Civil and Environmental Engineering

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) offers a Master of Science (MS) program, a doctoral degree (PhD) program, and a Master of Engineering (MEng) program.

CEE also offers three concurrent degree programs and two certificate programs.

Master of Science (MS) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

These degrees emphasize the application of the natural sciences to the analysis and solution of engineering problems. Advanced courses in mathematics, chemistry, physics, and the life sciences are normally included in a program that incorporates the engineering systems approach for analysis of problems.

Students in these degree programs select one of the following seven concentrations:

  1. Energy, Civil Infrastructure and Climate: The objective of the Energy, Civil Infrastructure and Climate (ECIC) program is to educate a cadre of professionals to analyze complex problems — such as energy efficiency of buildings, environmentally-informed design of transportation systems, embodied energy of construction materials, and electricity from renewable sources, as well as biofuels — from engineering, environmental, economic, and management perspectives. The analysis will be used to address such overarching societal problems as mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions and adaptation of infrastructure to a changing climate. ECIC also promotes research at the intersection of energy, infrastructure and climate science.
  2. Engineering and Project Management: The Engineering and Project Management (E&PM) program educates students for leadership positions in managing infrastructure, especially construction projects, and within field, project, and corporate management. Contemporary project management practice demands that the engineering professionals not only have a mastery of engineering, including construction concepts, but also a strong background in engineering and management methods. E&PM emphasizes new technologies, developments, and techniques in both domestic and international project management and construction, as well as the interrelationships of all life-cycle components: planning, design, manufacturing, construction, operation, maintenance, and end-of-life options.
  3. Environmental Engineering: The Environmental Engineering program encompasses air quality engineering (AQE), water quality engineering (WQE), and environmental fluid mechanics and hydrology (EFMH). AQE focuses on indoor microenvironments, plume dispersion, urban and regional air pollution, as well as global changes in climate and atmospheric chemistry. There is an emphasis on environmental and public health issues related to the built environment, including energy and transportation systems. EFMH focuses on physical processes that govern air and water movement, and the associated transport of contaminants, energy, and other scalars. It takes an integrated approach to studies of the coastal ocean and estuaries, the atmospheric boundary layer, surface and subsurface water flow, land-atmosphere interactions, the management of water resource systems, climate change and variability, and contaminant transport. WQE addresses the sources, transport and treatment of chemical and microbiological contaminants that affect water. Research and coursework focus on assessment of the sources, fate and transport of contaminants and the development of natural and engineered treatment systems for chemical contaminants and human pathogens.
  4. GeoSystems (Geoengineering): GeoSystems encompasses a broad area of teaching and research in geotechnical and geological engineering, environmental geotechnics, and applied geophysics. GeoSystems' focus is on the evaluation of engineering properties of geologic materials and on providing engineering solutions for dealing with geologic environment and processes, and natural hazards. Emphasis is on the study of the mechanical behavior of soil and rock masses, laboratory and field characterization of material properties, development and application of geophysical techniques for site and subsurface characterization, development of advanced analysis methods, and evaluation of static and dynamic (seismic) performance of soil deposits, earth structures, and underground space.
  5. Structural Engineering, Mechanics, and Materials: The Structural Engineering, Mechanics, and Materials (SEMM) program consists of three emphases: (1) Structural engineering, which is concerned with the analysis and design of all types of structures, including earthquake-resistant design. (2) Structural mechanics, which employs the disciplines of applied mathematics and the engineering sciences to examine problems in the behavior of structural elements and systems, and to investigate the mathematical description of properties. (3) Structural materials engineering, which is concerned with the development of construction materials (e.g., steel, concrete, aluminum alloys, timber, plastic, and composite materials) for engineering projects, such as mechanical and thermal response, microstructure behavior, and durability.
  6. Systems (Civil Systems): The focus of the Systems Program is to understand complex large-scale systems and to develop tools for their design and operation. Such systems encompass built elements (infrastructures transportation, structures), societal systems (social networks, populations enterprises), and natural systems (land, water, air). The understanding of how such systems work requires knowledge about the constitutive laws that govern them, such as traffic flow, fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, and smart networks. It also requires an understanding of the theoretical paradigms (e.g., theories of computation and control, optimization, behavioral economics, sensor networks, statistics, and signal processing) that are used to model, control and optimize such systems.
  7. Transportation Engineering: The Transportation Engineering (TE) program is concerned with the planning, design, construction, operation, performance, evaluation, maintenance, and rehabilitation of transportation systems and facilities, such as highways, railroads, urban transit, air transportation, logistic supply systems and their terminals. There is an emphasis on the economic and public policy aspects involved in transportation systems as well. TE stresses development of analytic, problem-solving, design, and management skills suitable for public and private sector professional work.

Students in the PhD program have the option of pursuing a designated emphasis (DE) to supplement their study.

Master of Engineering (MEng)

This professional degree emphasizes solving technical, sociological, environmental, and economic problems involved in the design, construction, and operation of engineering structures, processes, and equipment. Studies include courses in the engineering sciences necessary to the engineering interpretation of the latest scientific developments. Courses in design, operation, humanities, and economics provide a basis for the analysis and solution of problems in professional engineering.

Students in this degree program select either a concentration in Systems (Civil Systems) or Transportation Engineering (see above descriptions). There are options for either full-time or part-time enrollment.

CEE’s MEng program is offered in conjunction with the Fung Institute for Engineering Leadership.

Concurrent Degrees

The concurrent degree program is a formal arrangement of two existing, but separate, master's degree programs, which result in the students earning two master’s degrees. CEE offers the following concurrent degree programs:

  1. Structural Engineering and Architecture (MArch/MS)
  2. Transportation Engineering and City and Regional Planning (MCP/MS)
  3. Any CEE graduate program and Public Policy (MPP/MS)

For further information regarding these programs, please see the department's website.

Certificates

Certificate in Engineering and Business for Sustainability: This program is open to all Berkeley graduate students who meet the EBS Certificate course requirements. The EBS certificate program allows students to tap into multidisciplinary educational resources from the College of Engineering, Haas School of Business, Energy and Resources Group, Goldman School of Public Policy, College of Natural Resources, and the School of Public Health, to learn how to have a lasting beneficial impact on the global environment. For further information regarding this program, see the department's website.

Certificate in Intelligent Transportation Systems: Jointly sponsored by CEE, the Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science and Mechanical Engineering, this program is designed to assist students in studying ITS in a systematic and focused way. Faculty advisers help students design a personalized study program to meet their goals. For more information regarding this program, see the department's website.

Designated Emphasis

Designated emphases available for CEE doctoral students include:

A designated emphasis is a specialization, such as a new method of inquiry or an important field of application, which is relevant to two or more existing doctoral degree programs. You are required to complete the academic work in the area of specialization and all the requirements of the doctoral program. You must be admitted to the DE before taking the qualifying examination.  

Visit Department Website

Admissions

Admission to the University

Minimum Requirements for Admission

The following minimum requirements apply to all graduate programs and will be verified by the Graduate Division:

  1. A bachelor’s degree or recognized equivalent from an accredited institution;
  2. A grade point average of B or better (3.0);
  3. If the applicant comes from a country or political entity (e.g., Quebec) where English is not the official language, adequate proficiency in English to do graduate work, as evidenced by a TOEFL score of at least 90 on the iBT test, 570 on the paper-and-pencil test, or an IELTS Band score of at least 7 (note that individual programs may set higher levels for any of these); and
  4. Sufficient undergraduate training to do graduate work in the given field.

Applicants Who Already Hold a Graduate Degree

The Graduate Council views academic degrees not as vocational training certificates, but as evidence of broad training in research methods, independent study, and articulation of learning. Therefore, applicants who already have academic graduate degrees should be able to pursue new subject matter at an advanced level without need to enroll in a related or similar graduate program.

Programs may consider students for an additional academic master’s or professional master’s degree only if the additional degree is in a distinctly different field.

Applicants admitted to a doctoral program that requires a master’s degree to be earned at Berkeley as a prerequisite (even though the applicant already has a master’s degree from another institution in the same or a closely allied field of study) will be permitted to undertake the second master’s degree, despite the overlap in field.

The Graduate Division will admit students for a second doctoral degree only if they meet the following guidelines:

  1. Applicants with doctoral degrees may be admitted for an additional doctoral degree only if that degree program is in a general area of knowledge distinctly different from the field in which they earned their original degree. For example, a physics PhD could be admitted to a doctoral degree program in music or history; however, a student with a doctoral degree in mathematics would not be permitted to add a PhD in statistics.
  2. Applicants who hold the PhD degree may be admitted to a professional doctorate or professional master’s degree program if there is no duplication of training involved.

Applicants may apply only to one single degree program or one concurrent degree program per admission cycle.

Required Documents for Applications

  1. Transcripts: Applicants may upload unofficial transcripts with your application for the departmental initial review. If the applicant is admitted, then official transcripts of all college-level work will be required. Official transcripts must be in sealed envelopes as issued by the school(s) attended. If you have attended Berkeley, upload your unofficial transcript with your application for the departmental initial review. If you are admitted, an official transcript with evidence of degree conferral will not be required.
  2. Letters of recommendation: Applicants may request online letters of recommendation through the online application system. Hard copies of recommendation letters must be sent directly to the program, not the Graduate Division.
  3. Evidence of English language proficiency: All applicants from countries or political entities in which the official language is not English are required to submit official evidence of English language proficiency. This applies to applicants from Bangladesh, Burma, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Latin America, the Middle East, the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia, most European countries, and Quebec (Canada). However, applicants who, at the time of application, have already completed at least one year of full-time academic course work with grades of B or better at a US university may submit an official transcript from the US university to fulfill this requirement. The following courses will not fulfill this requirement:
    • courses in English as a Second Language,
    • courses conducted in a language other than English,
    • courses that will be completed after the application is submitted, and
    • courses of a non-academic nature.

If applicants have previously been denied admission to Berkeley on the basis of their English language proficiency, they must submit new test scores that meet the current minimum from one of the standardized tests.

Where to Apply

Visit the Berkeley Graduate Division application page

Admission to the Program

In addition to the the above University requirements, CEE has minimum graduate admission requirements, listed below.  **Note: These are minimum requirements and may not be competitive.

  • Sufficient undergraduate education for graduate work in your chosen field.
  • Score of the general Graduate Record Examination (GRE) taken during the past five years. CEE does not require a GRE subject test but the General GRE Test is required. Both the "Old" GRE and the "Revised" GRE are accepted.
  • If you are pursuing a PhD, a Master’s of Science degree from an accredited university and a minimum GPA of 3.5, OR  apply to the MS degree and add the PhD during the first year of the MS program.  Direct to PhD admissions is approved on an exception basis.
  • In addition, each of the 7 CEE programs has its own admissions prerequisite requirements (see below).

Energy, Civil Infrastructure, and Climate

Prerequisites
  • 1 year of college-level calculus
  • 1 semester probability and statistics
  • 1 semester elementary linear algebra

Engineering and Project Management

Prerequisites
  • 1 year college-level calculus
  • 1 year college-level physical science (e.g., PHYSICS 7A and PHYSICS 7B)
  • 1 semester probability and statistics
  • 1 semester elementary linear algebra

Environmental Engineering

Prerequisites

Minimum requirements for entry into the Environmental Engineering program consist of:

  • Math: equivalent of 2 years, including calculus, linear algebra and differential equations
  • Science: 1 semester of physics, 2 additional semesters of science (physics, chemistry, biology)

Additionally, it is strongly recommended that applicants have:

  • Experience with Matlab or other high-level programming language
  • Physics and/or chemistry coursework beyond the minimum listed above

The Environmental Engineering program also considers the following courses to be additional prerequisites of the program. These undergraduate courses can be taken during a student’s graduate study, but if they are, the courses would not count towards the graduate degree: Elementary Fluid Mechanics (CIV ENG 100), Environmental Engineering (CIV ENG 111), Introduction to Hydrology (CIV ENG 103) and Water Chemistry (CIV ENG 115). Either Introduction to Hydrology OR Water Chemistry may be taken as part of the graduate study.

Note: applications from non-engineering students are strengthened if engineering classes, particularly those considered prerequisite to the program, have already been taken at the time of application.

GeoSystems (Geoengineering)

Prerequisites
  • Math: equivalent of 2 years, including calculus, linear algebra and differential equations
  • Science: 1 semester of physics, 1 semester of chemistry
  • Introduction to Solid Mechanics (e.g., CIV ENG C30)
  • Engineering Geology (e.g., CIV ENG 70)
  • Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering (e.g., CIV ENG 175)

Structural Engineering, Mechanics and Materials

Prerequisites

Systems (Civil Systems)

Prerequisites
  • 1.5 years college-level calculus
  • 1 year college-level physical science (e.g., PHYSICS 7A/PHYSICS 7B)
  • 1 semester probability and statistics 
  • 1 semester elementary linear algebra
  • A GPA for the junior/senior years of at least 3.25

Transportation Engineering

Prerequisites
  • 1 year college-level calculus
  • 1 year college-level physical science (e.g., PHYSICS 7A/PHYSICS 7B)
  • 1 semester probability and statistics (See Statistics/linear algebra diagnostic below.)
  • 1 semester elementary linear algebra

Transportation Engineering requires strong analytical and quantitative preparation, but an engineering degree is not necessary. Applicants must be fluent with quantitative concepts of the above courses. Deficiencies in preparation must be remedied by additional work that may not count toward the degree. Students should discuss their preparation with their faculty adviser.

Statistics/linear algebra diagnostic: Incoming Transportation Engineering students, including transfers from within Berkeley, must take a diagnostic test at the beginning of their first semester in the program to see if their linear algebra, and probability and statistics preparation is adequate, i.e., on a level similar to CIV ENG 93. Consisting of 4 or 5 problems, the diagnostic test does not emphasize memorization. Rather, it tests whether students are capable of applying linear algebra and statistical concepts to solve simple transportation problems. If students do not solve most of the problems easily, or do not take the test, they must enroll in CIV ENG 262 during their first semester. This requirement cannot be put off to a later time.

Lack of linear algebra knowledge may be remedied by working through a suitable book, such as the Schaum's Outline Series.

See Example Statistics Diagnostic for First Year TE Grad Students

Doctoral Degree Requirements

Curriculum

The doctoral program is research-based and is not solely based on the curricula below. All doctoral students are expected to fulfill a major and two minors which total a minimum of 30 units or its equivalent. Each PhD student must have a graduate adviser to provide general academic guidance, and a research adviser to supervise the student's dissertation and to assist in identifying funding paths. A minimum 3.5 GPA is required in major course work and a 3.0 in minor course work. Students must have a master's degree from an accredited institution or earn the master's and then continue on for the PhD. An approved program of study is required, a tentative program upon entrance into the PhD and a final program of study before the qualifying examination. During the first or second year, a prequalifying examination is required. The qualifying examination is taken during the third year. For detailed information, see the department website. All first time graduate student instructors (GSIs) must take during the first semester of teaching CIV ENG 301, a teaching pedagogy course, attend the first time GSI conference the week before the start of the semester, and take an online ethics course prior to the third week of the semester.

Energy, Civil Infrastructure and Climate Concentration (ECIC)

The major core courses are listed below (10 units). In addition to the major courses, an ECIC doctoral student must take at least 15 units of elective courses from each of the following core areas (maximum 6 units in any one area): Environment Science & Engineering, Civil Infrastructure, and Economics & Policy. 9 units are required in each of the two minor fields (one minor may be within the CEE).  

CIV ENG 107Climate Change Mitigation3
CIV ENG 268ECivil Systems and the Environment3
CIV ENG 292ATechnologies for Sustainable Societies1
CIV ENG 295Energy Systems and Control3

Engineering and Project Management Concentration (EPM)

18 units in EPM are required from the courses below, related to the thesis, along with two approved, complementary minor fields, one comprised of courses outside CEE. The minor typically consists of 8 units from two or three graduate or advanced undergraduate level courses.

CIV ENG 268ALean Construction Concepts and Methods3
CIV ENG 268BLean Construction and Supply Chain Management3
CIV ENG 268DLaw for Engineers3
CIV ENG 268ECivil Systems and the Environment3
CIV ENG 268HAdvanced Project Planning and Control3
CIV ENG 268IBusiness Fundamentals for Engineers3
CIV ENG 292ATechnologies for Sustainable Societies1

Environmental Engineering Concentration (ENV)

For the major field, a minimum of 12 approved units from the list below, or its equivalent. Two minors, minimum 6 units each, for a total of 12 minor units, with one minor outside of CEE and 30 units in total.

CIV ENG 200AEnvironmental Fluid Mechanics3
CIV ENG 200BNumerical Methods for Environmental Flow Modeling3
CIV ENG 200CTransport and Mixing in the Environment3
CIV ENG 202AVadose Zone Hydrology3
CIV ENG 203NSurface Water Hydrology3
CIV ENG 205BMargins of Quality for Engineered Systems3
CIV ENG 209Design for Sustainable Communities3
CIV ENG 210Control of Water-Related Pathogens3
CIV ENG 211AEnvironmental Physical-Chemical Processes3
CIV ENG 211BEnvironmental Biological Processes3
CIV ENG 213Watersheds and Water Quality3
CIV ENG 217Environmental Chemical Kinetics3
CIV ENG 218AAir Quality Engineering3
CIV ENG 218BAtmospheric Aerosols3
CIV ENG 218CAir Pollution Modeling3

GeoSystems Concentration (GEO)

A study list tailored to the student’s research interests must be approved by the faculty adviser. The major field consists of 18 units of CEE courses focusing on a GeoSystems area of research. The two minor fields of 8 units each, one of which consists of courses outside CEE, support the dissertation topic. Minimum 30 units overall. Possible courses include:

CIV ENG 270Advanced Geomechanics3
CIV ENG 271Sensors and Signal Interpretation3
CIV ENG 272Numerical Modelling in Geomechanics3
CIV ENG 273Advanced GeoEngineering Testing and Design3
CIV ENG 275Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering3
CIV ENG C276Seismic Hazard Analysis and Design Ground Motions3
CIV ENG 277Advanced Foundation Engineering3
CIV ENG 281Engineering Geology3
CIV ENG 285CSeismic Methods in Applied Geophysics3
CIV ENG 286Digital Data Processing3
CIV ENG 290JAdvanced Topics in Geotechnical Engineering3

Structural Engineering, Mechanics & Materials Concentration (SEMM)

Twenty-one (21) units of SEMM courses for the major field are required. At least 15 units must be the graduate, 200-level courses. For the two minors, one should address the student's technical base and research background and include two graduate level courses.  One minor must be in mathematics or statistics in one of these areas: traditional mathematics, modern mathematics, numerical analysis, or statistics.  A minor in computer science should cover one of the following areas: databases, computer graphics, software engineering, or artificial intelligence. See program website for minor course lists. 

Students studying Structural Materials have different minor requirements. For Materials, one minor may be in SEMM and the second outside of CEE. The materials student's program of study is subject to the approval of the Vice Chair for Academic Affairs.

CIV ENG 220NNonlinear Structural Analysis3
CIV ENG 222Finite Element Methods3
CIV ENG 225Dynamics of Structures3
CIV ENG 227Earthquake-Resistant Design3
CIV ENG 228Advanced Earthquake Analysis3
CIV ENG C231Mechanics of Solids3
CIV ENG 232Structural Mechanics3
CIV ENG 233Computational Mechanics3
CIV ENG 234Computational Inelasticity3
CIV ENG C236Micromechanics3
CIV ENG C237Computational Nano-mechanics3
CIV ENG 240Civil Engineering Materials3
CIV ENG 241Concrete Technology3
CIV ENG 244Reinforced Concrete Structures3
CIV ENG 245Behavior of Reinforced Concrete3
CIV ENG 246Prestressed Concrete Structures3
CIV ENG 247Design of Steel and Composite Structures3
CIV ENG 248Behavior and Plastic Design of Steel Structures3
CIV ENG 249Experimental Methods in Structural Engineering3

Systems Engineering Concentration (SYS)

Systems requires at least 15 units (excluding research) in the major, 3 of which may be upper division undergraduate units. For the two minor fields, only one can be in CEE. Each minor is a group of three upper division and/or graduate courses. One semester of teaching is also required. CIV ENG 301 must be taken concurrently with the first teaching rotation. A final presentation when the dissertation is filed is also required.

CIV ENG 263NScalable Spatial Analytics3
CIV ENG 264Behavioral Modeling for Engineering, Planning, and Policy Analysis3
CIV ENG 271Sensors and Signal Interpretation3
CIV ENG 290ICivil Systems: Control and Information Management3
CIV ENG 295Energy Systems and Control3
CIV ENG C291FControl and Optimization of Distributed Parameters Systems3

Transportation Engineering Concentration (TE)

A broad range of courses in addition to the core courses (below) are required. Also required are two minors, one outside the department, selected in consultation with an adviser.  A total of 30 units minimum comprise a program of study.  See department website for more details. 

CIV ENG C250NTransportation Policy and Planning3
CIV ENG 251Operation of Transportation Facilities3
CIV ENG 252Systems Analysis in Transportation3
CIV ENG 262Analysis of Transportation Data (or equivalent, such as Stat 134/135)3

Master's Degree Requirements (MS)

Curriculum

Each program has two options for the MS degree: Plan I is a thesis option, usually two years in duration, with a minimum of 20 units of course work plus research, and Plan II is a 9-month plan, including a comprehensive exam or project (paper) with at least 24 units of course work. No more than 4 units of research (CIV ENG 299) may count towards the overall units required. These courses may not count towards the total units of the degree:  CIV ENG 297, CIV ENG 298, CIV ENG 301, CIV ENG 601, CIV ENG 602. A minimum of 12 units must be taken per semester.  See the department website for detailed and current degree program information.

Energy, Civil Infrastructure & Climate Concentration (ECIC)

Thesis option: the core courses below, minimum 3 units of research (CIV ENG 299), plus at least 6 units from courses in the three core areas, Environmental Science and Engineering, Civil Infrastructure, and Economics and Policy, but no more than 3 units in any one area. A thesis signed by three committee members, one preferably outside the department, is also required.

Comprehensive Exam option: the core courses below plus 9 units from courses in the three core areas of Environmental Science and Engineering, Civil Infrastructure, and Economics and Policy, but no more than 6 units in any one area. Must include 12 graduate level units in CEE. The written comprehensive examination will take place at the end of the spring semester.

Required Courses
CIV ENG 107Climate Change Mitigation3
CIV ENG 268ECivil Systems and the Environment3
CIV ENG 292ATechnologies for Sustainable Societies1
CIV ENG 295Energy Systems and Control3

Engineering & Project Management Concentration (EPM)

Thesis option: at least 8 units from the list below, not including Civ Eng 298. Remaining courses, minimum 12 units, comes from courses approved by the faculty adviser. No more than 4 units of CE 299 may count. A thesis with a three-person committee is required with two CEE members, at least one from EPM.

Comprehensive Exam option: 12 units from the list below are required, not including Civ Eng 298, and 12 units from a course list approved by the faculty adviser. No more than 4 units of CE 299 may count. A written comprehensive examination is required in the spring.

Required Courses
CIV ENG 268ALean Construction Concepts and Methods3
CIV ENG 268BLean Construction and Supply Chain Management3
CIV ENG 268DLaw for Engineers3
CIV ENG 268ECivil Systems and the Environment3
CIV ENG 268HAdvanced Project Planning and Control3
CIV ENG 268IBusiness Fundamentals for Engineers3
CIV ENG 298Group Studies, Seminars, or Group Research1-6

Environmental Engineering Concentration (ENV)

Thesis option: minimum 20 units with 8 units of graduate level courses in the major with no more than 4 units of CIV ENG 299. Individualized study list must be approved by adviser and a thesis approved by a committee of three, including two environmental faculty and preferably one member outside CEE.

Comprehensive Exam option: minimum 24 units with 12 units of graduate level courses in the major with no more than 4 units of CIV ENG 299. Individualized study list plus three courses from following (must be from different areas) as well as a written comprehensive exam in fall or spring.

Required Courses (one from each of the areas below)
CIV ENG 200AEnvironmental Fluid Mechanics3
CIV ENG 218AAir Quality Engineering3
Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydrology (EFMH) course:
CIV ENG 202AVadose Zone Hydrology3
CIV ENG 203NSurface Water Hydrology3
Water Quality Engineering (WQE) course:
CIV ENG 211AEnvironmental Physical-Chemical Processes3
CIV ENG 211BEnvironmental Biological Processes3

GeoSystems Engineering Concentration (GEO)

Thesis option: 20 units with 9 in approved graduate courses and the remaining 11 units from a list approved by the faculty adviser. The remaining units may be CIV ENG 299 research units. Minimum 12 units per semester.

Comprehensive option: 24 units with 12 units in approved graduate courses. A written report from at least 3 units of CIV ENG 299 or a capstone project from CIV ENG 273 is required.

Approved Graduate Courses
CIV ENG 270Advanced Geomechanics3
CIV ENG 271Sensors and Signal Interpretation3
CIV ENG 272Numerical Modelling in Geomechanics3
CIV ENG 273Advanced GeoEngineering Testing and Design3
CIV ENG 275Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering3
CIV ENG C276Seismic Hazard Analysis and Design Ground Motions3
CIV ENG 277Advanced Foundation Engineering3
CIV ENG 281Engineering Geology3
CIV ENG 285CSeismic Methods in Applied Geophysics3
CIV ENG 286Digital Data Processing3
CIV ENG 290JAdvanced Topics in Geotechnical Engineering3

Structural Engineering, Mechanics & Materials Concentration (SEMM)

Thesis option: at least 8 units from the list below. Remaining courses, minimum 12 units, must be approved by the faculty adviser. No more than 4 units of CIV ENG 299 may count. A thesis with a three-person committee is required with two CEE members.

Comprehensive Project/Exam option: 14 units of graduate level SEMM courses are required. Remaining courses, a minimum of 10 units, must be approved by the faculty adviser. No more than 4 units of CIV ENG 299 may count. A written comprehensive examination, or report approved by two faculty, is required in the spring.

Approved Graduate Courses
CIV ENG 220NNonlinear Structural Analysis3
CIV ENG 222Finite Element Methods3
CIV ENG 223Earthquake Protective Systems3
CIV ENG 225Dynamics of Structures3
CIV ENG 226Stochastic Structural Dynamics3
CIV ENG 227Earthquake-Resistant Design3
CIV ENG 228Advanced Earthquake Analysis3
CIV ENG 229Structural System Reliability3
CIV ENG C231Mechanics of Solids3
CIV ENG 232Structural Mechanics3
CIV ENG 233Computational Mechanics3
CIV ENG 234Computational Inelasticity3
CIV ENG C235Introduction to Statistical Mechanics for Engineers3
CIV ENG C236Micromechanics3
CIV ENG C237Computational Nano-mechanics3
CIV ENG 240Civil Engineering Materials3
CIV ENG 241Concrete Technology3
CIV ENG 244Reinforced Concrete Structures3
CIV ENG 245Behavior of Reinforced Concrete3
CIV ENG 246Prestressed Concrete Structures3
CIV ENG 247Design of Steel and Composite Structures3
CIV ENG 248Behavior and Plastic Design of Steel Structures3
CIV ENG 249Experimental Methods in Structural Engineering3

Systems Engineering Concentration (SYS)

Thesis option: minimum 21 units comprised of four of the courses below, 3 units of research (CIV ENG 299), and electives selected in conjunction with the Systems' graduate adviser. For the thesis committee, one adviser must be from the Systems faculty, a second from the department, and a third preferably from outside the department.

Comprehensive Report option: minimum 24 units and a capstone report. Students take four of the Systems courses listed below. Additionally, the student takes four elective courses making up a coherent subject specialization chosen with approval of the systems graduate adviser. A capstone report is completed in one of the Systems core courses.

Approved Graduate Courses
CIV ENG 263NScalable Spatial Analytics3
CIV ENG 264Behavioral Modeling for Engineering, Planning, and Policy Analysis3
CIV ENG 271Sensors and Signal Interpretation3
CIV ENG 290ICivil Systems: Control and Information Management3
CIV ENG C291FControl and Optimization of Distributed Parameters Systems3
CIV ENG 295Energy Systems and Control3

Transportation Engineering Concentration (TE)

Thesis option: minimum 8 units of the required 20 must be graduate transportation courses; 2 units may be in CE 299, individual study. The remaining 12 units (made up of undergraduate and graduate courses) can include 2 more units of CE 299.

Comprehensive exam option: 12 units of the required 24 must be in graduate transportation courses; 2 units may be in CE 299, individual study. The remaining 12 units (made up of undergraduate and graduate courses) can include 2 more units of CE 299. The comprehensive exam is at the end of the semester that all requirements are completed.

To assure sufficient breadth and depth, students are required to take, in addition to the fundamentals, courses in the following areas:

  • Transportation Engineering students: take one course in each area of Policy, Modal, and Analysis
  • Transportation Systems students: take one course in each area of Modal, Analysis, and Systems
  • Joint MS/MCP (City and Regional Planning): take a total of three courses in both Modal and Analysis

No course can count in more than one area.

Required Courses
Fundamentals (all are required):
CIV ENG 251Operation of Transportation Facilities3
CIV ENG 252Systems Analysis in Transportation3
CIV ENG 262Analysis of Transportation Data3
Policy area:
CIV ENG C250NTransportation Policy and Planning3
CIV ENG 256Transportation Sustainability3
Modal area:
CIV ENG 153Transportation Facility Design3
CIV ENG 253Intelligent Transportation Systems3
CIV ENG 255Highway Traffic Operations3
CIV ENG 259Public Transportation Systems3
CIV ENG 260Air Transportation3
Analysis area:
CIV ENG 254Transportation Economics3
CIV ENG 258Logistics3
CIV ENG 261Infrastructure Systems Management3
CIV ENG 263Operations of Transportation Terminals3
CIV ENG 264Behavioral Modeling for Engineering, Planning, and Policy Analysis3
CIV ENG 290ICivil Systems: Control and Information Management3
CIV ENG C291FControl and Optimization of Distributed Parameters Systems3
Systems area:
CIV ENG 271Sensors and Signal Interpretation3
CIV ENG 290ICivil Systems: Control and Information Management3
EL ENG C291/CIV ENG C291FControl and Optimization of Distributed Parameters Systems3

Master's Degree Requirements (MEng)

Curriculum

This professional degree emphasizes solving technical, sociological, environmental, and economic problems involved in the design, construction, and operation of engineering structures, processes, and equipment. The curriculum is comprised of 12 units of technical courses and 13 units of professionally-oriented leadership courses taught in conjunction with the Fung Institute. A capstone project approved by two faculty members, one from the home program, is required at the end of the spring semester. Both concentrations offer full and part-time options. You can find information about these and other programs on the Fung Institute website which includes details on part-time/full time enrollment, curriculum models, and possible career paths of graduates.

Students must have a BS degree in an accredited engineering curricula or satisfy the equivalent of a BS degree in engineering as determined by the department. See program requirements.

Systems Engineering Concentration (Large Cyber-Physical Systems)

This program prepares a student to use computational innovations for sensor networks, cloud computing, behavioral science, mobile communications and distributed parameter control to create entrepreneurial solutions for industries such as transportation, water, or energy. 

Required Courses
Core Technical Courses (12 units) choose 4 courses:
CIV ENG 263NScalable Spatial Analytics3
CIV ENG 264Behavioral Modeling for Engineering, Planning, and Policy Analysis3
CIV ENG 271Sensors and Signal Interpretation3
CIV ENG C289Embedded System Design: Modeling, Analysis, and Synthesis4
CIV ENG 290ICivil Systems: Control and Information Management3
CIV ENG C291FControl and Optimization of Distributed Parameters Systems3
CIV ENG 295Energy Systems and Control3
Core Leadership courses:
ENGIN 271Engineering Leadership I3
ENGIN 272Engineering Leadership II3
ENGIN 296MAMaster of Engineering Capstone Project2
ENGIN 296MBMaster of Engineering Capstone Project3

Transportation Engineering Concentration (Intelligent Transportation Systems)

Expanded surveillance, communication and computing technologies are enabling unprecedented opportunities for developing and deploying innovation that benefit managers, service providers, and system users.

Required Courses
Core Technical courses (both required):
CIV ENG 251Operation of Transportation Facilities3
CIV ENG 252Systems Analysis in Transportation3
And two courses (6 units) from the following:6
CIV ENG 253Intelligent Transportation Systems3
CIV ENG 255Highway Traffic Operations3
CIV ENG 259Public Transportation Systems3
CIV ENG 260Air Transportation3
CIV ENG 264Behavioral Modeling for Engineering, Planning, and Policy Analysis3
Core Leadership courses:
ENGIN 271Engineering Leadership I3
ENGIN 272Engineering Leadership II3
ENGIN 296MAMaster of Engineering Capstone Project2
ENGIN 296MBMaster of Engineering Capstone Project3

Courses

Civil and Environmental Engineering

CIV ENG 200A Environmental Fluid Mechanics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Fluid mechanics of the natural water and air environment. Flux equation analyses; unsteady free surface flow; stratified flow; Navier-Stokes equations; boundary layers, jets and plumes; turbulence, Reynolds equations, turbulence modeling; mixing, diffusion, dispersion, and contaminant transport; geophysical flows in atmosphere and ocean; steady and unsteady flow in porous media. Application to environmentally sensitive flows in surface and groundwater
and in lower atmosphere.
Environmental Fluid Mechanics: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 200B Numerical Methods for Environmental Flow Modeling 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Introduction to numerical methods with application to environmental flows (atmospheric, surface water, and subsurface flows). Scalar advection/ diffusion equations used to study finite difference schemes, numerical errors and stability. Methods introduced for solving Navier-Stokes equations and for turbulence modeling with Reynolds-averaging and large-eddy simulation. Basic programming skills required for hands-on exercises.

Numerical Methods for Environmental Flow Modeling: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 200C Transport and Mixing in the Environment 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2014
Application of fluid mechanics to transport and mixing in the environment. Fundamentals of turbulence, turbulent diffusion, and shear dispersion in steady and oscillatory flows and the effects of stratification. Application to rivers, wetlands, lakes, estuaries, the coastal ocean, and the lower atmosphere.

Transport and Mixing in the Environment: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 202A Vadose Zone Hydrology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
Course addresses fundamental and practical issues in flow and transport phenomena in the vadose zone, which is the geologic media between the land surface and the regional water table. A theoretical framework for modeling these phenomena will be presented, followed by applications in the areas of ecology, drainage and irrigation, and contaminant transport. Hands-on applications using numerical modeling and analysis of real-life problems and
field experiments will be emphasized.
Vadose Zone Hydrology: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 203A Graduate Hydrology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014
Hydrology is presented and analyzed in the context of a continuum extending from the atmosphere to the land surface to the subsurface to free water bodies. In this class, we develop the theoretical frameworks required to address problems that both lie within individual components and span these traditionally separate environments. Starting from a development of the fundamental dynamics of fluid motion, we examine applications within the subsurface, the atmosphere and
surface water systems.
Graduate Hydrology: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 203N Surface Water Hydrology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Course addresses topics of surface water hydrology, such as processes of water in the atmosphere, over land surface, and within soil; advanced representation and models for infiltration and evapotranspiration processes; partition of water and energy budgets at the land surface; snow and snowmelt processes; applications of remote sensing; flood and drought, and issues related to advanced hydrological modeling. Students will address practical problems
and will learn how to use the current operational hydrologic forecasting model, and build hydrological models.
Surface Water Hydrology: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 205B Margins of Quality for Engineered Systems 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2009, Fall 2007, Fall 2000
Processes and procedures to define and determine the demands and capacities of the structures and hardware elements of engineered systems during their life-cycles: margins of quality. The objective of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to define and evaluate system demands, capacities, and reliabiltity targets to be used in design, requalification, construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of engineered
systems.
Margins of Quality for Engineered Systems: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 209 Design for Sustainable Communities 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
This course provides conceptual and hands-on experience in design and implementation of innovative products or processes for improving the sustainability of resource-constrained communities (mostly poor ones in the developing countries). Teams of students will take on practical projects, with guidance from subject experts.

Design for Sustainable Communities: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 210 Control of Water-Related Pathogens 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 1996
Comprehensive strategies for the assessment and control of water-related human pathogens (disease-causing microorganisms). Transmission routes and life cycles of common and emerging organisms, conventional and new detection methods (based on molecular techniques), human and animal sources, fate and transport in the environment, treatment and disinfection, appropriate technology, regulatory approaches, water reuse.

Control of Water-Related Pathogens: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 211A Environmental Physical-Chemical Processes 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Fundamental concepts of physical-chemical processes that affect water quality in natural and engineered environmental systems. Focus is on developing a qualitative understanding of mechanisms as well as quantitative tools to describe, predict, and control the behavior of physical-chemical processes. Topics include reactor hydraulics and reaction kinetics, gas transfer, adsorption, particle characteristics, flocculation, gravitational separations
, filtration, membranes, and disinfection.
Environmental Physical-Chemical Processes: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 211B Environmental Biological Processes 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Fundamental concepts of biological processes that are important in natural and engineered environmental systems, especially those affecting water quality. Incorporates basic fundamentals of microbiology into a quantifiable engineering context to describe, predict, and control behavior of environmental biological systems. Topics include the stoichiometry, energetics and kinetics of microbial reactions, suspended and biofilm processes, carbon and
nutrient cycling, and bioremediation applications.
Environmental Biological Processes: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 213 Watersheds and Water Quality 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 1996
Overview of approaches used by engineers to preserve or improve water quality at the watershed scale. Characterization and modeling of nutrients, metals, and organic contaminants in watersheds. Application of ecosystem modification and pollutant trading to enhance water quality. The course emphasizes recent case studies and interdisciplinary approaches for solving water quality problems.

Watersheds and Water Quality: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 217 Environmental Chemical Kinetics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Kinetic aspects of chemical fate and transport in aquatic systems. Quantitative descriptions of the kinetics of intermedia transport and pollutant transformation by abiotic, photochemical, and biological reactions. Techniques for the estimation of environmental reaction rates. Development of models of pollutant behavior in complex natural systems.

Environmental Chemical Kinetics: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 218A Air Quality Engineering 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Quantitative overview of the characterization and control of air pollution problems. Summary of fundamental chemical and physical processes governing pollutant behavior. Analysis of key elements of the air pollution system: sources and control techniques, atmospheric transformation, atmospheric transport, modeling, and air quality management.

Air Quality Engineering: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 218B Atmospheric Aerosols 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Fall 2008, Spring 2006
Nature, behavior and signifance of airborne particulate matter. Size distributions. Transport phenomena and deposition processes. Light scattering, visibility impairment, and climate consequences. Aerosol thermodynamics and kinetics of phase-change processes, including nucleation. Phase partitioning of semivolatile species. Coagulation. Atmospheric sources including primary and secondary particle formation. Loss mechanisms including wet and
dry deposition. Technological controls.
Atmospheric Aerosols: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 218C Air Pollution Modeling 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2010, Spring 2008, Spring 2005
Theory and practice of mathematical air quality modeling. Modeling atmospheric chemical transformation processes. Effects of uncertainty in model parameters on predictions. Review of atmospheric diffusion theory and boundary layer meteorology. Dispersion modeling. Combining chemistry and transport.

Air Pollution Modeling: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 220 Structural Analysis Theory and Applications 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
Theory and applications of modern structural analysis. Direct stiffness method. Matrix formulations. Virtual work principles. Numerical solution methods. Modeling and practical analysis of large frame structures. Elastoplastic analysis of frames. P-delta effects.

Structural Analysis Theory and Applications: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 220N Nonlinear Structural Analysis 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017
Theory, modeling, and computation for analysis of structures with material and geometric nonlinearities. Sources of nonlinearity. Solution strategies for static and dynamic loads. Modeling of inelastic materials and members. P-Δ analysis and large deformation theory. Elastic stability. Nonlinear dynamic analysis. Time integration methods. Practical applications.

Nonlinear Structural Analysis: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 221 Nonlinear Structural Analysis 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Theory, modeling, and computation for analysis of structures with material and geometric nonlinearities. Sources of nonlinearity. Solution strategies for static and dynamic loads. Modeling of inelastic materials and members. P-delta and large deformation theory. Analysis of stability. Practical applications.

Nonlinear Structural Analysis: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 222 Finite Element Methods 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Approximation theory for analysis of deformation and stress in solids. Finite element formulations for frame, plane stress/strain, axisymmetric, torsion, and three-dimensional elastic problems. The isoparametric formulation and implementation. Plate and shell elements. Finite element modeling of structural systems.

Finite Element Methods: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 223 Earthquake Protective Systems 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2011
Conceptual basis for earthquake protective systems including seismic isolation and energy absorbing techniques. Design rules for seismic isolation, energy absorbing and self-centering systems. Characteristics of isolation bearings, frictional, metallic and energy absorbing devices, code provision for earthquake protective systems. Applications to new and existing structures.

Earthquake Protective Systems: Read More [+]

CIV ENG W224A Introduction to Earthquake Engineering 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Introduction to key concepts in earthquake engineering, including engineering seismology, dynamics of single-degree-of-freedom systems, earthquake ground motions, seismic hazard assessment, performance-based earthquake engineering, geotechnical design for earthquakes, and structural design for earthquakes.

Introduction to Earthquake Engineering: Read More [+]

CIV ENG W224B Linear Analysis of Structural and Geotechnical Systems 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Methods of linear static and dynamic analysis of structural and geotechnical systems; displacement method of analysis and direct stiffness implementation; modeling of structural and geotechnical systems; 1d and 2d finite elements; equations of motions; modal analysis and direct integration; linear response evaluation methods.

Linear Analysis of Structural and Geotechnical Systems: Read More [+]

CIV ENG W224C Earthquake Geotechnical Engineering 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Earthquake surface fault rupture, earthquake ground motions; influence of soil conditions on seismic site response; seismic site response analysis; evaluation and modeling of dynamic soil properties; seismic performance of foundations and soil structure interaction; evaluation and mitigation of soil liquefaction and its consequences; seismic slope stability and displacement analysis; seismic safety of dams, levees, embankments; seismic design of earth retaining
structures.
Earthquake Geotechnical Engineering: Read More [+]

CIV ENG W224D Nonlinear Analysis of Structural and Geotechnical Systems 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Response of structural systems with nonlinear materials under large displacements; event-to-event analysis for simple material response; nonlinear solution strategies; linear stability analysis; second order analysis; section analysis for nonlinear material response (moment-curvature, interaction diagrams); truss and beam-column elements with nonlinear materials; nonlinear time history analysis of structures; case studies of nonlinear response.

Nonlinear Analysis of Structural and Geotechnical Systems: Read More [+]

CIV ENG W224E Earthquake Resistant Design 2 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Design of structures to resist earthquakes excitations. Characterization of earthquakes for design. Development of design criteria for elastic and inelastic structural response. Seismic performance of various structural systems. Prediction of nonlinear seismic behavior. Basis for code design procedures. Preliminary design of steel and reinforced concrete structures. Evaluation of earthquake vulnerability of existing structures and rehabilitation of seismic deficiencies.

Earthquake Resistant Design: Read More [+]

CIV ENG W224F Risk Analysis and Decision Making 2 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Risk analysis and seismic policy issues for pre-event planning and post-event recovery: Topics will include national and local policies governing seismic safety, risk modeling, resilience metrics and lessons from policy and planning before and after recent major events in Japan, New Zealand, Italy, China, Haiti, Chile, and others.

Risk Analysis and Decision Making: Read More [+]

CIV ENG W224G Earthquake Resistant Concrete Structures 2 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Design methods for earthquake-resistant concrete construction; materials including confined concrete; design of beams, columns, and walls; structural diaphragms; foundations; conventional construction and hybrid construction; applications for buildings and bridges.

Earthquake Resistant Concrete Structures: Read More [+]

CIV ENG W224H Earthquake-Resistant Steel Structures 2 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Design methods for earthquake-resistant steel structures; material properties of steel, welds, and bolts; design of tension members, beams, columns, and beam-columns; connections including shear and moment connections, gusset plates, and base plates; floor diaphragms; lateral force resisting systems; concentrically braced frames; moment frames; eccentrically braced frames; steel shear walls; applications to buildings and bridges

Earthquake-Resistant Steel Structures: Read More [+]

CIV ENG W224I Dynamic Response of Foundations/Soil-Structure Interaction 2 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Dynamic response of foundations, design of foundations to resist seismic loading, influence of liquefaction on deep foundations, soil-structure interaction.

Dynamic Response of Foundations/Soil-Structure Interaction: Read More [+]

CIV ENG W224J Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering 2 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Fundamentals and evolution of Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering (PBEE). Probalilistic framework of PBEE. PBEE components: ground motion intensity measures, engineering demand parameters, damage measure, and decision variable. Multidisciplinary aspects of PBEE. Case studies of applications of PBEE.

Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 225 Dynamics of Structures 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Evaluation of deformations and forces in structures, idealized as single-degree of freedom or discrete-parameter multi-degree of freedom systems, due to dynamic forces. Evaluation of earthquake-induced deformations and forces in structures by linear response history analysis; estimation of maximum response by response spectrum analysis; effects of inelastic behavior. Laboratory demonstrations.

Dynamics of Structures: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 226 Stochastic Structural Dynamics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Spring 2012
Introduction to the theory of probability and random processes. Correlation and power spectral density functions. Stochastic dynamic analysis of single- and multi-degree-of-freedom structures subjected to stationary and non-stationary random excitations. Time- and frequency-domain analyses; modal cross-correlations. Response to multi-support excitations. Level crossings, envelope process, first-excursion probability, and distributions of
peaks and extremes. Introduction to nonlinear stochastic dynamic analysis. Applications in earthquake, wind, and ocean engineering.
Stochastic Structural Dynamics: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 227 Earthquake-Resistant Design 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Design of structures to resist earthquakes and other dynamic excitations. Characterization of earthquakes for design. Development of design criteria for elastic and inelastic structural response. Seismic performance of various structural systems. Prediction of nonlinear seismic behavior. Basis for code design procedures. Preliminary design of steel and reinforced concrete structures. Evaluation of earthquake vulnerability of existing structures
and rehabilitation of seismic deficiencies.
Earthquake-Resistant Design: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 228 Advanced Earthquake Analysis 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
Advanced topics in time-domain dynamic analysis of structures. Frequency-domain analysis of dynamic response; discrete Fourier transform methods. Earthquake analysis of structures including structural-foundation-soil interaction, and of structures interacting with fluids.

Advanced Earthquake Analysis: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 229 Structural System Reliability 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2013, Spring 2011
Review of probability theory. Multivariate distribution models. Review of classical methods for characterization of systems and assessment of system reliability. Formulation of structural reliability for components and systems. Exact solutions for special cases. Computational reliability methods, including first- and second-order reliability methods (FORM and SORM), response surface, Monte Carlo simulation, and importance sampling. Bounds
on system reliability. Reliability sensitivity and importance measures. Bayesian updating and reliability analysis under statistical and model uncertainties. Introductions to reliability-based optimal design, time- and space-variant reliability analysis, and finite-element reliability methods.
Structural System Reliability: Read More [+]

CIV ENG C231 Mechanics of Solids 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Mechanical response of materials: Simple tension in elastic, plastic and viscoelastic members. Continuum mechanics: The stress and strain tensors, equilibrium, compatibility. Three-dimensional elastic, plastic and viscoelastic problems. Thermal, transformation, and dealloying stresses. Applications: Plane problems, stress concentrations at defects, metal forming problems.

Mechanics of Solids: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 232 Structural Mechanics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
The goal of this course is to study the theories of structural mechanics within the framework of nonlinear continuum mechanics of solids. Finite elasticity; invariance. Energy principles: principles of virtual and complementary virtual work; primary and mixed variational principles. Theory of stability: Euler method; stability under follower loads. Classical theories of beams: planar, torsional, and lateral buckling. Plate theories. Invariant
theories of structural mechanics: directed continua; Cosserat theories of rods.
Structural Mechanics: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 233 Computational Mechanics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2012
Computational methods for solution of problems in structural mechanics. Finite-element methods for displacement and mixed variational solutions of problems in elasticity and inelasticity. Treatment of constraints arising from near incompressibility in solids, transverse shear effects in beams, plates, and shells, and/or contact between structures. Programming methods for finite-element implementations.

Computational Mechanics: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 234 Computational Inelasticity 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Fall 2007, Fall 2005
Computational methods applied to inelastic deformations of solids; 1, 2, and 3-D large and small-deformation continuum plasticity and viscoelasticity models and their algorithmic approximations; viscoplastic regularizations and softening; thermodynamics and its relationship to algorithmic stability; return mappings, closest-point projections and operator splits; application to metals, soils, concrete, and polymers and incorporation into finite
element codes.
Computational Inelasticity: Read More [+]

CIV ENG C235 Introduction to Statistical Mechanics for Engineers 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
Introduction to statistical mechanics for engineers. Basics of ensembles, phase spaces, partitions functions, and free energies. Analysis of expectation values and fluctuations in system properties. Applications to the study of elementary gases, phonons in solids, polymer chains and networks, harmonic and quasi-harmonic crystalline solids; limitations of classical methods and quantum mechanical influences; molecular dynamics simulations for solids.

Introduction to Statistical Mechanics for Engineers: Read More [+]

CIV ENG C236 Micromechanics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Spring 2012
Basic theories, analytical techniques, and mathematical foundations of micromechanics. It includes 1. physical micromechanics, such as mathematical theory of dislocation, and cohesive fracture models; 2. micro-elasticity that includes Eshelby's eigenstrain theory, comparison variational principles, and micro-crack/micro-cavity based damage theory; 3. theoretical composite material that includes the main methodologies in evaluating overall
material properties; 4. meso-plasticity that includes meso-damage theory, and the crystal plasticity; 5. homogenization theory for materials with periodic structures.
Micromechanics: Read More [+]

CIV ENG C237 Computational Nano-mechanics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2014, Spring 2013
Basic mathematics foundations, physical models, computational formulations and algorithms that are used in nanoscale simulations and modelings. They include (1) cohesive finite element methods and discontinuous Galerkin methods; (2) meshfree methods, partition of unity methods, and the eXtended finite element methods (X-FEM); (3) quasicontinuum method; (4) molecular dynamics; (5) multiscale simulations; (6) Boltzmann method.

Computational Nano-mechanics: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 240 Civil Engineering Materials 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Microstructures of concrete, wood, and steel. Differences and similarities in response to loading and environmental effects on these materials, with emphasis on strength, elastic properties, creep, shrinkage, thermal stresses, and failure mechanisms.

Civil Engineering Materials: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 241 Concrete Technology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2013, Fall 2012
Properties of fresh and hardened concrete; strength, elastic behavior, creep, shrinkage, and durability to chemical and physical attacks. New concrete-making materials. Recent advancements in concrete technology: high-strength, high-workability, and high-performance concrete; fiber-reinforced concrete, and roller-compacted concrete.

Concrete Technology: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 244 Reinforced Concrete Structures 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Analysis and design of reinforced concrete elements and systems that are common in building and bridge structures, with an emphasis on seismic response and design; structural design methods; reinforced concrete materials; confined concrete; line elements under axial, flexural, and shear loadings; bond, anchorage, and development; seismic design principles; earthquake-resistant building frames, walls, diaphragms, and foundations; earthquake-resistant
bridges.
Reinforced Concrete Structures: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 245 Behavior of Reinforced Concrete 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2013, Spring 2011
Advanced topics in reinforced concrete construction, including inelastic flexural behavior; applications of plastic analysis to reinforced concrete frames; behavior in shear and torsion; yield-line analysis of slabs; behavior under cyclic and reversed loading; seismic rehabilitation.

Behavior of Reinforced Concrete: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 246 Prestressed Concrete Structures 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Behavior and design of statically determinate prestressed concrete structures under bending moment, shear, torsion and axial load effects. Design of continous prestressed concrete beams, frames, slabs, and shells. Time-dependent effects and deflections of prestressed concrete structures. Applications to the design and construction of bridges and buildings.

Prestressed Concrete Structures: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 247 Design of Steel and Composite Structures 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Behavior and design of steel plate girders and shear walls. Design of bracings for stability. Design of members subjected to torsion. Design of composite beams, columns, and beam-columns. Behavior and design of shear, semi-rigid and moment connections. Concepts used in design of gusset plates and base plates. Selection and design of steel and composite systems.

Design of Steel and Composite Structures: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 248 Behavior and Plastic Design of Steel Structures 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2012, Fall 2010
Topics related to inelastic behavior and plastic design of steel members and structures. Behavior of plastic hinge in members subjected to bending moment, axial force, shear, and their combinations. Collapse mechanisms of steel members and structures such as moment frames and braced systems. Inelastic cyclic behavior of steel components. Introduction to fracture and fatigue of steel components.

Behavior and Plastic Design of Steel Structures: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 249 Experimental Methods in Structural Engineering 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2013
This course covers the following topics: similitude laws, design of structural models, instrumentation and measurement techniques; use of computers to acquire data and control tests; pseudo-dynamic testing method; standard proof-testing for capacity assessment; non-destructive testing for condition assessment, and virtual experimentation. Upon completing this course, the students will be able to use experimental methods to investigate the behavior
of a structure and to evaluate its condition.
Experimental Methods in Structural Engineering: Read More [+]

CIV ENG C250N Transportation Policy and Planning 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Policy issues in urban transportation planning; measuring the performance of transportation systems; the transportation policy formulation process; transportation finance, pricing, and subsidy issues; energy and air quality in transportation; specialized transportation for elderly and disabled people; innovations in transportation policy.

Transportation Policy and Planning: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 251 Operation of Transportation Facilities 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The management of vehicle flows and fleets. Traffic stream properties and their measurement. Theories of traffic flow. Capacity analysis and queueing. Flow control and fleet scheduling.

Operation of Transportation Facilities: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 252 Systems Analysis in Transportation 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The systems approach and its application to transportation planning and engineering. Prediction of flows and level of service. Production functions and cost minimization. Utility theory and demand modeling. Transportation network analysis and equilibrium assignment. Decision analysis and evaluation of transportation projects.

Systems Analysis in Transportation: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 253 Intelligent Transportation Systems 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
The use of advanced surveillance, navigation, communication, and computer technology to monitor, analyze, and improve the performance of transportation systems. Enabling technologies. Application to monitoring, analysis, evaluation, and prediction of transportation system performance and behavior. Intervention strategies. Feasibility studies. Human factors and institutional issues. Case studies. In the laboratory, students carry out a term project
under the supervision of an ITS researcher.
Intelligent Transportation Systems: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 254 Transportation Economics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2010, Spring 2009, Spring 2008
Application of micro- and macro-economic concepts to transportation systems. Urban and interregional travel demand analysis. Freight demand. Project and program evaluation. Social welfare theory. Analysis of social cost. Investment analysis and pricing theory. Economic impact analysis. Role of economic analysis in decision making.

Transportation Economics: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 255 Highway Traffic Operations 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Operational planning and management of the highway transportation system. The highway system is presented as a set of operating environments with each having its unique analytical framework. Major topics to be covered include policy and institutional issues, selection of strategies and tactics, evaluation of objectives and measures of effectiveness.

Highway Traffic Operations: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 256 Transportation Sustainability 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This multi-disciplinary course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of sustainable transportation, with an emphasis on: 1) current trends, climate and energy science, and the policy context; 2) methodological and analysis techniques; 3) vehicle technology, fuels, and intelligent transportation systems (ITS) solutions (supply side); and 4) land use, public transportation, and demand management.

Transportation Sustainability: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 258 Logistics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2013, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
Vehicle routing. Transportation-inventory-production interrelationships, physical distribution networks, many-to-many networks (airlines, postal, etc.), the role of transshipments and terminals in logistic systems for the transportation of goods and passengers, public and private transportation system design. Relevant methodologies.

Logistics: Read More [+]

CIV ENG C258 Supply Chain and Logistics Management 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Supply chain analysis is the study of quantitative models that characterize various economic trade-offs in the supply chain. The field has made significant strides on both theoretical and practical fronts. On the theoretical front, supply chain analysis inspires new research ventures that blend operations research, game theory, and microeconomics. These ventures result in an unprecedented amalgamation of prescriptive, descriptive, and predictive
models characteristic of each subfield. On the practical front, supply chain analysis offers solid foundations for strategic positioning, policy setting, and decision making.
Supply Chain and Logistics Management: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 259 Public Transportation Systems 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Analysis of mass transit systems, their operation, and management. Technology of transit vehicles and structures. Public policy and financing.

Public Transportation Systems: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 260 Air Transportation 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Nature of civil aviation; structure of the airline industry; aircraft characteristics and performance; aircraft noise; navigation and air traffic control; airport planning and design; airline operations; aviation system planning.

Air Transportation: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 261 Infrastructure Systems Management 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2011
Integrated treatment of quantitative and analytical methods for the management of infrastructure facilities over their life. The focus of the course is on statistical modeling and numerical optimization methods and their application to managing systems of civil infrastructure, with an emphasis on transportation facilities.

Infrastructure Systems Management: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 262 Analysis of Transportation Data 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Probabilistic models in transportation. The use of field data. Data gathering techniques, sources of errors, considerations of sample size. Experiment design for demand forecasting and transportation operations analysis. Analysis techniques.

Analysis of Transportation Data: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 263 Operations of Transportation Terminals 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2008, Spring 2007, Spring 2006
Characteristics of terminals on a mode by mode basis (sea ports, railyards, airports, parking lots, etc.). Methodologies used to study terminal operations and the management of congestion. (Chronographs, input-output diagrams, pricing, simulation). Studies illustrating the use of the methodologies for different modes.

Operations of Transportation Terminals: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 263N Scalable Spatial Analytics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Introduction to modern methods of data analysis, spatial data handling and visualization technologies for engineers and data scientists. Theoretical coverage includes a selection of methods from spatial statistics, exploratory data analysis, spatial data mining, discriminative and generative approaches of machine learning. Projects and assignment tasks are targeted at real-world scalable implementation of systems and services based on data analytics
in environmental remote sensing, transportation, energy, location-based services and the domain of “smart cities” in general
Scalable Spatial Analytics: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 264 Behavioral Modeling for Engineering, Planning, and Policy Analysis 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Many aspects of engineering, planning, and policy involve a human element, be it consumers, businesses, governments, or other organizations. Effective design and management requires understanding this human response. This course focuses on behavioral theories and the use of quantitative methods to analyze human response. A mix of theory and practical tools are covered, with applications drawn from infrastructure investment and use, urban
growth and design, health, and sustainability.
Behavioral Modeling for Engineering, Planning, and Policy Analysis: Read More [+]

CIV ENG C265 Traffic Safety and Injury Control 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course applies principles of engineering, behavioral science, and vision science to preventing traffic collisions and subsequent injury. A systematic approach to traffic safety will be presented in the course, and will include (1) human behavior, vehicle design, and roadway design as interacting approaches to preventing traffic crashes and (2) vehicle and roadway designs as approaches to preventing injury once a collision has occured.
Implications of intelligent transportation system concepts for traffic safety will be discussed throughout the course.
Traffic Safety and Injury Control: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 268A Lean Construction Concepts and Methods 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Inspired by the "lean" resolution in manufacturing, production management concepts and methods are woven into a lean project delivery system. Key concepts include flow, value, variability, and waste. Key methods include proecution system design, target costing, value stream mapping, and work flow control. Student teams apply concepts and methods in field studies of real project management processes and construction operations. The course
includes a tour of the NUMMI Auto Plant in Fremont.
Lean Construction Concepts and Methods: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 268B Lean Construction and Supply Chain Management 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2014
Principles and practices of "lean" production are applied to project delivery in the AEC industry. Case studies illustrate the concepts. Project delivery is viewed holistically with a focus on work structuring and supply chain management. Topics include systems dynamics, uncertainty, and variation; materials management; logistics; e-commerce; building information modeling (BIM); and integrated product and process design. Students
use process simulation to assess performance of different system configurations and develop a case study applying concepts on a real project.
Lean Construction and Supply Chain Management: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 268D Law for Engineers 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Engineering involves many parties with diverse interests. Legal principles form the framework for their interaction. Contracts for engineering services establish both risk allocation and reciprocal liabilities. Issues of contract formation, performance, breach, and remedy are covered in detail. Standard of care and professional negligence are emphasized during the discussion of tort law. Other topics include regulation, legal relationships
, litigation, and alternative dispute resolution.
Law for Engineers: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 268E Civil Systems and the Environment 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Methods and tools for economic and environmental analysis of civil engineering systems. Focus on construction, transportation, and operation, and maintenance of the built infrastructure. Life-cycle planning, design, costing, financing, and environmental assessment. Industrial ecology, design for environment, pollution prevention, external costs. Models and software tools for life-cycle economic and environmental inventory, impact, and improvement
analysis of civil engineering systems.
Civil Systems and the Environment: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 268H Advanced Project Planning and Control 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Cost and time estimating and controlling techniques for projects. Evaluation of labor, material, equipment, and subcontract resources, scheduling techniques, earned value concepts. Measuring project percent complete. Contractual risk allocation. Project investment analysis techniques.

Advanced Project Planning and Control: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 268I Business Fundamentals for Engineers 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course will provide a broad survey of management practices critical to starting and managing a business in the engineering and construction industries. Topics that are covered include the entrepreneurial process; organizing and staffing; establishing and applying production control systems; means of protecting products and services from competitive threat; and financial management.

Business Fundamentals for Engineers: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 268K Human and Organizational Factors: Quality and Reliability of Engineered Systems 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Spring 2010, Fall 2009
This course addresses human and organizational factors in development of desirable quality and reliabiltiy in engineered systems during their life-cyles (concept development through decommissioning). Applications tested and verified proactive, reactive, and interactive approaches are developed and illustrated.

Human and Organizational Factors: Quality and Reliability of Engineered Systems: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 270 Advanced Geomechanics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Advanced treatment of topics in soil mechanics, including state of stress, consolidation and settlement analysis, shear strength of cohesionless and cohesive soils, and slope stability analysis.

Advanced Geomechanics: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 271 Sensors and Signal Interpretation 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
An introduction to the fundamentals of sensor usage and signal processing, and their application to civil systems. In particular, the course focuses on how basic classes of sensors work, and how to go about choosing the best of the new MEMS-based devices for an application. The interpretation of the data focuses on analysis of transient signals, an area typically ignored in traditional signal processing courses. Goals include development of a critical
understanding of the assumptions used in common sensing and analysis methods and their implications, strengths, and limitations.
Sensors and Signal Interpretation: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 272 Numerical Modelling in Geomechanics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Constitutive laws for geotechnical materials including inelastic hyperbolic and elasto-plastic Cam-clay; soil behavior and critical-state soil mechanics; application of the finite element method to static analysis of earth structures; the Discontinuous Deformation Analysis method.

Numerical Modelling in Geomechanics: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 273 Advanced GeoEngineering Testing and Design 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Field and laboratory testing of soils to support analysis and design of earth structures. In situ field testing, including SPT, CPT, and vane shear, undisturbed sampling of soil, and laboratory testing of soil, including advanced equipment, instrumentation, data acquisition, and measurement techniques. Consolidation and static and cyclic triaxial and simple shear testing under stress- and strain-control with pore pressure measurements. Preparation
of an engineering report.
Advanced GeoEngineering Testing and Design: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 275 Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Seismicity, influence of soil conditions on site response, seismic site response analysis, evaluation and modelling of dynamic soil properties, analysis of seismic soil-structure interaction, evaluation and mitigation of soil liquefaction and its consequences, seismic code provisions and practice, seismic earth pressures, seismic slope stability and deformation analysis, seismic safety of dams and embankments, seismic performance of pile foundations
, and additional current topics.
Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering: Read More [+]

CIV ENG C276 Seismic Hazard Analysis and Design Ground Motions 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Deterministic and probabilistic approaches for seismic hazard analysis. Separation of uncertainty into aleatory variability and epistemic uncertainty. Discussion of seismic source and ground motion characterization and hazard computation. Development of time histories for dynamic analyses of structures and seismic risk computation, including selection of ground motion parameters for estimating structural response, development of fragility
curves, and methods for risk calculations.
Seismic Hazard Analysis and Design Ground Motions: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 277 Advanced Foundation Engineering 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Advanced treatment of topics in foundation engineering, including earth pressure theories, design of earth retaining structures, bearing capacity, ground improvement for foundation support, analysis and design of shallow and deep foundations.

Advanced Foundation Engineering: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 281 Engineering Geology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Influence of geologic origin and history on the engineering characteristics of soils and rocks. Application of geology in exploration, design, and construction of engineering works.

Engineering Geology: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 285C Seismic Methods in Applied Geophysics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Spring 2006, Spring 2002
This course gives an overview of seismic methods used to image the subsurface. Acquisition, processing, and interpretation of seismic data are discussed, with application to petroleum production, environmental site characterization, earthquake engineering, and groundwater.

Seismic Methods in Applied Geophysics: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 286 Digital Data Processing 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2013, Fall 2012
Considerations for digital signal processing and data analysis. Fourier Transforms, convolution and correlation. Discrete linear systems, Z tranforms. Digital processing of seismic reflection data, deconvolution and migration. Introduction to 3-D seismic data.

Digital Data Processing: Read More [+]

CIV ENG C289 Embedded System Design: Modeling, Analysis, and Synthesis 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Fall 2013
Principles of embedded system design. Focus on design methodologies and foundations. Platform-based design and communication-based design and their relationship with design time, re-use, and performance. Models of computation and their use in design capture, manipulation, verification, and synthesis. Mapping into architecture and systems platforms. Performance estimation. Scheduling and real-time requirements. Synchronous languages and time-triggered
protocols to simplify the design process.
Embedded System Design: Modeling, Analysis, and Synthesis: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 290 Advanced Special Topics in Civil and Environmental Engineering 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
This course covers current topics of interest in civil and environmental engineering. The course content may vary from semester to semester depending upon instructor.

Advanced Special Topics in Civil and Environmental Engineering: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 290F Advanced Topics in Seismology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
Active areas of research in applied seismology. Subjects include: anisotropic and viscoelastic wave propagation, borehole seismology, crosswell seismology, including crosswell seismic tomography, vertical seismic profiling, reservoir monitoring including passive seismic methods.

Advanced Topics in Seismology: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 290I Civil Systems: Control and Information Management 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Mathematical methods and information technologies for controlling CEE systems. Emphasizes designing component organizations that interact with the world in real-time to control a large system. Methods applied to transportation operations, supply chains, and structures. Management of design complexity by hierarchical specification, systematic use of simulation and verification tools, semantics, polymorphism,information management services, and
compilation from high-level design languages.
Civil Systems: Control and Information Management: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 290J Advanced Topics in Geotechnical Engineering 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2009, Spring 2007
Advanced treatment of developing areas of geomechanics and geotechnical earthquake engineering, including the development of generalized nonlinear soil constitutive models, new developments in soil dynamics and geotechnical earthquake engineering, soil improvement, geosynthetics and earth structures, and case studies of geotechnical problems.

Advanced Topics in Geotechnical Engineering: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 290T Advanced Topics in Transportation Theory 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2008, Spring 2008, Fall 2007
Selected topics in the mathematical analysis of transportation systems. Topics will vary from year to year.

Advanced Topics in Transportation Theory: Read More [+]

CIV ENG C290U Transportation and Land Use Planning 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Examination of the interactions between transportation and land use systems; historical perspectives on transportation; characteristics of travel and demand estimation; evaluation of system performance; location theory; models of transportation and urban structure; empirical evidence of transportation-land use impacts; case study examinations.

Transportation and Land Use Planning: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 291G Advanced Estimation, Control, and Optimization of Partial Differential Equations 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This course will cover advanced methods in estimation, control, and optimization of distributed parameter systems (partial differential equations in particular). The course builds on 291 and covers discrete methods relying on finite differencing such as quadratic programming for optimal control and variational data assimilation, (ensemble, extended) Kalman filtering. The course covers distributed transfer function analysis and frequency responses of PDEs, and characteristics-based
stability analysis.
Advanced Estimation, Control, and Optimization of Partial Differential Equations: Read More [+]

CIV ENG C291F Control and Optimization of Distributed Parameters Systems 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
Distributed systems and PDE models of physical phenomena (propagation of waves, network traffic, water distribution, fluid mechanics, electromagnetism, blood vessels, beams, road pavement, structures, etc.). Fundamental solution methods for PDEs: separation of variables, self-similar solutions, characteristics, numerical methods, spectral methods. Stability analysis. Adjoint-based optimization. Lyapunov stabilization. Differential
flatness. Viability control. Hamilton-Jacobi-based control.
Control and Optimization of Distributed Parameters Systems: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 292A Technologies for Sustainable Societies 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Exploration of selected important technologies that serve major societal needs, such as shelter, water, food, energy, and transportation, and waste management. How specific technologies or technological systems do or do not contribute to a move toward sustainability. Specific topics vary from year to year according to student and faculty interests.

Technologies for Sustainable Societies: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 295 Energy Systems and Control 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Introduction to energy system management and the underlying control system tools. Applications of interest include batteries, electric vehicles, renewable energy, power systems, and smart buildings/homes. Technical tools include system modeling, state-space representations, stability, parameter identification, state observers, feedback control, and optimization

Energy Systems and Control: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 297 Field Studies in Civil and Environmental Engineering 1 - 12 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Spring 2017
Supervised experience in off-campus companies relevant to specific aspects and applications of civil and environmental engineering. Written report required at the end of the semester. Course does not satisfy unit or residence requirements for a master's or doctoral degree.

Field Studies in Civil and Environmental Engineering: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 298 Group Studies, Seminars, or Group Research 1 - 6 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Advanced studies in various subjects through special seminars on annually selected topics, informal group studies of special problems, group participation in comprehensive design problems, or group research on complete problems for analysis and experimentation.

Group Studies, Seminars, or Group Research: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 299 Individual Research 1 - 12 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Spring 2017
Research or investigation in selected advanced subjects.

Individual Research: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 301 Workshop for Future Civil and Environmental Engineering Teachers 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
The course will include supervised teaching of laboratory sections of civil engineering courses, group analysis of videotapes, reciprocal classroom visitations, and an individual project.

Workshop for Future Civil and Environmental Engineering Teachers: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 601 Individual Study for Master's Students 1 - 6 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Individual study for the comprehensive or language requirements in consultation with the major field adviser. Units may not be used to meet either unit or residence requirements.

Individual Study for Master's Students: Read More [+]

CIV ENG 602 Individual Study for Doctoral Students 1 - 6 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Individual study in consultation with the major field adviser, intended to provide an opportunity for qualified students to prepare for the various examinations required of candidates for doctoral degrees. May not be used for unit or residence requirements.

Individual Study for Doctoral Students: Read More [+]

Faculty and Instructors

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

Norman Abrahamson, Adjunct Professor. Civil and environmental engineering, earthquake ground motions, spectral attenuation relations.
Research Profile

Lisa Alvarez-Cohen, Professor. Environmental microbiology, biodegradation of environmental contaminants, microbial carbon cycling, molecular tools for microbial ecology, metagenomics, biological hazardous waste treatment, bioremediation of groundwater pollutants such as PCE, TCE, DCE, VC, TCA, DCA, MTBE, BTEX, PBDEs, NDMA, Dioxane, PFOS, PFOA, fire-fighting foams.
Research Profile

Francisco Armero, Professor. Computational mechanics, nonlinear continuum mechanics.
Research Profile

Abolhassan Astaneh-Asl, Professor. Structural engineering, bridges, buildings, eathquake engineering, collapse of structures, Steel structures, welds, bolts, protection of buildings and bridges against terrorist attacks, self anchored suspension Bay Bridge, fatigue and fracture of structures, failure analysis, gusset plates, base plates, seismic design, ethics in engineering, registered professional engineer, long span bridges, skyscrapers, World Trade Center collapse studies.
Research Profile

Roger Bales, Adjunct Professor. Hydrology, water resources, climate, earth science, environmental engineering.
Research Profile

Alexandre M. Bayen, Professor. Transportation, modelling and control of distributed parameters systems, large scale infrastructure systems, water distribution.
Research Profile

Yousef Bozorgnia, Professor In-Residence. Ground motion hazard and earthquake engineering.
Research Profile

Jonathan D. Bray, Professor. Earthquake engineering, geotechnical engineering, physical and numerical modeling, environmental geotechnics.
Research Profile

Michael J. Cassidy, Professor. Traffic and transportation operations, traffic control.
Research Profile

Fotini Katopodes Chow, Professor. Environmental fluid mechanics, large-eddy simulation, turbulence modeling, atmospheric boundary layer flow, flow over complex terrain, urban dispersion modeling, coupled land-atmosphere modeling, wind energy applications.
Research Profile

Carlos F. Daganzo, Professor. Logistics, networks, urban transportation, traffic flow.
Research Profile

John A. Dracup, Professor. Hydroclimatology, water resources systems, surface water hydrology.
Research Profile

Filip C. Filippou, Professor. Nonlinear analysis of structures, finite element analysis, seismic response simulation, seismic evaluation of structures by computer analysis.
Research Profile

Ashok Gadgil, Professor. Fuel-efficient stoves, indoor air quality, energy efficiency, developing countries, drinking water, buildings energy efficiency.
Research Profile

Steven D. Glaser, Professor. Wireless sensor networks, ecological monitoring, rock mechanics, geophysics, nano-seismology.
Research Profile

Allen Goldstein, Professor. Global change, air pollution, environmental science, biogeochemistry, atmospheric chemistry.
Research Profile

Sanjay Govindjee, Professor. Finite element analysis, Theoretical and computational solid mechanics, constitutive theory, micromechanics, polymer mechanics, elastomer modeling, thermomechanics, continuum mechanics, failure analysis.
Research Profile

Mark Hansen, Professor. Transportation economics, policy and planning, air transportation, public transportation.
Research Profile

Robert Harley, Professor. Air pollution, atmospheric chemistry, motor vehicle emissions, ozone, sustainable transportation, air quality, emission inventory, photochemical air quality modeling, gasoline, diesel.
Research Profile

Slav W. Hermanowicz, Professor. Water quality management, biofilms, membrane processes, water reuse, biological processes for water quality, physical sustainability.
Research Profile

Arpad Horvath, Professor. Life cycle assessment, LCA, sustainability, green design, transportation, water, construction, biofuels, energy, environmental management, infrastructure systems.
Research Profile

C. William Ibbs, Professor. Strategic trends, strategic planning, construction industry, project control, management systems, construction disputes, management of engineering and contruction projects, labor productivity, construction accounting and project finance.
Research Profile

Adib Kanafani, Professor. Transportation economics, air transportation, transportation planning, transportation systems analysis, aviation policy and planning, urban and regional planning.
Research Profile

Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Associate Adjunct Professor. Air pollution.
Research Profile

Shaofan Li, Professor. Structural mechanics, computational mechanics and computational physics, finite element methods and meshfree particle methods, atomistic simulation and multiscale simulations, nonlinear continuum mechanics, soft matter mechanics, wave propagations, Modeling and simulation of material failures, Nano-mechanics, bio-mechanics and bio-physics, Cellular mechanics, micromechanics & composite materials.
Research Profile

Samer M. Madanat, Professor. Transportation systems analysis, transportation infrastructure management, transportation sustainability.
Research Profile

Stephen A. Mahin, Professor. Earthquake engineering, behavior of structures.
Research Profile

Baoxia Mi, Assistant Professor. Membrane separation, transport and interfacial phenomena, physicochemical processes, drinking water purification and wastewater reuse, desalination, environmental nanotechnology, and innovative applications of membrane technology to renewable energy generation, public health protection, and_hygiene and sanitation improvement for underdeveloped and disaster-ridden regions.
Research Profile

Jack P. Moehle, Professor. Earthquake engineering, structural engineering, reinforced concrete, performance-based earthquake engineering, high-rise buildings, lifeline systems, rehabilitation (retrofitting), laboratory testing.
Research Profile

Paulo J.M. Monteiro, Professor. Concrete behavior, structural materials.
Research Profile

Khalid M. Mosalam, Professor. Earthquake engineering, concrete and masonry structures, fracture mechanics, damage mechanics.
Research Profile

Scott Moura, Assistant Professor. Optimal control, PDE control, estimation, adaptive control, dynamic system modeling, energy management, battery management systems, vehicle-to-grid, smart grid.
Research Profile

William W Nazaroff, Professor. Indoor air quality, pollutant-surface interactions, transport/mixing phenomena, aerosols, semivolatile organic compounds, bioaerosol dynamics, environmental tobacco smoke, source characterization, control techniques, exposure analysis.
Research Profile

Kara L. Nelson, Professor. Water and wastewater treatment, water reuse, detection and inactivation of pathogens in water and sludge, appropriate technologies.
Research Profile

Claudia P. Ostertag, Professor. Fiber reinforced concrete, mechanical behavior, toughening mechanisms.
Research Profile

+ Juan M. Pestana, Professor. Geotechnical engineering, environmental geotechnics, constitutive modeling of soil behavior, soil properties, numerical modeling of soil-structure interaction, geotechnical earthquake engineering.
Research Profile

Alexey Pozdnukhov, Assistant Professor. Machine learning, spatial data mining, smart cities.
Research Profile

James W. Rector, Professor. Geophysics, Oil and Gas, Unconventional Shale Gas Reservoirs, Horizontal Drilling, Fracking, Near Surface Seismology, Tunnel Detection, Treasure Hunting, and Geophysical Archaeology, Borehole Seismology.
Research Profile

Michael Riemer, Adjunct Professor. Static evaluation, dynamic evaluation of soil properties, constitutive behavior of sands, liquefaction of unusual soils.
Research Profile

Yoram N. Rubin, Professor. Risk assessment, hydrogeology, contaminant transport, geostatistics.
Research Profile

David L. Sedlak, Professor. Fate and transport of and transformation of chemicals in the aquatic environment, water reuse and water recycling, urban water infrastructure, engineered treatment wetlands.
Research Profile

+ Raymond B. Seed, Professor. Geotechnical earthquake engineering, soil/structure interaction, slope stability, performance of dams, waste fills.
Research Profile

Raja Sengupta, Professor. Transportation, wireless communications, inertial navigation for vehicle systems.
Research Profile

Susan Shaheen, Adjunct Professor. Policy analysis, behavioral research, transportation, energy/environment, mobility and sharing economy, ITS (smartphone apps, automated vehicles), alternative fuels, and mobility for special populations (accessibility).
Research Profile

Zuo-Jun Max Shen, Professor. Logistics, supply chain design and management, inventory management, auction mechanism design.
Research Profile

Nicholas Sitar, Professor. Geotechnical earthquake engineering, wireless sensors, seismic slope stability, seismic earth pressure, rock erosion, groundwater remediation.
Research Profile

Alexander Skabardonis, Professor In-Residence. Transportation, traffic engineering, traffic control systems, traffic management, the environment.
Research Profile

Kenichi Soga, Professor. Infrastructure sensing and geomechanics for energy and sustainability.
Research Profile

Mark Stacey, Professor. Environmental fluid mechanics, transport and mixing in stratified flows, dynamics of estuaries, lakes and the coastal ocean, interdisciplinary applications of environmental fluid mechanics.
Research Profile

Robert L. Taylor, Professor. Computational mechanics, mechanics of solids, finite element methods, finite element software.
Research Profile

Sally Thompson, Assistant Professor. Nonlinear dynamics, spatial ecology, Ecohydrology, surface hydrology, arid and semi-arid watersheds and ecosystems, pattern formation, plant physiology, water resource sustainability.
Research Profile

Iris D. Tommelein, Professor. Lean construction, lean production, design management, sustainability, supply-chain management, life-cycle engineering, civil infrastructure systems, adaptive project leadership, megaproject delivery, construction process engineering, integrated project delivery IPD, building information modeling BIM, virtual design and construction VDC.
Research Profile

Evan A. Variano, Associate Professor. Fluid mechanics, turbulence, wetlands, imaging, plankton, sediment transport.
Research Profile

Joan Walker, Professor. Behavioral modeling, with an expertise in discrete choice analysis and travel behavior.
Research Profile

Lecturers

Jasenka Rakas, Lecturer. Availability and reliability of communications, navigation and surveillance systems, airport systems planning and design, airport and airspace capacity and delay analysis, systems modeling and performance analysis, National Airspace System (NAS) infrastructure performance and investment analysis, air traffic flow management, cost/benefit analysis, simulation modeling and analysis, human factors and cognitive psychology.
Research Profile

Ronald Shumway, Continuing Lecturer. Legal Resolution of Construction-Related Disputes.
Research Profile

Emeritus Faculty

James M. Anderson, Professor Emeritus. Detection of faultline movements, modern surveying techniques, image processing applications, photogrammetry.
Research Profile

Robert G. Bea, Professor Emeritus. Risk management, risk assessment, reliability, human and organizational factors, quality assurance, quality control, design, construction, maintenance, operations, decommissioning, ocean engineered systems.
Research Profile

Alex Becker, Professor Emeritus. Civil and environmental engineering, geoengineering, airborne electromagnetic sensing systems, detection and classification of buried metallic objects, high frequency impedance measurements for non-invasive permittivity determination.
Research Profile

Jack G. Bouwkamp, Professor Emeritus.

+ Anil K. Chopra, Professor Emeritus. Earthquake engineering, structural dynamics.
Research Profile

Ray W. Clough, Professor Emeritus.

George A. Cooper, Professor Emeritus. Novel drilling methods, drill bit design, borehole stability, cryogenic drilling, diamond tooth wear; electro-osmosis to reduce bit balling.
Research Profile

Keith C. Crandall, Professor Emeritus. Construction engineering.
Research Profile

Armen Der Kiureghian, Professor Emeritus. Risk analysis, earthquake engineering, structural reliability, random vibrations.
Research Profile

Mostafa Foda, Professor Emeritus. Continental shelf water dynamics, seabed mechanics.
Research Profile

Richard E. Goodman, Professor Emeritus. Rock mechanics, characterization and analysis of discontinuous rocks.
Research Profile

Alexander J. Horne, Professor Emeritus. Water pollution, behavior of pollutants in an aqueous environment.
Research Profile

David Jenkins, Professor Emeritus. Biological wastewater treatment, water chemistry, wastewater chemistry.
Research Profile

James M. Kelly, Professor Emeritus. Seismic response of structures, seismic-resistant design.
Research Profile

Jacob Lubliner, Professor Emeritus. Plasticity, viscoelasticity.
Research Profile

Adolf D. May, Professor Emeritus. Operations, control systems, simulation modeling, detector systems, capacity Analysis, HOV Systems.
Research Profile

Povindar K. Mehta, Professor Emeritus. Admixtures, aggregates, cements, composite materials, concrete, industrial waste management and waste reuse.
Research Profile

James K. Mitchell, Professor Emeritus.

Carl L. Monismith, Professor Emeritus. Pavement design, pavement rehabilitation, asphalt paving technology, transportation facilities design.
Research Profile

H. Frank Morrison, Professor Emeritus. Applied geophysics, electromagnetic methods, electrical properties of rocks, soils, field surveys and interpretation.
Research Profile

Karl S. Pister, Professor Emeritus. Technology, K-12 math and science education, technological literacy, society.
Research Profile

Graham H. Powell, Professor Emeritus. Bridges, earthquake engineering, computing, buidings.
Research Profile

Jerome L. Sackman, Professor Emeritus. Viscoelasticity, mechanics, elasticity, impact and collision phenomena, materials properties, waves, dynamics.
Research Profile

Hsieh Wen Shen, Professor Emeritus. Fluvial hydraulics, environmental river mechanics, basic sediment transport.
Research Profile

Rodney J. Sobey, Professor Emeritus. Civil and environmental engineering, coastal hydrodynamics, estuaries and wetlands, wave theory, hydrodynamic circulation in the coastal-zone, transient response modes of water bodies.
Research Profile

Garrison Sposito, Professor Emertitus.

Jerome F. Thomas, Professor Emeritus. Water, applied chemistry: air, corrosion.
Research Profile

Martin Wachs, Professor Emeritus. Urban Transportation Planning , Transportation Economics and Finance, Ethics in Planning.
Research Profile

William C. Webster, Professor Emeritus. Nonlinear coupled motions of offshore structures, operations research, shallow-water wave mechanics.
Research Profile

Edward L. Wilson, Professor Emeritus. Computational mechanics, civil and environmental engineering, systems, numerical methods, analysis and design, large structural, field testing of structures.
Research Profile

Contact Information

Civil and Environmental Engineering

760 Davis Hall

Phone: 510-642-3261

Fax: 510-643-5264

aao@ce.berkeley.edu

Visit Department Website

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Academic Affairs Office

750 Davis Hall

Phone: 510-643-6640

Fax: 510-643-5264

aao@ce.berkeley.edu

Vice Chair for Academic Affairs

Mark Stacey

760 Davis Hall

stacey@ce.berkeley.edu

Graduate Adviser

Shelley Okimoto

750 Davis Hall

Phone: 510-643-8944

Fax: 510-643-5264

okimoto@ce.berkeley.edu

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