Mechanical Engineering

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

The Department of Mechanical Engineering offers three graduate degree programs: the Master of Engineering (M.Eng), the Master of Science (M.S.), and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.).

Master of Engineering (M.Eng)

This accelerated Masters of Engineering Program has been designed in collaboration with several other departments in the College of Engineering for the purpose of developing professional leaders who understand the technical, environmental, economic, and social issues involved in Mechanical Engineering. It is supported by the College of Engineering's Coleman Fung Institute for Engineering Leadership. For more information about this interdisciplinary program, please see the Fung Institute Website.

There are full-time and part-time options for pursuing this program.

Master of Science (M.S.)

The MS degree can be earned only in conjunction with a Ph.D. (for the MS/PhD option) as application for the terminal M.S. is currently paused. Degrees are granted after completion of a program of study that emphasizes the application of the natural sciences to the analysis and solution of engineering problems. Advanced courses in engineering, math, and the sciences are normally included in a program that incorporates the engineering systems approach for the analysis of problems.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

This degree can be completed in conjunction with a master of science degree or alone. Degrees are granted after completion of programs of study that emphasize the application of the natural sciences to the analysis and solution of engineering problems. Advanced courses in mathematics, chemistry, physics, and the life sciences are normally included in a program that incorporates the engineering systems approach for the analysis of problems.

Visit Department Website

Admissions

Admission to the University

Minimum Requirements for Admission

The following minimum requirements apply to all graduate programs and will be verified by the Graduate Division:

  1. A bachelor’s degree or recognized equivalent from an accredited institution;
  2. A grade point average of B or better (3.0);
  3. If the applicant has completed a basic degree from a country or political entity (e.g., Quebec) where English is not the official language, adequate proficiency in English to do graduate work, as evidenced by a TOEFL score of at least 90 on the iBT test, 570 on the paper-and-pencil test, or an IELTS Band score of at least 7 on a 9-point scale (note that individual programs may set higher levels for any of these); and
  4. Sufficient undergraduate training to do graduate work in the given field.

Applicants Who Already Hold a Graduate Degree

The Graduate Council views academic degrees not as vocational training certificates, but as evidence of broad training in research methods, independent study, and articulation of learning. Therefore, applicants who already have academic graduate degrees should be able to pursue new subject matter at an advanced level without the need to enroll in a related or similar graduate program.

Programs may consider students for an additional academic master’s or professional master’s degree only if the additional degree is in a distinctly different field.

Applicants admitted to a doctoral program that requires a master’s degree to be earned at Berkeley as a prerequisite (even though the applicant already has a master’s degree from another institution in the same or a closely allied field of study) will be permitted to undertake the second master’s degree, despite the overlap in field.

The Graduate Division will admit students for a second doctoral degree only if they meet the following guidelines:

  1. Applicants with doctoral degrees may be admitted for an additional doctoral degree only if that degree program is in a general area of knowledge distinctly different from the field in which they earned their original degree. For example, a physics PhD could be admitted to a doctoral degree program in music or history; however, a student with a doctoral degree in mathematics would not be permitted to add a PhD in statistics.
  2. Applicants who hold the PhD degree may be admitted to a professional doctorate or professional master’s degree program if there is no duplication of training involved.

Applicants may apply only to one single degree program or one concurrent degree program per admission cycle.

Required Documents for Applications

  1. Transcripts: Applicants may upload unofficial transcripts with your application for the departmental initial review. Unofficial transcripts must contain specific information including the name of the applicant, name of the school, all courses, grades, units, & degree conferral (if applicable). 
  2. Letters of recommendation: Applicants may request online letters of recommendation through the online application system. Hard copies of recommendation letters must be sent directly to the program, by the recommender, not the Graduate Admissions.
  3. Evidence of English language proficiency: All applicants who have completed a basic degree from a country or political entity in which the official language is not English are required to submit official evidence of English language proficiency. This applies to institutions from Bangladesh, Burma, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Latin America, the Middle East, the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia, most European countries, and Quebec (Canada). However, applicants who, at the time of application, have already completed at least one year of full-time academic course work with grades of B or better at a US university may submit an official transcript from the US university to fulfill this requirement. The following courses will not fulfill this requirement:

    • courses in English as a Second Language,

    • courses conducted in a language other than English,

    • courses that will be completed after the application is submitted, and

    • courses of a non-academic nature.

Applicants who have previously applied to Berkeley must also submit new test scores that meet the current minimum requirement from one of the standardized tests. Official TOEFL score reports must be sent directly from Educational Test Services (ETS). The institution code for Berkeley is 4833 for Graduate Organizations. Official IELTS score reports must be sent electronically from the testing center to University of California, Berkeley, Graduate Division, Sproul Hall, Rm 318 MC 5900, Berkeley, CA 94720. TOEFL and IELTS score reports are only valid for two years prior to beginning the graduate program at UC Berkeley. Note: score reports can not expire before the month of June.

 

Where to Apply

Visit the Berkeley Graduate Division application page

Doctoral Degree Requirements

Normative Time

5 years or 10 semesters

Minimum Number of Units To Complete Degree

36 Semester units.  For students who are in the process of obtaining or have obtained their master’s degrees at UC Berkeley, master’s degree units that meet the restrictions below can be used towards their PhD unit requirement.

Minimum Units You Required In Order To Be Registered Each Semester

Students must enroll in 15 units each semester

Maximum Amount of Independent Study Units (298, 299, 300 and Above)

Independent course units are not counted towards the 36 semester units needed to graduate. The maximum of these units you can enroll per semester are listed below.

  • 298s: 8 units
  • 299s: 12 units
  • 300s:  6 units
  • 600s:  8 units

Maximum Number of Courses That Can Be Transferred Towards Degree

Students can transfer up to 2 courses from another school towards the PhD

  • Courses must be in the major field of study
  • Courses must be letter graded
  • Courses cannot be from the student’s Undergraduate course of study; courses must have been taken while in graduate standing

GSI/ME 300-Level Course Requirement

Each student must either serve as a Graduate Student Instructor (GSI) for at least 1 semester or have taken a 300-level course on teaching.

Minimum Grade Point Averages (GPAs)

All students are required to have the following minimum Grade Point Averages:

  • 3.5 in Major
  • 3.0 in Minors

Only courses with a C- or better can count towards graduate requirements.  Please note that only 1/3 of your unit total at the time of graduation may be pass/not pass or satisfactory/unsatisfactory.  Please note that to earn a “pass” or a “satisfactory” grade in a graduate course you need a grade of B- or better.

Required Emphases

Each student must declare 1 Major area as well as 2 Minors. At least one Minor is required to be outside of the department. The minor fields are required to broaden the base of the studies and lend support to the major field as well as the dissertation research.

Required Number of Courses

  • 5 Courses in your major, all of which must be letter graded
  • 3 Courses in your First Outside ME Minor (only 1 of these courses can be taken with the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory option rather than letter graded)
  • 2 Courses in your Inside ME or 2nd Outside ME Minor, all of which must be letter graded 2 Courses to support your Major or one Minor

Please note that 2/3 of the courses counted towards your degree must be letter graded.

Preliminary Examination (Prelim)

The objective of the Preliminary Examination is the early assessment of a student's potential for satisfactory completion of the doctoral degree.  The exams are entirely closed - no books or notes are allowed. Please see the FAQ on the department website for the latest information.

The examination is given twice a year, during the first week of the Spring and Fall semesters, and must be taken following two semesters of registration as a graduate student at the latest.  Tests cannot be taken before entering the program.

Qualifying Examination

This is an oral exam which covers courses and research. Exam should be scheduled 1 month in advance of the end of student’s 3rd year/6th semester. Students receive 2 attempts to pass. It may be taken after having completed:

  • 4 courses in the major for a GPA of 3.5, all of which must be letter-graded
  • 2 courses in each minor for a GPA of 3.0
  • Or, if you are in the Mechanics major field, all courses need to have been taken.
Qualifying Exam Committee Requirements
  • Chair (the first Inside ME member)
  • Second Inside ME member
  • Third Inside ME or additional members
  • Outside ME member
  • At least 2 members must be from the ME Department
  • The Chair of the Qualifying Examination
  • Committee cannot also serve as the Chair of the Dissertation Committee for the same student
  • There cannot be co-chairs for the Qualifying Exam

Detailed requirements can be found in Graduate Division’s Guide to Graduate Policyhttp://grad.berkeley.edu/policy/

Advancement To Candidacy

All students must complete the Advancement to Candidacy Application directly after passing their qualifying exam. The form can be found Section 13.

PhD Dissertation

Dissertations are required of all students. Each dissertation committee must include

All members of the dissertation committee must be members of the Berkeley Division of the Academic Senate. Detailed requirements and restrictions can be found in Graduate Division’s Guide to Graduate Policy: http://grad.berkeley.edu/policy/  

PhD Candidate Seminar

Each student must present their dissertation findings with at least one member of their dissertation committee present. The seminar must take place prior to the end of the semester in which you receive your degree.

Master's Degree Requirements (MS)

Note: The MS degree can be earned only in conjunction with a Ph.D. (for the MS/PhD option) as application for the terminal M.S. is currently paused temporarily. 

Plan I

Generally, this Plan is used by some people who are funded by government projects whose sponsors require them to write a thesis as a component/stipulation of their support.  It is not a common option.  

Normative Time

1.5 years or 3 semesters

Minimum Number of Units To Complete Degree

20 Semester Units

Course Restriction: Must be either in 200 series or 100 elective upper division series

Minimum Number of Mechanical Engineering Units

8 Semester Units 

Course Restriction:  Must be in 200 series and letter-graded

Minimum Units Required to Be Registered Each Semester

Students must enroll in 15 units each semester

Maximum Amount of Independent Study Units (298, 299, 300 And Above)

The maximum units in which you can enroll per semester are listed below.

  • 298s: 8 units 
  • 299s: 12 units*
  • 300s: 6 units 

*Please note that only 4 units of 299 can be counted towards the 20 unit total requirement.  

Residency, Minimum GPA, and P/NP & S/U

To be eligible to receive the Master’s degree, the student must complete at least two semesters in residency and undertake the total coursework units defined for the program, earning a CGPA of at least 3.0.  Only courses with a C- or better can count towards graduate requirements.

Please note that only 1/3 of your unit total at the time of graduation may be pass/not pass or satisfactory/unsatisfactory.  Please note that to earn a “pass” or a “satisfactory” grade in a graduate course you need a grade of B- or better.

Minimum Recommended Number of Units in Major Field Area (E.g.  Bioeng, Controls, Etc.)

8 Semester units from 200 or 100 upper division series

Maximum Number of Units You Can Transfer Towards Your Masters Degree

A master's student may transfer up to 4 semester units or 6 quarter units of course work completed as a graduate student at another institution.  The units must be equivalent to courses in the student's graduate program at Berkeley, and the student must have received at least a B in the course(s) and have a grade-point average of at least 3.3 at both Berkeley and the other institution.  However, students cannot use units from another institution to satisfy the minimum unit requirement in 200 series courses or the minimum academic residence requirement.  In addition, they may not present course work previously used to satisfy requirements for another degree program at Berkeley or at another institution.

Berkeley undergraduates who take graduate course work during their last undergraduate semester may petition to backdate graduate standing in order to receive graduate credit for that course work.  Graduate standing may be backdated from the last semester, and students may petition for credit only for the course work that was not required for the undergraduate degree.

All petitions to have units transferred must be first approved by the Vice-Chair for Graduate Study.  The ViceChair then forwards the petitions to Graduate Division.

Detailed restrictions can be found in Graduate Division's Guide to Graduate Policy.

Advancement to Candidacy

Before you can receive a Master's degree, you must first be Advanced to Candidacy.  The opportunity for this occurs during the first four (4) weeks of each semester.  By Academic Senate regulation, a minimum period of study of one term must intervene between formal advancement to candidacy and the conferring of the master's degree.  The form can be found on in Chapter 13.

Thesis

Thesis Committee

Three (3) committee members are needed for the thesis (please see restrictions below).  All committee members are required to be members of the Berkeley Division of the Academic Senate.   - Your Research Adviser

  • ME Professor
  • Professor outside of the ME Department
  • At least two committee members must be from ME
  • All members must also be members of the Berkeley Division of the Academic Senate
Procedures for Filing Your Thesis

After you have written your thesis, formatted it correctly, assembled the pages into the correct organization, and obtained your signatures, you are ready to file it with the UC Berkeley's Graduate Division:

  • Convert your thesis to a standard PDF file.  
  • Print and sign the Thesis Release Form.
  • Email your thesis as an attachment to edegrees@berkeley.edu.  Put your full name in the subject line.  Note: DO NOT SUBMIT A DRAFT.  Once your thesis has been submitted, you will not be allowed to make changes.  Be sure that it is in its final form!
  • The Degrees Office staff will review your submission and if everything is in order, you will receive an email stating that it has been approved.  If you need to make changes, you will be given the opportunity and will need to re-send a revised PDF.
  • Submit the following final documents to the Graduate Degrees Office at 318 Sproul Hall: your signed approval page, and your signed Thesis Release Form.
  • Submit a copy of the final documents to the Student Services Office at 6189 Etcheverry Hall.

Please note that all documents should be submitted together (the Graduate Degrees Office will not accept lone signature pages, for example).  You must submit your electronic thesis and bring your final documents to 318 Sproul Hall before 4:00 P.M. on the last day of the term.

For details about filing requirements, including information on deadlines, preparing the thesis, registration, and use of human or animal subjects, please see Instructions for Preparing and Filing Your Thesis

(http://grad.berkeley.edu/policies/guides/thesis-filing/) and Policies Affecting Both Master's and Doctoral Students.

Changes in Committee Membership

Before planning to file their theses, students who wish to change the membership of their thesis committee must be sure that such a change has been approved by the Graduate Division.  A student may request a change in committee by submitting a completed Change in Higher Degree Committee form.  The Head Graduate Adviser (who is our Vice Chair of Graduate Study) must state the reason for the change and sign the form.  The Head Graduate Adviser, rather than any committee member, has the final authority to approve the changes.  Forms are available from the Graduate Division website.

Library Permission Form

Each student filing a master's thesis must also submit a completed Library Permission Form, stating whether or not the student is willing to allow the University Library to supply copies of the thesis to any interested persons immediately, or if permission to do so should be withheld (for up to two years) while the student applies to obtain copyright.

Plan II

This Plan is the common master’s degree plan in our department; very rarely do students choose to complete Plan I.  The primary differences between Plan II and Plan I is Plan II requires 24 units (see below for details) and an Oral Presentation and Report, while Plan I requires 20 units and a Thesis 

Normative Time

1.5 years or 3 semesters

Minimum Number of Units To Complete Degree

24 Semester Units

Course Restriction: Must be either in 200 series or 100 elective upper division series.  At most, one third of the total units of course work may be taken S/U

Minimum Number of Mechanical Engineering Units

12 Semester Units

Course Restriction:  Must be in 200 series and letter-graded with the exception of the optional 4 units of ME 299 that can be included in the 12

Minimum Units to Be Registered Each Semester

Students must enroll in 15 units each semester.

Maximum Amount of Independent Study Units (298, 299, 300 And Above)

The maximum units in which you can enroll per semester are listed below.

  • 298s: 8 units
  • 299s: 12 units*
  • 300s: 6 units

*Please note that only 4 units of 299 can be counted towards the 24 unit total requirement.  

Minimum Required Number of Units in Major Field Area (ex.  Bioeng, Controls, Etc.)

12 Semester units

Course Restriction:  Must be in 200 or 100 elective upper division series

Residency, Minimum GPA, and P/NP & S/U

To be eligible to receive the Master’s degree, the student must complete at least two semesters in residency and undertake the total coursework units defined for the program, earning a CGPA of at least 3.0.  Only courses with a C- or better can count towards graduate requirements.

Please note that only 1/3 of your unit total at the time of graduation may be pass/not pass or satisfactory/unsatisfactory.  Please note that to earn a “pass” or a “satisfactory” grade in a graduate course you need a grade of B- or better.

Maximum Number of Units You Can Transfer Towards Your Master’s Degree

A master's student may transfer up to 4 semester units or 6 quarter units of course work completed as a graduate student at another institution.  The units must be equivalent to courses in the student's graduate program at Berkeley, and the student must have received at least a B in the course(s) and have a grade-point average of at least 3.3 at both Berkeley and the other institution.  However, students cannot use units from another institution to satisfy the minimum unit requirement in 200 series courses or the minimum academic residence requirement.  In addition, they may not present course work previously used to satisfy requirements for another degree program at Berkeley or at another institution.  

Berkeley undergraduates who take graduate course work during their last undergraduate semester may petition to backdate graduate standing in order to receive graduate credit for that course work.  Graduate standing may be backdated from the last semester, and students may petition for credit only for the course work that was not required for the undergraduate degree.  

All petitions to have units transferred must be first approved by the Vice-Chair for Graduate Study, then forwarded to Graduate Division.  Detailed restrictions can be found in Graduate Division's Guide to Graduate Policy.

Advancement to Candidacy

Before you can receive a Master's degree, you must first be Advanced to Candidacy.  The opportunity for this occurs during the first four (4) weeks of each semester.  By Academic Senate regulation, a minimum period of study of one term must intervene between formal advancement to candidacy and the conferring of the master's degree.  

Please complete the Application for Candidacy for Master's Degree Form and bring it to 6189 Etcheverry Hall for processing.  

Filing Your Master's Report (Plan II)

After you have written your report, formatted it correctly, assembled the pages into the correct organization, and obtained your signatures, you are ready to file your report (Plan II).  The steps are as follows:

  1. Convert your report to a standard PDF file.  
  2. Complete, sign, and convert the Library Permission Form to a standard PDF file.  Each student filing a master's report must also submit a completed library permission form, stating whether or not the student is willing to allow the University Library to supply copies of the report to any interested persons immediately, or if permission to do so should be withheld (for up to two years) while the student applies to obtain copyright.
  3. Log on your account on the College of Engineering Student Progress Summary Database webpage.
  4. Under "Document Type", select "Library Permission".
  5. Under "Upload File", click on "Choose file" to browse and navigate through your computer to locate and select your signed library permission form.  You should see your file name displayed near the menu "Choose File".
  6. Click on "submit" at the bottom of your summary page.  Once your file is successfully uploaded, you will see it on the page.
  7. Repeat the same procedure to upload your Master's Report.

Note: DO NOT SUBMIT A DRAFT.  Once your report has been submitted, you will not be allowed to make changes.  Be sure that it is in its final form and the cover-page is signed by the committee members!

Please note that all documents should be submitted together (e.g.  signed Report and the signed Library Permission Form).  The Graduate Student Services Office will not accept lone signature pages.  You must submit your electronic report before 4:00 P.M.  on the indicated deadline date listed on the Graduate Division's website.

Oral Presentation and Final Report (Plan II)

An oral presentation and a written report are required.  2 Faculty are required to be present.  At least one needs to be from the MS Committee.  All committee members are required to be members of the Berkeley Division of the Academic Senate.

Degree Committee Members

Two committee members are needed for the report:

  • Your Research Advisor
  • ME Professor or Professor outside the ME department
  • At least one committee members must be from ME
  • Both members must also be members of the Berkeley Division of the Academic Senate 

Master's Degree Requirements (MEng)

Normative Time

Full-time: Nine months or two semesters.

Part-time: Two-four years, depending on the student. Part-time students take the same classes as full-time students.

Minimum Number of Units to Complete Degree

25 semester units

Course restriction:  must be in 200 series.

Minimum Number of Mechanical Engineering Units in Area of Concentration

12 semester units (must be in 200 series and letter-graded). Only courses with a C- or better can count towards graduate requirements.

Minimum Grade Point Averages (GPAs)

All students are required to have a minimum overall grade point average of 3.0. 

Minimum Units You Are Required to Take in Order to Be Registered Each Semester

Full-time graduate students must enroll in 12 Semester units each semester. Part-time students may take one-to-three courses per semester and complete the program at their own pace in 2-4 years*

*Students must enroll in a minimum 6 units per semester to be eligible for financial aid, including federal loans

Maximum Number of Units Transferable Towards Master's of Engineering Degree

A master of engineering student may petition to transfer up to four semester units or six quarter units of 200-level courses completed as a graduate student at another UC campus.

Advancement To Candidacy

Students should apply for advancement to candidacy at the beginning of their second semester. 

Comprehensive Leadership and Technical Exam

A student must pass a comprehensive leadership exam and a comprehensive technical exam to receive their MEng degree..  

Curriculum

Courses Required
Approved individualized study list per student’s interest in concentration area, including the courses below:
ENGIN 270AOrganizational Behavior for Engineers1
ENGIN 270BR&D Technology Management & Ethics1
ENGIN 270CTeaming & Project Management1
ENGIN 270HAccounting & Finance for Engineers1
ENGIN 296MAMaster of Engineering Capstone Project3
ENGIN 296MBMaster of Engineering Capstone Project2
ENGIN 295Communications for Engineering Leaders ( 1 unit in fall and 1 unit in spring )1
Choose ENGIN 270D or ENGIN 270E
ENGIN 270DEntrepreneurship for Engineers1
ENGIN 270ETechnology Strategy & Industry Analysis1
Choose ENGIN 270F or ENGIN 270G
ENGIN 270FData Analytics1
ENGIN 270GMarketing & Product Management1
Concentrations
Advanced Energy Technology

Provides you with both technical and business foundations in energy engineering sciences and their potential applications in leading edge technologies, in fields such as advanced combustion, nanoscale energy conversion, and large scale renewable energy systems.

Coursework offerings vary year by year, and may include:
MEC ENG 235Design of Microprocessor-Based Mechanical Systems4
MEC ENG 246Advanced Energy Conversion Principles3
MEC ENG 249Machine Learning Tools for Modeling Energy Transport and Conversion Processes3
MEC ENG 250BAdvanced Convective Transport and Computational Methods3
MEC ENG 254Advanced Thermophysics for Applications3
MEC ENG 255Advanced Combustion Processes3
MEC ENG 258Heat Transfer with Phase Change3
MEC ENG 259Microscale Thermophysics and Heat Transfer3
Aerospace Engineering (NEW)

Aerospace Engineering has seen exponential growth over the last decade spanning: Commercial Aircraft, Urban Air Mobility, Spacecrafts, Military Aircraft, Drones, Satellites, Telecommunications, and Supersonic flight. This track provides you with both technical and business foundations in Aerospace Engineering and their potential applications in leading edge technologies.

Required courses:
Mechanical Engineering course in Aerodynamics (MEC ENG 200+)
MEC ENG 236UControl and Dynamics of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles3
Students must take at least two courses from the following list. Coursework offerings may vary year to year.
Highly recommended:
Mechanical Behavior of Composite Materials [3]
Experiential Advanced Control Design I [3]
Experiential Advanced Control Design II [3]
Oceanic and Atmospheric Waves [3]
Advanced Combustion Processes [3]
Advanced Fluid Mechanics I [3]
Advanced Fluid Mechanics II [3]
Hydrodynamic Stability and Instability [3]
Introduction to the Finite Element Method [3]
Foundations of the Theory of Continuous Media [3]
Turbulence [3]
Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics [3]
Advanced Dynamics [3]
Graduate Introduction to Continuum Mechanics [3]
Optional:
Oscillations in Linear Systems [3]
Nonlinear and Random Vibrations [3]
Finite Element Methods in Nonlinear Continua [3]
Theory of Elasticity [3]
Nonlinear Theory of Elasticity [3]
Theory of Shells [3]
Finite Difference Methods for Fluid Dynamics [4]
Spectral Methods for Fluid Dynamics [4]
Biomechanics

The Masters of Engineering (MEng) track in Biomechanical Engineering covers theories, methods, and practice of biomechanical engineering. Students will gain skills through biomechanics-focused courses, as well as through advanced courses in mechanics, materials, manufacturing and design. Courses will enable students to work on cutting-edge biomechanical engineering grand challenges. Capstone projects bring biomechanical prowess to ongoing clinical needs. Students will also gain skills in verbal and oral communication and mentorship. Biomechanical students are expected to take four technical courses from the list below as well as a capstone experience course.

Coursework offerings vary year by year, and may include:
MEC ENG C210Advanced Orthopedic Biomechanics4
MEC ENG 211The Cell as a Machine3
MEC ENG C213Fluid Mechanics of Biological Systems3
MEC ENG C214Advanced Tissue Mechanics3
MEC ENG C215Advanced Structural Aspects of Biomaterials4
MEC ENG C216Molecular Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of the Cell4
MEC ENG C223Polymer Engineering3
MEC ENG C225Deformation and Fracture of Engineering Materials4
MEC ENG 239Robotic Locomotion4
MEC ENG 270Advanced Augmentation of Human Dexterity4
MEC ENG C278Adv Designing for the Human Body4
MEC ENG 290LIntroduction to Nano-Biology3
MEC ENG 292AAdvanced Special Topics in Bioengineering1-4
MEC ENG 292CAdvanced Special Topics in Design1-4
Control of Robotic and Autonomous Systems

(Formerly Experimental Advanced Control Systems Design)

The complexity of modern robotic and autonomous systems has grown exponentially in the past ten years. Today’s engineers are challenged by the task of building high-performance machines which: (1) are safe despite the uncertainty of the environment they operate in; (2) are able to interact with humans; and (3) effectively use data, local embedded control platforms and distributed cloud computing. You will gain experience in state-of-the-art control systems design and implementation for such modern and highly complex systems. This concentration immerses you in the design and application of advanced controls systems, with numerous cutting-edge applications such as self-driving cars, drones, aerospace systems, and robotics for manufacturing and human assistance.

Coursework offerings vary year by year, and may include:
MEC ENG C231AExperiential Advanced Control Design I3
MEC ENG C231BExperiential Advanced Control Design II3
MEC ENG C232Advanced Control Systems I3
MEC ENG 233Advanced Control Systems II3
MEC ENG 235Design of Microprocessor-Based Mechanical Systems4
MEC ENG 237Control of Nonlinear Dynamic Systems3
MEC ENG 292BAdvanced Special Topics in Controls (Control and Dynamics of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles)1-4
MEC ENG 292CAdvanced Special Topics in Design (Feedback Control of Legged Robots)1-4
Fluids and Ocean (NEW)

This track provides graduates with a firm foundation in analytical, computational, and experimental essentials of fluid dynamics. Research activities span the Reynolds number range from creeping flows to planetary phenomena. Topics of current study include suspension mechanics, dynamics of phase changes (in engineering and in geophysical flows), earth mantle dynamics, interfacial phenomena, non-Newtonian fluid mechanics, biofluid mechanics, vascular flows, chaotic mixing and transport of scalars, bubble dynamics, environmental fluid dynamics, aerodynamics, vortex dynamics and breakdown, aircraft wake vortices, rotating flows, stability and transition, chaos, turbulence, shock dynamics, sonoluminescence, sonochemistry, reacting flows, planetary atmospheres, ship waves, internal waves, and nonlinear wave-vorticity interaction. One key application area is Ocean Engineering, which involves the development, design, and analysis of man-made systems that can operate in the offshore or coastal environment. Such systems may be used for transportation, recreation, fisheries, extraction of petroleum or other minerals, and recovery of thermal or wave energy, among others. Some systems are bottom-mounted, particularly those in shallower depths; others are mobile, as in the case of ships, submersibles, or floating drill rigs. All systems should be designed to withstand a hostile environment (wind, waves, currents, ice) and to operate efficiently while staying environmentally friendly.

Coursework offerings vary year by year, and may include:

Coursework offerings vary year by year, and may include:
MEC ENG 163Engineering Aerodynamics3
MEC ENG 165/242Ocean-Environment Mechanics3
MEC ENG 167Microscale Fluid Mechanics3
MEC ENG 168/292KMechanics of Offshore Systems3
MEC ENG C213Fluid Mechanics of Biological Systems3
MEC ENG 241AMarine Hydrodynamics I3
MEC ENG 241BMarine Hydrodynamics II3
MEC ENG 245Oceanic and Atmospheric Waves3
MEC ENG 260AAdvanced Fluid Mechanics I3
MEC ENG 260BAdvanced Fluid Mechanics II3
MEC ENG 262Hydrodynamic Stability and Instability3
MEC ENG 263Turbulence3
MEC ENG 266Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics3
MEC ENG C268Physicochemical Hydrodynamics3
MEC ENG 290CTopics in Fluid Mechanics3
MEC ENG 292KAdvanced Special Topics in Ocean Engineering1-4
ENGIN 266AFinite Difference Methods for Fluid Dynamics4
ENGIN 266BSpectral Methods for Fluid Dynamics4
MEMS/Nano (Micro-Electromechanical Systems/Nanotechnology)(NEW)

Over the past 20 years, the application of microelectronic technology to the fabrication of mechanical devices has revolutionized research in microsensors and microactuators. Micromachining technologies take advantage of batch processing to address the manufacturing and performance requirements of the sensor industry. This track provides you with highly interdisciplinary skills in microfabrication, MEMS design, and related topics such as microscale thermophysics, micro and nanoscale tribology, cellular and sub-cellular level transport phenomena and mechanics, and physicochemical hydrodynamics of ultra-thin fluid films.

Coursework offerings vary year by year, and may include:
MEC ENG C218/EL ENG 247AIntroduction to MEMS Design4
MEC ENG C231AExperiential Advanced Control Design I3
MEC ENG C231BExperiential Advanced Control Design II3
MEC ENG 235Design of Microprocessor-Based Mechanical Systems4
MEC ENG 238Advanced Micro/Nano Mechanical Systems Laboratory3
MEC ENG 259Microscale Thermophysics and Heat Transfer3
MEC ENG 280AIntroduction to the Finite Element Method3
MEC ENG 290LIntroduction to Nano-Biology3
MEC ENG 290TPlasmonic Materials3
Mechanics and Dynamics (NEW)

Having its roots in the classical theory of elastic materials, solid mechanics has grown to embrace all aspects involving the behavior of deformable bodies under loads. Thus, in addition to including the theory of linear elasticity, with its applications to structural materials, solid mechanics also incorporates modern nonlinear theories of highly deformable materials. This includes synthetic polymeric materials, as well as biological materials. Our program also includes other aspects of continuum mechanics including approximate theories (such as those involving moderate strains or moderate rotations) and the Lagrangian representation of vorticity. The behavior of continua that are almost rigid, with a view to characterizing their dynamical characteristics, is also an important top.

Coursework offerings vary year to year, and may include:
MEC ENG 273Oscillations in Linear Systems3
MEC ENG 274Random Oscillations of Mechanical Systems3
MEC ENG 275Advanced Dynamics3
MEC ENG 277Nonlinear and Random Vibrations3
MEC ENG C279/CIV ENG C235Introduction to Statistical Mechanics for Engineers3
MEC ENG 280AIntroduction to the Finite Element Method3
MEC ENG 280BFinite Element Methods in Nonlinear Continua3
MEC ENG 281Methods of Tensor Calculus and Differential Geometry3
MEC ENG 282Theory of Elasticity3
MEC ENG 283Wave Propagation in Elastic Media3
MEC ENG 284Nonlinear Theory of Elasticity3
MEC ENG 285AFoundations of the Theory of Continuous Media3
MEC ENG 285BSurfaces of Discontinuity and Inhomogeneities in Deformable Continua3
MEC ENG 285CElectrodynamics of Continuous Media3
MEC ENG 285DEngineering Rheology3
MEC ENG 286Theory of Plasticity3
MEC ENG 287Graduate Introduction to Continuum Mechanics3
MEC ENG 288Theory of Elastic Stability3
MEC ENG 289Theory of Shells3
MEC ENG 290ACourse Not Available
Modeling and Simulation  OF ADVANCED MANUFACTURING PROCESSES

Modern manufacturing can be characterized by three basic processing strategies – additive, subtractive and near-net shape. These are somewhat self-explanatory in their names. Near-net shape, aka forming/forging and molding techniques. Subtractive, for example, machining, is the “old standby” process used extensively in basic machine construction but is quite limited as applied to higher technology products. Additive manufacturing, ranging from deposition processes to the more recent rapid prototyping approaches, is an area that offers much future potential for both accurate and fast creation of complex products. Additive manufacturing (AM) and Rapid-Prototyping (RP) have received a great deal of attention for a number of years. In particular, the idea of 3-D Printing (3DP) has received quite a large amount of press. According to ASTM, AM is defined as the “process of joining materials to make objects from  3D model data, usually layer upon layer, as opposed to subtractive manufacturing methodologies. This track provides you with the sophisticated mathematical modeling skills critical to the manufacturing of advanced devices and systems across all sectors and industries. You will gain experience creating the tools that are used in an array of technologies that employ advanced manufacturing and 3D printing.

Coursework offerings vary year to year, and may include:
MEC ENG C201Modeling and Simulation of Advanced Manufacturing Processes3
MEC ENG C219Parametric and Optimal Design of MEMS3
MEC ENG 221Graduate Introduction to Lean Manufacturing Systems3
MEC ENG C223Polymer Engineering3
MEC ENG 224Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials3
MEC ENG C225Deformation and Fracture of Engineering Materials4
MEC ENG 226Tribology3
MEC ENG 227Mechanical Behavior of Composite Materials3
MEC ENG 229Design of Basic Electro-Mechanical Devices3
MEC ENG C231AExperiential Advanced Control Design I3
MEC ENG 280AIntroduction to the Finite Element Method3
MEC ENG 280BFinite Element Methods in Nonlinear Continua3
MEC ENG 290DSolid Modeling and CAD/CAM Fundamentals3
MEC ENG 290GLaser Processing and Diagnostics3
MEC ENG 290HGreen Product Development: Design for Sustainability3
MEC ENG 290ISustainable Manufacturing3
MEC ENG 290RTopics in Manufacturing3
Product Design

Theories, methods, and practice of design. Enables you to create, design, develop, and market new and innovative products to meet the needs of consumers from all backgrounds and requirements, including sustainability. You gain skills in communicating with and assessing the needs of the user/customer, prototyping and evaluating potential designs with respect to the performance specifications and requirements and ensuring safe operation, economical production, and reduced energy and resource consumption as well as environmental impact.

Coursework offerings vary year by year, and may include:
MEC ENG C205Critical Making4
MEC ENG C223Polymer Engineering3
MEC ENG 229Design of Basic Electro-Mechanical Devices3
MEC ENG C231AExperiential Advanced Control Design I3
MEC ENG 235Design of Microprocessor-Based Mechanical Systems4
MEC ENG 290KAInnovation through Design Thinking2
MEC ENG 290KBLife Cycle Thinking in Engineering Design1
MEC ENG 290DSolid Modeling and CAD/CAM Fundamentals3
MEC ENG 290PNew Product Development: Design Theory and Methods3
MEC ENG 290UInteractive Device Design4
MEC ENG 292CAdvanced Special Topics in Design1-4

Courses

Mechanical Engineering

Faculty and Instructors

* Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

Alice M. Agogino, Professor. New product development, computer-aided design and databases, theory and methods, intelligent learning systems, information retrieval and data mining, digital libraries, multiobjective and strategic product, nonlinear optimization, probabilistic modeling, supervisory.
Research Profile

M. Reza Alam, Associate Professor. Theoretical Fluid Dynamics, Nonlinear Wave Mechanics, Ocean and Coastal Waves Phenomena, Ocean Renewable Energy (Wave, Tide and Offshore Wind Energy), Nonlinear Dynamical Systems, Fluid Flow Control, ocean renewable energy.
Research Profile

David M. Auslander, Professor. Automatic control system design, mini-microcomputer system bioengineering, modeling and simulation of dynamic systems, process control.
Research Profile

David B. Bogy, Professor. Mechanics in computer technology: tribology in hard-disk drives, laser measurement systems, numerical simulations. Static and dynamic problems in solid and fluid mechanics.
Research Profile

Francesco Borrelli, Professor. Model Predictive Control, Model-Based AI, Distributed and Robust Constrained Control, Automotive Control Systems, Energy Efficiency, Energy Efficient Building Control Systems, Solar Power Plants, Mobility Contextual Intelligence, Robotics and Food Systems.
Research Profile

Van P. Carey, Professor. Energy conversion and transport; molecular-level modeling of thermophysics and transport in multiphase systems; statistical thermodynamics; thermal management and energy efficiency of electronic information systems; boiling phenomena in pure fluids and binary mixtures; surface wetting effects in condensation processes; heat pipes; energy-based sustainability analysis of energy conversion systems; high temperature solar collector technologies; radial flow turbines and disk rotor drag turbine expanders for green energy conversion technologies; computer-aided design of energy systems.
Research Profile

James Casey, Professor. Continuum mechanics, finite elasticity, continuum thermodynamics, plasticity, theories of elastic-plastic materials, history of mechanics, dynamics.
Research Profile

Chris Dames, Chair, Professor. Heat transfer and energy conversion at the micro and nano scale. Theoretical and experimental methods. Nanostructured thermoelectric materials. Thermal rectification. Graphene. Nonlinear, anisotropic, and asymmetric heat transfer.
Research Profile

Robert Dibble, Professor. Laser diagnostics in turbulent reactive flows, generation of green fuels from biomass, highest efficiency and lowest pollution combustion of fuels derived from biomass, combustion issues related to global warming, conversion of waste heat to power via Organic Rankine Cycle ( ORC ), spectroscopy, chemical kinetics, turbulent combustion, optics and electronics.
Research Profile

Carlos Fernandez-Pello, Professor. Ignition and fire spread; smoldering and transition to flaming; spacecraft/aircraft fire safety; wildland fire propagation and wildland fire spotting; liquid fuel pool burning; self heating and ignition; small-scale energy generation; biofuels combustion.
Research Profile

Michael Frenklach, Professor. Chemical kinetics; Computer modeling; Combustion chemistry; Pollutant formation (NOx, soot); Shock tube; Chemical vapor deposition of diamond films; Homogeneous nucleation of silicon, silicon carbide, and diamond powders; Interstellar dust formation.
Research Profile

Michael Gollner, Associate Professor. Combustion, Fire Dynamics, Wildland Fire, Fluid Mechanics.
Research Profile

Kosa Goucher-Lambert, Assistant Professor. Design theory, methodology, and automation: decision-making applied to engineering teams and individuals, ideation and creativity, analogical reasoning in design, preference modeling and design attribute optimization, design cognition, neuroimaging methods applied to design, sustainable design, new product development, crowdsourcing and collaboration.
Research Profile

Ralph Greif, Professor. Heat and mass transfer, micro scale transport, fuel cells, cooling at the chip level, semiconductor wafers, materials processing, laser surface interactions, nuclear reactor safety, phase change, buoyancy transport, bio heat transfer, reacting flows, deposition.
Research Profile

Costas P. Grigoropoulos, Professor. Laser processing of materials, ultrafast laser micro/nanomachining, nanotechnology, nanomanufacturing, fabrication of flexible electronics, laser crystal growth for thin film transistors, advanced energy applications, microscale fuel cells, hydrogen storage, heat transfer, electronics cooling, microfluidics, laser interactions with biological materials.
Research Profile

Grace X. Gu, Assistant Professor. Composites, additive manufacturing, fracture mechanics, topology optimization, machine learning, finite element analysis, and bioinspired materials.
Research Profile

Roberto Horowitz, Professor. Adaptive control, learning and nonlinear control, control of robot manipulators, computer mechatronics systems, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), intelligent vehicle, highways systems.
Research Profile

David Horsley, Adjunct Professor. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), ultrasonics, piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers (PMUTs), piezoelectric sensors and actuators, inertial and acoustic sensors, magnetic sensors, optical MEMS, dynamics and control issues in MEMS.
Research Profile

Alexis Kaminski, Assistant Professor . Stratified flows, hydrodynamic instabilities, transition to turbulence, mixing and entrainment, internal waves, non-normal stability, upper-ocean dynamics, physical oceanography, geophysical and environmental fluid dynamics.
Research Profile

Homayoon Kazerooni, Professor. Bioengineering, robotics, control systems, mechatronics, design, automated manufacturing and human-machine systems.
Research Profile

Tony M. Keaveny, Professor. Biomechanics: mechanical behavior of bone, finite element modeling and experimentation, design of bone-implant systems, tissue engineering.
Research Profile

Kyriakos Komvopoulos, Professor. Theoretical and numerical studies in nano-/micro-scale contact mechanics, tribology, mechanical behavior of bulk and thin-film materials, deposition and characterization of single and multi-layer ultrathin films by sputtering and filtered cathodic vacuum arc methods, reliability of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), surface force microprobe techniques, surface modification of biopolymers, surface chemical functionalization for enhanced biocompatibility and cell activity, mechanotransduction effects at the single-cell and tissue levels, scaffolds for tissue engineering, and flexible/stretchable bioelectronics.
Research Profile

George Leitmann, Professor. Economics, planning, dynamics systems, control theory, optimal control, dynamic games, & robust control, applications engineering, mechanical systems, business administrations, biological systems.
Research Profile

Liwei Lin, Professor. MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems); NEMS (Nanoelectromechanical Systems); Nanotechnology; design and manufacturing of microsensors and microactuators; development of micromachining processes by silicon surface/bulk micromachining; micromolding process; mechanical issues in MEMS including heat transfer, solid/fluid mechanics, and dynamics.
Research Profile

Fai Ma, Professor. Dynamical systems with inherent uncertainties, vibration, stochastic simulation.
Research Profile

Simo Aleksi Makiharju, Assistant Professor. Reduction drag on marine vehicles, mitigation of damage and noise caused by cavitation in naval and industrial applications, and efficient handling of single- and multiphase flows in energy production applications.
Research Profile

Samuel Mao, Adjunct Professor. Professor Mao and his team conduct research in the cross-disciplinary fields of clean energy technologies. The team also develops high throughput material processing and ultrafast laser technologies, in support of clean-energy research.
Research Profile

Philip S. Marcus, Professor. Algorithms, atmospheric flows, convection, fluid mechanics, nonlinear dynamics, ocean flows, numerical analysis, turbulence.
Research Profile

Sara McMains, Professor. Geometric and solid modeling, general purpose computation on the GPU (GPGPU), CAD/CAM, computational geometry, layered manufacturing, computer graphics and visualization, virtual prototyping, virtual reality.
Research Profile

Mohammad R. K. Mofrad, Professor. Multiscale Biomechanics of Cardiovascular Disease and Brain Injury; Molecular and Cellular Mechanobiology; Mechanics of Integrin-Mediated Focal Adhesions; Mechanics of the Nuclear Pore and Nucleocytoplasmic Transport.
Research Profile

Mark W. Mueller, Assistant Professor. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, dynamics and control; motion planning and coordination; state estimation and localization.
Research Profile

Grace O'Connell, Associate Professor. Biomechanics of cartilage and intervertebral disc; tissue engineering; continuum modeling of soft tissues; intervertebral disc function, degeneration, and regeneration.
Research Profile

* Oliver O'Reilly, Professor. Dynamics, Vibrations, Continuum Mechanics.
Research Profile

Panayiotis Papadopoulos, Professor. Computational mechanics, solid mechanics, biomechanics, applied mathematics.
Research Profile

* Kameshwar Poolla, Professor. Theory: Modeling & System Identification, Robust Control, Optimization. Applications: Wireless Sensor Networks, Green Buildings, Semiconductor Manufacturing, Medical Imaging.
Research Profile

Ravi Prasher, Adjunct Professor. Dr. Prasher’s primary research interests are fundamental and applied studies of Nano-to-macroscale thermal energy process and systems, using both theoretical and experimental methods. Some topics of current interest include thermal transport in Lithium ion batteries, microelectronics thermal management using microfluidics, solar thermal energy conversion, high density thermochemical storage, solar thermal desalination, heat and mass transfer in roll-to-roll manufacturing process and applications of machine learning in inverse design of optical metamaterials.

* Lisa Pruitt, Professor. Tissue biomechanics, biomaterial science, fatigue and fracture micromechanisms, orthopedic polymers for total joint replacement, cardiovascular biomaterials, synthetic cartilage, acrylic bone cements, tribology of diamond and DLCs.
Research Profile

Boris Rubinsky, Professor. Heat and mass transfer in biomedical engineering and biotechnology in particular low temperature biology, bio-electronics and biomedical devices in particular micro and nano bionic technologies and electroporation, medical imaging in particular electrical impedance tomography and light imaging, biomedical numerical analysis in particular genetic and evolutionary algorithms and fractal techniques.
Research Profile

Omer Savas, Professor. Fluid mechanics: aircraft wake vortices; biofluid mechanics; boundary layers; instrumentation; rotating flows; transient aerodynamics; turbulent flows; vortex dynamics.
Research Profile

Shawn Shadden, Associate Professor. Cardiovascular biomechanics, computational mechanics, computational fluid dynamics, dynamical systems, fluid dynamics, Lagrangian coherent structures, mathematical modeling, thrombosis.
Research Profile

Lydia Sohn, Professor. Micro-nano engineering, bioengineering.
Research Profile

Koushil Sreenath, Associate Professor. Hybrid Dynamic Robotics, Applied Nonlinear Control, Dynamic Legged Locomotion, Dynamic Aerial Manipulation.
Research Profile

David Steigmann, Professor. Continuum, mechanics, shell theory, finite elasticity, variational methods, stability, surface stress, capillary phenomena, mechanics of thin films.
Research Profile

Hannah Stuart, Assistant Professor. Dexterous manipulation, bioinspired design, soft and multi-material mechanisms, skin contact conditions, tactile sensing and haptics.
Research Profile

Hayden Taylor, Associate Professor. The invention, modeling and simulation of micro- and nano-manufacturing processes, materials-testing techniques operating down to the nanoscale, and applications of polymeric materials in micro- and nano-fabrication—including for tissue scaffold engineering.
Research Profile

Masayoshi Tomizuka, Professor. Adaptive control, computer-aided manufacturing, control systems and theory, digital control, dynamic systems, manufacturing, mechanical vibrations.
Research Profile

Vassilia Zorba, Associate Adjunct Professor. Energy Science & Technology; MEMS/Nano; Materials.

Affiliated Faculty

Murat Arcak, Professor. Dynamical systems and control theory with applications to synthetic biology, multi-agent systems, and transportation.
Research Profile

Saikat Chaudhuri, Professor. Corporate growth and innovation strategies, Technological innovation in dynamic environments, Digital disruption and transformation,High-technology mergers and acquisitions, High-value strategic partnerships and outsourcing.

Peter Hosemann, Professor. Mechanical performance and microstructural characterization of structural materials as well as in environmental degradation of materials in extreme environments. Multi scale mechanical property quantification and their implications for engineering performance as well as corrosion in unusual environments are part of the research. Furthermore, professor Hosemann is interested in the manufacturing of materials (from ore to product) and most recently in micromanufacturing of geometries using short, pulsed lasers.
Research Profile

Dorian Liepmann, Professor. BioMEMS, microfluid dynamics, experimental biofluid dynamics, hemodynamics associated with valvular heart disease and other cardiac and arterial flows.
Research Profile

Robert O. Ritchie, Professor. Structural materials, mechanical behavior in biomaterials, creep, fatigue and fracture of advanced metals, intermetallics, ceramics.
Research Profile

S. Shankar Sastry, Professor. Computer science, robotics, arial robots, cybersecurity, cyber defense, homeland defense, nonholonomic systems, control of hybrid systems, sensor networks, interactive visualization, robotic telesurgery, rapid prototyping.
Research Profile

Somayeh Sojoudi, Assistant Professor. Control theory, optimization theory, machine learning, algorithms, and data science.
Research Profile

Lecturers

George Anwar, Lecturer. Model Predictive Control, Distributed and Robust Constrained Control, Automotive Control Systems, Energy Efficient Building Control Systems.

Gabriel Gomes, Lecturer.

Marcel Kristel, Lecturer.

Ala Moradian, Lecturer. Dr. Moradian’s primary research interests are product development, advanced materials processing, semiconductor manufacturing, computational methods for process modeling and virtual fabrication, digital twin, and multi-physics modeling for product design optimization and manufacturing.

Kourosh (Ken) Youssefi, Lecturer.

Emeritus Faculty

Jyh-Yuan Chen, Professor Emeritus. Computational modeling of reactive systems, turbulent flows, combustion chemical kinetics.
Research Profile

George C. Johnson, Professor Emeritus. X-rays, plasticity, elasticity, instrumentation, sensors, acoustoelasticity, materials behavior, materials characterization, texture analysis, thin shells deformation, ultrasonic stress analysis.
Research Profile

* Dennis K. Lieu, Professor Emeritus. Actuators, magnetics, acoustics, electromechanical devices, rolling elements, spindle motors, structural mechanics.
Research Profile

Stephen Morris, Professor Emeritus. Continuum mechanics, micro mechanics of solid-solid phase changes, interfacial phenomena (evaporating thin films), electroporation .
Research Profile

Patrick J. Pagni, Professor Emeritus. Fire safety engineering science: fire physics, fire modeling, compartment fire growth, flamespread, flame shapes and heights, excess pyrolyzates, soot formation, backdrafts, glass breaking in compartment fires, explosions, gravity currents, salt water modeling, self-heating to ignition, brand lofting, urban/wildland intermix and post-earthquake conflagrations.

Robert F. Sawyer, Professor Emeritus. Air pollutant formation and control, motor vehicle emissions, energy and environment, regulatory policy.

Benson H. Tongue, Professor Emeritus. Nonlinear dynamics, vibrations, modal analysis, numerical modeling, acoustics.

Paul K. Wright, Professor Emeritus. Mechanical and electrical engineering design, 3D-printing, manufacturing, energy systems, wireless sensor networks, sensors/MEMS/NEMS, IT systems, automated manufacturing and inspection.
Research Profile

Kazuo Yamazaki, Professor Emeritus. Etc , micro custom diamond tool design and fabrication system, CNC machine tool control software and hardware system, ultrasonic milling, intelligent manufacturing systems, mechatronics control hardware and software for manufacturing processes and equipment, computer aided manufacturing system for five axis, milling - turning integrated machining process, nano/micro mechanical machining processes and equipment, precision metrology for nano/micro mechanical machining, Non-traditional manufacturing processes such as electric discharge machining, laser machining and electron beam finishing.
Research Profile

Ronald W. Yeung, Professor Emeritus. Mathematical modeling, hydromechanics, naval architecture, numerical fluid mechanics, offshore mechanics, ocean processes, separated flows, wave-vorticity interaction, vortex-induced vibrations, stratified fluid flow, ocean energy, green ships, tidal energy, multi-hull flow physics, Helmholtz resonance, ship motion instabilities, tank resonance.
Research Profile

Xiang Zhang, Professor Emeritus. Mechanical engineering, rapid prototyping, semiconductor manufacturing, photonics, micro-nano scale engineering, 3D fabrication technologies, microelectronics, micro and nano-devices, nano-lithography, nano-instrumentation, bio-MEMS.
Research Profile

Contact Information

Department of Mechanical Engineering

6141 Etcheverry Hall

Phone: 510-642-1338

Fax: 510-642-6163

Visit Department Website

Department Chair

Christopher Dames, PhD

6143 Etcheverry Hall

Phone: 510-643-7013

cdames@berkeley.edu

Vice Chair of Graduate Study

Shawn Shadden, PhD

6149 Etcheverry Hall

Phone: 510-664-9800

shadden@berkeley.edu

Director, Student Services

William Orta, MBA

6187 Etcheverry Hall

Phone: 510-642-5085

worta@berkeley.edu

Graduate Student Affairs Advisor, MS & PhD

Yawo Dagbevi Akpawu

6189 Etcheverry Hall

Phone: 510-642-5084

yawo@me.berkeley.edu

Graduate Student Affairs Advisor, MEng

Isabel Blanco

6189 Etcheverry Hall

Phone: 510-642-6780

miblanco@berkeley.edu

Graduate Student Affairs Advisor, 5th Year MS

Ricky Vides

6193 Etcheverry Hall

Phone: 510-642-4094

rickyv72@berkeley.edu

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