Neuroscience

University of California, Berkeley

Overview

The Neuroscience Graduate Group is a unique, diverse PhD training program that offers intensive, integrated training in multiple areas of neuroscience research. The program involves more than 55 faculty from different campus departments, with expertise ranging from molecular and cellular neuroscience to developmental neuroscience, systems and computational neuroscience, and human cognitive neuroscience.

The group provides a highly interdisciplinary, intellectually dynamic training environment of course work, research training, and mentoring within a strong research program that produces fundamental advances in knowledge and cutting-edge techniques. The program welcomes highly qualified applicants to join in better understanding the brain and its functions and disorders.

Faculty in the Neuroscience Graduate Program are involved in three broad research areas: Cellular, Molecular, and Developmental Neuroscience; Systems and Computational Neuroscience; and Cognition, Brain, and Behavior. Individual faculty may be involved in more than one research area.

The Neuroscience Graduate Program also sponsors an annual campuswide Neuroscience retreat, weekly seminar series, and a graduate student Neuroscience Journal Club.

Undergraduate Program

There is no undergraduate program in Neuroscience.

Graduate Program

Neuroscience: PhD

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Courses

Neuroscience

NEUROSC C217D Biological and Public Health Aspects of Alzheimer's Disease 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
This course will survey the field of Alzheimer's disease (AD) from a biological and public health perspective by reading original research papers in the fields of medicine, neuroscience, and epidemiology. The course will begin with a historical survey of the concept of AD, followed by a description of clinical and neuropathological features. Subsequent classes will cover the genetics and molecular biology of the disease, as well
as biomarkers, epidemiology, risk factors, treatment, development of new diagnostic approaches, and ethical issues. The course will also serve as a model for the analysis of complex diseases with multiple genetic and environmental causes, and late onset neurodegenerative diseases. The course will also serve as a model for the analysis of complex diseases with multiple genetic and environmental causes and late-onset neurodegenerative disease.
Biological and Public Health Aspects of Alzheimer's Disease: Read More [+]

NEUROSC C261 Cellular and Developmental Neurobiology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
This course covers the molecular/cellular basis of neuron excitability (membrane potentials, action potential generation and propagation, ion channels), synaptic transmission and plasticity, sensory receptor function, and developmental neurobiology.

Cellular and Developmental Neurobiology: Read More [+]

NEUROSC C262 Circuit and Systems Neurobiology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Fall 2015
Advanced coverage of current research problems in systems-level neuroscience, and experimental and computational techniques used for these studies.

Circuit and Systems Neurobiology: Read More [+]

NEUROSC C265 Neural Computation 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This course provides an introduction to the theory of neural computation. The goal is to familiarize students with the major theoretical frameworks and models used in neuroscience and psychology, and to provide hands-on experience in using these models. Topics include neural network models, supervised and unsupervised learning rules, associative memory models, probabilistic/graphical models, and models of neural coding in the brain.

Neural Computation: Read More [+]

NEUROSC 290 Neuroscience First Year Research 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Seminar on the presentation and evaluation of research results for first-year neuroscience graduate students. During the first weeks, faculty present their research (FERPS); later, students present individual research results and evaluate their own and each other's work. Course enrollment limited to 15.

Neuroscience First Year Research: Read More [+]

NEUROSC 290A Neuroscience Research Design and Analysis 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016
Professional core competency training for graduate students involved in neuroscience research at Berkeley. Includes survey of modern research methods, and professional skills including principles of experimental design and data reproducibility.

Neuroscience Research Design and Analysis: Read More [+]

NEUROSC 290B Neuroscience Career Skills 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017
Professional core competency training for graduate students involved in neuroscience research at Berkeley. Includes training in giving scientific presentations, scientific writing, and project management.

Neuroscience Career Skills: Read More [+]

NEUROSC 291A Neuroscience Introduction to Research 4 - 12 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Closely supervised, intensive laboratory experimental research under the direction of an individual faculty member. For first-year neuroscience graduate students, this course will provide an introduction to experimental methods and research approaches in the different areas of neuroscience. Grade awarded on completion of sequence, which includes 3 ten-week laboratory rotations spread out over the fall and spring semesters.

Neuroscience Introduction to Research: Read More [+]

NEUROSC 291B Neuroscience Introduction to Research 4 - 12 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Closely supervised, intensive laboratory experimental research under the direction of an individual faculty member. For first-year neuroscience graduate students, this course will provide an introduction to experimental methods and research approaches in the different areas of neuroscience. Grade awarded on completion of sequence, which includes 3 ten-week laboratory rotations spread out over the fall and spring semesters.

Neuroscience Introduction to Research: Read More [+]

NEUROSC 292 Neuroscience Graduate Research 3 - 12 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Summer 2017 10 Week Session
For graduate students in neuroscience in their second or later years. During the summer, the course will count for 3-6 units. Individual research under faculty supervision. In this course each graduate student conducts basic thesis and dissertation research after successful completion of the first-year laboratory rotation, Neuroscience 291A-291B. Laboratory work provides the basis for students' thesis research, preparation for
the preliminary examination, and continued progress toward completion of Ph.D. dissertation.
Neuroscience Graduate Research: Read More [+]

NEUROSC 293 Neuroscience Research Review 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2009, Fall 2008, Spring 2008
For graduate students in neuroscience in their second or later years. Two hours of seminar per week which complements the individual laboratory work under faculty supervision. Seminar will review current scientific literature and discuss original research performed by faculty, postdoctoral fellows, scientists, and graduate students in individual faculty laboratories.

Neuroscience Research Review: Read More [+]

NEUROSC 294 Neuroscience Graduate Student Presentation Seminar 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
This course will encompass three important facets of graduate education in the neurosciences: 1) Development of research presentation skills: fourth and fifth year graduate students will present seminars based on their ongoing dissertation research. Preparation and critiques of presentations will focus on organization of conceptual issues, data presentation, and summarization. 2) Exposure to current topics in neuroscience: faculty speakers
will present on current issues and topics relevant to scientific development in the neurosciences, such as technical methods, application of analytical and statistical techniques, and organization and preparation of competitive fellowship and other grant applications. 3) Seminar preparation: a crucial aspect of graduate education is the interaction of students with invited seminar speakers - who are often leaders in their fields. A selected number of class meetings will be devoted to the review of scientific articles published by upcoming seminar speakers and/or other related articles in the field.
Neuroscience Graduate Student Presentation Seminar: Read More [+]

NEUROSC 299 Seminars 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Course that focuses on topical subjects in specific fields of neuroscience.

Seminars: Read More [+]

Faculty and Instructors

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

Hillel Adesnik, Assistant Professor.

Martin S. Banks, Professor. Stereopsis, virtual reality, optometry, multisensory interactions, self-motion perception, vision, depth perception, displays, picture perception, visual ergonomics.
Research Profile

Helen Bateup, Assistant Professor. Molecular and cellular neuroscience, neurodevelopmental disorders, autism, epilepsy.
Research Profile

Diana Bautista, Associate Professor. Ion channels, sensory physiology, chemosensation, touch, thermosensation, somatosensory system.
Research Profile

George Bentley, Associate Professor. Hormones and behavior, neuroendocrinology of reproduction.
Research Profile

Sonia Bishop, Assistant Professor.

Steve Brohawn, Assistant Professor.
Research Profile

Jose M. Carmena, Professor. Brain-machine interfaces, neural ensemble computation, neuroprosthetics, sensorimotor learning and control.
Research Profile

Christopher J. Chang, Professor. Chemistry, inorganic chemistry, neuroscience, bioinorganic chemistry, general physiology, organic chemistry, new chemical tools for biological imaging and proteomics, new metal complexes for energy catalysis and green chemistry, chemical biology.
Research Profile

Anne Collins, Assistant Professor. Human learning, decision-making and executive functions; Computational modeling at multiple levels (cognitive and neuroscience); Behavioral, EEG, drug and genes studies in healthy or patient populations.Human learning, decision-making and executive functions; Computational modeling at multiple levels (cognitive and neuroscience); Behavioral, EEG, drug and genes studies in healthy or patient populations.
Research Profile

Mark T. D'Esposito, Professor. Cognitive neuroscience, psychology, working memory, frontal lobe function, functional MRI, neurology, brain imaging, dopamine.
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Yang Dan, Professor. Neuronal circuits, mammalian visual system, electrophysiological, psychophysical and computational techniques, visual cortical circuits, visual neurons.
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Michael Deweese, Assistant Professor. Machine learning, computation, systems neuroscience, auditory cortex, neural coding.
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Andrew Dillin, Professor.

+ Dan Feldman, Associate Professor. Neurobiology, learning, neurophysiology, sensory biology.
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Marla B. Feller, Professor. Neurophysiology, developmental neuroscience.
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John Gerard Flannery, Professor. Neurobiology, optometry, vision science, cell and molecular biology of the retina in normal and diseased states.
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David Foster, Professor.

Darlene Francis, Associate Professor.

Jack L. Gallant, Professor. Vision science, form vision, attention, fMRI, computational neuroscience, natural scene perception, brain encoding, brain decoding.
Research Profile

Gian Garriga, Professor. Developmental neurobiology; molecular genetics, development of nervous systems, cell division, cell migration, axonal pathfinding, caenorhabditis elegans.
Research Profile

Tom Griffiths, Associate Professor. Machine learning, computational models of human cognition, Bayesian statistics, cultural evolution.
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Ming Hsu, Assistant Professor. Cognitive neuroscience, experimental economics, behavioral economics, neuroeconomics.
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Ehud Y. Isacoff, Professor. Ion channel function, synaptic plasticity, neural excitability, synaptic transmission, the synapse.
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Rich Ivry, Professor. Cognitive neuroscience, behavior, cognition, brain, attention, coordination, psychology, motor and perceptual processes in normal and neurologically impaired populations, temporal processing, executive control.
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Lucia F. Jacobs, Professor. Cognitive and brain evolution, adaptive patterns in spatial memory, spatial navigation, cognitive sex differences and decision making.
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William J. Jagust, Professor. Neuroscience, cognition, brain aging, dementia, imaging, Alzheimer's disease.
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Na Ji, Associate Professor. Biophysics.

Daniela Kaufer, Associate Professor. Neuroscience, stress, neural stem cells, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury, blood brain barrier, prosocial behavior.
Research Profile

Stanley A. Klein, Professor. Optometry, vision science, spatial vision modeling, psychophysical methods and vision test design, corneal topography and contact lens design, source localization of evoked potentials, fMRI, amblyopia.
Research Profile

Robert Thomas Knight, Professor. Cognitive neuroscience, language, physiology, memory, attention, psychology, working memory, neuropsychology, human prefrontal cortex, neural mechanisms of cognitive processing, sensory gating, sustained attention, ad novelty detection.
Research Profile

Richard H. Kramer, Professor. Cells, synaptic transmission, chemical signaling between neurons, ion channels, electrical signals, chemical reagents, synapses.
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Lance Kriegsfeld, Associate Professor. NeuroendocrinologyCircadian Biology, Neuroimmunology, cancer biology, animal behavior.
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Stephan Lammel, Assistant Professor. Neuroscience, Optogenetics, dopamine, addiction, depression.
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Dennis M. Levi, Professor. Optometry, vision science, pattern vision, abnormal visual development.
Research Profile

Chunlei Liu, Professor.

Evan W. Miller, Assistant Professor.

John Ngai, Professor. Nervous system, molecular and cellular mechanisms of olfaction, detection of odors, odorant receptors, olfactory neurons, DNA microarray technologies, genome-wide patterns of gene expression.
Research Profile

Bruno Olshausen, Professor. Visual perception, computational neuroscience, computational vision.
Research Profile

Mu-Ming Poo, Professor. Neurobiology, cellular and molecular mechanisms, axon guidance, synapse formation, activity-dependent refinement of neural circuits.
Research Profile

Teresa Puthussery, Assistant Professor. Retinal Neurobiology and Neurophysiology.
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David Schaffer, Professor. Neuroscience, biomolecular engineering, bioengineering, stem cell biology, gene therapy.
Research Profile

Kristin Scott, Professor. Nerve cell connectivity in developing nervous systems, taste perception in the fruit fly, taste neural circuits, sensory maps in the brain.
Research Profile

Arthur P. Shimamura, Professor. Cognitive neuroscience, behavior, cognition, brain, psychology, frontal lobe function, basic memory research.
Research Profile

Michael Silver, Associate Professor. Cognitive neuroscience, pharmacology, learning, attention, visual perception, neuroimaging.
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Fritz SOMMER, Adjunct Professor. Bayesian methods, information theory, memory, sensory processing, visual system.
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Mark A. Tanouye, Professor. Genetics, neuroanatomy, electrophysiology, mechanisms of nervous system structure and function, drosophila mutants.
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W. Rowland Taylor, Professor. Retinal circuit function, neural architecture, immunohisochemical studies.
Research Profile

Frederic Theunissen, Professor. Behavior, cognition, brain, psychology, birdsong, vocal learning, audition, neurophysiology, speech perception, computational neuroscience, theoretical neuroscience.
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Jonathan David Wallis, Professor. Prefrontal cortex, neurophysiology, executive control, decision making.
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David Whitney, Professor. Cognitive neuroscience, cognition, attention, visual perception, vision, visually guided action.
Research Profile

Linda Wilbrecht, Assistant Professor. Neuroscience, addiction, early life adversity, adolescence.
Research Profile

Michael Yartsev, Assistant Professor. Neuroscience, engineering.
Research Profile

Contact Information

Neuroscience Graduate Group

444 Li Ka Shing Hall

Phone: 510-642-8915

candaceg@berkeley.edu

Visit Group Website

Program Chair/Head Graduate Adviser

Dan Feldman

Phone: 510-643-1723

dfeldman@berkeley.edu

Graduate Program Coordinator

Candace Groskreutz

Phone: 510-642-8915

candaceg@berkeley.edu

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