Bioengineering/Materials Science and Engineering Joint Major

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

Bachelor of Science (BS)

The joint major programs are designed for students who wish to undertake study in two areas of engineering in order to qualify for employment in either field or for positions in which competence in two fields is required. These curricula include the core courses in each of the major fields. While they require slightly increased course loads, they can be completed in four years. Both majors are shown on the student's transcript of record.

The Bioengineering/Materials Science and Engineering Joint Major is for students who have a keen interest in the field of biomaterials. Students will study the design and synthesis of novel materials that will define new paradigms in biomaterials from the molecular through macroscopic levels, and will also receive a broad–based learning experience that will include exposure to fundamental courses in engineering and life sciences. This joint major aims to allow the student to understand the interface between the two major fields. Students taking this double major will successfully compete for jobs in the field of biomaterials in academe, industry, and government.

Admission to the Joint Major

Admission directly to a joint major is closed to freshmen and junior transfer applicants. Students interested in a joint program may apply to change majors during specific times in their academic progress. Please see the College of Engineering joint majors website for complete details.

Visit Department Website

Major Requirements

In addition to the University, campus, and college requirements, students must fulfill the below requirements specific to their major program.

General Guidelines

  1. All courses taken in satisfaction of major requirements must be taken for a letter grade.

  2. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student’s major and minor programs.

  3. A minimum overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required for all work undertaken at UC Berkeley.

  4. A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required for all technical courses taken in satisfaction of major requirements.

For information regarding residence requirements and unit requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.

For a detailed plan of study by year and semester, please see the Plan of Study tab.

Lower Division Requirements

MATH 1ACalculus4
MATH 1BCalculus4
MATH 53Multivariable Calculus4
MATH 54Linear Algebra and Differential Equations4
CHEM 1A
1AL
General Chemistry
and General Chemistry Laboratory 1
4
or CHEM 4A General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis
CHEM 3A
3AL
Chemical Structure and Reactivity
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory 1
5
or CHEM 12A Organic Chemistry
PHYSICS 7APhysics for Scientists and Engineers4
PHYSICS 7BPhysics for Scientists and Engineers4
BIO ENG 10Introduction to Biomedicine for Engineers4
BIO ENG 11Engineering Molecules 13
BIO ENG 26Introduction to Bioengineering1
ENGIN 7Introduction to Computer Programming for Scientists and Engineers4
or COMPSCI 61A The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs
MAT SCI 45Properties of Materials3
MAT SCI 45LProperties of Materials Laboratory1
1

CHEM 4A and CHEM 12A are intended for students majoring in chemistry or a closely-related field.

Upper Division Requirements

Please note that technical courses listed below fulfill only one requirement.

BIO ENG 102Biomechanics: Analysis and Design4
BIO ENG 103Engineering Molecules 24
BIO ENG 104Biological Transport Phenomena4
BIO ENG 116Cell and Tissue Engineering4
or BIO ENG C117 Structural Aspects of Biomaterials
or BIO ENG 111 Functional Biomaterials Development and Characterization
BIO ENG C118Biological Performance of Materials4
MAT SCI 102Bonding, Crystallography, and Crystal Defects3
MAT SCI 103Phase Transformations and Kinetics3
MAT SCI 104Materials Characterization4
MAT SCI 130Experimental Materials Science and Design3
or BIO ENG 115 Cell Biology for Engineers
MAT SCI 151Polymeric Materials3
BIO ENG 110Biomedical Physiology for Engineers4
or BIO ENG 114 Cell Engineering
ENGIN 40Engineering Thermodynamics3-4
or CHEM 120B Physical Chemistry
MAT SCI Electives: Select two courses from the following:6-7
Properties of Electronic Materials
Corrosion (Chemical Properties)
Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials
Experimental Materials Science and Design
BIO ENG Elective: Select one of the following: 13-4
Biomedical Physiology for Engineers
Functional Biomaterials Development and Characterization
Cell Engineering
Cell Biology for Engineers
Structural Aspects of Biomaterials
BioMEMS and Medical Devices
Basic Principles of Drug Delivery
Introduction of Bionanoscience and Bionanotechnology
Bioengineering Design Project or Research: Select one of the following:3-4
BioMems and BioNanotechnology Laboratory
Synthetic Biology Laboratory
Practical Light Microscopy
Senior Design Projects
Honors Undergraduate Research
Undergraduate Design Research
Ethics requirement, select one of the following: 23-4
Ethics in Science and Engineering
Ethics, Engineering, and Society
Engineering, The Environment, and Society
Environmental Philosophy and Ethics
Bioethics and Society
Engineering, The Environment, and Society
Effective Personal Ethics for the Twenty-First Century
Ethical Theories
Moral Psychology
1

Cannot be a course you have taken to fulfill another requirement.

2

The Ethics requirement will also fulfill one Humanities/Social Sciences requirement. See College Requirements tab.

College Requirements

Students in the College of Engineering must complete no fewer than 120 semester units with the following provisions: 

  1. Completion of the requirements of one engineering major program study. 
  2. A minimum overall grade point average of 2.00 (C average) and a minimum 2.00 grade point average in upper division technical coursework required of the major. 
  3. The final 30 units and two semesters must be completed in residence in the College of Engineering on the Berkeley campus. 
  4. All technical courses (math, science and engineering), required of the major or not, must be taken on a letter graded basis (unless they are only offered P/NP). 
  5. Entering freshmen are allowed a maximum of eight semesters to complete their degree requirements. Entering junior transfers are allowed a maximum of four semesters to complete their degree requirements. (Note: junior transfers admitted missing three or more courses from the lower division curriculum are allowed five semesters.) Summer terms are optional and do not count toward the maximum. Students are responsible for planning and satisfactorily completing all graduation requirements within the maximum allowable semesters. 
  6. Adhere to all college policies and procedures as they complete degree requirements.
  7. Complete the lower division program before enrolling in upper division engineering courses. 

Humanities and Social Science (H/SS) Requirement

To promote a rich and varied educational experience outside of the technical requirements for each major, the College of Engineering has a six-course Humanities and Social Sciences breadth requirement, which must be completed to graduate. This requirement, built into all the engineering programs of study, includes two reading and composition courses (R&C), and four additional courses within which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. Follow these guidelines to fulfill this requirement:

  1. Complete a minimum of six courses from the  approved Humanities/Social Sciences (H/SS) lists
  2. Courses must be a minimum of 3 semester units (or 4 quarter units).
  3. Two of the six courses must fulfill the college's Reading and Composition (R&C) requirement. These courses must be taken for a letter grade (C- or better required) and must be completed by no later than the end of the sophomore year (fourth semester of enrollment). The first half of R&C, the “A” course, must be completed by the end of the freshman year; the second half of R&C, the “B" course, must be completed by no later than the end of the sophomore year. View a detailed list of courses that fulfill Reading and Composition requirements, or use the College of Letters and Sciences search engine to view R&C courses offered in a given semester. 
  4. The four additional courses must be chosen within College of Engineering guidelines from the H/SS lists (see below). These courses may be taken on a Pass/Not Passed basis (P/NP).
  5. Two of the six courses must be upper division (courses numbered 100-196).
  6. One of the six courses must satisfy the campus American Cultures requirement. For detailed lists of courses that fulfill American Cultures requirements, visit the American Cultures site. 
  7. A maximum of two exams (Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, or A-Level) may be used toward completion of the H/SS requirement. View the list of exams that can be applied toward H/SS requirements.
  8. Courses may fulfill multiple categories. For example, if you complete CY PLAN 118AC that would satisfy the American Cultures requirement and one upper division H/SS requirement.
  9. No courses offered by any engineering department other than BIO ENG 100, COMPSCI C79, ENGIN 125, ENGIN 157AC, MEC ENG 191K and MEC ENG 191AC may be used to complete H/SS requirements.
  10. Foreign language courses may be used to complete H/SS requirements. View the list of language options.
  11. Courses numbered 97, 98, 99, or above 196 may not be used to complete any H/SS requirement
  12. The College of Engineering uses modified versions of five of the College of Letters and Science (L&S) breadth requirements lists to provide options to our students for completing the H/SS requirement. No courses on the L&S Biological Sciences or Physical Sciences breadth lists may be used to complete H/SS requirements. Within the guidelines above, choose courses from any of the lists below.

Class Schedule Requirements

  • Minimum units per semester: 12.0.
  • Maximum units per semester:  20.5.
  • Minimum technical courses: College of Engineering undergraduates must enroll each semester in no fewer than two technical courses (of a minimum of 3 units each) required of the major program of study in which the student is officially declared.  (Note: for most majors, normal progress will require enrolling in 3-4 technical courses each semester).
  • All technical courses (math, science, engineering), required of the major or not, must be taken on a letter-graded basis (unless only offered as P/NP).
  • A student's proposed schedule must be approved by a faculty adviser (or on approval from the dean or a designated staff adviser) each semester prior to enrolling in courses.

Minimum Academic (Grade) Requirements

  • A minimum overall and semester grade point average of 2.00 (C average) is required of engineering undergraduates. A student will be subject to dismissal from the University if during any fall or spring semester their overall UC GPA falls below a 2.00, or their semester GPA is less than 2.00. 
  • Students must achieve a minimum grade point average of 2.00 (C average) in upper division technical courses required for the major curriculum each semester. A student will be subject to dismissal from the University if their upper division technical grade point average falls below 2.00. 
  • A minimum overall grade point average of 2.00, and a minimum 2.00 grade point average in upper division technical course work required for the major is needed to earn a Bachelor of Science in Engineering.

Unit Requirements

To earn a Bachelor of Science in Engineering, students must complete at least 120 semester units of courses subject to certain guidelines:

  • Completion of the requirements of one engineering major program of study. 
  • A maximum of 16 units of special studies coursework (courses numbered 97, 98, 99, 197, 198, or 199) is allowed towards the 120 units; a maximum of four is allowed in a given semester.
  • A maximum of 4 units of physical education from any school attended will count towards the 120 units.
  • Students may receive unit credit for courses graded P (including P/NP units taken through EAP) up to a limit of one-third of the total units taken and passed on the Berkeley campus at the time of graduation.

Normal Progress

Students in the College of Engineering must enroll in a full-time program and make normal progress each semester toward the bachelor's degree. The continued enrollment of students who fail to achieve minimum academic progress shall be subject to the approval of the dean. (Note: students with official accommodations established by the Disabled Students' Program, with health or family issues, or with other reasons deemed appropriate by the dean may petition for an exception to normal progress rules.) 

UC and Campus Requirements

University of California Requirements

Entry Level Writing

All students who will enter the University of California as freshmen must demonstrate their command of the English language by fulfilling the Entry Level Writing Requirement. Fulfillment of this requirement is also a prerequisite to enrollment in all reading and composition courses at UC Berkeley. 

American History and American Institutions

The American History and Institutions requirements are based on the principle that a U.S. resident graduated from an American university should have an understanding of the history and governmental institutions of the United States.

Campus Requirement

American Cultures

American Cultures (AC) is the one requirement that all undergraduate students at UC Berkeley need to take and pass in order to graduate. The requirement offers an exciting intellectual environment centered on the study of race, ethnicity and culture in the United States. AC courses offer students opportunities to be part of research-led, highly accomplished teaching environments, grappling with the complexity of American Culture.

Plan of Study

For more detailed information regarding the courses listed below (e.g., elective information, GPA requirements, etc.), please see the College Requirements and Major Requirements tabs.

Freshman
FallUnitsSpringUnits
CHEM 1A & CHEM 1AL, or CHEM 4A14CHEM 3A & CHEM 3AL, or CHEM 12A15
MATH 1A4MATH 1B4
BIO ENG 104PHYSICS 7A4
BIO ENG 261Reading and Composition course from List B4
Reading and Composition course from List A4 
 17 17
Sophomore
FallUnitsSpringUnits
MATH 534MATH 544
PHYSICS 7B4BIO ENG 113
ENGIN 7 or COMPSCI 61A4MAT SCI 453
Humanities/Social Sciences course3-4MAT SCI 45L1
 Humanities/Social Sciences course3-4
 15-16 14-15
Junior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
BIO ENG 1024BIO ENG 1044
BIO ENG 1034MAT SCI 1033
MAT SCI 1023ENGIN 40 or CHEM 120B3-4
BIO ENG 100 or Humanities/Social Sciences course with ethics content23-4BIO ENG 110 or 1144
 14-15 14-15
Senior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
BIO ENG 115 or MAT SCI 1303-4Bioengineering Design Project or Research43-4
BIO ENG C1184MAT SCI Elective33-4
MAT SCI Elective33-4BIO ENG Elective53-4
Humanities/Social Sciences course3-4MAT SCI 1513
Free Elective2Free Elective2
 15-18 14-17
Total Units: 120-130
1

CHEM 4A and CHEM 12A are intended for students majoring in chemistry or a closely-related field.

2

Students must take one course with ethics content. This may be fulfilled within the Humanities/Social Sciences requirement by taking one of the following courses: BIO ENG 100ENGIN 125ENGIN 157ACESPM 161ESPM 162IAS 157ACL & S 160BPHILOS 104PHILOS 107.

3

Students must choose two of the following MAT SCI Electives: MAT SCI 111, MAT SCI 112, MAT SCI 113, MAT SCI 130.

4

Bioengineering Design Project or Research: Choose one of the following: BIO ENG 121LBIO ENG 140LBIO ENG 168LBIO ENG 192BIO ENG H194BIO ENG 196.

5

Students must choose one of the following BIO ENG Electives: BIO ENG 110BIO ENG 111, BIO ENG 114, BIO ENG 115, BIO ENG C117, BIO ENG 121, BIO ENG 124, BIO ENG 150, , MAT SCI 112. The BIO ENG Elective cannot be a course you have taken to fulfill another requirement.

Courses

Bioengineering/Materials Science and Engineering

BIO ENG 10 Introduction to Biomedicine for Engineers 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course is intended for lower division students interested in acquiring a foundation in biomedicine with topics ranging from evolutionary biology to human physiology. The emphasis is on the integration of engineering applications to biology and health. The goal is for undergraduate engineering students to gain sufficient biology and human physiology fundamentals so that they are better prepared to study specialized topics, e.g., biomechanics
, imaging, computational biology, tissue engineering, biomonitoring, drug development, robotics, and other topics covered by upper division and graduate courses in UC Berkeley departments of Molecular and Cell Biology, Integrative Biology, Bioengineering, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Mechanical Engineering, and courses in the UC San Francisco Division of Bioengineering. The specific lecture topics and exercises will include the key aspects of genomics and proteomics as well as topics on plant and animal evolution, stem cell biomedicine, and tissue regeneration and replacement. Medical physiology topics include relevant engineering aspects of human brain, heart, musculoskeletal, and other systems.
Introduction to Biomedicine for Engineers: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 11 Engineering Molecules 1 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016
This course focuses on providing students with a foundation in organic chemistry and biochemistry needed to understand contemporary problems in synthetic biology, biomaterials and computational biology.

Engineering Molecules 1: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 24 Freshmen Seminar 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester.

Freshmen Seminar: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 24 Freshman Seminar 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
The Freshman Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 20 freshmen.

Freshman Seminar: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 25 Careers in Biotechnology 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This introductory seminar is designed to give freshmen and sophomores an opportunity to explore specialties related to engineering in the pharmaceutical/biotech field. A series of one-hour seminars will be presented by industry professionals, professors, and researchers. Topics may include biotechnology and pharmaceutical manufacturing; process and control engineering; drug inspection process; research and development; compliance and validation;
construction process for a GMP facility; project management; and engineered solutions to environmental challenges. This course is of interest to students in all areas of engineering and biology, including industrial engineering and manufacturing, chemical engineering, and bioengineering.
Careers in Biotechnology: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 26 Introduction to Bioengineering 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017
This introductory seminar is designed to give freshmen and sophomores a glimpse of a broad selection of bioengineering research that is currently underway at Berkeley and UCSF. Students will become familiar with bioengineering applications in the various concentration areas and see how engineering principles can be applied to biological and medical problems.

Introduction to Bioengineering: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 45 Properties of Materials 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017
Application of basic principles of physics and chemistry to the engineering properties of materials. Special emphasis devoted to relation between microstructure and the mechanical properties of metals, concrete, polymers, and ceramics, and the electrical properties of semiconducting materials. Sponsoring Department: Materials Science and Engineering

Properties of Materials: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 45L Properties of Materials Laboratory 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017
This course presents laboratory applications of the basic principles introduced in the lecture-based course MSE45 – Properties of Materials.

Properties of Materials Laboratory: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 84 Sophomore Seminar 1 or 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2013, Spring 2005
Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses offered by faculty members in departments all across the campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for close, regular intellectual contact between faculty members and students in the crucial second year. The topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sophomores.

Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 98 Supervised Independent Group Studies 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Organized group study on various topics under the sponsorship of a member of the Bioengineering faculty.

Supervised Independent Group Studies: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 99 Supervised Independent Study and Research 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Supervised independent study for lower division students.

Supervised Independent Study and Research: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 100 Ethics in Science and Engineering 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The goal of this semester course is to present the issues of professional conduct in the practice of engineering, research, publication, public and private disclosures, and in managing professional and financial conflicts. The method is through historical didactic presentations, case studies, presentations of methods for problem solving in ethical matters, and classroom debates on contemporary ethical issues. The faculty will be drawn from national
experts and faculty from religious studies, journalism, and law from the UC Berkeley campus.
Ethics in Science and Engineering: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 101 Instrumentation in Biology and Medicine 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course teaches the fundamental principles underlying modern sensing and control instrumentation used in biology and medicine. The course takes an integrative analytic and hands-on approach to measurement theory and practice by presenting and analyzing example instruments currently used for biology and medical research, including EEG, ECG, pulsed oximeters, Complete Blood Count (CBC), etc.

Instrumentation in Biology and Medicine: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 102 Biomechanics: Analysis and Design 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course introduces, develops and applies the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena abundant in biology and medicine. It is intended for upper level undergraduate students who have been exposed to vectors, differential equations, and undergraduate course(s) in physics and certain aspects of modern biology.

Biomechanics: Analysis and Design: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 102 Bonding, Crystallography, and Crystal Defects 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Bonding in solids; classification of metals, semiconductors, and insulators; crystal systems; point, line, and planar defects in crystals; examples of crystallographic and defect analysis in engineering materials; relationship to physical and mechanical properties.

Bonding, Crystallography, and Crystal Defects: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 103 Engineering Molecules 2 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016
Thermodynamic and kinetic concepts applied to understanding the chemistry and structure of biomolecules (proteins, membranes, DNA, and RNA) and their thermodynamic and kinetic features in the crowded cellular environment. Topics include entropy, bioenergetics, free energy, chemical potential, reaction kinetics, enzyme kinetics, diffusion and transport, non-equilibrium systems, and their connections to the cellular environment.

Engineering Molecules 2: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 103 Phase Transformations and Kinetics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
The nature, mechanisms, and kinetics of phase transformations and microstructural changes in the solid state. Atom diffusion in solids. Phase transformations through the nucleation and growth of new matrix or precipitate phases. Martensitic transformations, spinodal decomposition. The use of phase transformations to control microstructure.

Phase Transformations and Kinetics: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 104 Biological Transport Phenomena 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
The transport of mass, momentum, and energy are critical to the function of living systems and the design of medical devices. Biological transport phenomena are present at a wide range of length scales: molecular, cellular, organ (whole and by functional unit), and organism. This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biological transport phenomena over a range of length and time scales. The course
is intended for undergraduate students who have taken a course in differential equations and an introductory course in physics. Students should be familiar with basic biology; an understanding of physiology is useful, but not assumed.
Biological Transport Phenomena: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 104 Materials Characterization 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Physical and chemical characterization of materials: Diffraction, imaging, and spectroscopy using optical, electron, and X-ray methods for bulk and surface analysis. Measurement of mechanical and physical properties. Project laboratory focusing on mechanical, chemical, electrical, and magnetic properties of materials, and materials characterization. Field trips.

Materials Characterization: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C106A Introduction to Robotics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017
An introduction to the kinematics, dynamics, and control of robot manipulators, robotic vision, and sensing. The course covers forward and inverse kinematics of serial chain manipulators, the manipulator Jacobian, force relations, dynamics, and control. It presents elementary principles on proximity, tactile, and force sensing, vision sensors, camera calibration, stereo construction, and motion detection. The course concludes with current applications of robotics in
active perception, medical robotics, and other areas.
Introduction to Robotics: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C106B Robotic Manipulation and Interaction 4 Units

Terms offered: Not yet offered
This course is a sequel to EECS C106A/Bioengineering C106A, which covers kinematics, dynamics and control of a single robot. This course will cover dynamics and control of groups of robotic manipulators coordinating with each other and interacting with the environment. Concepts will include an introduction to grasping and the constrained manipulation, contacts and force control for interaction with the environment. We will also cover active perception guided manipulation
, as well as the manipulation of non-rigid objects. Throughout, we will emphasize design and human-robot interactions, and applications to applications in manufacturing, service robotics, tele-surgery, and locomotion.
Robotic Manipulation and Interaction: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 110 Biomedical Physiology for Engineers 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course introduces students to the physiology of human organ systems, with an emphasis on quantitative problem solving, engineering-style modeling, and applications to clinical medicine.

Biomedical Physiology for Engineers: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 111 Functional Biomaterials Development and Characterization 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course is intended for upper level engineering undergraduate students interested in the development of novel functional proteins and peptide motifs and characterization of their physical and biological properties using various instrumentation tools in quantitative manners. The emphasis of the class is how to develop novel proteins and peptide motifs, and to characterize their physical and biological functions using various analytical
tools in quantitative manners.
Functional Biomaterials Development and Characterization: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 111 Properties of Electronic Materials 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Introduction to the physical principles underlying the electric properties of modern solids with emphasis on semiconductors; control of defects and impurities through physical purification, bulk and thin film crystal growth and doping processes, materials basis of electronic and optoelectronic devices (diodes, transistors, semiconductor lasers) and optical fibers; properties of metal and oxide superconductors and their applications.

Properties of Electronic Materials: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 112 Corrosion (Chemical Properties) 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Electrochemical theory of corrosion. Mechanisms and rates in relation to physiochemical and metallurgical factors. Stress corrosion and mechanical influences on corrosion. Corrosion protection by design, inhibition, cathodic protection, and coatings.

Corrosion (Chemical Properties): Read More [+]

BIO ENG C112 Molecular Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of the Cell 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
This course applies methods of statistical continuum mechanics to subcellar biomechanical phenomena ranging from nanoscale (molecular) to microscale (whole cell and cell population) biological processes at the interface of mechanics, biology, and chemistry.

Molecular Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of the Cell: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 113 Stem Cells and Technologies 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
This course will teach the main concepts and current views on key attributes of embryonic stem cells (ESC), will introduce theory of their function in embryonic development, methods of ESC derivation, propagation, and characterization, and will discuss currently developing stem cell technologies.

Stem Cells and Technologies: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 113 Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course covers elastic and plastic deformation under static and dynamic loads. Prediction and prevention of failure by yielding, fracture, fatigue, wear and environmental factors are addressed. Design issues pertaining to materials selection for load bearing applications are discussed. Case studies of engineering failures are presented. Topics include engineering materials, structure-property relationships, materials selection for design, mechanical
behavior of polymers and design of plastic components, complex states of stress and strain, elastic deformation and multiaxial loading, plastic deformation and yield criteria, dislocation plasticity and strengthening mechanisms, creep, effects of stress concentrations, fracture, fatigue, and contact stresses.
Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 114 Cell Engineering 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016
This course will teach the main concepts and current views on key attributes of animal cells (somatic, embryonic, pluripotent, germ-line; with the focus on mammalian cells), will introduce theory of the regulation of cell function, methods for deliberate control of cell properties and resulting biomedical technologies. Techniques for primary cell-line derivation, propagation characterization and therapeutic use (transplantation and drug-screening) will be
outlined. Current bioengineering strategies will be discussed.
Cell Engineering: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 115 Cell Biology for Engineers 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
This course aims to provide a practical understanding of the nature of cell and tissue biology research. Students will be introduced to cell biology techniques as applied to cells and tissues including immunofluorescence, image analysis, protein quantification, protein expression, gene expression, and cell culture. The course culminates with a group project which synthesizes literature review, experimental design, implementation, troubleshooting
, and analysis of results.
Cell Biology for Engineers: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 116 Cell and Tissue Engineering 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
The goal of tissue engineering is to fabricate substitutes to restore tissue structure and functions. Understanding cell function in response to environmental cues will help us to establish design criteria and develop engineering tools for tissue fabrication. This course will introduce the basic concepts and approaches in the field, and train students to design and engineer biological substitutes.

Cell and Tissue Engineering: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 117 Properties of Dielectric and Magnetic Materials 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2011, Fall 2010
Introduction to the physical principles underlying the dielectric and magnetic properties of solids. Processing-microstructure-property relationships of dielectric materials, including piezoelectric, pryoelectric, and ferroelectric oxides, and of magnetic materials, including hard- and soft ferromagnets, ferrites and magneto-optic and -resistive materials. The course also covers the properties of grain boundary devices (including varistors)
as well as ion-conducting and mixed conducting materials for applications in various devices such as sensors, fuel cells, and electric batteries.
Properties of Dielectric and Magnetic Materials: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C117 Structural Aspects of Biomaterials 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2013, Spring 2012
This course covers the structure and mechanical functions of load bearing tissues and their replacements. Natural and synthetic load-bearing biomaterials for clinical applications are reviewed. Biocompatibility of biomaterials and host response to structural implants are examined. Quantitative treatment of biomechanical issues and constitutive relationships of tissues are covered in order to design biomaterial replacements for structural function.
Material selection for load bearing applications including reconstructive surgery, orthopedics, dentistry, and cardiology are addressed. Mechanical design for longevity including topics of fatigue, wear, and fracture are reviewed. Case studies that examine failures of devices are presented.
Structural Aspects of Biomaterials: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C118 Biological Performance of Materials 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course is intended to give students the opportunity to expand their knowledge of topics related to biomedical materials selection and design. Structure-property relationships of biomedical materials and their interaction with biological systems will be addressed. Applications of the concepts developed include blood-materials compatibility, biomimetic materials, hard and soft tissue-materials interactions, drug delivery, tissue engineering
, and biotechnology.
Biological Performance of Materials: Read More [+]

MAT SCI C118 Biological Performance of Materials 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course is intended to give students the opportunity to expand their knowledge of topics related to biomedical materials selection and design. Structure-property relationships of biomedical materials and their interaction with biological systems will be addressed. Applications of the concepts developed include blood-materials compatibility, biomimetic materials, hard and soft tissue-materials interactions, drug delivery, tissue engineering
, and biotechnology.
Biological Performance of Materials: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C119 Orthopedic Biomechanics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Statics, dynamics, optimization theory, composite beam theory, beam-on-elastic foundation theory, Hertz contact theory, and materials behavior. Forces and moments acting on human joints; composition and mechanical behavior of orthopedic biomaterials; design/analysis of artificial joint, spine, and fracture fixation prostheses; musculoskeletal tissues including bone, cartilage, tendon, ligament, and muscle; osteoporosis and fracture-risk predication
of bones; and bone adaptation. MATLAB-based project to integrate the course material.
Orthopedic Biomechanics: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 120 Materials Production 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Economic and technological significance of metals and other materials. Elementary geology (composition of lithosphere, mineralization). Short survey of mining and mineral processing techniques. Review of chemical thermodynamics and reaction kinetics. Principles of process engineering including material, heat, and mechanical energy balances. Elementary heat transfer, fluid flow, and mass transfer. Electrolytic production and refining of metals.
Vapor techniques for production of metals and coatings.
Materials Production: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 121 BioMEMS and Medical Devices 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Biophysical and chemical principles of biomedical devices, bionanotechnology, bionanophotonics, and biomedical microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMS). Topics include basics of nano- and microfabrication, soft-lithography, DNA arrays, protein arrays, electrokinetics, electrochemical, transducers, microfluidic devices, biosensor, point of care diagnostics, lab-on-a-chip, drug delivery microsystems, clinical lab-on-a-chip, advanced biomolecular
probes, etc.
BioMEMS and Medical Devices: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 121 Metals Processing 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
The principles of metals processing with emphasis on the use of processing to establish microstructures which impart desirable engineering properties. The techniques discussed include solidification, thermal and mechanical processing, powder processing, welding and joining, and surface treatments.

Metals Processing: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 121L BioMems and BioNanotechnology Laboratory 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Students will become familiar with BioMEMS and Lab-on-a-Chip research. Students will design and fabricate their own novel micro- or nano-scale device to address a specific problem in biotechnology using the latest micro- and nano-technological tools and fabrication techniques. This will involve an intensive primary literature review, experimental design, and quantitative data analysis. Results will be presented during class presentations and
at a final poster symposium.
BioMems and BioNanotechnology Laboratory: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 122 Ceramic Processing 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
Powder fabrication by grinding and chemical methods, rheological behavior of powder-fluid suspensions, forming methods, drying, sintering, and grain growth. Relation of processing steps to microstructure development.

Ceramic Processing: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 123 ELECTRONIC MATERIALS PROCESSING 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This 4-unit course starts with a brief review of the fundamentals of solid-state physics including bands and defects in semiconductors and oxides, and then moves to bulk semiconductor crystals growth and processing including doping, diffusion and implantation, and then to thin film deposition and processing methods, and finishes with a discussion of materials analysis and characterization. Recent advances in nanomaterials research will also be
introduced.
ELECTRONIC MATERIALS PROCESSING: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 124 Basic Principles of Drug Delivery 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course focuses on providing students with the foundations needed to understand contemporary literature in drug delivery. Concepts in organic chemistry, biochemistry, and physical chemistry needed to understand current problems in drug delivery are emphasized.

Basic Principles of Drug Delivery: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 125 Thin-Film Materials Science 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Fall 2014
Deposition, processing, and characterization of thin films and their technological applications. Physical and chemical vapor deposition methods. Thin-film nucleation and growth. Thermal and ion processing. Microstructural development in epitaxial, polycrystalline, and amorphous films. Thin-film characterization techniques. Applications in information storage, integrated circuits, and optoelectronic devices. Laboratory demonstrations.

Thin-Film Materials Science: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C125 Introduction to Robotics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
An introduction to the kinematics, dynamics, and control of robot manipulators, robotic vision, and sensing. The course covers forward and inverse kinematics of serial chain manipulators, the manipulator Jacobian, force relations, dynamics, and control. It presents elementary principles on proximity, tactile, and force sensing, vision sensors, camera calibration, stereo construction, and motion detection. The course concludes with current applications
of robotics in active perception, medical robotics, and other areas.
Introduction to Robotics: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C125B Robotic Manipulation and Interaction 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016
This course is a sequel to Electrical Engineering C106A/Bioengineering C125, which covers kinematics, dynamics and control of a single robot. This course will cover dynamics and control of groups of robotic manipulators coordinating with each other and interacting with the environment. Concepts will include an introduction to grasping and the constrained manipulation, contacts and force control for interaction with the environment. We will also cover
active perception guided manipulation, as well as the manipulation of non-rigid objects. Throughout, we will emphasize design and human-robot interactions, and applications to applications in manufacturing, service robotics, tele-surgery, and locomotion.
Robotic Manipulation and Interaction: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 130 Experimental Materials Science and Design 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course provides a culminating experience for students approaching completion of the materials science and engineering curriculum. Laboratory experiments are undertaken in a variety of areas from the investigations on semiconductor materials to corrosion science and elucidate the relationships among structure, processing, properties, and performance. The principles of materials selection in engineering design are reviewed.

Experimental Materials Science and Design: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 131 Introduction to Computational Molecular and Cell Biology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Topics include computational approaches and techniques to gene structure and genome annotation, sequence alignment using dynamic programming, protein domain analysis, RNA folding and structure prediction, RNA sequence design for synthetic biology, genetic and biochemical pathways and networks, UNIX and scripting languages, basic probability and information theory. Various "case studies" in these areas are reviewed; web-based computational
biology tools will be used by students and programming projects will be given. Computational biology research connections to biotechnology will be explored.
Introduction to Computational Molecular and Cell Biology: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 132 Genetic Devices 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
This senior-level course is a comprehensive survey of genetic devices. These DNA-based constructs are comprised of multiple "parts" that together encode a higher-level biological behavior and perform useful human-defined functions. Such constructs are the engineering target for most projects in synthetic biology. Included within this class of constructs are genetic circuits, sensors, biosynthetic pathways, and microbiological functions.

Genetic Devices: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 133 Biomolecular Engineering 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This is an introductory course of biomolecular engineering and is required for all CBE graduate students. Undergraduates with knowledge of thermodynamics and transport are also welcome. The topics include structures, functions, and dynamics of biomolecules; molecular tools in biotechnology; metabolic and signaling networks in cellular engineering; and synthetic biology and biomedical engineering applications.

Biomolecular Engineering: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 134 Genetic Design Automation 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017
Genetic Design Automation is the use of software to design and manage genetics experiments. This course introduces the interface between object-oriented programming and wetlab synthetic biology in a hands-on manner. Through a series of programming assignments, each student will build a computer program that automatically designs experiments starting from a formal specification. They will then independently build a new software module of their own design to augment the
basic platform
Genetic Design Automation: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 135 Frontiers in Microbial Systems Biology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2009
This course is aimed at graduate and advanced undergraduate students from the (bio) engineering and chemo-physical sciences interested in a research-oriented introduction to current topics in systems biology. Focusing mainly on two well studied microbiological model systems--the chemotaxis network and Lambda bacteriophage infection--the class systematically introduces key concepts and techniques for biological network deduction, modelling, analysis, evolution
, and synthetic network design. Students analyze the impact of approaches from the quantitative sciences--such as deterministic modelling, stochastic processes, statistics, non-linear dynamics, control theory, information theory, graph theory, etc.--on understanding biological processes, including (stochastic) gene regulation, signalling, network evolution, and synthetic network design. The course aims to identify unsolved problems and discusses possible novel approaches while encouraging students to develop ideas to explore new directions in their own research.
Frontiers in Microbial Systems Biology: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 136 Materials in Energy Technologies 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2011
In many, if not all, technologies, it is materials that play a crucial, enabling role. This course examines potentially sustainable technologies, and the materials properties that enable them. The science at the basis of selected energy technologies are examined and considered in case studies.

Materials in Energy Technologies: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C136L Laboratory in the Mechanics of Organisms 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
Introduction to laboratory and field study of the biomechanics of animals and plants using fundamental biomechanical techniques and equipment. Course has a series of rotations involving students in experiments demonstrating how solid and fluid mechanics can be used to discover the way in which diverse organisms move and interact with their physical environment. The laboratories emphasize sampling methodology, experimental design
, and statistical interpretation of results. Latter third of course devoted to independent research projects. Written reports and class presentation of project results are required.
Laboratory in the Mechanics of Organisms: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C137 Designing for the Human Body 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017
The course provides project-based learning experience in understanding product design, with a focus on the human body as a mechanical machine. Students will learn the design of external devices used to aid or protect the body. Topics will include forces acting on internal materials (e.g., muscles and total replacement devices), forces acting on external materials (e.g., prothetics and crash pads), design/analysis of devices aimed to improve or fix the human body, muscle
adaptation, and soft tissue injury. Weekly laboratory projects will incorporate EMG sensing, force plate analysis, and interpretation of data collection (e.g., MATLAB analysis) to integrate course material to better understand contemporary design/analysis/problems.
Designing for the Human Body: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 140 Nanomaterials for Scientists and Engineers 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
This course introduces the fundamental principles needed to understand the behavior of materials at the nanometer length scale and the different classes of nanomaterials with applications ranging from information technology to biotechnology. Topics include introduction to different classes of nanomaterials, synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials, and the electronic, magnetic, optical, and mechanical properties of nanomaterials.

Nanomaterials for Scientists and Engineers: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 140L Synthetic Biology Laboratory 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2014
This laboratory course is designed as an introduction to research in synthetic biology, a ground-up approach to genetic engineering with applications in bioenergy, heathcare, materials science, and chemical production. In this course, we will design and execute a real research project. Each student will be responsible for designing and constructing components for the group project and then performing experiments to analyze the system. In addition
to laboratory work, we will have lectures on methods and design concepts in synthetic biology including an introduction to Biobricks, gene synthesis, computer modeling, directed evolution, practical molecular biology, and biochemistry.
Synthetic Biology Laboratory: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 143 Computational Methods in Biology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
An introduction to biophysical simulation methods and algorithms, including molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo, mathematical optimization, and "non-algorithmic" computation such as neural networks. Various case studies in applying these areas in the areas of protein folding, protein structure prediction, drug docking, and enzymatics will be covered. Core Specialization: Core B (Informatics and Genomics); Core D (Computational Biology); BioE
Content: Biological.
Computational Methods in Biology: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 144 Introduction to Protein Informatics 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2008, Fall 2007
This course will introduce students to the bioinformatics algorithms used by biologists to identify homologs, construct multiple sequence alignments, predict protein structure, estimate phylogenetic trees, identify orthologs, predict protein-protein interaction, and build hidden Markov models. The focus is on the algorithms used, and on the sources of various types of errors in these methods.

Introduction to Protein Informatics: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 144L Protein Informatics Laboratory 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2008
This course is intended to provide hands-on experience with a variety of bioinformatics tools, web servers, and databases that are used to predict protein function and structure. This course will cover numerous bioinformatics tasks including: homolog detection using BLAST and PSI-BLAST, hidden Markov model construction and use, multiple sequence alignment, phylogenetic tree construction, ortholog identification, protein structure prediction, active site prediction,
cellular localization, protein-protein interaction and phylogenomic analysis. Some minimal programming/scripting skills (e.g., Perl or Python) are required to complete some of the labs.
Protein Informatics Laboratory: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 145 Intro to Machine Learning in Computational Biology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017
This course will review the fundamentals of Data Science and data mining techniques. We will begin by reviewing Data Science across the disciplines, including guest lectures from data scientists on campus. As the semester progresses, we will focus increasingly on data science techniques in computational biology and bioinformatics, illustrating major methods and issues from these fields. Finally, we will discuss ethical issues related to data from biomedical research
and genomics.
Intro to Machine Learning in Computational Biology: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C145L Introductory Electronic Transducers Laboratory 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
Laboratory exercises exploring a variety of electronic transducers for measuring physical quantities such as temperature, force, displacement, sound, light, ionic potential; the use of circuits for low-level differential amplification and analog signal processing; and the use of microcomputers for digital sampling and display. Lectures cover principles explored in the laboratory exercises; construction, response and signal to noise of electronic
transducers and actuators; and design of circuits for sensing and controlling physical quantities.
Introductory Electronic Transducers Laboratory: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C145M Introductory Microcomputer Interfacing Laboratory 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2012, Spring 2011
Laboratory exercises constructing basic interfacing circuits and writing 20-100 line C programs for data acquisition, storage, analysis, display, and control. Use of the IBM PC with microprogrammable digital counter/timer, parallel I/O port. Circuit components include anti-aliasing filters, the S/H amplifier, A/D and D/A converters. Exercises include effects of aliasing in periodic sampling, fast Fourier transforms of basic waveforms, the
use of the Hanning filter for leakage reduction, Fourier analysis of the human voice, digital filters, and control using Fourier deconvolution. Lectures cover principles explored in the lab exercises and design of microcomputer-based systems for data acquisitions, analysis and control.
Introductory Microcomputer Interfacing Laboratory: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 147 Principles of Synthetic Biology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
The field of synthetic biology is quickly emerging as potentially one of the most important and profound ways by which we can understand and manipulate our physical world for desired purposes. In this course, the field and its natural scientific and engineering basis are introduced. Relevant topics in cellular and molecular biology and biophysics, dynamical and engineering systems, and design and operation of natural and synthetic circuits are
covered in a concise manner that then allows the student to begin to design new biology-based systems.
Principles of Synthetic Biology: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 148 Bioenergy and Sustainable Chemical Synthesis: Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology Approaches 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course will cover metabolic engineering and the various synthetic biology approaches for optimizing pathway performance. Use of metabolic engineering to produce biofuels and general "green technology" will be emphasized since these aims are currently pushing these fields. The course is meant to be a practical guide for metabolic engineering and the related advances in synthetic biology as well the related industrial research and
opportunities.
Bioenergy and Sustainable Chemical Synthesis: Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology Approaches: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 150 Introduction of Bionanoscience and Bionanotechnology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course is intended for the bioengineering or engineering undergraduate students interested in acquiring a background in recent development of bio-nanomaterials and bio-nanotechnology. The emphasis of the class is to understand the properties of biological basis building blocks, their assembly principles in nature, and their application to build functional materials and devices.

Introduction of Bionanoscience and Bionanotechnology: Read More [+]

MAT SCI C150 Introduction to Materials Chemistry 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2012
The application of basic chemical principles to problems in materials discovery, design, and characterization will be discussed. Topics covered will include inorganic solids, nanoscale materials, polymers, and biological materials, with specific focus on the ways in which atomic-level interactions dictate the bulk properties of matter.

Introduction to Materials Chemistry: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 151 Micro/Nanofluidics for Bioengineering and Lab-On-A-Chip 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
Introduction and in-depth treatment of theory relevant to fluid flow in microfluidic and nanofluidic systems supplemented by critical assessment of recent applications drawn from the literature. Topics include low Reynolds Number flow, mass transport including diffusion phenomena, and emphasis on electrokinetic systems and bioanalytical applications of said phenomena.

Micro/Nanofluidics for Bioengineering and Lab-On-A-Chip: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 151 Polymeric Materials 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course is designed for upper division undergraduate and graduate students to gain a fundamental understanding of the science of polymeric materials. Beginning with a treatment of ideal polymeric chain conformations, it develops the thermodynamics of polmyer blends and solutions, the modeling of polymer networks and gelations, the dynamics of polymer chains, and the morphologies of thin films and other dimensionally-restricted structures
relevant to nanotechnology.
Polymeric Materials: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 163 Principles of Molecular and Cellular Biophotonics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course provides undergraduate and graduate bioengineering students with an opportunity to increase their knowledge of topics in the emerging field of biophotonics with an emphasis on fluorescence spectroscopy, biosensors and devices for optical imaging and detection of biomolecules. This course will cover the photophysics and photochemistry of organic molecules, the design and characterization of biosensors and their applications within diverse
environments.
Principles of Molecular and Cellular Biophotonics: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 163L Molecular and Cellular Biophotonics Laboratory 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Fall 2013
This course provides undergraduate and graduate bioengineering students with an opportunity to acquire essential experimental skills in fluorescence spectroscopy and the design, evaluation, and optimization of optical biosensors for quantitative measurements of proteins and their targets. Groups of students will be responsible for the research, design, and development of a biosensor or diagnostic device for the detection, diagnosis, and monitoring
of a specific biomarker(s).
Molecular and Cellular Biophotonics Laboratory: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 164 Optics and Microscopy 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2010, Fall 2009, Fall 2008
This course teaches fundamental principles of optics and examines contemporary methods of optical microscopy for cells and molecules. Students will learn how to design simple optical systems, calculate system performance, and apply imaging techniques including transmission, reflection, phase, and fluorescence microscopy to investigate biological samples. The capabilities of optical microscopy will be compared with complementary techniques including
electron microscopy, coherence tomography, and atomic force microscopy. Students will also be responsible for researching their final project outside of class and presenting a specific application of modern microscopy to biological research as part of an end-of-semester project.
Optics and Microscopy: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C165 Medical Imaging Signals and Systems 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Biomedical imaging is a clinically important application of engineering, applied mathematics, physics, and medicine. In this course, we apply linear systems theory and basic physics to analyze X-ray imaging, computerized tomography, nuclear medicine, and MRI. We cover the basic physics and instrumentation that characterizes medical image as an ideal perfect-resolution image blurred by an impulse response. This material could prepare the student
for a career in designing new medical imaging systems that reliably detect small tumors or infarcts.
Medical Imaging Signals and Systems: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 168L Practical Light Microscopy 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2015, Fall 2013
This laboratory course is designed for students interested in obtaining practical hands-on training in optical imaging and instrumentation. Using a combination of lenses, cameras, and data acquisition equipment, students will construct simple light microscopes that introduce basic concepts and limitations important in biomedical optical imaging. Topics include compound microscopes, Kohler illumination, Rayleigh two-point resolution, image contrast
including dark-field and fluorescence microscopy, and specialized techniques such as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). Intended for students in both engineering and the sciences, this course will emphasize applied aspects of optical imaging and provide a base of practical skill and reference material that students can leverage in their own research or in industry.
Practical Light Microscopy: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C181 The Berkeley Lectures on Energy: Energy from Biomass 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
After an introduction to the different aspects of our global energy consumption, the course will focus on the role of biomass. The course will illustrate how the global scale of energy guides the biomass research. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of the biological aspects (crop selection, harvesting, storage and distribution, and chemical composition of biomass) with the chemical aspects to convert biomass to energy. The course aims to
engage students in state-of-the-art research.
The Berkeley Lectures on Energy: Energy from Biomass: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 190 Special Topics in Bioengineering 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
This course covers current topics of research interest in bioengineering. The course content may vary from semester to semester.

Special Topics in Bioengineering: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 192 Senior Design Projects 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This semester-long course introduces students to bioengineering project-based learning in small teams, with a strong emphasis on need-based solutions for real medical and research problems through prototype solution selection, design, and testing. The course is designed to provide a "capstone" design experience for bioengineering seniors. The course is structured around didactic lectures, and a textbook, from which assigned readings will
be drawn, and supplemented by additional handouts, readings, and lecture material. Where appropriate, the syllabus includes guest lectures from clinicians and practicing engineers from academia and industry. The course includes active learning through organized activities, during which teams will participate in exercises meant to reinforce lecture material through direct application to the team design project.
Senior Design Projects: Read More [+]

BIO ENG H194 Honors Undergraduate Research 3 or 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Supervised research. Students who have completed 3 or more upper division courses may pursue original research under the direction of one of the members of the staff. May be taken a second time for credit only. A final report or presentation is required. A maximum of 4 units of this course may be used to fulfill the research or technical elective requirement or in the Bioengineering program.

Honors Undergraduate Research: Read More [+]

MAT SCI H194 Honors Undergraduate Research 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Students who have completed a satisfactory number of advanced courses with a grade-point average of 3.3 or higher may pursue original research under the direction of one of the members of the staff. A maximum of 3 units of H194 may be used to fulfill technical elective requirements in the Materials Science and Engineering program or double majors (unlike 198 or 199, which do not satisfy technical elective requirements). Final report required.

Honors Undergraduate Research: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 195 Special Topics for Advanced Undergraduates 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
Group study of special topics in materials science and engineering. Selection of topics for further study of underlying concepts and relevent literature, in consultion with appropriate faculty members.

Special Topics for Advanced Undergraduates: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 196 Undergraduate Design Research 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Supervised research. This course will satisfy the Senior Bioengineering Design project requirement. Students with junior or senior status may pursue research under the direction of one of the members of the staff. May be taken a second time for credit only. A final report or presentation is required.

Undergraduate Design Research: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 198 Directed Group Study for Advanced Undergraduates 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Group study of a selected topic or topics in bioengineering, usually relating to new developments.

Directed Group Study for Advanced Undergraduates: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 198 Directed Group Studies for Advanced Undergraduates 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Group studies of selected topics.

Directed Group Studies for Advanced Undergraduates: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 199 Supervised Independent Study 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Supervised independent study.

Supervised Independent Study: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 199 Supervised Independent Study 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Supervised independent study. Enrollment restrictions apply; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.

Supervised Independent Study: Read More [+]

Faculty and Instructors

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

John Anderson, Assistant Professor.

Martin S. Banks, Professor. Stereopsis, virtual reality, optometry, multisensory interactions, self-motion perception, vision, depth perception, displays, picture perception, visual ergonomics.
Research Profile

Steven Brenner, Professor. Molecular biology, computational biology, evolutionary biology, bioengineering, structural genomics, computational genomics, cellular activity, cellular functions, personal genomics.
Research Profile

John Canny, Professor. Computer science, activity-based computing, livenotes, mechatronic devices, flexonics.
Research Profile

Jose M. Carmena, Professor. Brain-machine interfaces, neural ensemble computation, neuroprosthetics, sensorimotor learning and control.
Research Profile

Michelle Chang, Associate Professor.

Irina M. Conboy, Associate Professor. Stem cell niche engineering, tissue repair, stem cell aging and rejuvenation.
Research Profile

Yang Dan, Professor. Neuronal circuits, mammalian visual system, electrophysiological, psychophysical and computational techniques, visual cortical circuits, visual neurons.
Research Profile

John Eugene Dueber, Assistant Professor. Synthetic biology, Metabolic Engineering.
Research Profile

+ Robert J. Full, Professor. Energetics, comparative biomechanics, arthropod, adhesion, comparative physiology, locomotion, neuromechanics, biomimicry, biological inspiration, reptile, gecko, amphibian, robots, artificial muscles.
Research Profile

Jack L. Gallant, Professor. Vision science, form vision, attention, fMRI, computational neuroscience, natural scene perception, brain encoding, brain decoding.
Research Profile

Xiaohua Gong, Professor. Optometry, vision science, eye development and diseases, lens development.
Research Profile

Amy Herr, Associate Professor. Microfluidics, bioanalytical separations, diagnostics, electrokinetic transport, engineering design.
Research Profile

Tony M. Keaveny, Professor. Biomechanics of bone, orthopaedic biomechanics, design of artificial joints, osteoporosis, finite element modeling, clinical biomechanics.
Research Profile

Stanley A. Klein, Professor. Optometry, vision science, spatial vision modeling, psychophysical methods and vision test design, corneal topography and contact lens design, source localization of evoked potentials, fMRI, amblyopia.
Research Profile

Luke Lee, Professor. Biophotonics, biophysics, bionanoscience, molecular imaging, single cell analysis, bio-nano interfaces, integrated microfluidic devices (iMD) for diagnostics and preventive personalized medicine.
Research Profile

Seung-Wuk Lee, Associate Professor. Nanotechnology, bio-inspired nanomaterials, synthetic viruses, regenerative tissue engineering materials, drug delivery vehicles.
Research Profile

Song Li, Professor. Bioengineering, vascular tissue engineering, stem cell engineering, mechano-chemical signal transduction, biomimetic matrix, molecules, bioinformatic applications in tissue engineering, molecular dynamics.
Research Profile

Michel Maharbiz, Associate Professor. Neural interfaces, bioMEMS, microsystems, MEMS, microsystems for the life sciences.
Research Profile

Gerard Marriott, Professor.

Richard Mathies, Professor. Genomics, biophysical, bioanalytical, physical chemistry; laser spectroscopy, resonance Raman, excited-state reaction dynamics photoactive proteins, rhodopsins, microfabricated chemical biochemical analysis devices, forensics, infectious disease detection.
Research Profile

Mohammad Mofrad, Professor. Nuclear pore complex and nucleocytoplasmic transport, mechanobiology of disease, cellular mechanotransduction, integrin-mediated focal adhesions.
Research Profile

Niren Murthy, Professor.

+ Alexander Pines, Professor. Theory and experiment in magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging, quantum coherence and decoherence, novel concepts and methods including molecular and biomolecular sensors and microfluidics, laser hyperpolarization and detection, laser and zero-field NMR, in areas from material science to biomedicine.
Research Profile

Austin John Roorda, Professor. Adaptive optics, eye, vision, ophthalmoscopy, scanning laser ophthalmoscope, ophthalmology.
Research Profile

Kimmen Sjolander, Professor. Computational biology, algorithms, phylogenetic tree reconstruction, protein structure prediction, multiple sequence alignment, evolution, bioinformatics, hidden Markov models, metagenomics, statistical modeling, phylogenomics, emerging and neglected diseases, machine-learning, genome annotation, metagenome annotation, systems biology, functional site prediction, ortholog identification.
Research Profile

Lydia Sohn, Associate Professor. Micro-nano engineering.
Research Profile

Danielle Tullman-Ercek, Assistant Professor. Bioenergy, synthetic biology, protein engineering, bionanotechnology.
Research Profile

Emeritus Faculty

Thomas F. Budinger, Professor Emeritus. Image processing, biomedical electronics, quantitative aging, cardiovascular physiology, bioastronautics, image reconstruction, nuclear magnetic resonance, positron emission, tomography, reconstruction tomography, inverse problem mathematics.
Research Profile

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

Joel W. Ager, Adjunct Professor.

Paul Alivisatos, Professor. Physical chemistry, semiconductor nanocrystals, nanoscience, nanotechnology, artificial photosynthesis, solar energy, renewable energy, sustainable energy.
Research Profile

Elke Arenholz, Associate Adjunct Professor.

Mark D. Asta, Professor.

Jillian Banfield, Professor. Nanoscience, Bioremediation, genomics, biogeochemistry, carbon cycling, geomicrobiology, MARS, minerology.
Research Profile

Robert Birgeneau, Professor. Physics, phase transition behavior of novel states of matter.
Research Profile

Gerbrand Ceder, Professor.

Daryl Chrzan, Professor. Materials science and engineering, computational materials science, metals and metallic compounds, defects in solids, growth of nanostructures.
Research Profile

Thomas M. Devine, Professor. Synthesis of nanomaterials, nuclear power, oil production, secondary batteries for electric vehicles, computer disk drives, and synthesis and characterization of metal oxide nanowires, corrosion resistance of materials.
Research Profile

Fiona Doyle, Professor. Electrochemistry, mineral processing, solution processing of materials, interfacial chemistry, extractive metallurgy, remediation of abandoned mines.
Research Profile

Oscar D. Dubon, Professor. Magnetic, optical materials, processing, properties in electronic.
Research Profile

Kevin Healy, Professor. Bioengineering, biomaterials engineering, tissue engineering, bioinspired materials, tissue and organ regeneration, stem cell engineering, microphysiological systems, organs on a chip, drug screening and discovery, multivalent bioconjugate therapeutics.
Research Profile

Frances Hellman, Professor. Condensed matter physics and materials science.
Research Profile

Digby D. Macdonald, Professor in Residence.

Lane W. Martin, Associate Professor. Complex Oxides, novel electronic materials, thin films, materials processing, materials characterization, memory, logic, information technologies, energy conversion, thermal properties, dielectrics, ferroelectrics, pyroelectrics, piezoelectrics, magnetics, multiferroics, transducers, devices.
Research Profile

Phillip B. Messersmith, Professor.

Andrew M. Minor, Professor. Metallurgy, nanomechanics, in situ TEM, electron microscopy of soft materials.
Research Profile

Kristin A. Persson, Assistant Professor. Lithium-ion Batteries.
Research Profile

R. Ramesh, Professor. Processing of complex oxide heterostructures, nanoscale characterization/device structures, thin film growth and materials physics of complex oxides, materials processing for devices, information technologies.
Research Profile

Robert O. Ritchie, Professor. Structural materials, mechanical behavior in biomaterials, creep, fatigue and fracture of advanced metals, intermetallics, ceramics.
Research Profile

Miquel B. Salmeron, Adjunct Professor. Molecules, lasers, atoms, materials science and engineering, matter, scanning, tunneling, atomic force microscopies, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.
Research Profile

Junqiao Wu, Associate Professor. Semiconductors, nanotechnology, energy materials.
Research Profile

Ting Xu, Associate Professor. Polymer, nanocomposite, biomaterial, membrane, directed self-assembly, drug delivery, protein therapeutics, block copolymers, nanoparticles.
Research Profile

Peidong Yang, Professor. Materials chemistry, sensors, nanostructures, energy conversion, nanowires, miniaturizing optoelectronic devices, photovoltaics, thermoelectrics, solid state lighting.
Research Profile

Jie Yao, Assistant Professor. Optical materials, Nanophotonics, optoelectronics.
Research Profile

Haimei Zheng, Assistant Adjunct Professor.

Lecturers

Matthew Sherburne, Lecturer.

Emeritus Faculty

Robert H. Bragg, Professor Emeritus.

Didier De Fontaine, Professor Emeritus. Phase transformations in alloys, crystallography, thermodynamics of phase changes, particularly ordering reactions, phase separation, calculations of phase equilibria by combined quantum, statistical mechanical methods.
Research Profile

Lutgard De Jonghe, Professor Emeritus. Ceramic properties, advanced ceramics, silicon carbide, densification studies, microstructure development.
Research Profile

James W. Evans, Professor Emeritus. Production of materials, particularly fluid flow, reaction kinetics, mass transport, electrochemical, electromagnetic phenomena governing processes for producing materials, metals, storing energy.
Research Profile

+ Douglas W. Fuerstenau, Professor Emeritus. Mineral processing, extractive metallurgy; application of surface, colloid chemistry to mineral/water systems; fine particle science, technology; principles of comminution, flotation, pelletizing; hydrometallurg, extraction of metals.
Research Profile

Andreas M. Glaeser, Professor Emeritus. Ceramic joining, TLP bonding, brazing, reduced-temperature joining, ceramic-metal joining, ceramic processing, surface and interface properties of ceramics, thermal barrier coatings.
Research Profile

+ Ronald Gronsky, Professor Emeritus. Internal structure of materials, engineering applications.
Research Profile

Eugene E. Haller, Professor Emeritus. Semiconductor crystal growth, characterization of impurities and defects in semiconductors: infrared and microwave detectors, isotopically controlled semiconductors.
Research Profile

Marshal F. Merriam, Professor Emeritus.

+ J. W. Morris, Professor Emeritus. Structural materials, computational materials, the limits of strength, deformation mechanisms, non-destructive testing with SQUID microscopy, mechanisms of grain refinement in high strength steels, lead-free solders for microelectronics.
Research Profile

Eicke R. Weber, Professor Emeritus. Optical materials, magnetic materials, semiconductor thin film growth, device processing in electronic materials.
Research Profile

Contact Information

Department Office, Bioengineering and Materials Science & Engineering

306 Stanley Hall

Phone: 510-642-5833

Fax: 510-642-5835

Visit Department Website

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

210 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

Phone: 510-642-3801

Fax: 510-643-5792

http://www.mse.berkeley.edu/

Department of Bioengineering

306 Stanley Hall

Phone: 510-642-5833

Fax: 510-642-5835

http://bioeng.berkeley.edu/

Department Chair, Materials Science and Engineering

Mark Asta, PhD

384 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

Phone: 510-642-3803

mdasta@berkeley.edu

Engineering Student Services Adviser

Eugenia Foon

230 Bechtel Engineering Ctr.

Phone: 510-642-7594

http://engineering.berkeley.edu/ESS

ess@berkeley.edu

Department Chair, Bioengineering

Daniel Fletcher, PhD

306 Stanley Hall

Phone: 510-642-5833

bioe-chair@berkeley.edu

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