technology is also expected to play a key role in resolving contemporary problems associated with the detection and removal of buried explosive ordinance.

Center for Integrative Planetary Science (CIPS) is a new organized research unit at UC Berkeley. Their task is to unite scientists and students from many disciplines on a rapidly emerging scientific landscape characterized by striking developments. These discoveries, and others during the past decade, have revealed a remarkable set of connections among many separate traditional sciences: geophysics, astrophysics, meteorology, oceanography, organic chemistry, biology, and planetary science. These disciplines are well represented at Berkeley, where strong research programs with long records of accomplishment have existed for some time in diverse campus departments, the Space Science Laboratory, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. CIPS takes advantage of these strengths with the integrated study of the physical origin and geochemical evolution of planets and planetary systems. Much of the compelling research about the solar system and other planetary systems will require knowledge across traditional disciplinary boundaries. From the condensation of planets within protoplanetary discs to the geochemical history of planets and moons, future researchers will require frontier knowledge of all related disciplines.

Undergraduate Programs

Atmospheric Science: BA, Minor
Earth and Planetary Science: Minor
Environmental Earth Science: BA, Minor
Geology: BA, Minor
Geophysics: BA, Minor
Marine Science: BA, Minor
Planetary Science: BA, Minor

Graduate Program

Earth and Planetary Science: MA, PhD (the MA program is only open to students who majored in EPS at Berkeley)

Visit Department Website

Courses

Earth and Planetary Science

EPS 3 The Water Planet 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Spring 2016
An overview of the processes that control water supply to natural ecosystems and human civilization. Hydrologic cycle, floods, droughts, groundwater. Patterns of water use, threats to water quality, effects of global climate change on future water supplies. Water issues facing California.

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EPS 7 Introduction to Climate Change 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017
This course covers the physical processes that determine Earth's past, present, and future climate, with a particular focus on the essentially irreversible climate change (a.k.a., global warming) caused by the burning of coal, oil, and natural gas. Topics will also
include the estimation of future warming and impacts, the Earth resources that can be used to combat climate change, and the policies being used to shift towards the use of those resources.

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EPS C12 The Planets 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
A tour of the mysteries and inner workings of our solar system. What are planets made of? Why do they orbit the sun the way they do? How do planets form, and what are they made of? Why do some bizarre moons have oceans, volcanoes, and ice floes? What makes the Earth hospitable for life? Is the Earth a common type of planet or some cosmic quirk? This course will introduce basic physics, chemistry, and math to understand planets, moons, rings
, comets, asteroids, atmospheres, and oceans. Understanding other worlds will help us save our own planet and help us understand our place in the universe.
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EPS W12 The Planets 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2015 8 Week Session, Summer 2014 8 Week Session
A tour of the mysteries and inner workings of our solar system. What are planets made of? Why do they orbit the sun the way they do? How do planets form, and what are they made of? Why do some bizarre moons have oceans, volcanoes, and ice floes? What makes the Earth hospitable for life? Is the Earth a common type of planet or some cosmic quirk? This course will introduce
basic physics, chemistry, and math to understand planets, moons, rings, comets, asteroids, atmospheres, and oceans. Understanding other worlds will help us save our own planet and help us understand our place in the universe. This course is web-based.
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EPS 20 Earthquakes in Your Backyard 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
Introduction to earthquakes, their causes and effects. General discussion of basic principles and methods of seismology and geological tectonics, distribution of earthquakes in space and time, effects of earthquakes, and earthquake hazard and risk, with particular emphasis on the situation in California.

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EPS C20 Earthquakes in Your Backyard 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Introduction to earthquakes, their causes and effects. General discussion of basic principles and methods of seismology and geological tectonics, distribution of earthquakes in space and time, effects of earthquakes, and earthquake hazard and risk, with particular emphasis on the situation in California.

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EPS 24 Freshman Seminar in Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
The freshman seminar in earth and planetary science is designed to provide new students with an opportunity to explore a topic in geology or earth sciences with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will include such possible topics as great voyages of geologic discovery and the role of atmospheric sciences in geologic study.

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EPS 39A Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 2 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

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EPS 50 The Planet Earth 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
An introduction to the physical and chemical processes that have shaped the earth through time, with emphasis on the theory of plate tectonics. Laboratory work will involve the practical study of minerals, rocks, and geologic maps and exercises on geological processes.

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EPS 80 Environmental Earth Sciences 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Fall 2016
This course focuses on the processes on and in the earth that shape the environment. Humanity's use of land and oceans is examined based on an understanding of these processes.

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EPS C82 Oceans 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course offers multidisciplinary approach to begin answering the question "Why are oceans important to us?" Upon a physical, chemical, and geologic base, we introduce the alien world of sea life, the importance of the ocean to the global carbon cycle, and the principles of ecology with a focus on the important concept of energy flow through food webs. Lectures expand beyond science to include current topics as diverse as music, movies
, mythology, biomechanics, policy, and trade.
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EPS N82 Introduction to Oceans 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
The geology, physics, chemistry, and biology of the world oceans. The application of oceanographic sciences to human problems will be explored through special topics such as energy from the sea, marine pollution, food from the sea, and climate change.

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EPS 84 Sophomore Seminar 1 or 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Fall 2012, Spring 2012
Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses offered by faculty members in departments all across the campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for close, regular intellectual contact between faculty members and students in the crucial second year. The topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sophomores.

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EPS 98 Directed Group Study 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2012, Spring 2009, Spring 2008
Group studies of selected topics which vary from semester to semester.

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EPS 100A Minerals: Their Constitution and Origin 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Introduction to structural, compositional, and physical properties of minerals, their analogs and related substances, their genesis in various geological and synthetic processes, and laboratory techniques to identify and investigate minerals. One field trip to selected mineral deposits and visits to laboratories.

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EPS 100B Genesis and Interpretation of Rocks 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Introduction to the principal geologic environments where rocks are formed and displayed. Igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic processes discussed in the context of global tectonics.

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EPS C100 Communicating Ocean Science 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
For undergraduates interested in improving their ability to communicate their scientific knowledge by teaching ocean science in elementary schools or science centers/aquariums. The course will combine instruction in inquiry-based teaching methods and learning pedagogy with six weeks of supervised teaching experience in a local school classroom or the Lawrence Hall of Science with a partner. Thus, students will practice communicating scientific
knowledge and receive mentoring on how to improve their presentations.
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EPS 101 Field Geology and Digital Mapping 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Geological mapping, field observation, and problem-solving in the Berkeley hills and environs leading to original interpretation of geological processes and history from stratigraphic, structural, and lithological investigations. Integration of the Berkeley hills geology into the Coast Ranges and California as a whole through field trips to key localities. Training in digital field mapping, global positioning systems, and laser surveying. Interdisciplinary
focus encourages participation by nonmajors.
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EPS 102 History and Evolution of Planet Earth 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Formation and evolution of the earth. Nucleosynthesis; formation of the solar system; planetary accretion; dating the earth and solar system; formation of the core, mantle, oceans, and atmosphere; plate tectonics; heat transfer and internal dynamics; stratigraphic record of environment, and evolution; climate history and climate change.

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EPS 103 Introduction to Aquatic and Marine Geochemistry 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2015
Introduction to marine geochemistry: the global water cycle; processes governing the distribution of chemical species within the hydrosphere; ocean circulation; chemical mass balances, fluxes, and reactions in the marine environment from global to submicron scales; carbon system equilibrium chemistry and biogeochemistry of fresh and salt walter; applications of natural and anthropogenic stable and radioactive tracers; internal ocean proc
esses.
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EPS 104 Mathematical Methods in Geophysics 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
Linear systems. Linear inverse problems, least squares; generalized inverse, resolution; Fourier series, integral transforms; time series analysis, spherical harmonics; partial differntial equations of geophysics; functions of a complex variable; probability and significance tests, maximum likelihood methods. Intended for students in geophysics and other physical sciences.

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EPS 108 Geodynamics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Basic principles in studying the physical properties of earth materials and the dynamic processes of the earth. Examples are drawn from tectonics, mechanics of earthquakes, etc., to augment course material.

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EPS 109 Computer Simulations in Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Introduction to modern computer simulation methods and their application to selected Earth and Planetary Science problems. In hands-on computer labs, students will learn about numerical algorithms, learn to program and modify provided programs, and display the solution graphically. This is an introductory course and no programming experience is required. Examples include fractals in geophysics, properties of materials at high pressure, celestial
mechanics, and diffusion processes in the Earth. Topics range from ordinary and partial differential equations to molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations.
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EPS 111 Petroleum Geology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2012
Basin development related to plate tectonics. Origin of petroleum: quality, quantity, thermal maturation of organic matter in source rock. Primary and secondary migration. Petroleum composition. Reservoir rock: stratigraphy and geometry. Traps: structural, stratigraphic or combination. Reservoir fluids and energy. Oil provinces, individual fields.

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EPS 115 Stratigraphy and Earth History 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Collecting, analyzing, and presenting stratigraphic data; dating and correlating sedimentary rocks; recognizing ancient environments and reconstructing Earth history; seismic and sequence stratigraphy; event stratigraphy and neocatastrophism; applications of stratigraphy to climate change, petroleum geology, and archaeology.

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EPS 116 Structural Geology and Tectonics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Introduction to the geometry and mechanics of brittle and ductile geologic structures; their origins and genetic relation to stress fields and their use as kinematic indicators; case histories of selected regions to elucidate tectonic evolution in different plate tectonic settings. Laboratory exercises will focus on analysis of hand specimens and structural relations portrayed on geologic maps. Several trips to observe geologic structures
in the field to supplement laboratory exercises.
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EPS 117 Geomorphology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Quantitative examination of landforms, runoff generation, weathering, mechanics of soil erosion by water and wind, mass wasting, glacial and periglacial processes and hillslope evolution.

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EPS 118 Advanced Field Course 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Advanced geological mapping, intensive field observation, and problem solving in the field areas selected by instructors. Includes preparation of final reports.

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EPS 119 Geologic Field Studies 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Two to four weekend field trips to localities of geological interest.

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EPS 122 Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Gravity field, density distribution, and internal seismic structure of the Earth and planets. Constitution, composition, temperature distribution, and energetics of the Earth's interior. The geomagnetic field and the geodynamo, and concepts in seismic imaging and geophysical fluid dynamics. This
course welcomes physics, computer science, engineering and applied maths majors.

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EPS 124 Isotopic Geochemistry 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Fall 2013
An overview of the use of natural isotopic variations to study earth, planetary, and environmental problems. Topics include geochronology, cosmogenic isotope studies of surficial processes, radiocarbon and the carbon cycle, water isotopes in the water cycle, and radiogenic and stable isotope studies of planetary evolution, mantle dynamics, volcanoes, groundwater, and geothermal systems. The course begins with a short introduction to nuclear
processes and includes simple mathematical models used in isotope geochemistry.
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EPS 125 Stable Isotope Geochemistry 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018
This course provides an introduction to the principles of stable isotope geochemistry and the application of these principles to problems in Earth and planetary science. This course provides a foundation for the physical, chemical, and biological processes that cause isotopes to fractionate in nature including the kinetic theory of gases, equilibrium thermodynamics, and the kinetics of chemical reactions. These principles will be applied to the study of problems related
to the water cycle, paleoclimate, igneous petrology, biogeochemical cycles in the past and present, and planetary science.
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EPS C129 Biometeorology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2012
This course describes how the physical environment (light, wind, temperature, humidity) of plants and soil affects the physiological status of plants and how plants affect their physical environment. Using experimental data and theory, it examines physical, biological, and chemical processes affecting transfer of momentum, energy, and material (water, CO2, atmospheric trace gases) between vegetation and the atmosphere. Plant biometeorology instrumentation
and measurements are also discussed.
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EPS 130 Strong Motion Seismology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Generation of seismic waves. Synthetic accelerograms. Instrumentation to measure strong ground motion. Estimation of seismic motion at a site. Ground motion spectra. Influence of soils and geologic structures. Seismic risk mapping.

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EPS 131 Geochemistry 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Chemical reactions in geological processes. Thermodynamic methods for predicting chemical equilibria in nature. Isotopic and chemical tracers of transport processes in the earth. Chemistry of the solid earth, oceans, and atmosphere.

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EPS C146 Geological Oceanography 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2011, Spring 2010, Spring 2008
The tectonics and morphology of the sea floor, the geologic processes in the deep and shelf seas, and the climatic record contained in deep-sea sediments. The course will cover sources and composition of marine sediments, sea-level change, ocean circulation, paleoenvironmental reconstruction using fossils, imprint of climatic zonation on marine sediments, marine stratigraphy, and ocean floor resources.

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EPS 150 Case Studies in Earth Systems 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Analysis and discussion of three research problems on the interactions of solid earth, hydrologic, chemical, and atmospheric processes. Emphasis is on the synthesis and application of the student's disciplinary knowledge to a new integrative problem in the earth sciences.

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EPS C162 Planetary Astrophysics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Physics of planetary systems, both solar and extra-solar. Star and planet formation, radioactive dating, small-body dynamics and interaction of radiation with matter, tides, planetary interiors, atmospheres, and magnetospheres. High-quality oral presentations may be required in addition to problem sets and a final exam.

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EPS C178 Applied Geophysics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The theory and practice of geophysical methods for determining the subsurface distribution of physical rock and soil properties. Measurements of gravity and magnetic fields, electrical and electromagnetic fields, and seismic velocity are interpreted to map the subsurface distribution of density, magnetic susceptibility, electrical conductivity, and mechanical properties.

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EPS C180 Air Pollution 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
This course is an introduction to air pollution and the chemistry of earth's atmosphere. We will focus on the fundamental natural processes controlling trace gas and aerosol concentrations in the atmosphere, and how anthropogenic activity has affected those processes at the local, regional, and global scales. Specific topics include stratospheric ozone depletion, increasing concentrations of green house gasses, smog, and changes in the oxidation
capacity of the troposphere.
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EPS C181 Atmospheric Physics and Dynamics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course examines the processes that determine the structure and circulation of the Earth's atmosphere. The approach is deductive rather than descriptive: to figure out the properties and behavior of the Earth's atmosphere based on the laws of physics and fluid dynamics. Topics will include interaction between radiation and atmospheric composition; the role of water in the energy and radiation balance; governing equations for atmospheric motion
, mass conservation, and thermodynamic energy balance; geostrophic flow, quasigeostrophic motion, baroclinic instability and dynamics of extratropical cyclones.
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EPS C182 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Laboratory 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Fluid dynamics, radiative transfer, and the kinetics, spectroscopy, and measurement of atmospherically relevant species are explored through laboratory experiments, numerical simulations, and field observations.

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EPS C183 Carbon Cycle Dynamics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
The focus is the (unsolved) puzzle of the contemporary carbon cycle. Why is the concentration of atmospheric CO2 changing at the rate observed? What are the terrestrial and oceanic processes that add and remove carbon from the atmosphere? What are the carbon management strategies under discussion? How can emission protocols be verified? Students are encouraged to gain hands-on experience with the available data, and learn modeling
skills to evaluate hypotheses of carbon sources and sinks.
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EPS H195 Senior Honors Course 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Original research and preparation of an acceptable thesis. May be taken during two consecutive semesters of senior year and may be substituted for six units of the upper division requirement with consent of major adviser.

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EPS 197 Field Study 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2010
Written proposal signed by faculty sponsor and approved by major faculty advisor. Supervised experience relevant to specific aspects of students' EPS specialization in off-campus organization. Regular meetings with faculty sponsor and written report required.

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EPS 198 Directed Group Study 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2010
Group studies of selected topics which vary from semester to semester.

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EPS 199 Supervised Independent Study and Research 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2014
Enrollment is restricted by regulations.

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EPS 200 Problems in Hydrogeology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2010, Fall 2006
Current problems in fluid flow, heat flow, and solute transport in the earth. Pressure- and thermal-driven flow, instability, convection, interaction between fluid flow and chemical reactions. Pore pressure; faulting and earthquakes; diagenesis; hydrocarbon migration and trapping; flow-associated mineralization; contaminant problems.

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EPS 203 Introduction to Aquatic and Marine Geochemistry 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2015
Introduction to marine geochemistry: the global water cycle; processes governing the distribution of chemical species within the hydrosphere; ocean circulation; chemical mass balances, fluxes, and reactions in the marine environment from global to submicron scales; carbon system equilibrium chemistry and biogeochemistry of fresh and salt walter; applications of natural and anthropogenic stable and radioactive tracers; internal ocean proc
esses.
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EPS 204 Elastic Wave Propagation 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012, Fall 2007, Fall 2004
Wave propagation in elastic solids; effects of anelasticity and anistropy; representation theorems; reflection and refraction; propagation in layered media; finite-difference and finite-element methods.

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EPS 207 Laboratory in Observational Seismology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Group problem solving of current seismological topics. Analysis, inversion, and numerical modeling of seismic waveform data to investigate questions regarding the physics of the earthquake source and seismic wave propagation. Application of current developments and techniques in seismological research.

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EPS 209 Matlab Applications in Earth Science 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Fall 2002
Introduction to Matlab programming with toolboxes. Applications come from Earth sciences and related fields including biology. Topics range from image processing, riverbed characterization, landslide risk analysis, signal processing, geospatial and seismic data analysis, and machine learning to parallel computation. Designed for beginning graduate students.

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EPS 210 Exploration, Ore Petrology, and Geochemistry 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Spring 2010
Overview of geological, petrological, and geochemical analysis of ore forming processes including sedimentary, magmatic, hydrothermal, and geothermal resources. Geochemical rock buffers and hydrothermal phase equilibria. Electro-geochemistry of near surface oxidation of primary ores related to climate change, hydrological evolution, and tectonics. Exploration for earth materials for conventional and sustainable technologies including multiple
junction semiconductor photo-voltaic cells. Mass balance modeling of ore-forming systems and soils. Environmental management of exploration sites. Lab includes macroscopic and X-ray identification of ore and alteration minerals and ore microscopy. Field trips use digital GIS mapping methods for rock type, structure, mineralization, and wall rock alteration. Integration interpretation of geophysics with geology.
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EPS 212 Advanced Stratigraphy and Tectonics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Spring 2009, Spring 2008
Evolution of the earth in response to internal, surficial and extraterrestrial processes.

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EPS 214 Igneous Petrology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2014, Spring 2002
The composition, generation, and cooling of magmas to form igneous rocks. The physical and thermodynamic properties of silicate liquids.

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EPS 216 Active Tectonics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2014
This course is a graduate course designed to introduce students in the earth sciences to the geology of earthquakes, including tectonic geomorphology, paleoseismology and the analysis and interpretation of geodetic measurements of active deformation. While the focus will be primarily on seismically active faults, we will also discuss deformation associated with landslides, regional isostatic rebound, and volcanoes, as well as measurements of global
plate motions. We will address methods and applications in paleoseismology, tectonic geomorphology, and geodesy. The course will address measurement techniques (e.g,. GPS, leveling, etc.), data analysis and inversion, and subsequent modeling and interpretation of the data. The integration of geodetic measurements with geologic and seismologic data allows an improved understanding of active processes.
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EPS 217 Fluvial Geomorphology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Application of fluid mechanics to sediment transport and development of river morphology. Form and process in river meanders, the pool-riffle sequence, aggradation, grade, and baselevel.

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EPS 220 Advanced Concepts in Mineral Physics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
A combined seminar and lecture course covering advanced topics related to mineral physics. The interface between geophysics with the other physical sciences is emphasized. Topics vary each semester.

Advanced Concepts in Mineral Physics: Read More [+]

EPS 224 Isotopic Geochemistry 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Fall 2013
An overview of the use of natural isotopic variations to study earth, planetary, and environmental problems. Topics include geochronology, cosmogenic isotope studies of surficial processes, radiocarbon and the carbon cycle, water isotopes in the water cycle, and radiogenic and stable isotope studies of planetary evolution, mantle dynamics, volcanoes, groundwater, and geothermal systems. The course begins with a short introduction to nuclear
processes and includes simple mathematical models used in isotope geochemistry.
Isotopic Geochemistry: Read More [+]

EPS 225 Topics in High-Pressure Research 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Analysis of current developments and techniques in experimental and theoretical high-pressure research, with applications in the physical sciences. Topics vary each semester.

Topics in High-Pressure Research: Read More [+]

EPS 229 Introduction to Climate Modeling 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2015
This course emphasizes the fundamentals of the climate system via a hierarchy of climate models. Topics will include energy balance, numerical techniques, climate observations, atmospheric and oceanic circulation and heat transports, and parameterizations of eddy processes. The model hierarchy will also explore nonlinear and stochastic processes, and biogeochemistry. Students will build computational models to investigate climate feedbacks, climate sensitivity
, and response times.
Introduction to Climate Modeling: Read More [+]

EPS 230 Radiation and Its Interactions with Climate 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2013
Introduction to role of radiative processes in structure and evolution of the climate system. Electromagnetism; solar and terrestrial radiation; interactions of radiation with Earth's atmosphere, ocean, and land surface; greenhouse and runaway greenhouse effects; radiative balance of the climate system; energy-balance climate models; effects of clouds and aerosols; interactions of radiation with atmospheric and oceanic dynamics; radiative processes
and paleoclimate; radiative processes and anthropogenic global warming.
Radiation and Its Interactions with Climate: Read More [+]

EPS 236 Geological Fluid Mechanics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
An advanced course in the application of fluid mechanics in the earth sciences, with emphasis on the design and scaling of laboratory and numerical models. Principals of inviscid and viscous fluid flow; dynamic similarity; boundary layers; convection; instabilities; gravity currents; mixing and chaos; porous flow. Applications to mantle convection, magma dynamics, atmosphere and ocean dynamics, sediment/debris flows, and hydrogeology. Topics may
vary from year to year.
Geological Fluid Mechanics: Read More [+]

EPS C241 Stable Isotope Ecology 5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Spring 2012
Course focuses on principles and applications of stable isotope chemistry as applied to the broad science of ecology. Lecture topics include principles of isotope behavior and chemistry, and isotope measurements in the context of terrestrial, aquatic, and marine ecological processes and problems. Students participate in a set of laboratory exercises involving preparation of samples of choice for isotopic analyses, the use of the mass spectrometer
and optical analysis systems, and the anlaysis of data.
Stable Isotope Ecology: Read More [+]

EPS C242 Glaciology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2015
A review of the mechanics of glacial systems, including formation of ice masses, glacial flow mechanisms, subglacial hydrology, temperature and heat transport, global flow, and response of ice sheets and glaciers. We will use this knowledge to examine glaciers as geomorphologic agents and as participants in climate change.

Glaciology: Read More [+]

EPS C249 Solar System Astrophysics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2011, Fall 2008
The physical foundations of planetary sciences. Topics include planetary interiors and surfaces, planetary atmospheres and magnetospheres, and smaller bodies in our solar system. The physical processes at work are developed in some detail, and an evolutionary picture for our solar system, and each class of objects, is developed. Some discussion of other (potential) planetary systems is also included.

Solar System Astrophysics: Read More [+]

EPS 250 Advanced Topics in Earth and Environmental Sciences 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
Review of recent literature and discussion of ongoing research at the interface between earth science and environmental science.

Advanced Topics in Earth and Environmental Sciences: Read More [+]

EPS 251 Carbon Cycle Dynamics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
In this course, we will focus on the (unsolved) puzzle of the contemporary carbon cycle. Why is the concentration of atmospheric CO2 changing at the rate observed? What are the terrestrial and oceanic processes that add and remove carbon from the atmosphere? What are the processes responsible for long-term storage of carbon on land and in the sea? Emphasis will be placed on the observations and modeling needed to evaluate hypotheses about
carbon sources and sinks. Past records will be examined for clues about sensitivity of carbon processes to climate variations.
Carbon Cycle Dynamics: Read More [+]

EPS 254 Advanced Topics in Seismology and Geophysics 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Lectures on various topics representing current advances in seismology and geophysics, including local crustal and earthquake studies, regional tectonics, structure of the earth's mantle, and core and global dynamics.

Advanced Topics in Seismology and Geophysics: Read More [+]

EPS 255 Advanced Topics in Earth and Planetary Science 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Lectures on various topics representing current advances in all aspects of earth and planetary science.

Advanced Topics in Earth and Planetary Science: Read More [+]

EPS 256 Earthquake of the Week 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Each week, the seismicity of the previous week, in California and worldwide, is reviewed. Tectonics of the region as well as source parameters and waveforms of interest are discussed and placed in the context of ongoing research in seismology.

Earthquake of the Week: Read More [+]

EPS 260 Research in Earth Science 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Weekly presentations to introduce new graduate students and senior undergraduates to current research conducted in the Department of Earth and Planetary Science.

Research in Earth Science: Read More [+]

EPS 271 Field Geology and Digital Mapping 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2012, Spring 2011
Geological mapping, field observation, and problem solving in the Berkeley hills and environs leading to original interpretation of geological processes and history from stratigraphic, structural, and lithological investigations. Integration of the Berkeley hills geology into the tectonic and paleo-climatic record of the Coast Ranges and California as a whole through systematic field mapping in key localities and reading of original literature.
Training in digital field mapping, use of digital base maps, and use of global positioning systems.
Field Geology and Digital Mapping: Read More [+]

EPS C276 Seismic Hazard Analysis and Design Ground Motions 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Deterministic and probabilistic approaches for seismic hazard analysis. Separation of uncertainty into aleatory variability and epistemic uncertainty. Discussion of seismic source and ground motion characterization and hazard computation. Development of time histories for dynamic analyses of structures and seismic risk computation, including selection of ground motion parameters for estimating structural response, development of
fragility curves, and methods for risk calculations.
Seismic Hazard Analysis and Design Ground Motions: Read More [+]

EPS 280 Research 2 - 12 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session
Individual conferences to be arranged. Provides supervision in the preparation of an original research paper or dissertation.

Research: Read More [+]

EPS 290 Seminar 2 - 6 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Topics will be announced each semester.

Seminar: Read More [+]

EPS C292 Planetary Science Seminar 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
The departments of Astronomy and Earth and Planetary Science offer a joint research seminar in advanced topics in planetary science, featuring speakers drawn from graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, faculty, and visiting scholars. Topics will span planetary interiors; surface morphology; atmospheres; dynamics; planet formation; and astrobiology. Speakers will vary from semester to semester. Meetings will be held once a week for 1 hour
each, and the schedule of speakers will be determined on the first day of class. To pass the class, participants will be required to give a 30-minute presentation, either on their own research or on recent results from the literature.
Planetary Science Seminar: Read More [+]

EPS C295Z Energy Solutions: Carbon Capture and Sequestration 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
After a brief overview of the chemistry of carbon dioxide in the land, ocean, and atmosphere, the course will survey the capture and sequestration of CO2 from anthropogenic sources. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of materials synthesis and unit operation design, including the chemistry and engineering aspects of sequestration. The course primarily addresses scientific and engineering challenges and aims to engage
students in state-of-the-art research in global energy challenges.
Energy Solutions: Carbon Capture and Sequestration: Read More [+]

EPS 298 Directed Group Study for Graduates 1 - 9 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017

Directed Group Study for Graduates: Read More [+]

EPS C301 Communicating Ocean Science 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Fall 2014, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
For graduate students interested in improving their ability to communicate their scientific knowledge by teaching ocean science in elementary schools or science centers/aquariums. The course will combine instruction in inquiry-based teaching methods and learning pedagogy with six weeks of supervised teaching experience in a local school classroom or the Lawrence Hall of Science with a partner.
Thus, students will practice communicating scientific knowledge and receive mentoring on how to improve their presentations.
Communicating Ocean Science: Read More [+]

EPS 375 Professional Preparation: Supervised Teaching of Geology and Geophysics 1 - 6 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Discussion, curriculum, class observation, and practice teaching in geology, geophysics, and earth science.

Professional Preparation: Supervised Teaching of Geology and Geophysics: Read More [+]

Faculty and Instructors

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

Richard Allen, Professor. Seismology earthquakes earthquake hazard mitigation earth structure tomography natural hazards.
Research Profile

Jillian Banfield, Professor. Nanoscience, Bioremediation, genomics, biogeochemistry, carbon cycling, geomicrobiology, MARS, minerology.
Research Profile

Jim Bishop, Professor. Ocean carbon cycle dynamics, remote sensing, aquatic chemistry, marine biogeochemistry, land - ocean biogeochemistry, chemical oceanography, ocean sensors and autonomous observing systems, Carbon Explorer, Carbon Flux Explorer.
Research Profile

Kristie A. Boering, Professor. Physical chemistry, climate change, atmospheric chemistry, environmental chemistry, ozone, earth and planetary science, isotopic compositions of atmospheric trace gases, stratospheric ozone, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, molecular hydrogen, methane.
Research Profile

William Boos, Associate Professor.

Bruce Buffett, Professor. Dynamics and evolution of planetary interiors, including mantle convection, plate tectonics, and planetary dynamos.

Roland Burgmann, Professor. Geophysics, geology, earth and planetary science, geomechanics, tectonics, structural geology, active tectonics, fault zone processes, crustal deformation, space geodesy.
Research Profile

+ Eugene Chiang, Professor. Planetary science, theoretical astrophysics, dynamics, planet formation, circumstellar disks.
Research Profile

Ronald C. Cohen, Professor. Physical chemistry, water, climate, air pollution, atmospheric chemistry, environmental chemistry, analytical chemistry, ozone, nitrogen oxides, CO2, clouds.
Research Profile

William D. Collins, Professor in Residence. Interactions of clouds and aerosols with solar and terrestrial radiation.

Kurt Cuffey, Professor. Continuum mechanics, climate, geomorphology, glaciers, glaciology, climate history, stable isotopes, geographical thought.
Research Profile

Imke De Pater, Professor. Radio, planetary science, infrared, observations.
Research Profile

William E. Dietrich, Professor. Morphology, earth and planetary sciences, geomorphology, evolution of landscapes, geomorphic transport laws, landscape evolution modeling, high resolution laser altimetry, cosmogenic nuclide analysis.
Research Profile

Douglas S. Dreger, Professor. Wave propagation, geophysics, earth and planetary sciences, waveform data, geophysical inverse problems, seismic radiation, regional distance methodology, crustal structure affects on ground motions in the greater San Francisco Bay area.
Research Profile

Inez Fung, Professor. Global change, environmental policy, ecosystem scienes.
Research Profile

Lynn Ingram, Professor. Geophysics, geology, earth and planetary science, geography, stratigraphy with strontium isotopes, paleontological, paleoclimate, California climate change, paleosalinity, shellmounds, geochemical data, paleoclimatic and paleo-environmental reconstruction in aquatic environments using sedimentological.
Research Profile

Raymond Jeanloz, Professor. Planetary geophysics, high-pressure physics, national and international security, science-based policy.
Research Profile

+ Michael Manga, Professor. Hydrogeology, fluid mechanics, geomorphology, earth & planetary science, geological processes involving fluids, including problems in physical volcanology, geodynamics, dynamics of suspensions, flow & transport in porous materials, percolation theory.
Research Profile

Burkhard Militzer, Associate Professor. Saturn, structure and evolution of Jupiter, and extrasolar giant planets.
Research Profile

Steven R. Pride, Adjunct Professor. Crusted seismology, poroelasticity, electrical properties of rocks, physics of brittle fracture.

James W. Rector, Professor. Geophysics, Oil and Gas, Unconventional Shale Gas Reservoirs, Horizontal Drilling, Fracking, Near Surface Seismology, Tunnel Detection, Treasure Hunting, and Geophysical Archaeology, Borehole Seismology.
Research Profile

Paul Renne, Professor in Residence. Geochemistry, geochronology, paleomagnetism.
Research Profile

Mark A. Richards, Professor. Crustal deformation, earth & planetary sciences, mantle convection, large-scale mantle structure, rotational dynamics & gravity fields of terrestrial planets, history & dynamics of global plate motions, igneous processes in the mantle and deep crust.
Research Profile

Barbara A. Romanowicz, Professor. Earth & planetary science, deep earth structure & dynamics, earthquake processes & scaling laws, real time estimation of earthquake parameters, development of modern broadband seismic and geophysical observatories, planetary seismology.
Research Profile

David Romps, Assistant Professor. Climate, atmosphere, atmospheric science, weather, clouds, fluid dynamics.
Research Profile

Stephen Self, Adjunct Professor. Physical volcanology; field studies of products of large eruptions; environmental impact of volcanism.

David Shuster, Associate Professor. Noble gas geochemistry, thermochronometry, and cosmogenic nuclide observations.

Daniel Stolper, Assistant Professor. Biogeochemistry; Earth History; Geobiology; Global Climate Studies; Organic Geochemistry; Stable Isotope Geochemistry.

Nicholas Swanson-Hysell, Assistant Professor. Geology, stratigraphy, paleomagnetism, paleogeography.
Research Profile

Lecturers

Horst Rademacher, Lecturer.

Visiting Faculty

Paul C. Henshaw, Visiting Professor.

Paul Henshaw, Visiting Professor. Petroleum systems include the evolution of basins with their stratigraphic, structural and biogeochemical processes through time.

Emeritus Faculty

Walter Alvarez, Professor Emeritus.

George H. Brimhall, Professor Emeritus. Earth and planetary sciences, geology, ore-forming processes, mineral exploration science, non-renewable resource issues, photo-voltaic semi-conductor resources.
Research Profile

Mark S. T. Bukowinski, Professor Emeritus. Geophysics, earth and planetary sciences, planetary interiors, theoretical mineral physics, deep earth minerals, geochemical processes, thermal and chemical evolution.
Research Profile

Richard L. Hay, Professor Emeritus.

Lane Johnson, Professor Emeritus. Earth & planetary science, geophysical methods of studying structure & processes within the earth, seismic sources, monitoring of nuclear test ban treaties, theoretical & computational methods of treating wave propagation in realistic earth models.
Research Profile

James Kirchner, Professor Emeritus. Evolutionary ecology, biogeochemistry, earth and planetary sciences, geomorphology, watershed hydrology & geochemistry.
Research Profile

Chi-Yuen Wang, Professor Emeritus. Earth & planetary science.
Research Profile

Lionel E. Weiss, Professor Emeritus.

Hans-Rudolf Wenk, Professor Emeritus. Crystallography, earth & planetary science, structural geology & rock deformation, seismic anisotropy, investigating development of preferred orientation under expreme conditions using neutron diffraction, synchrotron x-rays, & electron microscopy.
Research Profile

Contact Information

Department of Earth and Planetary Science

307 McCone Hall

Phone: 510-642-3993

Fax: 510-643-9980

Visit Department Website

Department Chair and Director, Berkeley Seismological Lab

Dr. Richard Allen

279 McCone Hall

rallen@berkeley.edu

Undergraduate Student Services Manager

Nadine Spingola-Hutton

305 McCone Hall

Phone: 510-643-4068

http://tinyurl.com/epsadvisor

nspingola@berkeley.edu

Graduate Student Services Adviser

Margie Winn

319 McCone Hall

Phone: 510-642-5574

margie@eps.berkeley.edu

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