Journalism

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

The first ever summer-only minor at UC Berkeley is designed to give students hands-on training in improving and modernizing their skills across a wide range of communication media, including narrative writing and reporting, web skills, social media, photography and video, and audio reporting and production.

No matter your major or intended profession, literacy today requires the ability to communicate not just with text but also with pictures, video, and sound. Although millennials are often described as “digital natives” and are accustomed to ubiquitous flows of online information, many do not know how to shape that information into compelling, well-reported narratives. Instruction will focus on teaching students to use the latest digital tools to engage with audiences in their work, and to think critically and responsibly about information.

The minor  is open to all Berkeley students. For visitors—including students from abroad, from UC campuses elsewhere, or from other universities—a certificate option is available. Courses are also open to students who are not seeking the minor or a certificate.

The undergraduate minor is housed in the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, which is widely regarded as one of the top professional journalism academies in the United States. Its teaching faculty is composed of distinguished current and former professional journalists who bring real-world expertise to the classroom. The master’s program was launched in 1951 and established as a professional school at UC Berkeley in 1968.

Declaring the Minor

Students intending to pursue the minor degree must submit a Declaration of Intent to Pursue the Undergraduate Minor in Journalism with the Director of Undergraduate Programs at the GSJ upon completion of their first course.

Students must submit a Completion of the Undergraduate Minor in Journalism form at the start of their final course in the minor sequence.

Students with a strong interest in an area of study outside their major often decide to complete a minor program. These programs have set requirements and are noted officially on the transcript in the memoranda section, but are not noted on diplomas.

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Summer Minor Requirements

The curriculum is organized into two parts: two core courses followed by three elective courses, emphasizing respectively, fundamentals and focused expertise.

There are two required introductory courses—the first on journalistic reporting, writing, principles and ethics; and a second course on new forms of digital media and techniques of online storytelling. After completing the two required courses, students choose three elective courses in which they receive hands-on training in specialized reporting and/or multimedia production. All courses are upper division. The two parts of the curriculum—a broad introduction followed by focused study—are designed after the successful model currently taught in the Graduate School of Journalism.  

General Guidelines

  1. The minor degree consists of a minimum of 15 units (five 3-unit courses).
  2. All courses taken to fulfill the minor requirements must be taken for graded credit.
  3. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required for courses used to fulfill the minor requirements.
  4. All minor requirements must be completed prior to the last day of finals during the semester in which you plan to graduate.
  5. The minor is open to enrollment for all Berkeley students.
  6. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student's major and minor programs.
Required Courses
JOURN 100Introduction to News Reporting3-4
JOURN 110Introduction to Multimedia3
Electives (Choose Three)
JOURN 111Social Media and Journalism3
JOURN 115Advanced Multimedia3
JOURN 120Investigative Reporting3
JOURN 130Specialty Reporting3

Related Courses

JOURN 24 Freshman Seminars 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester.

Freshman Seminars: Read More [+]

JOURN 39H Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2010, Fall 2009, Spring 2009
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

JOURN 39J Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2010, Spring 2009
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

JOURN 39K Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Spring 2013
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

JOURN 98 Directed Group Study in Journalism 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015

Directed Group Study in Journalism: Read More [+]

JOURN 100 Introduction to News Reporting 3 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 First 6 Week Session
Survey of journalistic principles and practices, and study and practice of methods of gathering, writing, and editing news.

Introduction to News Reporting: Read More [+]

JOURN 102AC The Wire: When Journalism Meets Drama 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Fall 2012, Spring 2012
The goal of the class is to make students aware of how the issues of crime, policing, and identity are framed and mediated through television, as well as through conventional journalism. The class will explore the relationship between real crime, popular fiction, and television, specifically The Wire.

The Wire: When Journalism Meets Drama: Read More [+]

JOURN C103 Edible Education: Telling Stories About Food and Agriculture 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2013, Fall 2012
As the costs of our industrialized food system become impossible to ignore, a national debate over the future of food and farming has begun. Telling stories about where food comes from, how it is produced (and might be produced differently) plays a critical role in bringing attention to the issues and shifting politics. Each week a prominent figure in this debate explores what can be done to make the food system healthier more equitable, more sustainable
, and the role of storytelling in the process.
Edible Education: Telling Stories About Food and Agriculture: Read More [+]

JOURN 110 Introduction to Multimedia 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 First 6 Week Session
What’s it like to tell stories using a variety of different media? Competence in the use of new journalistic tools and the skill to shape content for rapidly changing formats are both essential for any communicator in the 21st century. This intensive introductory course is designed to teach foundational skills for students who have minimal or no experience in creating multimedia news
packages. Using lectures, readings, discussions, guest speakers, and field work, we will guide students through an exploration of the elements and forms of multimedia storytelling, and teach skills in newsgathering and story production.
Introduction to Multimedia: Read More [+]

JOURN 111 Social Media and Journalism 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
This course will help students understand and use social media for journalistic purposes by focusing on how social networks, conversational media, and associated digital media tools and platforms can be used to develop new sources, establish beneficial conversations with end users, identify story ideas and trends, aggregate and curate the work of other journalists, and promote their
own work.
Social Media and Journalism: Read More [+]

JOURN 115 Advanced Multimedia 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
Instruction begins with how to properly approach a news assignment for online publication, specifically how to choose which media form—video, audio, photo, graphics, or text—is best for telling a particular type of story or different segments of a story. Students also learn how to storyboard an assignment by breaking a story up into its component parts and deciding which type of
media should be used to tell each part of the story. This is followed by lessons on capturing video, photo, and audio; proper technique; and working with news subjects.
Advanced Multimedia: Read More [+]

JOURN 120 Investigative Reporting 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
Whether it’s matters of national security, public health, or official misconduct, investigative reporters play a crucial role in a democracy, exposing events, realities and conditions that powerful interests would often prefer kept quiet. The best investigative reporters – such as Woodward and Bernstein, Seymour Hersh, Glenn Greenwald – change the way we think about the world.

The objective of this course is to teach students the basic tools and techniques used in investigative reporting. We will explore how to find sources, obtain public records, and craft enterprising reporting into compelling stories that go behind the curtain of public life.

Investigative Reporting: Read More [+]

JOURN 130 Specialty Reporting 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
This course provides background and techniques for students interested in developing their journalistic skills at covering a single beat. The course will explore the concepts and methods used by beat journalists to write stories that go deeper than general reporting--including source development, understanding key issues, debates and institutions, and parsing official documents.
The course will launch with The Good the Bad and the Ugly of American Business. (In subsequent years, at the discretion of the J-School Dean, Specialty Reporting may shift its focus to other news beats.)
Specialty Reporting: Read More [+]

JOURN 134 International Reporting 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session
In a globalizing world local stories often become international ones. From politics to financial markets to terrorism and climate change, a more closely connected world often means critical issues do not stay put. Events in Russia, China, Iran and Germany regularly occupy headlines in the U.S. Journalists covering foreign lands now face new levels of complexity in their work. Competent reporting demands a high levels of skill: a broad awareness
of global trends, an ability to develop reliable sources, and a keen understanding of how different communities respond to the forces affecting their lives.

International Reporting: Read More [+]

JOURN C141 Understanding Journalism 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
In this course, students learn why sound journalism is so important to a healthy, working democracy. Journalism is rapidly changing. The class will give a context to those changes and provide an overview of comtemporary journalistic institutions. Students will examine how news is made, who decides what news is, who makes it, who profits by it, and what rules guide how reporters and editors work. Central issues affecting journalism, such as
bias and professionalism, will be discussed. The class is not specifically intended for future journalists, but students will learn why pursuing a career in journalism can be so fulfilling and thrilling, as well as becoming better consumers of the news.
Understanding Journalism: Read More [+]

JOURN 197 Field Study in Journalism 1 - 2 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Summer 2016 8 Week Session, Fall 2015
Supervised experience in the practice of journalism in off-campus organizations. Individual meetings with faculty sponsor and written reports required. See Additional Information, "Field Study and Internships."

Field Study in Journalism: Read More [+]

JOURN 198 Directed Group Study in Journalism 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2017

Directed Group Study in Journalism: Read More [+]

JOURN 199 Supervised Individual Study and Research 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Enrollment restrictions apply; see department.

Supervised Individual Study and Research: Read More [+]

Faculty and Instructors

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

Orlando Bagwell, Professor in Residence.

Lowell Bergman, Professor. National security, forensic science, terrorism, corporate crime, corruption, tobacco, Symposium in Investigative Reporting.
Research Profile

Lydia Chavez, Professor. Jounalism, reporting, writing.
Research Profile

Mark D. Danner, Professor. Central America, politics, Balkans, foreign affairs, journalism, Haiti, documentaries.
Research Profile

William J. Drummond, Professor. Politics, journalism, reporting, national security, freelancing in both print and radio.
Research Profile

Tom Goldstein, Professor. Journalism, mass communications, writer, reporter, editor.
Research Profile

Richard Hernandez, Assistant Professor. Journalism, new media, Mobile, visual storytelling.
Research Profile

Ken Light, Adjunct Professor. Journalism, photojournalism, documentary photography.
Research Profile

Michael Pollan, Professor. Agriculture, environment, obesity, science, nutrition, journalism, food, cooking, gardening.
Research Profile

Edward Wasserman, Professor. Media ethics, economics and politics of news, professional standards, media history.
Research Profile

Lecturers

Joan Bieder, Senior Lecturer SOE. History of Jewish communities in South East Asia.
Research Profile

Mark Bittman, Lecturer.

Thomas R. Burke, Lecturer.

Robert Calo, Senior Lecturer SOE. Journalism, cultural geography, social history, urban affairs, television news production.
Research Profile

Andres Cediel, Lecturer.

Marilyn M. Chase, Lecturer.

David J. Cohn, Lecturer.

Edwin C. Dobb, Lecturer.

Deirdre English, Lecturer.

Paul Grabowicz, Senior Lecturer SOE. Journalism, multimedia and convergence, new media, online publishing, digital technology, interactivity, computer assisted reporting, entrepreneurism, video games, local online news sites.
Research Profile

Laura Green, Lecturer.

Shaleece Haas, Lecturer.

Carl T. Hall, Lecturer.

Adam Hochschild, Lecturer.

Joshua E. Johnson, Lecturer.

Jennifer Kahn, Lecturer.

Yukari Kane, Lecturer.

Daniel K. Krauss, Lecturer.

Ben Manilla, Lecturer.

Timothy Mcgirk, Lecturer.

Alan Mutter, Lecturer.

Thomas Peele, Lecturer.

Kara A. Platoni, Lecturer.

Jeremy Rue, Lecturer.

Linda Schacht, Lecturer.

Rebecca L. Skloot, Lecturer.

Zachary J. Stauffer, Lecturer.

Abbie Vansickle, Lecturer.

James R. Wheaton, Lecturer.

Samantha G. Wiesler, Lecturer.

Emeritus Faculty

Ben H. Bagdikian, Professor Emeritus.

Jon Else, Professor Emeritus. Directing, history, film, journalism, writing, documentary, producing, cinematography, nuclear weapons.
Research Profile

Timothy Ferris, Professor Emeritus.

Cynthia Gorney, Professor Emeritus. Ethics, law, journalism, writing, reporting the news, profiles.
Research Profile

Neil Henry, Professor Emeritus. Race, Africa, urban society, journalism, newspapers, community reporting, journalistic values, foreign reporting, sports, fraud.
Research Profile

Thomas C. Leonard, Professor Emeritus. Journalism, the press, role of the press in society, journalists and historians, Americans, American history.
Research Profile

A. Kent Macdougall, Professor Emeritus.

Bernard Taper, Professor Emeritus.

Carolyn Wakeman, Professor Emeritus.

Contact Information

Graduate School of Journalism

121 North Gate Hall

Phone: 510-642-3383

Fax: 510-643-9136

Visit School Website

Dean

Edward Wasserman

Phone: 510-642-3394

ed.wasserman@berkeley.edu

Acting Director of Undergraduate Programs

David Thigpen

B-42 North Gate Hall

Phone: 917-848-9365

davidthigpen@berkeley.edu

Student Affairs Coordinator

Michele Kerr

123 North Gate Hall

Phone: 510-643-1174

mkerr@berkeley.edu

Student Adviser

TBD

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