Education

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

The Graduate School of Education is committed to high-quality scholarship and professionalism in order to prepare future leaders of education practice, policy, and research. Faculty research and teaching are grounded equally in theory and practice. Our research, teaching, and practice approaches support a vision of public education that has as its goal equity and inclusion at all levels – classroom, school, community, district, state, national, and global — and that positively impacts personal growth and social transformation. Our renowned faculty engage students in theoretical and practical studies, providing opportunities to develop interdisciplinary scholarship, as well as to participate in field studies, unpack the history and philosophy of education, and explore cutting-edge research.

The Graduate School of Education offers Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Master's of Arts (MA), and credential degree programs. The PhD degree is designed for students interested in pursuing scholarly research and academic careers in education. The MA degree serves the interest of students who want to carve out a career in education, either as an education researcher or as an education practitioner. Credential programs, which all contain an MA component, are designed for students who plan to work in schools as teachers, principals, district and county administrators, and school psychologists.

The school also offers an undergraduate minor in Education, which is the second most popular minor program at Berkeley.

MA/PhD Program

Students build their knowledge about education and its policies and practices in a dynamic learning environment facilitates the development of human, organizational, and systemic capacities. The breadth of our faculty’s expertise allows students to conduct research in a number of areas, including:

Preparing for K-12

Students learn how to develop professional leadership skills, elevate their understanding of the causes of educational inequality, and contribute to the development of pedagogical, curricular, and policy innovations that provide for greater educational opportunity. We prepare students for a career in one of these fields:

  • Classroom teaching
  • School site leadership (principals and other administrators)
  • District-level/systems leadership; or
  • Other education-related fields

Learn more about the GSE's Professional Programs.

Additional Programs

Graduate Group in Science and Mathematics Education (SESAME) 
Informally known as SESAME, this interdisciplinary graduate program is for students who seek advanced expertise in a scientific discipline as well as in educational theory and research methodologies. The course of study leads to a doctoral degree in science, mathematics, or engineering education.

Intersection of Sport and Education
We investigate the ways in which institutionalized sport both conflicts with and complements the educational missions of American secondary and post-secondary schools.

School Psychology
Our School Psychology program is based on the assumption that school psychologists, through the skilled application of their knowledge, can work together with teachers and other education professionals to clarify and resolve problems regarding the educational and mental health needs of children in classrooms.

Special Education (Joint Doctoral Program with SF State University)
This program prepares leaders in research, teaching, administration, and supervision for the variety of professional needs facing children, youth, and adults with disabilities. It integrates the resources of Berkeley and SFSU, allowing students to combine theoretical interests with applied practices in a broad spectrum of specializations within Special Education.

Visit School Website

Admissions

Admission to the University

Minimum Requirements for Admission

The following minimum requirements apply to all graduate programs and will be verified by the Graduate Division:

  1. A bachelor’s degree or recognized equivalent from an accredited institution;
  2. A grade point average of B or better (3.0);
  3. If the applicant comes from a country or political entity (e.g., Quebec) where English is not the official language, adequate proficiency in English to do graduate work, as evidenced by a TOEFL score of at least 90 on the iBT test, 570 on the paper-and-pencil test, or an IELTS Band score of at least 7 on a 9-point scale (note that individual programs may set higher levels for any of these); and
  4. Sufficient undergraduate training to do graduate work in the given field.

Applicants Who Already Hold a Graduate Degree

The Graduate Council views academic degrees not as vocational training certificates, but as evidence of broad training in research methods, independent study, and articulation of learning. Therefore, applicants who already have academic graduate degrees should be able to pursue new subject matter at an advanced level without need to enroll in a related or similar graduate program.

Programs may consider students for an additional academic master’s or professional master’s degree only if the additional degree is in a distinctly different field.

Applicants admitted to a doctoral program that requires a master’s degree to be earned at Berkeley as a prerequisite (even though the applicant already has a master’s degree from another institution in the same or a closely allied field of study) will be permitted to undertake the second master’s degree, despite the overlap in field.

The Graduate Division will admit students for a second doctoral degree only if they meet the following guidelines:

  1. Applicants with doctoral degrees may be admitted for an additional doctoral degree only if that degree program is in a general area of knowledge distinctly different from the field in which they earned their original degree. For example, a physics PhD could be admitted to a doctoral degree program in music or history; however, a student with a doctoral degree in mathematics would not be permitted to add a PhD in statistics.
  2. Applicants who hold the PhD degree may be admitted to a professional doctorate or professional master’s degree program if there is no duplication of training involved.

Applicants may apply only to one single degree program or one concurrent degree program per admission cycle.

Required Documents for Applications

  1. Transcripts: Applicants may upload unofficial transcripts with your application for the departmental initial review. If the applicant is admitted, then official transcripts of all college-level work will be required. Official transcripts must be in sealed envelopes as issued by the school(s) attended. If you have attended Berkeley, upload your unofficial transcript with your application for the departmental initial review. If you are admitted, an official transcript with evidence of degree conferral will not be required.
  2. Letters of recommendation: Applicants may request online letters of recommendation through the online application system. Hard copies of recommendation letters must be sent directly to the program, not the Graduate Division.
  3. Evidence of English language proficiency: All applicants from countries or political entities in which the official language is not English are required to submit official evidence of English language proficiency. This applies to applicants from Bangladesh, Burma, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Latin America, the Middle East, the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia, most European countries, and Quebec (Canada). However, applicants who, at the time of application, have already completed at least one year of full-time academic course work with grades of B or better at a US university may submit an official transcript from the US university to fulfill this requirement. The following courses will not fulfill this requirement:
    • courses in English as a Second Language,
    • courses conducted in a language other than English,
    • courses that will be completed after the application is submitted, and
    • courses of a non-academic nature.

If applicants have previously been denied admission to Berkeley on the basis of their English language proficiency, they must submit new test scores that meet the current minimum from one of the standardized tests. Official TOEFL score reports must be sent directly from Educational Test Services (ETS). The institution code for Berkeley is 4833. Official IELTS score reports must be mailed directly to our office from British Council. TOEFL and IELTS score reports are only valid for two years.

Where to Apply

Visit the Berkeley Graduate Division application page

Doctoral Degree Requirements (PhD)

Normative Time Requirements

Normative Time Schedule

Normative time refers to the amount of time that the Graduate Division has determined it should take a student enrolled full time to complete a particular degree program. The normative time for all doctoral degree programs in the School of Education is six years, whether you enter with an MA or not. The following schedule reflects the maximum time to complete the various stages in PhD programs in order to complete your degree within the six year limit.

First Year
  • 1st Semester Coursework
  • 2nd Semester First Year Evaluation/ Outline of Program for the MA Degree
    Advance to Candidacy for the MA Degree
Second Year
  • 3rd Semester Complete MA Degree
  • 4th Semester Outline of Program for PhD
Third Year
  • 5th Semester Complete Prequalifying Review Papers
  • 6th Semester Prequalifying Review (Completion of Position Papers and a Dissertation Prospectus)
Fourth Year
  • 7th Semester Qualifying Examination
    Advance to Candidacy
Fifth Year
  • 9th Semester Dissertation Proposal Review Meeting
    Report on Progress in Candidacy
  • 10th Semester Conduct dissertation research
Sixth Year
  • 11th Semester Report on Progress in Candidacy
  • 12th Semester File Dissertation

Time to Advancement

Curriculum

Courses Required: All Concentrations
Cognition & Development (CD)
Language, Literacy, Society & Culture (LLSC)
Policy, Organization, Measurement & Evaluation (POME)
GSE Core Courses:2
One approved course from within concentration
One approved course from another concentration
Qualitative Methods Course (1) from approved list1
Quantitative Methods Course (1) from approved list1
GSE courses per approved study list for student research interests:
Three areas of specialization are required within concentration
CD—Education in Math, Science, & Technology Concentration 
SCMATHE 210Practicum in Science and Math Education Research and Development (2 semesters)1-4
SCMATHE 292Research Seminar and Colloquium (4 semesters)1
Select two Individual & Social Cognition courses from the following:8
Constructive Epistemology [3]
or EDUC 227
Course Not Available
EDUC 229A
Course Not Available [4]
Discourse and Learning in Math and Science Classrooms [3]
Conceptual Change [3]
EDUC 232
Course Not Available [4]
Special Topics Seminars: Cognition and Development [1-4] (Representations)
Special Topics Seminars: Cognition and Development [1-4] (Principles for Embodied Design )
Special Topics Seminars: Cognition and Development [1-4] (Neo-Vygotskian Perspectives on Cognitive Development )
Special Topics Seminars: Cognition and Development [1-4] (Cognitive Ergonomics in STEM Education Research)
Select one Discipline course from the following:1-4
EDUC 222A
Course Not Available [3]
Mathematical Thinking and Problem Solving [3]
Special Topics Seminars: Cognition and Development [1-4] (Scientific Thinking and Learning )
Special Topics Seminars: Cognition and Development [1-4] (Learning Chance: Computer-Supported Inquiry into Probability )
Special Topics Seminars: Cognition and Development [1-4] (Paradigmatic Didactic Mathematics Problem Situation)
Select one Curriculum & Technology Design course from the following:1-4
Instructional Design in Science and Mathematics Education [3]
Towards Ambitious Instruction in Mathematics: Research Into Practice [3]
EDUC 221B
Course Not Available [4]
Special Topics Seminars: Cognition and Development [1-4]
Technology, Curriculum, and Instruction [3]
Select one of the following:3
Qualitative Methodology [3] (GSE requirement filled)
EDUC 228B
Course Not Available
EDUC 293VVideo-Analysis Seminar1-3
or EDUC 290C Special Topics Seminars: Cognition and Development
One Qualitative Methodology course from the following:3-4
Data Analysis in Education Research [4] (GSE requirement filled)
Data Analysis in Educational Research II [4]
PSYCH 205A
Course Not Available [3]
EDUC 223BSpecial Problems in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education2-6
CD—Development in Mathematics and Science (DMS) 
EDUC 200ACulture and Cognitive Development: Theoretical Perspectives3
EDUC 205Instruction and Development3
EDUC 214Human Development and Education Seminar1
EDUC 228AQualitative Methodology3
EDUC 293A/293LData Analysis in Education Research4
EDUC 223B/290CSpecial Problems in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education2-6
Select two of the following advanced seminars:
Neo-Vygotskian approaches to cognitive development
Development of elementary mathematical understandings in children
Teaching and learning
Mathematical Thinking and Problem Solving [3]
EDUC 220C
Course Not Available [4]
Special Topics Seminars: Cognition and Development [1-4]
Conceptual Change [3]
Gender, Mathematics and Science [3]
Select one of the following advanced methods seminars:3-4
Data Analysis in Educational Research II [4]
PSYCH 205A
Course Not Available [3]
CD—Human Development and Education Concentration 
EDUC 214Human Development and Education Seminar1
EDUC 200ACulture and Cognitive Development: Theoretical Perspectives3
EDUC 200BSocial Development3
EDUC 215Socialization Processes Within the Family3
EDUC 205Instruction and Development3
CD—School Psychology Concentration 
EDUC 200ACulture and Cognitive Development: Theoretical Perspectives3
Select two of the following:8
Socialization Processes Within the Family [3]
Social Development [3]
Psychosocial Development: Identity, Culture, and Education [3]
EDUC 205Instruction and Development3
PSYCH 290BSeminars: Biological2
EDUC 274AMeasurement in Education and the Social Sciences I4
EDUC 293A/293LData Analysis in Education Research4
EDUC 275B/275LData Analysis in Educational Research II4
EDUC 298CGroup Studies, Seminars, or Group Research--DCEMST1-4
EDUC 213LLaboratory for School Psychology (Supervision, 8 semesters)1
EDUC 213ATheoretical and Scientific Bases for School Psychology, Part I: Childhood3
EDUC 213BTheoretical and Scientific Bases for School Psychology, Part II: Adolescence3
EDUC 213CSchool-Based Consultation3
EDUC 213DEducational Interventions for the School Psychologist3
EDUC 207BIndividual Appraisal of Intelligence4
EDUC 207CDiagnosis of Human Handicaps4
EDUC 263ALegal Issues in Educational Practice1-3
EDUC 413LConsultation for School Psychology Students (6 semesters)1
EDUC 413A/413BCommunity-Based Internship in School Psychology2-7
EDUC 413C/413DSchool-Based Internship in School Psychology2-8
Select one of the following:3
Theoretical Issues in the Study of Literacy [3]
Urban Education [3]
Psychosocial Development: Identity, Culture, and Education [3]
Select two of the following:6
Psychology of Reading [3]
Culture and Cognitive Development [3]
Qualitative Methodology [3]
PSYCH 234C
Course Not Available [3]
EDUC 204CResearch Seminars: Inquiry in Educational Psychology (8 semesters)3
LLCS-Language, Literacy & Culture concentration 
Select two courses from the following:6
Language Study for Educators [3]
Theoretical Issues in the Study of Literacy [3]
Language Socialization [3]
Qualitative Research in Language/Literacy Education [3]
Discourse Analysis [3]
The Ethnography of Literacy [3]
EDUC 293A/293LData Analysis in Education Research4
One course from approved LLSC list4
One course from approved lists in CD or POME4
Two courses outside GSE6
LLCS—Social & Cultural Studies concentration 
EDUC 280AProseminar: Sociocultural Critique of Education3
EDUC 280BProseminar: Sociocultural Critique of Education3
EDUC 280CResearch Apprenticeship and Qualitative Methodology Seminar I3
EDUC 280DResearch Apprenticeship and Qualitative Methodology Seminar II3
Five Grad Electives in a concentration from:5
Ethnic Studies, History, Philosophy, Anthropology, Sociology, or professional school
One GSE Core Course form CD or POME1
POME—Policy & Organizations Research 
EDUC 290ASpecial Topics Seminars: Policy, Organization, Measurement, and Evaluation1-4
Two Qualitative Methods Courses:
EDUC 271BIntroduction to Qualitative Research Methods3
EDUC 274AMeasurement in Education and the Social Sciences I4
Individualized study list approved by advisor, including:
Two Introductory courses:
EDUC 260AIssues in Educational Administration and Policy3
EDUC 283BHistorical Perspectives on American Education3
Select two Advanced courses from the following:6
Organization Theory in Education and Other Social Services [3]
EDUC 283C
Course Not Available [3]
Research Advances in Race, Diversity, and Educational Policy [3]
One Special Topics Seminar in concentration area:
EDUC 290ASpecial Topics Seminars: Policy, Organization, Measurement, and Evaluation (topics vary by semester)1-4
Select two Quantitative Methods Courses from the following:6-8
Data Analysis in Education Research
and Educational Data Analysis Laboratory
Data Analysis in Educational Research II
and Educational Data Analysis Laboratory II
Measurement in Education and the Social Sciences II [4]
Introduction to Program Evaluation [3]
Practicum in Evaluation [2-4]
Theoretical Issues in Evaluation [3]
One Research Design course4
POME—Quantitative Methods and Evaluation 
EDUC 290ASpecial Topics Seminars: Policy, Organization, Measurement, and Evaluation1-4
Two Qualitative Methods Courses:
EDUC 271BIntroduction to Qualitative Research Methods3
EDUC 274AMeasurement in Education and the Social Sciences I4
Introductory Courses:
EDUC 293A/293LData Analysis in Education Research4
EDUC 275B/275LData Analysis in Educational Research II4
EDUC 274AMeasurement in Education and the Social Sciences I4
EDUC 276AIntroduction to Program Evaluation3
Minimum four courses in statistics, measurement, and evaluation:
Individualized study list approved by advisor, including:
QME Concentration Courses:
EDUC 270BBEAR Center Seminar2,3
EDUC 274BMeasurement in Education and the Social Sciences II4
EDUC 274CResearch Seminar in Measurement4
EDUC 274DMultidimensional Measurement4
EDUC 275GHierarchical and Longitudinal Modeling3
EDUC 276CPracticum in Evaluation2-4
EDUC 276EResearch Design and Methods for Program and Policy Evaluation3
Approved Outside Concentration Courses:
PB HLTH 240ACourse Not Available4
PB HLTH 242CCourse Not Available4
STAT 200AIntroduction to Probability and Statistics at an Advanced Level4
STAT 200BIntroduction to Probability and Statistics at an Advanced Level4
STAT C239AThe Statistics of Causal Inference in the Social Science4
STAT C245CBiostatistical Methods: Computational Statistics with Applications in Biology and Medicine4

Field Papers

This is the step that calls for the student to pull together his/her graduate education course work, tutorials, and research into a coherent whole. Student is expected to relate what he/she learned to issues of concern in their field of study, and to be able to take and defend positions on these varying issues. The prequalifying review for PhD degree students consists of the approval of two or three position papers (depending on the area of study) and a dissertation prospectus.

Prospectus

The dissertation prospectus is a preliminary version of the dissertation proposal and is usually five to ten pages in length. It is a statement of preliminary work (pilot studies, prior research findings, research goals, hypotheses and methodology) as well as the theories, strategies, and analyses that will be used in the dissertation research. Check program requirements for the style in which the prospectus is to be written.

Qualifying Exam

The qualifying examination is the University’s means of evaluating and certifying the adequacy and appropriateness of your preparation for the doctorate. This examination is required for all doctoral degree programs in the Graduate School of Education. The qualifying examination is an oral examination of two or three hours duration. The examination committee is composed of four faculty members selected by the student in consultation with his or her faculty adviser. The purpose of this examination is to test eligibility of the student for admission to candidacy for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Education and to evaluate his or her ability to complete a satisfactory doctoral dissertation.

CITI Protocol Course Certifications

If conducting research using human subjects, student is required to take the online Collaborative IRB Training Initiative (CITI) course (citiprogram.org/default.asp) and submit a copy of the CITI Course Completion Record with the candidacy application. For more information, contact the Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects at: cphs.berkeley.edu.

Time in Candidacy

Dissertation Presentation/Finishing Talk

There is no formal defense of the completed dissertation. Education students are required to schedule a proposal review meeting with their dissertation committee. Students are required to develop the prospectus into a proposal for this purpose.

Required Professional Development

Presentations

Students participate in the annual GSE Research Day.

Professional Conference Presentation

Students present in AERA or other national conferences.

Teaching

The department gives students an opportunity to gain teaching experience. Our students work as graduate student instructors, readers, or tutors not only in Education but also in other departments on campus.

Doctoral Degree Requirements (EdD)

Normative Time Requirements

Total Normative Time is three years. See our website for a sample timeline.

Time to Advancement

Curriculum

Courses Required
EDUC 271BIntroduction to Qualitative Research Methods3
EDUC 273CDecision Making Based on Data Evidence3
EDUC 273DDecision Making II3
EDUC 277ASystemic Educational Reform I3
EDUC 277BSystemic Educational Reform II3
EDUC 278BExcellence and Equity 2: The Dynamics of Improving Schools and Districts3
EDUC 279BResource Management 23
EDUC 290ESpecial Topics Seminars: Special Topics Seminar1-4
EDUC 278CMilestone 2: Mapping the Professional Knowledge Base3
EDUC 278DMilestone 4:Research Design and Methodology3
EDUC 294EThesis Seminar1-4
EDUC 470CResidency: Decision Making and Resource Management3

See our website for more information.

Field Papers

This is the step that calls for the student to pull together his/her graduate education course work, tutorials, and research into a coherent whole. Student is expected to relate what he/she learned to issues of concern in their field of study, and to be able to take and defend positions on these varying issues. The prequalifying review for EdD students consists of the approval of two position papers and a dissertation prospectus.

Prospectus

The dissertation prospectus is a preliminary version of the dissertation proposal and is usually five to ten pages in length. It is a statement of preliminary work (pilot studies, prior research findings, research goals, hypotheses and methodology) as well as the theories, strategies, and analyses that will be used in the dissertation research.

Qualifying Examination

The qualifying examination is the University’s means of evaluating and certifying the adequacy and appropriateness of your preparation for the doctorate. This examination is required for all doctoral degree programs in the Graduate School of Education. The qualifying examination is an oral examination of two or three hours duration. The examination committee is composed of four faculty members selected by the student in consultation with his or her faculty adviser. The purpose of this examination is to test eligibility of the student for admission to candidacy for the degree of Doctor of Education and to evaluate his or her ability to complete a satisfactory doctoral dissertation.

CITI Protocol Course Certifications

If conducting research uses human subjects, student is required to take the online Collaborative IRB Training Initiative (CITI) course and submit a copy of the CITI Course Completion Record with the candidacy application. For more information, contact the Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects at: cphs.berkeley.edu.

Time in Candidacy

Dissertation Presentation/Finishing Talk

There is no formal defense of the completed dissertation. Education students are required to schedule a proposal review meeting with their dissertation committee. Students are required to develop the prospectus into a proposal for this purpose.

Required Professional Development

Presentations

Students participate in the annual GSE Research Day.

Professional Conference Presentation

Students present in AERA or other national conferences.

Master's Degree Requirements

Unit Requirements

Described below are the two plans of study for completing an MA. The plan selected is generally a matter of personal choice. Some programs, however, restrict their students to a designated plan.

Plan I Requirements

Twenty semester units and a thesis, including at least eight units in 200 series education courses. The remaining units are selected from 100 and 200 series courses in education or related departments, including an School of Education core course. A maximum of one third of the total units may be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Please note that EDUC 299 courses may not be used to meet the master’s unit requirement.

The MA thesis is the report of a research investigation appropriate to the student’s specialization. It should be succinct but comparable in style, organization, and depth of understanding to investigations of greater scope, such as the dissertations of doctoral candidates. It should offer a critique or synthesis that is the author’s own original contribution. The thesis is written under the supervision of a three member faculty committee appointed at the time of advancement to candidacy and approved by the head graduate adviser and the dean of the Graduate Division.

Plan II Requirements

Twenty-four semester units and a comprehensive examination, including at least 12 units in 200 series education courses. The remaining units are selected from 100 and 200 series courses in education or related departments, including a School of Education core course. A maximum of one third of the total units as shown on your transcript may be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Please note that EDUC 299 courses may not be used to meet the master’s unit requirement.

The MA Comprehensive Examination is taken after advancement to candidacy. It can take the form of a written examination or a written seminar paper, which may include an oral examination.

The written examination, taking two or three hours to complete, examines students in their area of specialization.

Examinations are evaluated by the faculty adviser and at least one other faculty member.

The written seminar study is ordinarily completed in connection with an advanced seminar in the student’s field of study. The topic is selected in consultation with both the faculty adviser and the instructor of the seminar. After completing the seminar study, the MA candidate may be required to pass an oral examination.

The faculty adviser and at least one other faculty member evaluate the seminar study.

Curriculum

Courses Required

Cognition & Development—Development in Mathematics and Science (DMS)
EDUC 200ACulture and Cognitive Development: Theoretical Perspectives3
EDUC 200BSocial Development3
EDUC 214Human Development and Education Seminar1
Individualized study list approved by adviser, including selected research methods courses.
Cognition & Development—Education in Math, Science, & Technology (EMST) 
SCMATHE 210Practicum in Science and Math Education Research and Development (2 semesters)1-4
Select one Qualitative Methodology course from the following:3
Qualitative Methodology [3] (GSE requirement filled)
EDUC 228B
Course Not Available [4]
Video-Analysis Seminar [1-3]
Special Topics Seminars: Cognition and Development [1-4]
Select one Qualitative Methodology course from the following:4
Data Analysis in Education Research [4] (GSE requirement filled)
Data Analysis in Educational Research II [4]
PSYCH 205A
Course Not Available [3]
Select one Discipline course from the following:4
EDUC 222A
Course Not Available [4]
Mathematical Thinking and Problem Solving [3]
Special Topics Seminars: Cognition and Development [1-4] (Scientific Thinking and Learning )
Special Topics Seminars: Cognition and Development [1-4] (Learning Chance: Computer-Supported Inquiry into Probability)
Special Topics Seminars: Cognition and Development [1-4] (Paradigmatic Didactic Mathematics Problem Situation)
Select One Curriculum & Technology Design course from the following:4
Instructional Design in Science and Mathematics Education [3]
Towards Ambitious Instruction in Mathematics: Research Into Practice [3]
EDUC 221B
Course Not Available [4]
Special Topics Seminars: Cognition and Development [1-4]
Technology, Curriculum, and Instruction [3]
One GSE core course from approved list4
One course from Individual & Social Perspectives approved course list4
Cognition & Development—Human Development & Education (HDE) 
One core course outside the program area (see HDE Handbook)4
Individualized study list approved by adviser, including selected research methods courses.4
Cognition & Development—MA/Credential in Science & Mathematics Education (MACSME) 
EDUC 207DAssessment and Education of Exceptional Pupils in Regular Classes2
EDUC 223BSpecial Problems in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education2-6
EDUC 224AMathematical Thinking and Problem Solving3
or EDUC 290C Special Topics Seminars: Cognition and Development
EDUC 231STEM Teaching Methods in Curriculum and Instruction4
or CHEM 303 Course Not Available
EDUC 246ATeaching Linguistic and Cultural Minority Students1-3
EDUC 283FUrban Education3
EDUC 289Comprehensive Health Education for Teachers1
EDUC 295BTechnology, Curriculum, and Instruction3
EDUC 390DSupervised Teaching in Mathematics and Science for Secondary Schools2-6
SCMATHE 210Practicum in Science and Math Education Research and Development (2 semesters)1-4
CD—Developmental Teacher Education MA/ Credential Program 
EDUC 149Foundations for Teaching Language Arts2
EDUC 158Foundations for Teaching Reading in Grades K-82-3
EDUC 160Foundations for Teaching Social Studies2
EDUC 207DAssessment and Education of Exceptional Pupils in Regular Classes2
EDUC 211ADevelopment, Learning, and Instruction in Cultural Contexts3
EDUC 211BSocial and Emotional Development3
EDUC 236AScience Education for Elementary School Children2
EDUC 236BElementary Teaching in Mathematics3
EDUC 246ATeaching Linguistic and Cultural Minority Students1-3
EDUC 283FUrban Education3
EDUC 290CSpecial Topics Seminars: Cognition and Development1-4
EDUC 298CGroup Studies, Seminars, or Group Research--DCEMST1-4
EDUC W289Comprehensive Health Education for Teachers1
EDUC 390CSupervised Teaching in Elementary Education1-8
EDUC 391ATechnology, Curriculum, and Instruction1
EDUC 392CArts Integration in K-12 Classrooms1
EDUC 393Preparation for Completion of the California TPA1
Language, Literacy, Social & Culture—Social & Cultural Studies (SCS) 
GSE-wide core courses (one from approved list)
EDUC 280A/280BProseminar: Sociocultural Critique of Education3
Individualized study list approved by adviser
Language, Literacy, Social & Culture—Cultural Studies of Sport in Education (CSSE) 
Individualized study list approved by advisor, including:
3 CSSE-specific core courses12
EDUC 257Theoretical Foundations for the Cultural Study of Sport in Education3
EDUC 294BThesis Seminar--ELLC (2 semesters)1-6
Language, Literacy, Social & Culture—Language, Literacy & Culture Concentration

See school website.

Language, Literacy, Social & Culture—Multicultural Urban Secondary English (MUSE) MA/Credential Program Concentration
EDUC 207DAssessment and Education of Exceptional Pupils in Regular Classes2
EDUC 212Adolescent Development and the Teaching of Secondary English3
EDUC 240ALanguage Study for Educators3
EDUC 244BMethods for Teaching English in the Secondary Schools4
EDUC 244CMethods for Teaching English in the Secondary Schools3
EDUC 245AApproaches in Teaching English as a Second Language3
EDUC 249CFoundations in Reading (Learning from Text) for Secondary Schools3
EDUC 283FUrban Education3
EDUC 289Comprehensive Health Education for Teachers1
EDUC 290BSpecial Topics Seminars: Education in Language, Literacy, and Culture1-4
EDUC 294BThesis Seminar--ELLC1-6
EDUC 295CIntegrating Technology into Secondary English Instruction4
EDUC 390ASupervised Teaching for Secondary English7
EDUC 390BSupervised Teaching for Secondary English8
POME—Policy and Organizations Research Concentration 
24 course units and Comprehensive Exam (written + oral): Individualized study list approved by adviser, including core courses below
EDUC 290ASpecial Topics Seminars: Policy, Organization, Measurement, and Evaluation1-4
EDUC 290ASpecial Topics Seminars: Policy, Organization, Measurement, and Evaluation1-4
EDUC 276AIntroduction to Program Evaluation3
EDUC 290ASpecial Topics Seminars: Policy, Organization, Measurement, and Evaluation1-4
Four Elective courses approved by advisor, including:12-13
Data Analysis in Education Research [4]
Issues in Educational Administration and Policy [3]
Historical Perspectives on American Education [3]
Organization Theory in Education and Other Social Services [3]
Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods [3]
EDUC 283C
Course Not Available [3]
Research Advances in Race, Diversity, and Educational Policy [3]
POME—Principal Leadership Institute (PLI) MA/Credential Concentration 
EDUC 262AUrban School Leadership and Management 13
EDUC 262HUrban School Leadership and Management 22
EDUC 271EIssues in Teaching and Learning for Educational Leaders I3
EDUC 271FIssues in Teaching and Learning for Educational Leaders II2
EDUC 262BSchool Supervision: Theory and Practice3
EDUC 262FOrganizational Policy and Teachers' Work3
EDUC 272BSchool Data Analysis for Principals1-2
EDUC 294AThesis Seminar: Policy, Organization, Measurement, and Evaluation (POME)1-4
EDUC 262CPersonnel Administration in School Systems and Social Organizations3
EDUC 263BLegal and Policy Issues in Urban Educational Leadership3
EDUC 266BSchool Site Finance and Resources 11
EDUC 272BSchool Data Analysis for Principals1-2
EDUC 460APracticum in School Site Management I3
EDUC 460BPracticum in School Site Management1-2
EDUC 460CResearch Practicum in Administration3

Courses

Education

Faculty and Instructors

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

Dor Abrahamson, Associate Professor. Mathematical cognition, design-based research, mixed-media design for mathematics learning environments, embodied interaction.
Research Profile

Patricia Baquedano-Lopez, Associate Professor. Immigration and diaspora from Latin America to the U.S., Latinos and education, race and language, language socialization processes.
Research Profile

Prudence L. Carter, Professor. Youth identity and race, class, and gender; urban poverty; social and cultural inequality; the sociology of education and mixed research methods.

Anne E. Cunningham, Professor. Education, literacy development, disciplinary knowledge of reading, student achievement, cognitive development and instruction across the life span, cognitive consequences of literacy, adults, adolescents.
Research Profile

Michael Dumas, Assistant Professor. Urban education, urban political economy, cultural politics of education, Black cultural politics, critical social and cultural theory, Black education, critical childhood studies, photoethnographic methodology and practice.
Research Profile

Bruce Fuller, Professor. Policy analysis and evaluation, reform issues, charter schools, child care, early childhood development, economy and education.
Research Profile

Lisa Garcia Bedolla, Professor. Politics, immigration, race, gender, inequality.
Research Profile

Bernard R. Gifford, Professor. Educational equity, education, assessment and educational measurement, computer-mediated learning, curriculum development, development of professional learning communities, experimental design in education.
Research Profile

Kris Gutierrez, Professor. Learning sciences, literacy and new media; design-based and qualitative research methods.
Research Profile

Susan Holloway, Professor. Japan, development, education, cognition, child development, early childhood education, families, young children in diverse societies, thoughts, values and expectations of parents, socialization and education of young children.
Research Profile

+ Glynda Hull, Professor. Language, culture, society, education, literacy, writing in and out of schools, multi-media technology, new literacies, adult learning, work, and community, school, university collaborations.
Research Profile

Zeus Leonardo, Professor. Race inequality, critical social theory, sociology of education.
Research Profile

Marcia C. Linn, Professor. Technology, learning, mathematics, science, education, science teaching, gender equity, design of learning environments.
Research Profile

Jabari Mahiri, Professor. Language, culture, society, literacy, literacy learning of urban youth, African American students in schools, writing development, effective teaching, learning strategies in multicultural urban schools and communities.
Research Profile

Heinrich Mintrop, Associate Professor. Educational equity, policy analysis and evaluation, urban leadership, urban schooling, achievement issues, international education, leadership, principalship, school culture.
Research Profile

Erin Murphy-Graham, Associate Adjunct Professor. Educational equity, cultural studies, gender equity, diversity, international education, alternative schooling, democratic education, ethnic issues.
Research Profile

Larry Nucci, Adjunct Professor. Moral development, social development, moral education, domain theory, personal domain.
Research Profile

Zach Pardos, Assistant Professor. Education Data Science, Learning Analytics, Big Data in Education, data mining, Data Privacy and Ethics, Computational Psychometrics, Digital Learning Environments, Cognitive Modeling, Bayesian Knowledge Tracing, Formative Assessment, Learning Maps, machine learning.
Research Profile

P. David Pearson, Professor. Language, culture, society, education, literacy, early literacy education, reading assessment.
Research Profile

Daniel Perlstein, Associate Professor. Schooling, diversity, democracy, urban education, teachers unions, inequality education.
Research Profile

Sophia Rabe-Hesketh, Professor. Biostatistics, educational statistics, latent variable models, multilevel models, generalized linear latent and mixed models, hierarchical models, longitudinal data, Item response models, structural equation models.
Research Profile

Michael Ranney, Professor. Problem solving, knowledge representation and reorganization, explanatory coherence and inference, conceptual change, societal implications, science instruction, global climate change psychology, numeracy in journalism, naive/informal physics, computational models of cognition, perceptual-cognitive interactions, intelligent tutoring systems, understandings of biological evolution, Reasoning, qualitative and quantitative thinking.
Research Profile

Geoffrey B. Saxe, Professor. U.S., developmental psychology, interplay between culture and cognitive development, mathematical cognition in children, Papua New Guinea, urban and rural areas of Northeastern Brazil, elementary school classrooms, cognitive development, mathematics education.
Research Profile

Alan H. Schoenfeld, Professor. Thinking, teaching, learning, productive learning environments, mathematics education, modeling the process of teaching, understanding how and why teachers do what they do.
Research Profile

Janelle Scott, Associate Professor. Educational policy, charter schools, politics of education, race and education, school choice, desegregation, philanthropy and education, advocacy.
Research Profile

Harley Shaiken, Professor. Mexico, labor, globalization, education, United States, geography, work organization, issues of economic and political integration in the Americas, information technology, skill.
Research Profile

Laura Sterponi, Associate Professor. Language and literacy socialization, moral development, communication of and with children with autism.
Research Profile

Tina Trujillo, Associate Professor. Educational equity, urban schooling, educational leadership, high stakes accountability, school improvement, educational policy, educational management and administration.
Research Profile

Elliot Turiel, Professor. Development, education, cognition, human development, development of social judgments and action, the development of moral reasoning, children_ _s conceptions of authority, rules in school settings, culture and social development.
Research Profile

Derek Van Rheenen, Associate Adjunct Professor.

Michelle H. Wilkerson, Assistant Professor. Science and mathematics learning environments; technologies for thinking and learning.

Mark Wilson, Professor. Measurement, psychometrics, assessment, development of assessment resources, assessment systems.
Research Profile

Frank Worrell, Professor. Development, education, cognition, academic talent development, adolescence, African American, at-risk youth, English-speaking Caribbean, ethnic identity, gifted, psychosocial development, racial identity, school psychology, teacher effectiveness, Trinidad and Tobago.
Research Profile

Lecturers

Cheryl Anne Lana Agrawal, Lecturer.

Elizabeth C. Baham, Lecturer.

Amy E. Bloodgood, Lecturer.

Alisa B. Crovetti, Lecturer.

Michael Davis, Lecturer.

Dora J. Dome, Lecturer.

Kathleen M. Donohue, Lecturer.

Rena Dorph, Lecturer.

Karen Draney, Lecturer.

Charles Flores, Lecturer.

David Futterman, Lecturer.

Laura Galicia, Lecturer.

Lloyd Goldwasser, Lecturer.

Thomas R. Green, Lecturer.

Lisa M. Griffin, Lecturer.

Judith Guilkey-Amado, Lecturer.

Edward Ham, Lecturer.

Annie Johnston, Lecturer.

Frances Kendall, Lecturer.

Richard Mccallum, Lecturer.

Xenia Meyer, Lecturer.

Anthony A. Mirabelli, Lecturer.

Sonal Patel, Lecturer.

Kate Perry, Lecturer.

Rachel Reinhard, Lecturer.

Lihi L. Rosenthal, Lecturer.

Soraya A. Sablo-Sutton, Lecturer.

Murray A. Sperber, Lecturer.

Katherine S. Suyeyasu, Lecturer.

Yukiko Watanabe, Lecturer.

Matt Wayne, Lecturer.

Nives B. Wetzel De Cediel, Lecturer.

Gary Yabrove, Lecturer.

Visiting Faculty

Zehlia Babaci Wilhite, Visiting Assistant Professor.

Jacoba A. Bulterman-Bos, Visiting Professor.

Emeritus Faculty

Paul R. Ammon, Professor Emeritus.

Guy (Karen Nelson) Benveniste, Professor Emeritus.

Joseph Campione, Professor Emeritus. Development, education, cognition, learning and transfer processes, atypical development, new approaches in instruction and assessment, and the integration of institutional procedures, instructional practices.
Research Profile

Geraldine Joncich Clifford, Professor Emeritus.

Patricia K. Cross, Professor Emeritus. Learning, higher education, assessment, community colleges.
Research Profile

Andrea Disessa, Professor Emeritus. Education, cognition, conceptual development, science education, design of technology for education, computational literacies.
Research Profile

Lily Wong Fillmore, Professor Emeritus. Language, culture, society, education, literacy, education of language minority students in American schools, second language learning and teaching, the education of language minority students, the socialization of children for learning across culture.
Research Profile

Sarah W. Freedman, Professor Emeritus. Writing, educational linguistics, international civics education, multiculturalism, human rights, English teaching, teacher education, teacher action research.
Research Profile

David Pierpont Gardner, Professor Emeritus.

James W. Guthrie, Professor Emeritus.

Donald Hansen, Professor Emeritus.

Curtis Hardyck, Professor Emeritus.

Paul Holland, Professor Emeritus.

John G. Hurst, Professor Emeritus.

James L. Jarrett, Professor Emeritus.

Jean Lave, Professor Emeritus. Ethnography, social theory, education, social practice, anthropologu, re-conceiving of learning, learners, and educational institutions.
Research Profile

Judith Warren Little, Professor Emeritus. Organizational contexts of teachers' work, teacher policy;teacher workforce issues, professional education.
Research Profile

+ Lawrence F. Lowery, Professor Emeritus.

Kathleen Metz, Professor Emeritus. Development, education, cognition, young children_ _s scientific reasoning, children_ _s intuitions about rudimentary statistical constructs, data-based inquiry, limitations of young children_ _s scientific inquiry.
Research Profile

Rodney J. Reed, Professor Emeritus.

William Rohwer, Professor Emeritus.

Robert B. Ruddell, Professor Emeritus.

Lloyd F. Scott, Professor Emeritus.

Carol B. Stack, Professor Emeritus. Language, culture, migration, society, education, literacy, urban youth, rural and urban families, service sector employment, facets of the social context of education, women_ _s studies.
Research Profile

David S. Stern, Professor Emeritus. Education, school reform, high schools, career academies, the relationship between education and work, school-based enterprise, resource allocation in schools.
Research Profile

Lawrence Stewart, Professor Emeritus.

+ James C. Stone, Professor Emeritus.

Paul T. Takagi, Professor Emeritus.

Alan B. Wilson, Professor Emeritus.

Contact Information

Graduate School of Education

1501 Tolman Hall

Phone: 510-642-5345

Visit School Website

Dean

Prudence L. Carter, PhD

1501 Tolman Hall

Phone: 510-643-6644

gsedean@berkeley.edu

Head Graduate Adviser

Anne Cunningham, PhD

4307 Tolman Hall

Phone: 510-642-4201

acunning@berkeley.edu

Director of Student Services

Ilka Williams

1603 Tolman

Phone: 510-642-0820

ilkaw@berkeley.edu

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