Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

The Department of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning offers a professional master's degree, the Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA), and a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning.

Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA)

The Master of Landscape Architecture degree is a professional degree accredited by the American Society of Landscape Architects. The program offers advanced work in landscape architecture from the scale of detailed form to that of the regional landscape. A core of courses in the department is required of all students, emphasizing the relationship between the design and the environmental planning aspects of the field. This core group forms the foundation for extended coursework in landscape design, urban and community design, and environmental planning.

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning

The doctor of philosophy program is offered for students who wish to pursue advanced scholarly and research work. The program emphasizes the development of theories and methods that underlie the fields of environmental planning or urban design, and the processes of planning and design as they relate to the solution of problems in the natural and urban environment. The PhD degree in Environmental Planning is appropriate for those seeking careers in research and teaching in environmental planning or urban design or in specialized roles in government or professional consultation.

See Department Website

Admissions

Admission to the University

Minimum Requirements for Admission

The following minimum requirements apply to all graduate programs and will be verified by the Graduate Division:

  1. A bachelor’s degree or recognized equivalent from an accredited institution;
  2. A grade point average of B or better (3.0);
  3. If the applicant comes from a country or political entity (e.g., Quebec) where English is not the official language, adequate proficiency in English to do graduate work, as evidenced by a TOEFL score of at least 90 on the iBT test, 570 on the paper-and-pencil test, or an IELTS Band score of at least 7 (note that individual programs may set higher levels for any of these); and
  4. Sufficient undergraduate training to do graduate work in the given field.

Applicants Who Already Hold a Graduate Degree

The Graduate Council views academic degrees not as vocational training certificates, but as evidence of broad training in research methods, independent study, and articulation of learning. Therefore, applicants who already have academic graduate degrees should be able to pursue new subject matter at an advanced level without need to enroll in a related or similar graduate program.

Programs may consider students for an additional academic master’s or professional master’s degree only if the additional degree is in a distinctly different field.

Applicants admitted to a doctoral program that requires a master’s degree to be earned at Berkeley as a prerequisite (even though the applicant already has a master’s degree from another institution in the same or a closely allied field of study) will be permitted to undertake the second master’s degree, despite the overlap in field.

The Graduate Division will admit students for a second doctoral degree only if they meet the following guidelines:

  1. Applicants with doctoral degrees may be admitted for an additional doctoral degree only if that degree program is in a general area of knowledge distinctly different from the field in which they earned their original degree. For example, a physics PhD could be admitted to a doctoral degree program in music or history; however, a student with a doctoral degree in mathematics would not be permitted to add a PhD in statistics.
  2. Applicants who hold the PhD degree may be admitted to a professional doctorate or professional master’s degree program if there is no duplication of training involved.

Applicants may apply only to one single degree program or one concurrent degree program per admission cycle.

Required Documents for Applications

  1. Transcripts: Applicants may upload unofficial transcripts with your application for the departmental initial review. If the applicant is admitted, then official transcripts of all college-level work will be required. Official transcripts must be in sealed envelopes as issued by the school(s) attended. If you have attended Berkeley, upload your unofficial transcript with your application for the departmental initial review. If you are admitted, an official transcript with evidence of degree conferral will not be required.
  2. Letters of recommendation: Applicants may request online letters of recommendation through the online application system. Hard copies of recommendation letters must be sent directly to the program, not the Graduate Division.
  3. Evidence of English language proficiency: All applicants from countries or political entities in which the official language is not English are required to submit official evidence of English language proficiency. This applies to applicants from Bangladesh, Burma, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Latin America, the Middle East, the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia, most European countries, and Quebec (Canada). However, applicants who, at the time of application, have already completed at least one year of full-time academic course work with grades of B or better at a US university may submit an official transcript from the US university to fulfill this requirement. The following courses will not fulfill this requirement:
    • courses in English as a Second Language,
    • courses conducted in a language other than English,
    • courses that will be completed after the application is submitted, and
    • courses of a non-academic nature.

If applicants have previously been denied admission to Berkeley on the basis of their English language proficiency, they must submit new test scores that meet the current minimum from one of the standardized tests.

Where to Apply

Visit the Berkeley Graduate Division application page

Admission to the MLA Program

A bachelor's degree is the minimum requirement for admission to the graduate program. It is recommended that applicants have completed a minimum of one basic course each in the life, earth and social sciences. In addition, graphics and freehand drawing are strongly recommended for applicants with non-design backgrounds.

MLA 3D: First Professional Degree

The three-year MLA degree is the first professional degree accredited by the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA). This degree is for students with non-design backgrounds.

MLA 2D: Second Professional Degree

The two-year MLA degree is the second professional degree, also accredited by ASLA, for those students with first degrees in landscape architecture, architecture, or environmental design.

MLA EP: Environmental Planning

The department also offers a two-year environmental planning program leading to the MLA degree for students with a strong background in the environmental sciences or management.

Admission to the PhD Program

Admission is granted to a small number of individuals each year. Most applicants will have completed a master's degree before entering. Students with only a bachelor's degree should apply to the MLA program first or otherwise complete an appropriate master's degree before applying.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

The PhD in Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning is offered for students who want to pursue scholarly and research work beyond the master's level. Emphasis in this program is placed on the development of theories and methods that underlie the field of landscape architecture and environmental planning, and the processes of planning and design as they relate to the solution of problems in the natural and urban environment. The PhD degree is appropriate for students seeking careers in research and teaching in landscape architecture and environmental planning, or in specialized roles in government or professional consultation.

Degree Requirements

Students formulate coursework plans (to include the PhD seminar) to develop an individual specialization within the field, which must be approved by the students' program advisers. PhD requirements are as follows: 32 units of upper division and graduate coursework, a two-year academic residency, reading knowledge of a departmentally approved foreign language, successful completion of a qualifying examination, and a dissertation.

Progress toward the degree is evaluated at least annually by the PhD committee. By no later than the end of the third semester, students will be evaluated as to their suitability for completing the PhD degree. Any student who, in the opinion of the faculty, seems unlikely to be able to complete all degree requirements (including dissertation research) will be subject to dismissal.

Curriculum

LD ARCH 255Doctoral Seminar in Environmental Planning (Five semesters)1
Individualized approved study list, as per student’s research interest27

Research

Participation of faculty in research increases the base of knowledge and theory in support of teaching and the profession. PhD students are often involved in these research topics as research assistants. Current topics include natural resource analysis, computerized inventories, environmental impact studies, methods of shoreline classification, principles of forest landscape design, urban livability studies, urban perception, case studies in urban design, morphological studies of the urban edge, environmental interpretation, behavior in parks and open spaces, community recreation projects, and environmental simulation.

Admissions Criteria

Admission to the PhD program is granted to a small number of highly qualified individuals each year. Applicants should have completed a master's degree before entering. Students with only a bachelor's degree should apply to the MLA program first, or otherwise complete an appropriate master's degree before applying.

Master's Degree Requirements

The Department of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning offers three Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA) degree programs that are structured to equip students with advanced design and planning skills:

  • The three-year MLA degree is the first professional degree accredited by the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA). This degree is for students with non-design backgrounds.
  • The two-year MLA degree is the second professional degree, also accredited by ASLA, for those students with first degrees in landscape architecture, architecture, or environmental design.
  • The department also offers a two-year environmental planning program leading to the MLA degree for students with a strong background in the environmental sciences or management.

Degree Requirements

Students are required to select and complete one of two plans for the degree: Plan I—Thesis, or Plan II—Comprehensive Exam (professional project or designated studio.) The thesis is for students who wish to do original research on a problem in landscape architecture or environmental planning. The thesis committee is composed of two faculty members from the Department of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning and a third faculty member from another department at Berkeley. The comprehensive exam format can be either a professional project or a designated studio that demonstrates broad competence plus the concepts and skills necessary to the field of landscape architecture. The professional project consists of a report of not more than 40 pages of text with appropriate professional drawings. It should document a real-world project. The professional project committee is composed of two faculty members from the Department of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning and a third member from outside the University community who usually is affiliated with the project.

Students may elect to fulfill the final degree requirement through the successful completion of a comprehensive exam studio taken in their final semester. Students who are in the Environmental Planning Concentration or in one of the concurrent degree programs are not eligible for the comprehensive exam studio option.

In addition, a summer internship (preferably taken the summer before the student's final year) is recommended. Previous professional experience may be substituted for this internship.

Normative time for the MLA degree is either two years (design background and environmental planning students) or three years (non-design background). A student's normative time is determined when the student enters the MLA program.

Public Information Policy

Public Information Policy Programs accredited by the Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board (LAAB) are required to provice reliable information to the public. Programs must report on accreditation status and its performance. This information is to help potential students make informed application decisions. To review this information, click here.

Curriculum

MLA 3D Track (Three Years): First Professional Degree (84 Units Required)
LD ARCH 110Ecological Analysis3
LD ARCH 110LEcological Analysis Laboratory2
LD ARCH 112Landscape Plants: Identification and Use4
LD ARCH 120Topographic Form and Design Technology3
LD ARCH 121Design in Detail: Introduction to Landscape Materials and Construction4
LD ARCH 132Computer Applications in Environmental Design4
LD ARCH 134ADrawing Workshop 13
LD ARCH 134BDrawing Workshop II3
LD ARCH 135The Art of Landscape Drawing3
LD ARCH 160Professional Practice Seminar3
LD ARCH 170History and Literature of Landscape Architecture3
LD ARCH 200AFundamentals of Landscape Design5
LD ARCH 200BCase Studies in Landscape Design5
LD ARCH 201Ecological Factors in Urban Landscape Design5
LD ARCH 202Design of Landscape Sites5
LD ARCH 251Theories of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning2
LD ARCH 254Topics in Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning1
Select one social factors course from departmental breadth list 3
Select one studio requirement from the following:5
Landscape Project Design
Advanced Studio: Urban Design/Environmental Planning
Architecture & Urbanism Design Studio (by petition)
Select one of the following:2-3
Thesis and Professional Project Proposal Seminar (required for Thesis/Professional Project Students only)
Elective
Select one of the following:5
Final Project Preparation Studio: Thesis and Reports
Final Degree Studio:
Advanced Project Design
Advanced Studio: Urban Design/Environmental Planning
ElectivesVariable
MLA 2D Track (Two Years): Second Professional Degree (LA UG Degree, 49 Units Required; ARCH UG Degree, 55 Units Required)
LD ARCH 110Ecological Analysis3
LD ARCH 110LEcological Analysis Laboratory2
LD ARCH 120Topographic Form and Design Technology 23
LD ARCH 135The Art of Landscape Drawing 23
LD ARCH 160Professional Practice Seminar 23
LD ARCH 201Ecological Factors in Urban Landscape Design5
LD ARCH 251Theories of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning2
Select one course in landscape plants and their applications from the following: 13
Plants in Design
Landscape Plants: Identification and Use
Individualized study list based on the following (some courses may be waived by petition):
Select one or two additional studios (dependent on student's background) from the following: 15-10
Design of Landscape Sites
Landscape Project Design
Advanced Project Design
Environmental Planning Studio
Advanced Studio: Urban Design/Environmental Planning
Architecture & Urbanism Design Studio
Select one course in landscape history from the following: 23
History and Literature of Landscape Architecture
Select one course in landscape structures/infrastructures from the following: 13
Design in Detail: Introduction to Landscape Materials and Construction
Landscape Design Construction
Select one course in natural factors from the departmental breadth list 13
Urban Forest Planning and Management
Select one course in social factors from the departmental breadth list 3
LD ARCH 252BThesis and Professional Project Proposal Seminar (required for thesis/professional project students only)3
Select one of the following:5
Final Project Preparation Studio: Thesis and Reports
Final Degree Studio from one of the following:
Advanced Project Design
Environmental Planning Studio
Advanced Studio: Urban Design/Environmental Planning
ElectivesVariable
1

Students with architecture backgrounds must enroll in LD ARCH 110,LD ARCH 110LLD ARCH 112, LD ARCH 121, LD ARCH 170, LD ARCH 202 or LD ARCH 205.

2

May be waived by petition.

MLA EP Track (Two Years):  Environmental Planning (55 Units Required)
LD ARCH 134ADrawing Workshop 13
LD ARCH 134BDrawing Workshop II3
LD ARCH C188Geographic Information Systems4
LD ARCH 200AFundamentals of Landscape Design5
LD ARCH 206Final Project Preparation Studio: Thesis and Reports5
LD ARCH 221Quantitative Methods in Environmental Planning3
LD ARCH 237The Process of Environmental Planning3
LD ARCH 252BThesis and Professional Project Proposal Seminar3
LD ARCH 254Topics in Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning1
Select one social factors course from departmental breadth list 3
Select one natural factors course from departmental breadth list 3
Hydrology for Planners
Urban Forest Planning and Management
Restoration of Rivers and Streams
ElectivesVariable

Courses

Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning

LD ARCH 200A Fundamentals of Landscape Design 5 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This studio introduces students to the programmatic, artistic, and technical aspects of land form and topographic adjustments to accommodate human use. Topics include pedestrian and vehicular circulation, conservation and addition of plant materials, movement of water, recreation use, and creation of views. Sculptural land forms will be emphasized through the use of topographic plans, sections, and contour models.

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LD ARCH 200B Case Studies in Landscape Design 5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This studio stresses the shaping and coordination of ideas from initial concept to complete design product. A product(s) of intermediate scale and complexity (such as a garden, small park, plaza, or campus courtyard) will be developed in detail including the selection of planting, selection of construction materials, and topographic design. Lecture modules on selected professional topics are integrated into this course.

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LD ARCH 201 Ecological Factors in Urban Landscape Design 5 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Through lectures, studio problems, research projects, and discussion, this course will explore the challenge and potential incorporating ecological factors in urban contexts. The course focuses on the interaction of landscape science (hydrology, geology, etc.) with the necessities and mechanisms of the human environment (urban design, transportation, economics, etc.). Lectures and research projects will particularly emphasize innovative and forward
thinking solutions to the ecological problems of the human environment. Throughout the semester, reading and discussion sessions will highlight the connections between the broader concerns of the global ecological crisis and landscape design and planning.
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LD ARCH 202 Design of Landscape Sites 5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
A site design studio stressing the shaping and coordination of ideas from initial concept to complete design of open space in various contexts. Typical projects will be of an intermediate scale and might include a park, plaza, museum sculpture garden, playground, office park, or housing project. Modules on social factors and planting design are included.

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LD ARCH 203 Landscape Project Design 5 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
A site design studio stressing the shaping and coordination of ideas from initial concept to the thoughtful execution of design ideas at the site scale. Typical projects will focus on the experiential rather than the pictorial. Projects might include a park, plaza, or rehabilitation of a brownfield site.

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LD ARCH C203 Shaping the Public Realm 5 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This interdisciplinary studio focuses on the public realm of cities and explores opportunities for creating more humane and delightful public places. Problems will be at multiple scales in both existing urban centers and in areas of new growth. Skills in analyzing, designing, and communicating urban design problems will be developed. Studio work will be supplemented with lectures, discussions, and field trips. Visiting professionals will present
case studies and will serve on reviews.
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LD ARCH 204 Advanced Project Design 5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Special topics in the design and planning of the landscape. The focus of the studio varies from semester to semester. Possible topics include community design, educative environments, landscape as art, park design, or energy-conserving design. For current offerings, see department announcement.

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LD ARCH 205 Environmental Planning Studio 5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Application of environmental planning principles to a complex problem involving a variety of environmental criteria and desired land uses in a complex institutional and political setting. Student teams will identify needed data, assess environmental developmental problems, weigh competing uses, and prepare an environmental management plan.

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LD ARCH 206 Final Project Preparation Studio: Thesis and Reports 5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This is a spring studio for students to work on final projects (theses and professional reports). The studio, including lectures by the instructor, is meant to train and assist students in thesis or professional project research and help them in finalizing their thesis or professional report topic. The course includes weekly exercises ranging from writing articles documenting, illustrating, and critiquing landscapes to finally producing a
thesis or professional report.
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LD ARCH 221 Quantitative Methods in Environmental Planning 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Discussion and critique of the application of quantitative methods to environmental assessment, analysis, and evaluation in environmental planning. Topics to include geographical information systems and data bases, remote sensing, and multivariate analysis. This course emphasizes computer applications and data analysis.

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LD ARCH 222 Hydrology for Planners 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course presents an overview of relevant hydrologic, hydraulic, and geomorphic processes, to provide the planner and ecologist with insight sufficient to coordinate with technical specialists in the field of hydrology. In addition, relevant regulations and policies are reviewed.

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LD ARCH 223 Introduction to California Landscapes 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
Introduction to the ecology, visual characteristics, land use, and design history of the major landscape regions in California.

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LD ARCH 225 Urban Forest Planning and Management 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
Introduction to the field of urban forestry, its history, and its role in contemporary towns and cities. Emphasis on planning and management of the urban forest, restoration of old parks, street trees, and community participation.

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LD ARCH 226 Landscape Design Construction 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
The course investigates the process of developing schematic landscape design proposals into constructed landscapes. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the durability of materials and design details, the efficient use of materials, and the ability to evaluate how material selection and detailing can impact the environment. Field trips to construction sites, manufacturing facilities, and built landscapes will be included.

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LD ARCH 227 Restoration of Rivers and Streams 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course reviews the underlying goals and assumptions of river and stream restoration projects, reviews techniques employed in these efforts, and emphasizes strategies for evaluation of project success. The course focuses on geomorphic and hydrologic analyses relevant to restoration and enhancement of aquatic and riparian habitat in freshwater systems. Format: lectures by instructor, guest lectures, presentation of student independent projects
, and field trips. Course requirement: independent term project involving original research.
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LD ARCH 228 Research in Environmental River Planning, Management, and Restoration 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Fall 2010, Spring 2010
This course consists of (1) presentation by students of proposals, progress reports, and final results of their independent research projects, and (2) reviews of recently published research papers in the field. Students review recent issues of specific journals for all papers relevant to environmental river planning, management and restoration, and report on the papers to the seminar, broadly reviewing all the relevant papers and going into
depth on one. Emphasis is on research methods and new findings. Oral presentation skills are also critiqued. Requirement: one or two oral presentations, accompanied by a 2-page handout.
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LD ARCH C231 Environmental Planning and Regulation 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
This course will examine emerging trends in environmental planning and policy and the basic regulatory framework for environmental planning encountered in the U.S. We will also relate the institutional and policy framework of California and the United States to other nations and emerging international institutions. The emphasis of the course will be on regulating "residuals" as they affect three media: air, water, and land.

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LD ARCH 232 The Landscape As a Sacred Place 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
Visual and cultural analysis of landscapes, inventory procedures for "place" values, and problems related to sustainable design development, with special emphasis on highly valued places.

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LD ARCH 237 The Process of Environmental Planning 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
A review of the techniques used in environmental planning, and evaluation of alternate means of implementation in varying environmental and political circumstances. The class will examine and critique a number of well-known environmental planning programs and plans. Lectures and discussion will address recurrent planning problems, such as the limitations of available data, legal and political constraints on plans, conflicts among specialists.

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LD ARCH C241 Research Methods in Environmental Design 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
The components, structure, and meaning of the urban environment. Environmental problems, attitudes, and criteria. Environmental survey, analysis, and interview techniques. Methods of addressing environmental quality. Environmental simulation.

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LD ARCH C242 Citizen Involvement in the City Planning Process 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
An examination of the roles of the citizens and citizen organizations in the city planning process. Models for citizen involvement ranging from advising to community control. Examination of the effectiveness of different organizational models in different situations.

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LD ARCH C250 Theories of Urban Form and Design 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Theories and patterns of urban form throughout history are studied with emphasis on the role of planning and design in shaping cities and the relationship between urban form and social, economic, and geographic factors. Using a case study approach, cities are evaluated in terms of various theories and performance dimensions.

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LD ARCH 251 Theories of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
The focus will be on debate and discussion of central ideas in landscape architecture and environmental planning, drawing on primary literature over many decades of thought. This is not a history course, but it will include some literature that goes back to the early years of the field. This course covers the breadth of thinking in the field, including both environmental planning and landscape design as well as other sub disciplines. Each week
students will lead a debate on a different theoretical issue.
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LD ARCH 252A Thesis and Professional Project Proposal Seminar 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
Students learn research methods including social factors, historical/archival, design exploration, master planning, theoretical, and scientific field work. Students develop a conceptual framework, survey instrument, literature review, and detailed work plan. A full committee and funding proposal due on the last day of class.

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LD ARCH 252B Thesis and Professional Project Proposal Seminar 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Students learn research methods including social factors, historical/archival, design exploration, master planning, theoretical, and scientific field work. Students develop a conceptual framework, survey instrument, literature review, and detailed work plan. A full committee and funding proposal due on the last day of class.

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LD ARCH 253 Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning Colloquium 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Invited lectures on current research, planning practice, and design projects. Out of approximately 14 presentations per term, typically two or three would be by department faculty, two or three by graduating students, the remainder by outside speakers.

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LD ARCH 254 Topics in Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning 1 - 5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Designed to be a forum for presentation of student research, discussions with faculty researchers and practitioners, and examination of topical issues in landscape architecture and environmental planning. Topics will be announced at the beginning of each semester.

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LD ARCH 255 Doctoral Seminar in Environmental Planning 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Designed to be a forum for presentation of doctoral student research, discussions with faculty researchers and environmental planning practitioners, and examination of topical issues in environmental planning. Topics will be announced at the beginning of each semester.

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LD ARCH 257 Special Topics in Design 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Research seminar on selected topics in landscape design. Seminars will focus on the theoretical foundations and practical applications of design and planning methods as well as emerging issues in the discipline. Seminars will include lectures by the faculty member offering the course, guest lecturers, student presentations, and discussions. Readings and requirements vary from year to year based on the topic and instructor.

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LD ARCH 258 California Water: An Interdisciplinary Seminar 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Fall 2010, Spring 2010
This seminar studies California water issues from an interdisciplinary perspective, building upon the established California Colloquium on Water, to increase understanding and appreciation of water resources and contribute to informed decision-making about water in California. Each semester four distinguished scholars in the fields of humanities, natural sciences, engineering, social sciences, law, and environmental design present lectures
to students, faculty, and the general public. Students in the seminar attend the colloquium lectures, complete background readings, and meet for two hours on alternate weeks in the seminar session to discuss issues raised by the colloquium presentations and related readings. Course requirements: attendance at colloquia, attendance and participation in seminars, completion of course readings, brief written critiques of lectures, and a short presentation of literature relevant to colloquium topics.
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LD ARCH 271 The Literature of the Landscape Architecture Profession 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2004
The class will investigate the ideas in landscape architecture through the study of Landscape Architecture Magazine (LAM), the discipline’s primary American professional magazine. The class will focus on comparing LAM’s recent topics with the content it has covered since its premier 1911 issue. Major trends in values, theories and methods in the magazine articles will also be related to other design and planning publications. The intent is to gain
insight into the evolving focus of the landscape architecture profession and how it has responded to broader cultural movements, including urban design, regionalism, ecological values and methods, social values and processes, preservation/conservation issues, sustainability and artistic movements.
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LD ARCH 289 Applied Remote Sensing 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016
This course consists of one lecture and one computer lab per week introducing fundamental principles and methods of environmental remote sensing and their practical applications. We will explore strategies for working with different types of remote sensing data and extracting image-based landscape information for various environmental research and planning objectives. This course focuses largely on local to regional scale applications of remote sensing
in ecology, environmental planning and design, civil & environmental engineering and natural resource management.
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LD ARCH 295 Supervised Research in Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Supervised experience on a research project in landscape architecture and/or environmental planning. Regular meetings with faculty sponsor required. See departmental sheet for other limitations.

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LD ARCH 296 Directed Dissertation Research 1 - 12 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Open to qualified students who have been advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree and are directly engaged upon the doctoral dissertation.

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LD ARCH 297 Supervised Field Study 2 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Supervised experience relative to specific aspects of practice in landscape architecture and/or environmental planning. Regular meetings with faculty and outside sponsor as well as final report required. See departmental information sheet for other limitations.

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LD ARCH 298 Group Study 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Special group studies. Topics to be announced at the beginning of each semester.

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LD ARCH 299 Individual Research 1 - 6 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2017
Research work conducted preparatory to completion of the thesis or professional project as well as other approved research. A maximum of six units will be counted toward the M.L.A degree. The six units allows for four units maximum for thesis or professional project research, and two units maximum for other approved research. See departmental information sheet for other limitations.

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LD ARCH 300 Supervised Teaching in Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Supervised teaching experience in undergraduate courses. Regular meetings with faculty sponsor. See departmental sheet for other limitations.

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LD ARCH 301 Methods of Teaching in Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
This course presents general pedagogical principles and methods adapted to teaching in the fields of landscape architecture, environmental planning, and environmental sciences. The format varies from week to week, but involves presentations by faculty and experienced graduate student instructors (GSIs), guided discussions, sharing of teaching experiences for current GSIs, discussion of readings on effective teaching, viewing of videos, and presentation
by GSIs of sections for upcoming weeks. Required of all graduate students to be eligible for appointment as GSIs; may be taken concurrently with first GSI position for entering students. Topics include learning objectives, lesson plans, active learning, group learning, classroom diversity, assessing student learning, giving constructive feedback, teaching in the studio environment, engaging students through field exercises, grading, and composing effective tests.
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LD ARCH 375 Methods of Teaching in Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course presents general pedagogical principles and methods adapted to teaching in the fields of landscape architecture, environmental planning, and environmental sciences. The format varies from week to week, but involves presentations by faculty and experienced graduate student instructors (GSIs), guided discussions, sharing of teaching experiences for current GSIs, discussion of readings on effective teaching, viewing of videos, and presentation
by GSIs of sections for upcoming weeks. Required of all graduate students to be eligible for appointment as GSIs; may be taken concurrently with first GSI position for entering students. Topics include learning objectives, lesson plans, active learning, group learning, classroom diversity, assessing student learning, giving constructive feedback, teaching in the studio environment, engaging students through field exercises, grading, and composing effective tests.
Methods of Teaching in Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning: Read More [+]

LD ARCH 601 Individual Study for Master's Students 1 - 8 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Individual study for final degree requirements in consultation with adviser.

Individual Study for Master's Students: Read More [+]

LD ARCH 602 Individual Study for Doctoral Students 1 - 8 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Individual study in consultation with the major field adviser, intended to provide an opportunity for qualified students to prepare themselves for the various examinations required of candidates for the Ph.D.

Individual Study for Doctoral Students: Read More [+]

Faculty and Instructors

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

Peter C. Bosselmann, Professor. Urban design, architecture, city and regional planning, landscape architecture.
Research Profile

Danika Cooper, Assistant Professor.

Iryna Dronova, Assistant Professor.

Kristina Hill, Associate Professor.

Richard L. Hindle, Assistant Professor. Patents, landscape architecture, ecology, technology, innovation, fabrication, horticulture.
Research Profile

Walter J. Hood, Professor. Urban design, community development, landscape architecture, environmental planning, landscape design, citizen participation, design of architecture and landscape.
Research Profile

G. Mathias Kondolf, Professor. Ecological restoration, landscape architecture, environmental planning, fluvial geomorphology, hydrology, environmental geology, environmental impact assessment, riparian zone management.
Research Profile

John Lund Kriken, Adjunct Professor.

Karl Kullmann, Associate Professor. Landscape and urban design, landscape and urban theory, digital representation.
Research Profile

Elizabeth S. Macdonald, Associate Professor. Urban design.
Research Profile

David Meyer, Associate Adjunct Professor.

Louise A. Mozingo, Professor.

John Radke, Associate Professor. City and regional planning, landscape architecture and environmental planning, geographic information systems, database design and construction, spatial analysis, pattern recognition computational morphology.
Research Profile

Chip Sullivan, Professor.

Lecturers

Jennifer Brooks, Lecturer.

Joan Chaplick, Lecturer.

Agostino Di Tommaso, Lecturer.

Andrea Gaffney, Lecturer.

Susan Goltsman, Lecturer.

Daniel S. Iacofano, Lecturer.

Brian R. Jencek, Lecturer.

Dawn A. Kooyumjian, Lecturer.

Michael M. Lamb, Lecturer.

Kelley D. Lemon, Lecturer.

Blaine Andrew Merker, Lecturer.

Tim Mollette-Parks, Lecturer.

Paul P. Peninger, Lecturer.

Erik Prince, Lecturer.

Kimberlee Stryker, Lecturer.

Emeritus Faculty

Clare Cooper Marcus, Professor Emeritus. Architecture, landscape architecture, environmental planning, medium-density housing, public housing modernization, public open-space design, children_ _s environments, housing for the elderly.
Research Profile

Randolph T. Hester, Professor Emeritus.

Linda L. Jewell, Professor Emerita. Urban design, landscape architecture, environmental planning, landscapes and structures, on-site design decisions, site planning, sustainable construction.
Research Profile

+ Joe R. McBride, Professor Emeritus. Urban forestry, forest ecology.
Research Profile

Robert H. Twiss, Professor Emeritus.

Contact Information

Department of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning

202 Wurster Hall

Phone: 510-642-4022

Fax: 510-643-6166

See Department Website

Department Chair/Head Graduate Adviser

Louise Mozingo, MLA

202 Wurster Hall

Phone: 510-643-2965

lmozingo@berkeley.edu

Graduate Student Affairs Officer

Tony Tieu

206 Wurster Hall

Phone: 510-642-2965

laepgrad@berkeley.edu

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