Materials Science and Engineering/Nuclear Engineering Joint Major

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

Bachelor of Science (BS)

The joint major programs are designed for students who wish to undertake study in two areas of engineering in order to qualify for employment in either field or for positions in which competence in two fields is required. These curricula include the core courses in each of the major fields. While they require slightly increased course loads, they can be completed in four years. Both majors are shown on the student's transcript of record.

The interface between materials science and engineering and nuclear engineering is an especially challenging and rewarding one giving students in this joint major an exciting range of career options. With a sound curriculum steeped in the fundamentals, the joint major program prepares students to fully understand the behavior of materials in a reactor or related extreme environments, including their design and optimization. Students completing this joint major will successfully compete for positions in the energy sector.

Admission to the Joint Major

Admission directly to a joint major is closed to freshmen and junior transfer applicants. Students interested in a joint program may apply to change majors during specific times in their academic progress. Please see the College of Engineering joint majors website for complete details.

Visit Department Website

Major Requirements

In addition to the University, campus, and college requirements, students must fulfill the below requirements specific to their major program.

General Guidelines

  1. All technical courses taken in satisfaction of major requirements must be taken for a letter grade.

  2. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student’s major and minor programs.

  3. A minimum overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required for all work undertaken at UC Berkeley.

  4. A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required for all technical courses taken in satisfaction of major requirements.

For information regarding residence requirements and unit requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.

For a detailed plan of study by year and semester, please see the Plan of Study tab.

Lower division Requirements

MATH 1ACalculus4
MATH 1BCalculus4
MATH 53Multivariable Calculus4
MATH 54Linear Algebra and Differential Equations4
CHEM 1A
1AL
General Chemistry
and General Chemistry Laboratory 1
4
or CHEM 4A General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis
PHYSICS 7APhysics for Scientists and Engineers4
PHYSICS 7BPhysics for Scientists and Engineers4
PHYSICS 7CPhysics for Scientists and Engineers4
ENGIN 7Introduction to Computer Programming for Scientists and Engineers4
ENGIN 40Engineering Thermodynamics4
MAT SCI 45Properties of Materials3
MAT SCI 45LProperties of Materials Laboratory1
NUC ENG 24Freshman Seminars1
MEC ENG C85Introduction to Solid Mechanics3
1

CHEM 4A is intended for students majoring in chemistry or a closely-related field.

Upper division Requirements

MAT SCI 102Bonding, Crystallography, and Crystal Defects3
MAT SCI 103Phase Transformations and Kinetics3
MAT SCI 104Materials Characterization4
MAT SCI 111Properties of Electronic Materials4
MAT SCI 112Corrosion (Chemical Properties)3
MAT SCI 113Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials3
MAT SCI 130Experimental Materials Science and Design3
NUC ENG 100Introduction to Nuclear Engineering3
NUC ENG 101Nuclear Reactions and Radiation4
NUC ENG 104Radiation Detection and Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory4
NUC ENG 120Nuclear Materials4
NUC ENG 150Introduction to Nuclear Reactor Theory4
NUC ENG 170ANuclear Design: Design in Nuclear Power Technology and Instrumentation3
Ethics Requirement 13-4
Upper division Technical Electives: Minimum 16 units 2,316
Must include at least 9 units of upper division NUC ENG courses, in consultation with faculty adviser
Must include at least 3 units of MAT SCI 12x (120 series course)
The additional 4 units of technical electives must be chosen in consultation with faculty adviser
1

Students must take one course with ethics content. This may be fulfilled within the Humanities/Social Sciences requirement by taking one of the following courses: ANTHRO 156B, BIO ENG 100, ENGIN 125, ENGIN 157AC, ESPM 161, ESPM 162, GEOG 31, IAS 157AC, ISF 100E, L & S 160BMEC ENG 191ACPHILOS 2, PHILOS 104, PHILOS 107, SOCIOL 116.

2

Students may receive up to three units of technical elective credit for graded research in MAT SCI H194 or NUC ENG H194.

3

Technical Electives cannot include:

College Requirements

Students in the College of Engineering must complete no fewer than 120 semester units with the following provisions: 

  1. Completion of the requirements of one engineering major program study. 
  2. A minimum overall grade point average of 2.00 (C average) and a minimum 2.00 grade point average in upper division technical coursework required of the major. 
  3. The final 30 units and two semesters must be completed in residence in the College of Engineering on the Berkeley campus. 
  4. All technical courses (math, science and engineering), required of the major or not, must be taken on a letter graded basis (unless they are only offered P/NP). 
  5. Entering freshmen are allowed a maximum of eight semesters to complete their degree requirements. Entering junior transfers are allowed a maximum of four semesters to complete their degree requirements. (Note: junior transfers admitted missing three or more courses from the lower division curriculum are allowed five semesters.) Summer terms are optional and do not count toward the maximum. Students are responsible for planning and satisfactorily completing all graduation requirements within the maximum allowable semesters. 
  6. Adhere to all college policies and procedures as they complete degree requirements.
  7. Complete the lower division program before enrolling in upper division engineering courses. 

Humanities and Social Science (H/SS) Requirement

To promote a rich and varied educational experience outside of the technical requirements for each major, the College of Engineering has a six-course Humanities and Social Sciences breadth requirement, which must be completed to graduate. This requirement, built into all the engineering programs of study, includes two reading and composition courses (R&C), and four additional courses within which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. Follow these guidelines to fulfill this requirement:

  1. Complete a minimum of six courses from the  approved Humanities/Social Sciences (H/SS) lists
  2. Courses must be a minimum of 3 semester units (or 4 quarter units).
  3. Two of the six courses must fulfill the college's Reading and Composition (R&C) requirement. These courses must be taken for a letter grade (C- or better required) and must be completed by no later than the end of the sophomore year (fourth semester of enrollment). The first half of R&C, the “A” course, must be completed by the end of the freshman year; the second half of R&C, the “B" course, must be completed by no later than the end of the sophomore year. View a detailed list of courses that fulfill Reading and Composition requirements, or use the College of Letters and Sciences search engine to view R&C courses offered in a given semester. 
  4. The four additional courses must be chosen within College of Engineering guidelines from the H/SS lists (see below). These courses may be taken on a Pass/Not Passed basis (P/NP).
  5. Two of the six courses must be upper division (courses numbered 100-196).
  6. One of the six courses must satisfy the campus American Cultures requirement. For detailed lists of courses that fulfill American Cultures requirements, visit the American Cultures site. 
  7. A maximum of two exams (Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, or A-Level) may be used toward completion of the H/SS requirement. View the list of exams that can be applied toward H/SS requirements.
  8. Courses may fulfill multiple categories. For example, if you complete CY PLAN 118AC that would satisfy the American Cultures requirement and one upper division H/SS requirement.
  9. No courses offered by any engineering department other than BIO ENG 100, COMPSCI C79, ENGIN 125, ENGIN 157AC, MEC ENG 191K and MEC ENG 191AC may be used to complete H/SS requirements.
  10. Foreign language courses may be used to complete H/SS requirements. View the list of language options.
  11. Courses numbered 97, 98, 99, or above 196 may not be used to complete any H/SS requirement
  12. The College of Engineering uses modified versions of five of the College of Letters and Science (L&S) breadth requirements lists to provide options to our students for completing the H/SS requirement. No courses on the L&S Biological Sciences or Physical Sciences breadth lists may be used to complete H/SS requirements. Within the guidelines above, choose courses from any of the lists below.

Class Schedule Requirements

  • Minimum units per semester: 12.0.
  • Maximum units per semester:  20.5.
  • Minimum technical courses: College of Engineering undergraduates must enroll each semester in no fewer than two technical courses (of a minimum of 3 units each) required of the major program of study in which the student is officially declared.  (Note: for most majors, normal progress will require enrolling in 3-4 technical courses each semester).
  • All technical courses (math, science, engineering), required of the major or not, must be taken on a letter-graded basis (unless only offered as P/NP).
  • A student's proposed schedule must be approved by a faculty adviser (or on approval from the dean or a designated staff adviser) each semester prior to enrolling in courses.

Minimum Academic (Grade) Requirements

  • A minimum overall and semester grade point average of 2.00 (C average) is required of engineering undergraduates. A student will be subject to dismissal from the University if during any fall or spring semester their overall UC GPA falls below a 2.00, or their semester GPA is less than 2.00. 
  • Students must achieve a minimum grade point average of 2.00 (C average) in upper division technical courses required for the major curriculum each semester. A student will be subject to dismissal from the University if their upper division technical grade point average falls below 2.00. 
  • A minimum overall grade point average of 2.00, and a minimum 2.00 grade point average in upper division technical course work required for the major is needed to earn a Bachelor of Science in Engineering.

Unit Requirements

To earn a Bachelor of Science in Engineering, students must complete at least 120 semester units of courses subject to certain guidelines:

  • Completion of the requirements of one engineering major program of study. 
  • A maximum of 16 units of special studies coursework (courses numbered 97, 98, 99, 197, 198, or 199) is allowed towards the 120 units; a maximum of four is allowed in a given semester.
  • A maximum of 4 units of physical education from any school attended will count towards the 120 units.
  • Students may receive unit credit for courses graded P (including P/NP units taken through EAP) up to a limit of one-third of the total units taken and passed on the Berkeley campus at the time of graduation.

Normal Progress

Students in the College of Engineering must enroll in a full-time program and make normal progress each semester toward the bachelor's degree. The continued enrollment of students who fail to achieve minimum academic progress shall be subject to the approval of the dean. (Note: students with official accommodations established by the Disabled Students' Program, with health or family issues, or with other reasons deemed appropriate by the dean may petition for an exception to normal progress rules.) 

UC and Campus Requirements

University of California Requirements

Entry Level Writing

All students who will enter the University of California as freshmen must demonstrate their command of the English language by fulfilling the Entry Level Writing Requirement. Fulfillment of this requirement is also a prerequisite to enrollment in all reading and composition courses at UC Berkeley. 

American History and American Institutions

The American History and Institutions requirements are based on the principle that a U.S. resident graduated from an American university should have an understanding of the history and governmental institutions of the United States.

Campus Requirement

American Cultures

American Cultures (AC) is the one requirement that all undergraduate students at UC Berkeley need to take and pass in order to graduate. The requirement offers an exciting intellectual environment centered on the study of race, ethnicity and culture in the United States. AC courses offer students opportunities to be part of research-led, highly accomplished teaching environments, grappling with the complexity of American Culture.

Plan of Study

For more detailed information regarding the courses listed below (e.g., elective information, GPA requirements, etc.), please see the College Requirements and Major Requirements tab.

Freshman
FallUnitsSpringUnits
CHEM 1A & 1AL, or CHEM 4A14MATH 1B4
MATH 1A4PHYSICS 7A4
NUC ENG 241ENGIN 74
Reading & Composition course from List A4Reading & Composition course from List B4
Humanities/Social Sciences course3-4 
 16-17 16
Sophomore
FallUnitsSpringUnits
MATH 534MATH 544
PHYSICS 7B4PHYSICS 7C4
Humanities/Social Sciences Course3-4MEC ENG C853
MAT SCI 453NUC ENG 1003
MAT SCI 45L1 
 15-16 14
Junior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
ENGIN 404MAT SCI 1033
MAT SCI 1023MAT SCI 1044
NUC ENG 1014NUC ENG 1044
Technical Electives2,37NUC ENG 1504
 Humanities/Social Sciences course3-4
 18 18-19
Senior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
MAT SCI 1303MAT SCI 1114
NUC ENG 1204MAT SCI 1123
Technical Electives2,39MAT SCI 1133
 NUC ENG 170A3
 Humanities/Social Sciences course with Ethics content43-4
 16 16-17
Total Units: 129-133
1

CHEM 4A is intended for students majoring in chemistry or a closely-related field.

2

Technical electives must include at least 9 units of upper-division NUC ENG courses and at least 3 units from the MAT SCI 120 series courses. The additional 4 units of upper-division technical electives must be chosen in consultation with the faculty adviser. Students may receive up to 3 units of technical elective credit for graded research in MAT SCI H194 Honors Undergraduate Research or NUC ENG H194 Honors Undergraduate Research.

3

Technical Electives cannot include:

4

Students must take one course with ethics content. This may be fulfilled within the Humanities/Social Sciences requirement by taking one of the following courses: ANTHRO 156B, BIO ENG 100, ENGIN 125, ENGIN 157AC, ESPM 161, ESPM 162, GEOG 31, IAS 157AC, ISF 100E, L & S 160BMEC ENG 191ACPHILOS 2, PHILOS 104, PHILOS 107SOCIOL 116.

Courses

Courses

Materials Science and Engineering Courses

MAT SCI 24 Freshman Seminar 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
The Freshman Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 20 freshmen.

Freshman Seminar: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 45 Properties of Materials 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017
Application of basic principles of physics and chemistry to the engineering properties of materials. Special emphasis devoted to relation between microstructure and the mechanical properties of metals, concrete, polymers, and ceramics, and the electrical properties of semiconducting materials. Sponsoring Department: Materials Science and Engineering

Properties of Materials: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 45L Properties of Materials Laboratory 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017
This course presents laboratory applications of the basic principles introduced in the lecture-based course MSE45 – Properties of Materials.

Properties of Materials Laboratory: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 102 Bonding, Crystallography, and Crystal Defects 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Bonding in solids; classification of metals, semiconductors, and insulators; crystal systems; point, line, and planar defects in crystals; examples of crystallographic and defect analysis in engineering materials; relationship to physical and mechanical properties.

Bonding, Crystallography, and Crystal Defects: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 103 Phase Transformations and Kinetics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
The nature, mechanisms, and kinetics of phase transformations and microstructural changes in the solid state. Atom diffusion in solids. Phase transformations through the nucleation and growth of new matrix or precipitate phases. Martensitic transformations, spinodal decomposition. The use of phase transformations to control microstructure.

Phase Transformations and Kinetics: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 104 Materials Characterization 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Physical and chemical characterization of materials: Diffraction, imaging, and spectroscopy using optical, electron, and X-ray methods for bulk and surface analysis. Measurement of mechanical and physical properties. Project laboratory focusing on mechanical, chemical, electrical, and magnetic properties of materials, and materials characterization. Field trips.

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MAT SCI 111 Properties of Electronic Materials 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Introduction to the physical principles underlying the electric properties of modern solids with emphasis on semiconductors; control of defects and impurities through physical purification, bulk and thin film crystal growth and doping processes, materials basis of electronic and optoelectronic devices (diodes, transistors, semiconductor lasers) and optical fibers; properties of metal and oxide superconductors and their applications.

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MAT SCI 112 Corrosion (Chemical Properties) 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Electrochemical theory of corrosion. Mechanisms and rates in relation to physiochemical and metallurgical factors. Stress corrosion and mechanical influences on corrosion. Corrosion protection by design, inhibition, cathodic protection, and coatings.

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MAT SCI 113 Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course covers elastic and plastic deformation under static and dynamic loads. Prediction and prevention of failure by yielding, fracture, fatigue, wear and environmental factors are addressed. Design issues pertaining to materials selection for load bearing applications are discussed. Case studies of engineering failures are presented. Topics include engineering materials, structure-property relationships, materials selection for design, mechanical
behavior of polymers and design of plastic components, complex states of stress and strain, elastic deformation and multiaxial loading, plastic deformation and yield criteria, dislocation plasticity and strengthening mechanisms, creep, effects of stress concentrations, fracture, fatigue, and contact stresses.
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MAT SCI 117 Properties of Dielectric and Magnetic Materials 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2011, Fall 2010
Introduction to the physical principles underlying the dielectric and magnetic properties of solids. Processing-microstructure-property relationships of dielectric materials, including piezoelectric, pryoelectric, and ferroelectric oxides, and of magnetic materials, including hard- and soft ferromagnets, ferrites and magneto-optic and -resistive materials. The course also covers the properties of grain boundary devices (including varistors)
as well as ion-conducting and mixed conducting materials for applications in various devices such as sensors, fuel cells, and electric batteries.
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MAT SCI C118 Biological Performance of Materials 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course is intended to give students the opportunity to expand their knowledge of topics related to biomedical materials selection and design. Structure-property relationships of biomedical materials and their interaction with biological systems will be addressed. Applications of the concepts developed include blood-materials compatibility, biomimetic materials, hard and soft tissue-materials interactions, drug delivery, tissue engineering
, and biotechnology.
Biological Performance of Materials: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 120 Materials Production 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Economic and technological significance of metals and other materials. Elementary geology (composition of lithosphere, mineralization). Short survey of mining and mineral processing techniques. Review of chemical thermodynamics and reaction kinetics. Principles of process engineering including material, heat, and mechanical energy balances. Elementary heat transfer, fluid flow, and mass transfer. Electrolytic production and refining of metals.
Vapor techniques for production of metals and coatings.
Materials Production: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 121 Metals Processing 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
The principles of metals processing with emphasis on the use of processing to establish microstructures which impart desirable engineering properties. The techniques discussed include solidification, thermal and mechanical processing, powder processing, welding and joining, and surface treatments.

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MAT SCI 122 Ceramic Processing 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
Powder fabrication by grinding and chemical methods, rheological behavior of powder-fluid suspensions, forming methods, drying, sintering, and grain growth. Relation of processing steps to microstructure development.

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MAT SCI 123 ELECTRONIC MATERIALS PROCESSING 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This 4-unit course starts with a brief review of the fundamentals of solid-state physics including bands and defects in semiconductors and oxides, and then moves to bulk semiconductor crystals growth and processing including doping, diffusion and implantation, and then to thin film deposition and processing methods, and finishes with a discussion of materials analysis and characterization. Recent advances in nanomaterials research will also be
introduced.
ELECTRONIC MATERIALS PROCESSING: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 125 Thin-Film Materials Science 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Fall 2014
Deposition, processing, and characterization of thin films and their technological applications. Physical and chemical vapor deposition methods. Thin-film nucleation and growth. Thermal and ion processing. Microstructural development in epitaxial, polycrystalline, and amorphous films. Thin-film characterization techniques. Applications in information storage, integrated circuits, and optoelectronic devices. Laboratory demonstrations.

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MAT SCI 130 Experimental Materials Science and Design 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course provides a culminating experience for students approaching completion of the materials science and engineering curriculum. Laboratory experiments are undertaken in a variety of areas from the investigations on semiconductor materials to corrosion science and elucidate the relationships among structure, processing, properties, and performance. The principles of materials selection in engineering design are reviewed.

Experimental Materials Science and Design: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 136 Materials in Energy Technologies 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2011
In many, if not all, technologies, it is materials that play a crucial, enabling role. This course examines potentially sustainable technologies, and the materials properties that enable them. The science at the basis of selected energy technologies are examined and considered in case studies.

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MAT SCI 140 Nanomaterials for Scientists and Engineers 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
This course introduces the fundamental principles needed to understand the behavior of materials at the nanometer length scale and the different classes of nanomaterials with applications ranging from information technology to biotechnology. Topics include introduction to different classes of nanomaterials, synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials, and the electronic, magnetic, optical, and mechanical properties of nanomaterials.

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MAT SCI C150 Introduction to Materials Chemistry 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2012
The application of basic chemical principles to problems in materials discovery, design, and characterization will be discussed. Topics covered will include inorganic solids, nanoscale materials, polymers, and biological materials, with specific focus on the ways in which atomic-level interactions dictate the bulk properties of matter.

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MAT SCI 151 Polymeric Materials 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course is designed for upper division undergraduate and graduate students to gain a fundamental understanding of the science of polymeric materials. Beginning with a treatment of ideal polymeric chain conformations, it develops the thermodynamics of polmyer blends and solutions, the modeling of polymer networks and gelations, the dynamics of polymer chains, and the morphologies of thin films and other dimensionally-restricted structures
relevant to nanotechnology.
Polymeric Materials: Read More [+]

MAT SCI H194 Honors Undergraduate Research 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Students who have completed a satisfactory number of advanced courses with a grade-point average of 3.3 or higher may pursue original research under the direction of one of the members of the staff. A maximum of 3 units of H194 may be used to fulfill technical elective requirements in the Materials Science and Engineering program or double majors (unlike 198 or 199, which do not satisfy technical elective requirements). Final report required.

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MAT SCI 195 Special Topics for Advanced Undergraduates 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
Group study of special topics in materials science and engineering. Selection of topics for further study of underlying concepts and relevent literature, in consultion with appropriate faculty members.

Special Topics for Advanced Undergraduates: Read More [+]

MAT SCI 198 Directed Group Studies for Advanced Undergraduates 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Group studies of selected topics.

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MAT SCI 199 Supervised Independent Study 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Supervised independent study. Enrollment restrictions apply; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.

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Nuclear Engineering Courses

NUC ENG 24 Freshman Seminars 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester.

Freshman Seminars: Read More [+]

NUC ENG 100 Introduction to Nuclear Engineering 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016
The class provides students with an overview of the contemporary nuclear energy technology with emphasis on nuclear fission as an energy source. Starting with the basic physics of the nuclear fission process, the class includes discussions on reactor control, thermal hydraulics, fuel production, and spent fuel management for various types of reactors in use around the world as well as analysis of safety and other nuclear-related issues. This class is
intended for sophomore NE students, but is also open to transfer students and students from other majors.
Introduction to Nuclear Engineering: Read More [+]

NUC ENG 101 Nuclear Reactions and Radiation 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Energetics and kinetics of nuclear reactions and radioactive decay, fission, fusion, and reactions of low-energy neutrons; properties of the fission products and the actinides; nuclear models and transition probabilities; interaction of radiation with matter.

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NUC ENG 102 Nuclear Reactions and Radiation Laboratory 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
Laboratory course in nuclear physics. Experiments will allow students to directly observe phenomena discussed in Nuclear Engineering 101. These experiments will give students exposure to (1) electronics, (2) alpha, beta, gamma radiation detectors, (3) radioactive sources, and (4) experimental methods relevant for all aspects of nuclear science. Experiments include: Rutherford scattering, x-ray fluorescence, muon lifetime, gamma-gamma angular
correlations, Mossbauer effect, and radon measurements.
Nuclear Reactions and Radiation Laboratory: Read More [+]

NUC ENG 104 Radiation Detection and Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Basic science of radiation measurement, nuclear instrumentation, neutronics, radiation dosimetry. The lectures emphasize the principles of radiation detection. The weekly laboratory applies a variety of radiation detection systems to the practical measurements of interest for nuclear power, nuclear and non-nuclear science, and environmental applications. Students present goals and approaches of the experiements being performed.

Radiation Detection and Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory: Read More [+]

NUC ENG 107 Introduction to Imaging 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2012
Introduction to medical imaging physics and systems, including x-ray computed tomography (CT), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), positron emission tomography (PET), and SPECT; basic principles of tomography and an introduction to unfolding methods; resolution effects of counting statistics, inherent system resolution and human factors.

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NUC ENG 120 Nuclear Materials 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Effects of irradiation on the atomic and mechanical properties of materials in nuclear reactors. Fission product swelling and release; neutron damage to structural alloys; fabrication and properties of uranium dioxide fuel.

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NUC ENG 124 Radioactive Waste Management 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Components and material flowsheets for nuclear fuel cycle, waste characteristics, sources of radioactive wastes, compositions, radioactivity and heat generation; waste treatment technologies; waste disposal technologies; safety assessment of waste disposal.

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NUC ENG 130 Analytical Methods for Non-proliferation 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Use of nuclear measurement techniques to detect clandestine movement and/or possession of nuclear materials by third parties. Nuclear detection, forensics, signatures, and active and passive interrogation methodologies will be explored. Techniques currently deployed for arms control and treaty verification will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on common elements of detection technology from the viewpoint of resolution of threat signatures
from false positives due to naturally occurring radioactive material. Laboratory will involve experiments conducted in the Nucleonics Laboratory featuring passive and active neutron signals, gamma ray detection, fission neutron multiplicity, and U and Pu isotopic identification and age determination. Students should be familiar with alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron radiation and basic concepts of nuclear fission.
Analytical Methods for Non-proliferation: Read More [+]

NUC ENG 150 Introduction to Nuclear Reactor Theory 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Neutron interactions, nuclear fission, and chain reacting systematics in thermal and fast nuclear reactors. Diffusion and slowing down of neutrons. Criticality calculations. Nuclear reactor dynamics and reactivity feedback. Production of radionuclides in nuclear reactors.

Introduction to Nuclear Reactor Theory: Read More [+]

NUC ENG 155 Introduction to Numerical Simulations in Radiation Transport 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Computational methods used to analyze radiation transport described by various differential, integral, and integro-differential equations. Numerical methods include finite difference, finite elements, discrete ordinates, and Monte Carlo. Examples from neutron and photon transport; numerical solutions of neutron/photon diffusion and transport equations. Monte Carlo simulations of photon and neutron transport. An overview of optimization techniques
for solving the resulting discrete equations on vector and parallel computer systems.
Introduction to Numerical Simulations in Radiation Transport: Read More [+]

NUC ENG 161 Nuclear Power Engineering 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Energy conversion in nuclear power systems; design of fission reactors; thermal and structural analysis of reactor core and plant components; thermal-hydraulic analysis of accidents in nuclear power plants; safety evaluation and engineered safety systems.

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NUC ENG 162 Radiation Biophysics and Dosimetry 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Interaction of radiation with matter; physical, chemical, and biological effects of radiation on human tissues; dosimetry units and measurements; internal and external radiation fields and dosimetry; radiation exposure regulations; sources of radiation and radioactivity; basic shielding concepts; elements of radiation protection and control; theories and models for cell survival, radiation sensitivity, carcinogenesis, and dose calculation.

Radiation Biophysics and Dosimetry: Read More [+]

NUC ENG 167 Risk-Informed Design for Advanced Nuclear Systems 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Project-based class for design and licensing of nuclear facilities, including advanced reactors. Elements of a project proposal. Regulatory framework and use of deterministic and probabilistic licensing criteria. Siting criteria. External and internal events. Identification and analysis of design basis and beyond design basis events. Communication with regulators and stakeholders. Ability to work in and contribute to a design team.

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NUC ENG 170A Nuclear Design: Design in Nuclear Power Technology and Instrumentation 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Design of various fission and fusion power systems and other physically based applications. Each semester a topic will be chosen by the class as a whole. In addition to technology, the design should address issues relating to economics, the environment, and risk assessment.

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NUC ENG 170B Nuclear Design: Design in Bionuclear, Nuclear Medicine, and Radiation Therapy 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2010, Spring 2009, Spring 2008
A systems approach to the development of procedures for nuclear medicine and radiation therapy. Each semester a specific procedure will be studied and will entail the development of the biological and physiological basis for a procedure, the chemical and biochemical characteristics of appropriate drugs, dosimetric requirements and limitations, the production and distribution of radionuclides and/or radiation fields to be applied, and the
characteristics of the instrumentation to be used.
Nuclear Design: Design in Bionuclear, Nuclear Medicine, and Radiation Therapy: Read More [+]

NUC ENG 175 Methods of Risk Analysis 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2013, Fall 2011, Fall 2009
Methodological approaches for the quantification of technological risk and risk based decision making. Probabilistic safety assessment, human health risks, environmental and ecological risk analysis.

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NUC ENG 180 Introduction to Controlled Fusion 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Introduction to energy production by controlled thermonuclear reactions. Nuclear fusion reactions, energy balances for fusion systems, survey of plasma physics; neutral beam injection; RF heating methods; vacuum systems; tritium handling.

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NUC ENG H194 Honors Undergraduate Research 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Supervised research. Students who have completed three or more upper division courses may pursue original research under the direction of one of the members of the staff. A final report or presentation is required. A maximum of three units of H194 may be used to fulfill a technical elective requirement in the Nuclear Engineering general program or joint major programs.

Honors Undergraduate Research: Read More [+]

NUC ENG 198 Group Study for Advanced Undergraduates 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Group studies of selected topics.

Group Study for Advanced Undergraduates: Read More [+]

NUC ENG 199 Supervised Independent Study 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Supervised independent study. Enrollment restrictions apply; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.

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NUC ENG S199 Supervised Independent Study 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Supervised independent study. Please see section of the for description and prerequisites.

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Faculty and Instructors

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

Joel W. Ager, Adjunct Professor.

Paul Alivisatos, Professor. Physical chemistry, semiconductor nanocrystals, nanoscience, nanotechnology, artificial photosynthesis, solar energy, renewable energy, sustainable energy.
Research Profile

Elke Arenholz, Associate Adjunct Professor.

Mark D. Asta, Professor.

Jillian Banfield, Professor. Nanoscience, Bioremediation, genomics, biogeochemistry, carbon cycling, geomicrobiology, MARS, minerology.
Research Profile

Robert Birgeneau, Professor. Physics, phase transition behavior of novel states of matter.
Research Profile

Gerbrand Ceder, Professor.

Daryl Chrzan, Professor. Materials science and engineering, computational materials science, metals and metallic compounds, defects in solids, growth of nanostructures.
Research Profile

Thomas M. Devine, Professor. Synthesis of nanomaterials, nuclear power, oil production, secondary batteries for electric vehicles, computer disk drives, and synthesis and characterization of metal oxide nanowires, corrosion resistance of materials.
Research Profile

Fiona Doyle, Professor. Electrochemistry, mineral processing, solution processing of materials, interfacial chemistry, extractive metallurgy, remediation of abandoned mines.
Research Profile

Oscar D. Dubon, Professor. Magnetic, optical materials, processing, properties in electronic.
Research Profile

Kevin Healy, Professor. Bioengineering, biomaterials engineering, tissue engineering, bioinspired materials, tissue and organ regeneration, stem cell engineering, microphysiological systems, organs on a chip, drug screening and discovery, multivalent bioconjugate therapeutics.
Research Profile

Frances Hellman, Professor. Condensed matter physics and materials science.
Research Profile

Digby D. Macdonald, Professor in Residence.

Lane W. Martin, Associate Professor. Complex Oxides, novel electronic materials, thin films, materials processing, materials characterization, memory, logic, information technologies, energy conversion, thermal properties, dielectrics, ferroelectrics, pyroelectrics, piezoelectrics, magnetics, multiferroics, transducers, devices.
Research Profile

Phillip B. Messersmith, Professor.

Andrew M. Minor, Professor. Metallurgy, nanomechanics, in situ TEM, electron microscopy of soft materials.
Research Profile

Kristin A. Persson, Assistant Professor. Lithium-ion Batteries.
Research Profile

R. Ramesh, Professor. Processing of complex oxide heterostructures, nanoscale characterization/device structures, thin film growth and materials physics of complex oxides, materials processing for devices, information technologies.
Research Profile

Robert O. Ritchie, Professor. Structural materials, mechanical behavior in biomaterials, creep, fatigue and fracture of advanced metals, intermetallics, ceramics.
Research Profile

Miquel B. Salmeron, Adjunct Professor. Molecules, lasers, atoms, materials science and engineering, matter, scanning, tunneling, atomic force microscopies, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.
Research Profile

Junqiao Wu, Associate Professor. Semiconductors, nanotechnology, energy materials.
Research Profile

Ting Xu, Associate Professor. Polymer, nanocomposite, biomaterial, membrane, directed self-assembly, drug delivery, protein therapeutics, block copolymers, nanoparticles.
Research Profile

Peidong Yang, Professor. Materials chemistry, sensors, nanostructures, energy conversion, nanowires, miniaturizing optoelectronic devices, photovoltaics, thermoelectrics, solid state lighting.
Research Profile

Jie Yao, Assistant Professor. Optical materials, Nanophotonics, optoelectronics.
Research Profile

Haimei Zheng, Assistant Adjunct Professor.

Lecturers

Matthew Sherburne, Lecturer.

Emeritus Faculty

Robert H. Bragg, Professor Emeritus.

Didier De Fontaine, Professor Emeritus. Phase transformations in alloys, crystallography, thermodynamics of phase changes, particularly ordering reactions, phase separation, calculations of phase equilibria by combined quantum, statistical mechanical methods.
Research Profile

Lutgard De Jonghe, Professor Emeritus. Ceramic properties, advanced ceramics, silicon carbide, densification studies, microstructure development.
Research Profile

James W. Evans, Professor Emeritus. Production of materials, particularly fluid flow, reaction kinetics, mass transport, electrochemical, electromagnetic phenomena governing processes for producing materials, metals, storing energy.
Research Profile

+ Douglas W. Fuerstenau, Professor Emeritus. Mineral processing, extractive metallurgy; application of surface, colloid chemistry to mineral/water systems; fine particle science, technology; principles of comminution, flotation, pelletizing; hydrometallurg, extraction of metals.
Research Profile

Andreas M. Glaeser, Professor Emeritus. Ceramic joining, TLP bonding, brazing, reduced-temperature joining, ceramic-metal joining, ceramic processing, surface and interface properties of ceramics, thermal barrier coatings.
Research Profile

+ Ronald Gronsky, Professor Emeritus. Internal structure of materials, engineering applications.
Research Profile

Eugene E. Haller, Professor Emeritus. Semiconductor crystal growth, characterization of impurities and defects in semiconductors: infrared and microwave detectors, isotopically controlled semiconductors.
Research Profile

Marshal F. Merriam, Professor Emeritus.

+ J. W. Morris, Professor Emeritus. Structural materials, computational materials, the limits of strength, deformation mechanisms, non-destructive testing with SQUID microscopy, mechanisms of grain refinement in high strength steels, lead-free solders for microelectronics.
Research Profile

Eicke R. Weber, Professor Emeritus. Optical materials, magnetic materials, semiconductor thin film growth, device processing in electronic materials.
Research Profile

Faculty

Lee A. Bernstein, Adjunct Professor.

Massimiliano Fratoni, Assistant Professor. Nuclear reactor design, fuel cycle analysis, fusion reactors.
Research Profile

Ehud Greenspan, Professor. Professor of the Graduate School.

Peter Hosemann, Associate Professor. Microscopy, nanomaterials, Nuclear materials, material science, radiation damage, corrosion in liquid metals, materials development, materials under extremes, nuclear applications, ion beam microscopy, nanoscale mechanical testing.
Research Profile

Daniel M. Kammen, Professor. Public policy, nuclear engineering, energy, resources, risk analysis as applied to global warming, methodological studies of forecasting, hazard assessment, renewable energy technologies, environmental resource management.
Research Profile

Ka-Ngo Leung, Professor. Professor of the Graduate School, Plasma and Ion Beam technology in microfabrication processes.

Edward C. Morse, Professor. Applied plasma physics: fusion technology: microwaves, experimental investigation of RF plasma heating, experimental studies of compact toroids spectral method for magnetohydrodynamic stability.
Research Profile

Eric B. Norman, Professor. Professor of the Graduate School, nuclear astrophysics, experimental nuclear physics, homeland security, neutrinos.
Research Profile

Per F. Peterson, Professor. Nuclear engineering, heat and mass transfer, reactor thermal hydraulics, nuclear reactor design, radioactive waste, nuclear materials management.
Research Profile

Rachel Slaybaugh, Assistant Professor. Computational methods, high performance computing, neutron transport.
Research Profile

Karl A. Van Bibber, Professor. Experimental nuclear physics, Particle Astrophysics, Accelerator Technology and Neutron Sources.
Research Profile

Kai Vetter, Professor.

Jasmina L. Vujic, Professor. Nuclear engineering, numerical methods in reactor physics, neutron and photon transport, reactor core design and analysis, shielding, radiation protection, biomedical application of radiation, optimization techniques for vector, parallel computers.
Research Profile

Lecturers

Ralph E. Berger, Lecturer.

Alan Michael Bolind, Lecturer.

Emeritus Faculty

T. Kenneth Fowler, Professor Emeritus. Plasma physics, nuclear engineering, magnetic fusion, confinement and stability of plasmas for thermonuclear fusion, fusion reactor design, spehromak compact toroid plasma confinement configuration.
Research Profile

Lawrence M. Grossman, Professor Emeritus. Nuclear engineering, reactor physics, numerical approximation methods in neutron diffusion, transport theory, control and optimization theory in nuclear reactor engineering.
Research Profile

Selig N. Kaplan, Professor Emeritus. Radiation reactions, interaction of radiation of matter, detection and measurement of ionizing radiation.
Research Profile

William E. Kastenberg, Professor Emeritus. Risk management, risk assessment, nuclear reactor safety, ethical issues in emerging technologies.
Research Profile

Donald R. Olander, Professor Emeritus. Nuclear engineering, nuclear materials: reactor fuel behavior, hydriding of zirconium and uranium, high-temperature kinetic and thermodynamic behavior of nuclear reactor fuels, performance of degraded nuclear fuels.
Research Profile

Contact Information

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

210 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

Phone: 510-642-3801

Fax: 510-643-5792

Visit Department Website

Department of Nuclear Engineering

Student Services

4149 Etcheverry Hall

Phone: 510-642-5760

Fax: 510-643-9685

http://www.nuc.berkeley.edu/

Engineering Student Services Adviser

Kathy Barrett

Phone: 510-642-7594

http://engineering.berkeley.edu/ESS

ess@berkeley.edu

Department Chair, Materials Science and Engineering

Mark Asta, PhD

384 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

Phone: 510-642-3803

mdasta@berkeley.edu

Department Chair, Nuclear Engineering

Karl A. Van Bibber, PhD

4151 Etcheverry Hall

Phone: 510-642-3477

karl.van.bibber@nuc.berkeley.edu

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