Society and Environment

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

Bachelor of Science (BS)

Social and environmental problems are deeply intertwined. This major introduces students to the main approaches and theory for environmental social sciences including how social science tools can be applied to environmental problems and how social science theories contribute to understanding environmental problems. At the upper division level, there are three major areas of concentration. Students are exposed to all three areas and choose to focus in one: US Environmental Policy and Management, Global Environmental Politics, or Justice and Sustainability.

Society and Environment graduates are well-prepared for careers in fields such as environmental consulting, education, health, or law; community, urban, or regional planning; and other related areas of environmentalism in public agencies, nonprofit conservation organizations, and private companies. Graduates are well-qualified for a variety of graduate programs, including law school.

Admission to the Major

Freshman students may apply directly to the major, or they may select the College of Natural Resource's undeclared option and declare the major by the end of their fourth semester. For further information regarding how to declare the major after admission including information on a change of major or change of college, please see the College of Natural Resources Undergraduate Student Handbook.

Honors Program

Students with a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.6 or higher may enroll in the College of Natural Resources honors program (H196) once they have reached upper division standing. To fulfill the program requirements, students design, conduct, and report on an individual research project working with a faculty sponsor. For further information on the honors program, please see the College of Natural Resources website.

Minor Program

There is no minor program in Society and Environment.

Other Majors and Minors Offered by the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management

Conservation and Resource Studies (Major and Minor)
Environmental Sciences (Major only)
Forestry and Natural Resources (Major and Minor)
Molecular Environmental Biology (Major only)

Visit Department Website

Major Requirements

In addition to the University, campus, and college requirements listed on the College Requirements tab, students must fulfill the below requirements specific to their major program.

General Guidelines

  1. All courses taken to fulfill the major requirements below must be taken for letter graded credit, other than courses listed which are offered on a Pass/No Pass basis only. Other exceptions to this requirement are noted as applicable.

  2. A minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required.

  3. A minimum GPA of 2.0 in upper division major requirements is required.

  4. At least 15 of the 36 required upper division units must be taken in the College of Natural Resources (EEP, ERG, ES, ESPM, NAT RES, NST, PMB).

  5. A maximum of 16 units of independent study (courses numbered 97, 98, 99, 197, 198, and 199) may count toward graduation, with a maximum of 4 units of independent study per semester.

  6. No more than 1/3 of the total units attempted at UC Berkeley may be taken Pass/No Pass. This includes units in the Education Abroad Program and UC Intercampus Visitor or Exchange Programs.

  7. A maximum of 4 units of physical education courses will count toward graduation.

For information regarding residence requirements and unit requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.

Lower Division Requirements

ESPM Environmental Science Core (cannot overlap with breadth)
Select one of the following:4
The Biosphere
Environmental Biology
Environmental Issues
Introduction to Environmental Sciences (formerly ENV SCI 10)
Climate Change and the Future of California
ESPM Social Science Core (cannot overlap with breadth)
Select one of the following:4
Introduction to Environmental Studies
Americans and the Global Forest
Introduction to Culture and Natural Resource Management
Environmental Policy, Administration, and Law
Math or Statistics4
Select one of the following:
Analytic Geometry and Calculus
Calculus
Methods of Mathematics: Calculus, Statistics, and Combinatorics
Introduction to Statistics
Foundations of Data Science
Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Introductory Probability and Statistics for Business
PB HLTH 140
Course Not Available
Introduction to Probability and Statistics in Biology and Public Health
Economics 1
Select one of the following:
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy
Introduction to Economics
Introduction to Economics--Lecture Format
1

The economics course may also fulfill the social & behavioral sciences breadth requirement. 

Five-Course Breadth of Knowledge Requirement

Select one course from each of the five breadth categories below. Click here for complete listings. The American Cultures requirement may overlap with any of the following courses. These courses cannot overlap with other requirements.

  • Social & Behavioral Sciences (3-4 units)
  • International Studies (3-4 units)
  • Physical Sciences (3-4 units)
  • Arts & Literature, Historical Studies, or Philosophy & Values (3-4 units)
  • Biological Science (3-4 units)

Upper Division Requirements

Area of Concentration
Select seven courses from one Area of Concentration (see below)
Environmental or Political Economics
Select one of the following:
History of Development and Underdevelopment
Environmental Economics
Ecological Economics in Historical Context
Microeconomic Theory with Application to Natural Resources
Environmental Economics
Globalization and the Natural Environment
Economics of Race, Agriculture, and the Environment
Population, Environment, and Development
Advanced Topics in Environmental and Resource Economics
Economic Geography of the Industrial World
History of Development and Underdevelopment
Global Poverty: Challenges and Hopes in the New Millennium
Classical Theories of Political Economy
Contemporary Theories of Political Economy
International Political Economy
Development Politics
Wealth and Poverty
Capstone Presentation
ESPM 194BCapstone Course in Society and Environment (Research or poster presentation (final semester of the senior year))1

Area of Concentration Requirement

Students select a total of seven courses (including their core course) in the areas of concentration. In consultation with a faculty adviser, students choose their primary area of concentration and:

  1. Select one of the ESPM courses in their primary area as their core course.
  2. Select three additional courses from that area (ESPM or non-ESPM) to constitute the primary area of concentration.
  3. Choose three additional courses (ESPM or non-ESPM), with at least one course from each of the other two concentrations.

At least three of the seven courses (12 units) in the areas of concentration must come from the approved ESPM courses.

1. US Environmental Policy and Management
Approved ESPM courses
ESPM 102CResource Management4
ESPM 102DClimate and Energy Policy4
ESPM 160ACAmerican Environmental and Cultural History4
ESPM 161Environmental Philosophy and Ethics4
ESPM 186Management and Conservation of Rangeland Ecosystems4
ESPM C191/HISTART C189/AMERSTD C112F/UGIS C136The American Forest: Its Ecology, History, and Representation4
Approved non-ESPM courses
AMERSTD/UGBA C172History of American Business3
UGBA 107The Social, Political, and Ethical Environment of Business3
UGBA/AMERSTD C172History of American Business3
CY PLAN 110Introduction to City Planning4
CY PLAN 113AEconomic Analysis for Planning3
CY PLAN 113BCommunity and Economic Development3
CY PLAN 118ACThe Urban Community4
ENE,RES C100/PUB POL C184Energy and Society4
ENE,RES 175Water and Development4
ENE,RES 180Ecological Economics in Historical Context (formerly C180)3
ENVECON/ECON C102Natural Resource Economics4
ENVECON/IAS C118Introductory Applied Econometrics4
ENVECON 141Agricultural and Environmental Policy4
ENVECON 152Advanced Topics in Development and International Trade3
ENVECON 153Population, Environment, and Development3
ENVECON 162Economics of Water Resources3
GEOG 110Economic Geography of the Industrial World (formerly C110)4
GEOG 130Food and the Environment4
HISTORY 120ACAmerican Environmental and Cultural History4
HISTORY 122ACAntebellum America: The Advent of Mass Society4
HISTORY 124AThe Recent United States: The United States from the Late 19th Century to the Eve of World War II4
HISTORY 135American Indian History: Precontact to the Present4
LEGALST 100Foundations of Legal Studies4
LEGALST 145Law and Economics I4
LEGALST 147Law and Economics II4
LEGALST 176Twentieth-Century American Legal and Constitutional History4
LEGALST 178Seminar on American Legal and Constitutional History3
POL SCI 114ATheories of Governance: Late 20th Century4
POL SCI 161Public Opinion, Voting and Participation4
PUB POL C103Wealth and Poverty4
PUB POL C184Energy and Society4
SOCIOL 110Organizations and Social Institutions4
SOCIOL 131ACRace and Ethnic Relations: U.S. American Cultures4
SOCIOL 144Ethnic Politics4
SOCIOL 145ACSocial Change: American Cultures (formerly 170AC)4
SOCIOL 186American Society (formerly 180)4
2. Global Environmental Politics
Approved ESPM courses
ESPM 151Society, Environment, and Culture4
ESPM 162Bioethics and Society4
ESPM 165International Rural Development Policy4
ESPM 168Political Ecology4
ESPM 169International Environmental Politics4
Approved non-ESPM Courses:
AFRICAM 131Caribbean Societies and Cultures3
ANTHRO 137Energy, Culture and Social Organization4
ANTHRO 139Controlling Processes4
CY PLAN C139Urban and Sub-national Politics in Developing Countries4
EDUC 186ACThe Southern Border4
ETH STD 159ACThe Southern Border4
ENVECON 131Globalization and the Natural Environment3
GWS 141Interrogating Global Economic "Development"4
GEOG 130Food and the Environment4
GEOG 137Top Ten Global Environmental Problems4
GEOG 138Global Environmental Politics4
GEOG 159ACThe Southern Border4
IAS 102Scope and Methods of Research in International and Area Studies4
LEGALST 140Property and Liberty4
LEGALST 179Comparative Constitutional Law4
LEGALST 182Law, Politics and Society4
POL SCI 138EThe Varieties of Capitalism: Political Economic Systems of the World4
POL SCI C139Urban and Sub-national Politics in Developing Countries (formerly 139D)4
RHETOR 107Rhetoric of Scientific Discourse (formerly 174)4
SOCIOL 102Sociological Theory II (formerly 101B)5
SOCIOL 127Development and Globalization (formerly 172)4
3. Justice and Sustainability
Approved ESPM courses
ESPM 117Urban Garden Ecosystems4
ESPM 155ACSociology and Political Ecology of Agro-Food Systems4
ESPM 163ACEnvironmental Justice: Race, Class, Equity, and the Environment4
ESPM 166Natural Resource Policy and Indigenous Peoples4
ESPM C167/PB HLTH C160Environmental Health and Development4
Approved non-ESPM Courses:
ANTHRO 148Anthropology of the Environment4
DEV STD C100/GEOG C112History of Development and Underdevelopment4
GWS 130ACGender, Race, Nation, and Health4
GEOG C112/DEV STD C100History of Development and Underdevelopment4
HISTORY 135American Indian History: Precontact to the Present4
LD ARCH 130Sustainable Landscapes and Cities4
LEGALST 100Foundations of Legal Studies4
LEGALST 103Theories of Law and Society4
LEGALST 107Theories of Justice4
LEGALST 187Diversity, Law & Politics4
NATAMST 100Native American Law4
POL SCI 124CEthics and Justice in International Affairs4
POLECON 150Advanced Study in Political Economy of Industrial Societies (depends on topic)4
PB HLTH C160/ESPM C167Environmental Health and Development4
PB HLTH 196Special Topics in Public Health (if topic is Nutrition in Developing Countries)1-4
SOCIOL 137ACEnvironmental Justice: Race, Class, Equity, and the Environment (formerly 128AC)4
SOCIOL 145ACSocial Change: American Cultures (formerly 170AC)4
SOCIOL 182Elementary Forms of Racial Domination: International Perspectives (formerly 131B)4

College Requirements

Reading and Composition

In order to provide a solid foundation in reading, writing and critical thinking all majors in the College require two semesters of lower division work in composition. Students must complete a first-level reading and composition course by the end of their second semester and a second-level course by the end of their fourth semester. 

Foreign LanguageEEP Majors only

The Foreign Language requirement is only required by Environmental Economics and Policy (EEP) majors. It may be satisfied by demonstrating proficiency in reading comprehension, writing, and conversation in a foreign language equivalent to the second semester college level, either by passing an exam or by completing approved course work.

Quantitative ReasoningEEP Majors only

The Quantitative Reasoning requirement is only required by Environmental Economics and Policy (EEP) majors. The requirement may be satisfied by exam or by taking an approved course.

Undergraduate Breadth

Undergraduate breadth provide Berkeley students with a rich and varied educational experience outside of their major program. Breadth courses are built into CNR major requirements. The EEP major is the only CNR major that requires the entire 7 course breadth. As the foundation of a liberal arts education, breadth courses give students a view into the intellectual life of the University while introducing them to a multitude of perspectives and approaches to research and scholarship. Engaging students in new disciplines and with peers from other majors, the breadth experience strengthens interdisciplinary connections and context that prepares Berkeley graduates to understand and solve the complex issues of their day. 

High School Exam Credit

CNR students may apply high school exam credit (Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, A-Level Exam) towards many College and Major Requirements. See AP Exam Equivalency Chart and Higher Level IB Exam Equivalency Chart in the CNR Student Handbook for more information.

Units Requirements

Students must complete at least 120 semester units of courses subject to certain guidelines:

  • At least 36 units must be upper division courses, including a minimum of 15 units of upper division courses in the College of Natural Resources. 
  • A maximum of 16 units of Special Studies coursework (courses numbered 97, 98, 99, 197, 198, or 199) is allowed towards the 120 units; a maximum of four is allowed in a given semester.
  • A maximum of 4 units of Physical Education from any school attended will count towards the 120 units.
  • Students may receive unit credit for courses graded P (including P/NP units taken through EAP) up to a limit of one-third of the total units taken and passed on the Berkeley campus at the time of graduation.

​Semester Unit Minimum

All CNR students must enroll in at least 13 units each fall and spring semester. 

Semester Unit Maximum

To request permission to take more than 19.5 units in a semester, please see the major adviser.

Semester Limit

Students admitted as freshmen must graduate within 8 fall/spring semesters at UC Berkeley. Students admitted as transfer students must graduate within 4 fall/spring semesters at UC Berkeley. Students who go on EAP and UCDC can petition for additional semesters. Summer session, UC Extension and non-UC study abroad programs do not count towards this semester limit. Students approved for double majors or  simultaneous degrees in two colleges may be granted an additional semester. CNR does not limit the number of total units a student can accrue.

Senior Residence Requirement

After reaching senior status (90 semester units earned), students must complete at least 24 of the remaining 30 units in at least two semesters in residence at the College of Natural Resources. To count as residence, a semester must consist of at least four passed units. Inter-campus Visitor, Education Abroad Program, UC Berkeley Washington Program, and UC Berkeley Extension units do not count toward this requirement.

Students may use Summer Session to satisfy one semester of the Senior Residence Requirement, provided that four units of coursework are completed.

Modified Senior Residence Requirement

Participants in the UC Education Abroad Program (UCEAP) or the UC Berkeley Washington Program may meet a modified Senior Residence Requirement by completing 24 of their final 60 semester units in residence (excluding UCEAP). At least 12 of these 24 units must be completed after senior status is reached.

Most students automatically fulfill the residence requirement by attending classes here for four years. In general, there is no need to be concerned about this requirement, unless students go abroad for a semester or year or want to take courses at another institution or through University Extension during their senior year. In these cases, students should make an appointment to see an adviser to determine how they can meet the Senior Residence Requirement.

Grade Requirements

  • A 2.0 UC GPA is required for graduation.
  • A 2.0 average in all upper division courses required of the major program is required for graduation.

Plan of Study

S&E Freshman/Sophomore Sample Schedule

Freshman
FallUnitsSpringUnits
Reading and Composition course R1A4Reading and Composition course R1B4
MATH 16A or STAT 23-4Breadth3-4
ESPM Core #13-4ESPM Core #23-4
Elective, Seminar, and/or Berkeley Connect1-4Elective, Seminar, DeCal, and/or Berkeley Connect1-4
 11-16 11-16
Sophomore
FallUnitsSpringUnits
ECON 1 or ENVECON C14American Cultures3-4
Breadth3-4Breadth3-4
Breadth3-4Breadth3-4
Elective, Seminar, DeCal, and/or Berkeley Connect3-4Elective, Seminar, DeCal, and/or Berkeley Connect3-4
 13-16 12-16
Total Units: 47-64
1

 Breadth Courses (select one 3-4 unit course from each of the five breadth categories below:

  • Biological Sciences
  • Humanities: Arts & Literature, Historical Studies, or Philosophy & Values
  • International Studies
  • Physical Sciences
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences
2

 Remaining Requirements for Junior & Senior Years:

  • Seven courses from the Area of Concentration Requirement
  • One course in Environmental or Political Economics
  • Senior Capstone Presentation ESPM 194B (spring senior year)
3

 Freshman/Sophomore Seminars: see FSS website for details

4

 Berkeley Connect: see Berkeley Connect website for details

5

 DeCal Courses: see DeCal website for details

S&E Transfer Sample Schedule

(assumes the completion of IGETC or all lower division requirements)

First Year
FallUnitsSpringUnits
S&E Course3-4S&E Course3-4
S&E Course3-4S&E Course3-4
Elective3-4Elective3-4
Berkeley Connect/DeCal1-4Elective3-4
 10-16 12-16
Second Year
FallUnitsSpringUnits
S&E Course3-4S&E Course3-4
S&E Course3-4S&E Course3-4
Elective3-4S&E Senior Capstone1
Elective3-4Elective3-4
 12-16 10-13
Total Units: 44-61

S&E Transfer Sample Schedule - Major & Minor

(assumes the completion of IGETC or all lower division requirements)

First Year
FallUnitsSpringUnits
S&E Course3-4S&E Course3-4
S&E Course3-4S&E Course3-4
Minor Course3-4Minor Course3-4
Berkeley Connect/DeCal1-4Minor Course3-4
 10-16 12-16
Second Year
FallUnitsSpringUnits
S&E Course3-4S&E Course3-4
S&E Course3-4S&E Course3-4
Minor Course3-4S&E Senior Capstone1
Minor Course3-4Minor Course3-4
 12-16 10-13
Total Units: 44-61

Student Learning Goals

Learning Goals for the Major

The Society and Environment major develops students’ capacities to theorize, analyze, interpret and influence social causes and consequences of environmental problems.

Society and Environment graduates gain understanding of the complex interactions between social, technological, and natural systems—conceptually, analytically, operationally, and articulately—for their individually chosen environmental problems and solutions. Graduates do the following:

  • Learn about social processes that affect environmental equity, productivity, and stability for diverse peoples and generations.
  • Form and link institutions of science, industry, technology, resource use, and societal governance.
  • Work across the operational scales of environmental management and policy from the local to global.
  • Shape operational responses, in policy and practice, to problems of environmental injustice, sustainability, and productivity.

Graduates are expected to play effective and credible roles in the public, professional, and scientific arenas in which they choose to work. These arenas include, for example, the politics, policy and management of urban, agricultural, forest, land and water systems and the particular sets of socioeconomic, scientific, industrial, and governmental institutions these engage.

Advising

In the College of Natural Resources, we provide holistic, individual advising services to prospective and current students who are pursuing major and minors in our college. We assist with a range of topics including course selection, academic decision-making, achieving personal and academic goals, and maximizing the Berkeley experience.

If you are looking to explore your options, or you are ready to declare a major, double major, or minor, contact the undergraduate adviser for your intended major. Visit our website to explore all of our advising services.

Courses

Society and Environment

ESPM 2 The Biosphere 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
An introduction to the unifying principles and fundamental concepts underlying our scientific understanding of the biosphere. Topics covered include the physical life support system on earth; nutrient cycles and factors regulating the chemical composition of water, air, and soil; the architecture and physiology of life; population biology and community ecology; human dependence on the biosphere; and the magnitude and consequences of human interventions
in the biosphere.
The Biosphere: Read More [+]

ESPM 3 The Political Ecologies of Spain and California in Comparative Perspective 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This course introduces a political dimension to the study of ecology by exploring questions such as the political causes and effects of environmental policymaking and the unequal impact of environmental issues on different social, economic, cultural, or political groups among others.

The Political Ecologies of Spain and California in Comparative Perspective: Read More [+]

ESPM 5 FROM FARM TO TABLE: FOOD SYSTEMS IN A CHANGING WORLD 4 Units

Terms offered: Not yet offered
This course explores the journey of the U.S. food supply from the farm to the family table. The ecology, management, and politics of farming under a global change scenario, the impact of our changing patterns of demand on food processing and retail, the opportunties and costs of exports, and the way different groups access, use, and consume food.

FROM FARM TO TABLE: FOOD SYSTEMS IN A CHANGING WORLD: Read More [+]

ESPM 6 Environmental Biology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Basic biological and ecological principles discussed in relation to environmental disruptions. Human interactions with the environment; their meaning for animals and plants. Discussion of basic ecological processes as a basis for understanding environmental problems and formulating strategies for their solution.

Environmental Biology: Read More [+]

ESPM 9 Environmental Science Case Study Seminar 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
Utilizing a field intensive seminar format, the course will introduce lower division students to the process of addressing real environmental problems. Through a progression of case studies, students will explore a spectrum of research design and implementation approaches. By the end of the semester, they will be able to frame a researchable question, design a protocol for gathering relevant information, analyze the information, and derive
an objective conclusion. Throughout the semester, students will present case study results in oral and written form.
Environmental Science Case Study Seminar: Read More [+]

ESPM C10 Environmental Issues 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Relationship between human society and the natural environment; case studies of ecosystem maintenance and disruption. Issues of economic development, population, energy, resources, technology, and alternative systems.

Environmental Issues: Read More [+]

ESPM C11 Americans and the Global Forest 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
This course challenges students to think about how individual and American consumer decisions affect forest ecosystems around the world. A survey course that highlights the consequences of different ways of thinking about the forest as a global ecosystem and as a source of goods like trees, water, wildlife, food, jobs, and services. The scientific tools and concepts that have guided management of the forest for the last 100 years, and the
laws, rules, and informal institutions that have shaped use of the forests, are analyzed.
Americans and the Global Forest: Read More [+]

ESPM C12 Introduction to Environmental Studies 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This integrative course, taught by a humanities professor and a science professor, surveys current global environmental issues; introduces the basic intellectual tools of environmental science; investigates ways the human relationship to nature has been imagined in literary and philosophical traditions; and examines how tools of scientific and literary analysis; scientific method, and imaginative thinking can clarify what is at stake in environmental
issues and ecological citizenship.
Introduction to Environmental Studies: Read More [+]

ESPM 15 Introduction to Environmental Sciences 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2017
Introduction to the science underlying biological and physical environmental problems, including water and air quality, global change, energy, ecosystem services, introduced and endangered species, water supply, solid waste, human population, and interaction of technical, social, and political approaches to environmental management.

Introduction to Environmental Sciences: Read More [+]

ESPM 24 Freshman Seminar 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
The Freshman Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Freshman Seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics may vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to fifteen freshman.

Freshman Seminar: Read More [+]

ESPM 39E Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

ESPM 40 Insects and Human Society 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Summer 2016 8 Week Session
An introduction to the diversity and natural history of insects in natural and human environments. The course examines the wonder of insects, their interactions with the living world, and their contributions to and impacts on human society.

Insects and Human Society: Read More [+]

ESPM 42 Natural History of Insects 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
An outline of the main facts and principles of biology as illustrated by insects, with special emphasis on their relations to plants and animals, including humans.

Natural History of Insects: Read More [+]

ESPM 44 Biological Control 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
Regulation of populations of organisms, especially insects, through interactions with parasites, predators, pathogens, competitors. Discussion of examples from agricultural, forest, urban, and recreational environments.

Biological Control: Read More [+]

ESPM C46 Climate Change and the Future of California 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016
Introduction to California geography, environment, and society, past and future climates, and the potential impacts of 21st-century climate change on ecosystems and human well-being. Topics include fundamentals of climate science and the carbon cycle; relationships between human and natural systems, including water supplies, agriculture, public health, and biodiversity; and the science, law, and politics of possible solutions that can reduce the magnitude
and impacts of climate change.
Climate Change and the Future of California: Read More [+]

ESPM 50AC Introduction to Culture and Natural Resource Management 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session
An introduction to how culture affects the way we use and manage fire, wildland and urban forests, rangelands, parks and preserves, and croplands in America. The basic concepts and tools for evaluating the role of culture in resource use and management are introduced and used to examine the experience of American cultural groups in the development and management of western natural resources.

Introduction to Culture and Natural Resource Management: Read More [+]

ESPM 60 Environmental Policy, Administration, and Law 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2015
Introduction to U.S. environmental policy process focuses on history and evolution of political institutions, importance of property, federal and state roles in decision making, and challenges of environmental policy. Emphasis is on use of science in decision making, choices between regulations and incentives, and role of bureaucracy in resource policy. Case studies on natural resource management, risk management, environmental regulation, and
environmental justice.
Environmental Policy, Administration, and Law: Read More [+]

ESPM 72 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2017
Introduction to computer systems, data processing software for natural resources studies. Components of geographic information systems; concepts of surveying, mapping, and remote sensing as data sources; various methods of data processing and analysis including classification, map overlay, buffer analysis, topographic modeling, spatial interpolation, and map design with a GIS. Intensive hands-on
practices with relevant computer software packages.
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems: Read More [+]

ESPM 78A Teaching and Learning Environmental Science 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
Introduces theories of cognitive development and the practices of curriculum design and lesson presentation for environmental education. Ecology and natural resource management provide the context of curriculum development. Students create lesson plans integrating core concepts and their knowledge of local environmental issues. Lessons are presented to Bay Area K-12 students in field and classroom settings.

Teaching and Learning Environmental Science: Read More [+]

ESPM 88A Exploring Geospatial Data 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016
From interactive web maps to spatial data analysis, digital geographic data and information are becoming an important part of the data science landscape. Almost everything happens somewhere that can be mapped on the surface of the earth. In many cases the where matters as much to an analysis as the what and the why. Geospatial data analysis allows a researcher to consider location explicitly. This course provides an introduction to working with digital
geographic data, or geospatial data. We will explore concepts of geospatial data representation, methods for acquisition, processing and analysis, and techniques for creating compelling geovisualizations. No prior knowledge is assumed or expected.


Exploring Geospatial Data: Read More [+]

ESPM 88B Data Sciences in Ecology and the Environment 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016
Many of the greatest challenges we face today come from understanding and interacting with the natural world: from global climate change to the sudden collapse of fisheries and forests, from the spread of disease and invasive species to the unknown wealth of medical, cultural, and technological value we derive from nature. Advances in satellites and micro­sensors, computation, informatics and the Internet have made available unprecedented amounts of data about the
natural world, and with it, new challenges of sifting, processing and synthesizing large and diverse sources of information. In this course, students will apply methods and understanding they gain in the Foundations course to real­world ecological and environmental data
Data Sciences in Ecology and the Environment: Read More [+]

ESPM 90 Introduction to Conservation and Resource Studies Major 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Introduction to the major, emphasizing each student's educational goals. Overview of ecological problems and contrasting approaches to solutions through institutional and community-based efforts. Required of all CRS sophomore majors and all entering off-campus transfer students to CRS major. Restricted to CRS majors. One field trip is normally required.

Introduction to Conservation and Resource Studies Major: Read More [+]

ESPM 98 Directed Group Study in ESPM 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Study of special topics that are not covered in depth in regular courses in the department.

Directed Group Study in ESPM: Read More [+]

ESPM 98BC Berkeley Connect 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. Over the course of a semester, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor (following a faculty-directed curriculum), meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising, attend lectures and panel discussions featuring department
faculty and alumni, and go on field trips to campus resources. Students are not required to be declared majors in order to participate.
Berkeley Connect: Read More [+]

ESPM 99 Supervised Independent Study and Research 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Supervised independent study or research on topics relevant to department that are not covered in depth by other courses. Open to students in good standing who, in consultation with a faculty sponsor, present a proposal with clearly formulated objectives and means of implementation. Intended for exceptional students.

Supervised Independent Study and Research: Read More [+]

ESPM 100 Environmental Problem Solving 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Analysis of contrasting approaches to understanding and solving environmental and resource management problems. Case studies and hands-on problem solving that integrate concepts, principles, and practices from physical, biological, social, and economic disciplines. Their use in environmental policies and resource and management plans.

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ESPM 100ES Introduction to the Methods of Environmental Science 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Introduction to basic methods used in environmental research by biological, physical, and social scientists; designed to teach skills necessary to conduct independent thesis research in the required senior seminar, 196A-196B/196L. Topics include development of research questions, sampling methods, experimental design, statistical analysis, scientific writing and graphics, and introductions to special techniques for characterizing environmental
conditions and features. This course is the prerequisite to 196A.
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ESPM 102A Terrestrial Resource Ecology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2013, Fall 2012, Fall 2011
Provides a foundation in terrestrial ecology. Organized around five topics: environmental biophysics, ecosystem carbon balance, ecophysiology, population ecology, community ecology. Examines how each contributes to understanding of distribution and abundance of organisms in biosphere. Laboratory exercises, a mandatory weekend field trip, and a group research project provide opportunities to explore questions in depth. Emphasis on building quantitative
understanding of ecological phenomena.
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ESPM 102B Natural Resource Sampling 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course is designed to introduce students to the major sampling systems used in natural resources and ecology. It also introduces students to important sampling and measurement concepts in grassland, forest, wildlife, insect, soil, and water resources. May be taken without laboratory course 102BL.

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ESPM 102BL Laboratory in Natural Resource Sampling 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This laboratory course is designed to introduce students to the major sampling systems used in natural resources and ecology. Field data is collected with various important sampling designs and analyzed. Mean values and confidence intervals are constructed from the data collected in this course. This course must be taken in conjunction with lecture course 102B.

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ESPM 102C Resource Management 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Presents concept and practical approaches to public and private natural resource management decision making. The focus is on goals, criteria, data, models, and technology for quantifying and communicating the consequences of planning options. A range of contemporary air, soil, wetland, rangeland, forest, social, economic, and ecosystem management problems is addressed.

Resource Management: Read More [+]

ESPM 102D Climate and Energy Policy 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
This intermediate level course engages with both the politics and the design of climate and clean energy policy, with a focus on the United States. Key themes include political strategies to climate change, the choice of policy instruments, the role of various state actors and interest groups in policy making, the interaction of policy and low-carbon technology markets, and the US and global politics. The course combines the study of analytical
concepts with in-depth case studies.
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ESPM C103 Principles of Conservation Biology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Fall 2016
A survey of the principles and practices of conservation biology. Factors that affect the creation, destruction, and distribution of biological diversity at the level of the gene, species, and ecosystem are examined. Tools and management options derived from ecology and evolutionary biology that can recover or prevent the loss of biological diversity are explored.

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ESPM C104 Modeling and Management of Biological Resources 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Models of population growth, chaos, life tables, and Leslie matrix theory. Harvesting and exploitation theory. Methods for analyzing population interactions, predation, competition. Fisheries, forest stands, and insect pest management. Genetic aspects of population management. Mathematical theory based on simple difference and ordinary differential equations. Use of simulation packages on microcomputers (previous experience with computers not
required).
Modeling and Management of Biological Resources: Read More [+]

ESPM 105A Sierra Nevada Ecology 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 8 Week Session
Introduction to silvicultural theory, forest operations, and utilization and manufacture of forest products. Evaluation of silviculture for managing forest stands for multiple objectives including regeneration, stand density control, forest growth, genetic improvement, and prescribed burning. Introduction to harvest and access systems, wood structure and quality, and manufacture of forest product.
Field trips and lectures to local areas illustrating different approaches to forest problems.
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ESPM 105B Forest Measurements 1 Unit

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 8 Week Session
This course teaches students how to use common forestry tools, maps, and various sampling methods to collect information about the forest environment. Thirty percent of the time is spent in the classroom learning about the techniques and working up field data. The remaining time is spent in the field applying these techniques in real world settings. Skills taught will include tree and plot measurement
procedures, map reading, and simple field orienteering principles.
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ESPM 105C Silviculture and Utilization 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 8 Week Session
Introduction to silvicultural theory, forest operations, and utilization and manufacture of forest products. Evaluation of silviculture for managing forest stands for multiple objectives including regeneration, stand density control, forest growth, genetic improvement, and prescribed burning. Introduction to harvest and access systems, wood structure and quality, and manufacture of forest product.
Field trips and lectures to local areas illustrating different approaches to forest problems.
Silviculture and Utilization: Read More [+]

ESPM 105D Forest Management and Assessment 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 8 Week Session
Develop skills in evaluating forests and developing management strategies to meet ownership objectives. Develop integrated forest management plan for 160 acre parcel. During first week, inventory and assess ecological condition of the assigned parcel. During second week, develop comprehensive integrated forest resource plan, integrating water, wood, wildlife, range, fisheries, and recreation.
Oral reports in both an office and field setting required and written management plan.
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ESPM C105 Natural History Museums and Biodiversity Science 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
(1) survey of museum resources, including strategies for accession, conservation, collecting and acquiring material, administration, and policies; (2) strategies for making collections digitally available (digitization, databasing, georeferencing, mapping); (3) tools and approaches for examining historical specimens (genomics, isotopes, ecology, morphology, etc); and (4) data integration and inference. The final third of the course will involve
individual projects within a given museum.
Natural History Museums and Biodiversity Science: Read More [+]

ESPM 106 American Wildlife: Management and Policy in the 21st Century 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
This course will introduce the history of key wildlife management and policy paradigms, such as parks and protected areas, threatened and endangered species protections, and state wildlife management. We will then explore in depth a number of species case studies in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, a major laboratory for wildlife science, management and policy. The course will draw on lectures, readings, discussions, and guest perspectives.
The course will help students majoring in related fields to prepare for careers in wildlife science and related conservation, management, and policy efforts; but students of any major should come away with a better
understanding of key issues facing iconic American wildlife species.

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ESPM C107 Biology and Geomorphology of Tropical Islands 13 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Natural history and evolutionary biology of island terrestrial and freshwater organisms, and of marine organisms in the coral reef and lagoon systems will be studied, and the geomorphology of volcanic islands, coral reefs, and reef islands will be discussed. Features of island biogeography will be illustrated with topics linked to subsequent field studies on the island of Moorea (French Polynesia).

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ESPM 108A Trees: Taxonomy, Growth, and Structures 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Study of trees and associated woody species including their taxonomy and distribution, modes of shoot growth and diameter growth, and stem structure. Modes of stem structure and growth will be considered in relation to habitat and life cycles, and to suitability for timber value. Instruction in oral communication. Oral presentation required.

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ESPM 108B Environmental Change Genetics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course will examine the consequences of environmental change on the levels and distribution of genetic diversity within species. Students will be introduced to methods of analysis and their application to organisms from a range of ecosystems. The fate of populations under rapid environmental change will be assessed in the light of dispersal and adaptation (genetic and epigenetic) potential. Students will learn to use population genetics freeware
to evaluate molecular data.
Environmental Change Genetics: Read More [+]

ESPM 110 Primate Ecology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Spring 2010, Spring 2008
This course examines the comparative ecology of sympatric primate species in forests of Central and South America, Africa, and Southeast Asia. In addition to primate ecology, students will master comparative information on the three main tropical forest regions of the world and examine the impact of selective logging on primate densities and diversities in each area.

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ESPM 111 Ecosystem Ecology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course will develop principles of ecosystems ecology, emphasizing terrestrial ecosystems, and will consider how these principles apply to ecosystem recovery and to regional and global fluxes of carbon and nutrients.

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ESPM 112 Microbial Ecology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Introduction to the ecology of microorganisms. Topics include the ecology and evolution of microbes and their relationship with each other and the environment. The role and function of microbes in several ecosystems is also discussed.

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ESPM 112L Microbial Ecology Lab 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Laboratory introduction to the ecology of microorganisms. Topics include the ecology and evolution of microbes and their relationship with each other and the environment. The role and function of microbes in several ecosystems is also discussed.

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ESPM 113 Insect Ecology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Ecology of insects: interactions with the physical environment; structure and functioning of insect populations and communities; behavioral ecology of predator-prey interactions; plant-insect interactions; social insects; pollination biology; applied insect ecology.

Insect Ecology: Read More [+]

ESPM 114 Wildlife Ecology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Introduction to wildlife ecology and its relationship to management programs. Includes population, community, and ecosystem levels of organization, followed by selected case studies.

Wildlife Ecology: Read More [+]

ESPM 115B Biology of Aquatic Insects 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2011, Fall 2009, Spring 2009
Identification and ecology of aquatic insects, including their role as indicators of environmental quality.

Biology of Aquatic Insects: Read More [+]

ESPM 115C Fish Ecology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
Introduction to fish ecology, with particular emphasis on the identification and ecology of California's inland fishes. This course will expose students to the diversity of fishes found in California, emphasizing the physical (e.g., temperature, flow), biotic (e.g., predation, competition), and human-related (e.g., dams, fisheries) factors that affect the distribution, diversity, and abundance of these fishes.

Fish Ecology: Read More [+]

ESPM C115A Freshwater Ecology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018
Lakes, rivers, wetlands, and estuaries are biologically rich, dynamic, and among the most vital and the most vulnerable of Earth’s ecosystems. Lectures will introduce general topics including the natural history of freshwater biota and habitats, ecological interactions, and ecosystem linkages and dynamics. Broad principles will be illustrated with results from selected recent research publications. Factors affecting resilience or vulnerability of freshwater ecosystems
to change will be examined. Course requirements: two exams and a short synthesis paper projecting the future states of a freshwater or estuarine ecosystem of the student's choice under plausible scenarios of local, regional, or global change.
Freshwater Ecology: Read More [+]

ESPM C115C Fish Ecology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2015
Introduction to fish ecology, with particular emphasis on the identification and ecology of California's inland fishes. This course will expose students to the diversity of fishes found in California, emphasizing the physical (e.g., temperature, flow), biotic (e.g., predation, competition), and human-related (e.g., dams, fisheries) factors that affect the distribution, diversity, and abundance of these fishes.

Fish Ecology: Read More [+]

ESPM 116B Range Ecology, Improvements, and Management 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2010, Spring 2006
The ecological basis for range management activities, considered in the context of western range ecosystem types. Specific range improvement and range management practices are discussed in the context of ecosystem processes.

Range Ecology, Improvements, and Management: Read More [+]

ESPM 116C Tropical Forest Ecology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Spring 2009, Spring 2008
Introduction to the ecology of terrestrial tropical ecosystems, with particular emphasis on neotropical forests. Explores unique aspects of tropical ecosystems, especially nutrient cycles, net primary productivity, biological diversity, forest structure and dynamics, disturbance ecology, and the natural history of key forest organisms. Basic ecology is integrated with discussion of human disturbances, restoration of tropical ecosystems, and
the global importance of tropical forests.
Tropical Forest Ecology: Read More [+]

ESPM 117 Urban Garden Ecosystems 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session
An ecosystem approach to the study of urban gardens with an organic perspective. Topics include fundamentals of horticulture, soil properties and fertility, pest and disease management, and food perservation. Laboratories include methods in garden design, plant propagation, compost technique, soil preparation, irrigation systems, pest management, individual or group projects, demonstrations, and discussions.
Enrollment may be limited.
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ESPM 118 Agricultural Ecology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Examines in a holistic framework fundamental biological, technical, socio-economic, and political processes that govern agroecosystem productivity and stability. Management techniques and farming systems' designs that sustain longterm production are emphasized. One Saturday field trip and one optional field trip.

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ESPM 119 Chemical Ecology 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
Plant toxins and their effects on animals, hormonal interactions between plants and animals, feeding preferences, animal pheromones, and defense substances, biochemical interactions between higher plants, and phytoalexins and phytotoxins.

Chemical Ecology: Read More [+]

ESPM 120 Soil Characteristics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Introduction to physical, engineering, chemical, and biological properties of soil; methods of soil description, identification, geographic distribution and uses; the role of soil in supplying water and nutrients to plants; and soil organisms. Soil management for agriculture, forestry, and urban uses will also be discussed. Includes a Saturday field trip.

Soil Characteristics: Read More [+]

ESPM 121 Development and Classification of Soils 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2009, Spring 2006
Development, morphology, and classification of soils as related to geology, environmental factors, and time. Soils as functioning parts of ecosystems; use of soils in archeological and paleoclimatic studies; anthropogenic effects on soil ecosystems.

Development and Classification of Soils: Read More [+]

ESPM 122 Field Study of Soil Development 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2009, Spring 2006
Five day-long Saturday field trips to locations in central California. The field study of soil development and morphology. Methods of soil morphological descriptions; study of factors controlling soil development; relationship of soil morphology to land use; quaternary geology of central California; use of soils in dating landscapes.

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ESPM C125 Biogeography 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018
The course will provide a historical background for the field of biogeography and the ecological foundations needed to understand the distribution and abundance of species and their changes over time. It will also discuss developing technologies (including genomic tools and environmental models) together with the availability of big data and increasingly sophisticated analytical tools to examine the relevance of the field to global change biology, conservation, and
invasion biology, as well as sustainable food systems and ecosystem services.,Terms offered: Not yet offered
The course will provide a historical background for the field of biogeography and the ecological foundations needed to understand the distribution and abundance of species and their changes over time. It will also discuss developing technologies (including genomic tools and environmental models) together with the availability of big data and increasingly sophisticated analytical tools to examine the relevance of the field to global change biology, conservation, and invasion biology, as well as sustainable food systems and ecosystem services.

Biogeography: Read More [+]

ESPM C125 Biogeography 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018
The course will provide a historical background for the field of biogeography and the ecological foundations needed to understand the distribution and abundance of species and their changes over time. It will also discuss developing technologies (including genomic tools and environmental models) together with the availability of big data and increasingly sophisticated analytical tools to examine the relevance of the field to global change biology, conservation, and
invasion biology, as well as sustainable food systems and ecosystem services.,Terms offered: Not yet offered
The course will provide a historical background for the field of biogeography and the ecological foundations needed to understand the distribution and abundance of species and their changes over time. It will also discuss developing technologies (including genomic tools and environmental models) together with the availability of big data and increasingly sophisticated analytical tools to examine the relevance of the field to global change biology, conservation, and invasion biology, as well as sustainable food systems and ecosystem services.

Biogeography: Read More [+]

ESPM C126 Animal Behavior 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
An introduction to comparative animal behavior and behavioral physiology in an evolutionary context, including but not limited to analysis of behavior, genetics and development, learning, aggression, reproduction, adaptiveness, and physiological substrates.

Animal Behavior: Read More [+]

ESPM C128 Chemistry of Soils 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Chemical mechanisms of reactions controlling the fate and mobility of nutrients and pollutants in soils. Role of soil minerals and humus in geochemical pathways of nutrient biovailability and pollutant detoxification. Chemical modeling of nutrient and pollutant soil chemistry. Applications to soil acidity and salinity.

Chemistry of Soils: Read More [+]

ESPM C129 Biometeorology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2012
This course describes how the physical environment (light, wind, temperature, humidity) of plants and soil affects the physiological status of plants and how plants affect their physical environment. Using experimental data and theory, it examines physical, biological, and chemical processes affecting transfer of momentum, energy, and material (water, CO2, atmospheric trace gases) between vegetation and the atmosphere. Plant biometeorology instrumentation
and measurements are also discussed.
Biometeorology: Read More [+]

ESPM 130A Environmental Hydrology 4 Units

Terms offered: Not yet offered
This course introduces the fundamental physical principles that are necessary to understand
the distribution and dynamics of water near the Earth's surface. A quantitative approach will provide
mathematical descriptions of hydrological phenomena that will be used for a variety of hydrological
applications to river flow hydraulics, flood frequency analysis, evapotranspiration from terrestrial
ecosystems, groundwater flow, and ecohydrological
dynamics. The course will provide an introduction to
hydrological processes and data analysis. The purpose of the laboratory is to illustrate in an experimental
setting the principles and applications introduced in lecture.

Environmental Hydrology: Read More [+]

ESPM C130 Terrestrial Hydrology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
A quantitative introduction to the hydrology of the terrestrial environment including lower atmosphere, watersheds, lakes, and streams. All aspects of the hydrologic cycle, including precipitation, infiltration, evapotranspiration, overland flow, streamflow, and groundwater flow. Chemistry and dating of groundwater and surface water. Development of quantitative insights through problem solving and use of simple models. This course
requires one field experiment and several group computer lab assignments.
Terrestrial Hydrology: Read More [+]

ESPM 131 Soil Microbial Ecology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Introduction to the organisms that live in the soil and their activities in the soil ecosystem. Lectures will cover the physical and chemical properties of soils and the soil as a habitat for microorganisms, the diversity and ecology of soil microorganisms, and their activity in the context of biogeochemical cycling, plant-microbe interactions, global environmental change and bioremediation. Goals: To gain fundamental knowledge of the occurrence
and activities of soil microorganisms and their influence on soil productivity and environmental quality as well as potential applications of soil microbiology.
Soil Microbial Ecology: Read More [+]

ESPM 132 Spider Biology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Covers topics ranging from mythological ideas about spiders and their importance in traditional cultures and folklore, to diversity patterns, ecology, behavior, and general biology of spiders. In the laboratory section, students learn to identify local spiders and to prepare a collection.

Spider Biology: Read More [+]

ESPM C133 Water Resources and the Environment 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016
Distribution, dynamics, and use of water resources in the global environment. Water scarcity, water rights, and water wars. The terrestrial hydrologic cycle. Contemporary environmental issues in water resource management, including droughts, floods, saltwater intrusion, water contamination and remediation, river restoration, hydraulic fracturing, dams, and engineering of waterways. The role of water in ecosystem processes and geomorphology. How water
resources are measured and monitored. Basic water resource calculations. Effects of climate change on water quantity, quality, and timing.
Water Resources and the Environment: Read More [+]

ESPM 134 Fire, Insects, and Diseases in Forest Ecosystems 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Study of the influence of fire, insects, and diseases on species diversity, succession, and the survival of North American forests including the evolution of these interactions due to modern human policies of preservation and management and exploitation.

Fire, Insects, and Diseases in Forest Ecosystems: Read More [+]

ESPM 137 Landscape Ecology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course will cover broad topics in landscape ecology with the goal of answering the core questions of how patterns develop on landscapes, how these patterns relate to biotic and abiotic processes, and how these patterns and processes change through time. Lab exercises will focus on practical aspects of landscape ecological analysis using modern tools like remote sensing, GIS, population modeling, and landscape genetics.

Landscape Ecology: Read More [+]

ESPM C138 Introduction to Comparative Virology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
This course will provide a comparative overview of virus life cycles and strategies viruses use to infect and replicate in hosts. We will discuss virus structure and classification and the molecular basis of viral reproduction, evolution, assembly, and virus-host interactions. Common features used during virus replication and host cellular responses to infection will be covered. Topics also included are common and emerging virus diseases
, their control, and factors affecting their spread.
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ESPM 139 THE ENVIRONMENT AND THE SELF: AN ECO PRACTICUM 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017
This course will provide a practical exploration of how to engage effectively with contemporary environmental issues using discussion of scientific and philosophical texts, activities, and group work. We will evaluate how different worldviews influence how humans relate to the natural world and how our own worldview shapes our way of engaging in environmental problem solving.

THE ENVIRONMENT AND THE SELF: AN ECO PRACTICUM: Read More [+]

ESPM 140 General Entomology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Biology of insects, including classification of orders and common families, morphology, physiology, behavior, and ecology.

General Entomology: Read More [+]

ESPM 141 Development of Taxonomic Identification Keys and Natural Language Descriptions 2 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Tools for identification of organisms to species or higher-level taxonomic groups are critically needed. This course will allow students to learn both the theoretical basis of and practical skills for building traditional dichotomous keys and various types of interactive keys. Emphasis will be on learning to build a web-based interactive key and developing natural language descriptions through students' individual projects. Students can train on the Microptics Digital
XLT imaging system and learn to use Lucid and Lucid Phoenix software. Other Internet identification tools will also be surveyed and discussed. Each student will produce an online key as a project.
Development of Taxonomic Identification Keys and Natural Language Descriptions: Read More [+]

ESPM 142 Insect Behavior 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Insects display an incredibly rich array of behaviors, including extravagant displays, rituals, deception, sociality, and slavery. In some cases, these behaviors are innate, but in other cases individual insects can actively learn and modify their future behaviors based on real-life experiences. This course will focus on the development, structure, and function of insect behaviors, using examples from classic and recent publications. We will examine
the evolution of insect behavior, how these behaviors play a role in the ecology of the organisms that express them, and explore various modes of communication that allow insects to judge their environment and respond appropriately.
Insect Behavior: Read More [+]

ESPM 144 Insect Physiology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
A survey of the unique physiological mechanisms of insects, including the analysis of physiological systems at the cellular-molecular level. The roles of the nervous and endocrine systems in coordinating physiological processes are emphasized.

Insect Physiology: Read More [+]

ESPM 146L Medical and Veterinary Entomology Laboratory 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2005, Spring 2003, Spring 2001
Laboratory identification of the major arthropod vectors of disease agents to humans and other animals, and study of the structural adaptations associated with free-living and parasitic stages and with blood feeding.

Medical and Veterinary Entomology Laboratory: Read More [+]

ESPM 147 Field Entomology 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
This course introduces methods and techniques for collection and preparation of specimens and associated biological data, field observation, and recording and interpretation of arthropod behavior, relationships to habitats, and plant-arthropod interactions.

Field Entomology: Read More [+]

ESPM C148 Pesticide Chemistry and Toxicology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Chemical composition of pesticides and related compounds, their mode of action, resistance mechanisms, and methods of evaluating their safety and activity.

Pesticide Chemistry and Toxicology: Read More [+]

ESPM C149 Molecular Ecology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2010, Spring 2008, Spring 2005
This course focuses on the use of molecular genetic information in ecology. Applications and techniques covered range from analysis of parentage and relatedness (DNA fingerprinting and multilocus genetic analysis) through gene flow, biogeographic history and community composition (comparative DNA sequencing) to analysis of diet and trophic interactions (biological isotopes). Grades are based on one final exam, problem sheets, and a critique
of a recent research paper.
Molecular Ecology: Read More [+]

ESPM 150 Special Topics in Environmental Science, Policy, and Management 2 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Special topics in Environmental Science, Policy, and Management. Topics may vary from semester to semester.

Special Topics in Environmental Science, Policy, and Management: Read More [+]

ESPM 151 Society, Environment, and Culture 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
Issues, concepts, and processes pertaining to the diverse approaches to understanding the relationship between human society, culture, and the environment. Core ideas in and approaches to science, nature, culture, feminism, indigeneity, and postcolonialism as they pertain to the environment and society. Critical analysis and discussion of fundamental and contemporary issues and texts in the field.

Society, Environment, and Culture: Read More [+]

ESPM 152 Global Change Biology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
The course will focus on understanding how anthropogenic changes to the global environment (e.g., climate change, habitat destruction, global trade) impact organisms. We will evaluate responses to global change in a wide diversity of organisms (from microbes to mammals) and ecosystems (from arctic to temperate to tropical). We will also explore conservation and mitigation strategies in the face of global change. Discussions will draw on recent
primary research and case studies.
Global Change Biology: Read More [+]

ESPM 155AC Sociology and Political Ecology of Agro-Food Systems 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2016
Sociology and political ecology of agro-food systems; explores the nexus of agriculture, society, the environment; analysis of agro-food systems and social and environmental movements; examination of alternative agricultural initiatives--(i.e. fair trade, food justice/food sovereignty, organic farming, urban agriculture).

Sociology and Political Ecology of Agro-Food Systems: Read More [+]

ESPM C156 Animal Communication 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018
Communication is central to the lives of most, if not all animals. How and why animals communicate is thus central to understanding the ecology, behavior, neurobiology, and evolution of animal systems. This course will focus on understanding the basic principles driving the communication system of a species, drawing together topics ranging from the physical properties of the environment, physiology of sensory systems, animal behavior and ecology, using examples from
classic and recent publications.
Animal Communication: Read More [+]

ESPM 157 Data Science in Global Change Ecology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017
Many of the greatest challenges we face today come from understanding and interacting with the natural world: from global climate change to the sudden collapse of fisheries and forests, from the spread of disease and invasive species to the unknown wealth of medical, cultural, and technological value we derive from nature. Advances in satellites and micro-sensors, computation, informatics and the Internet have made available unprecedented amounts of data about the natural
world, and with it, new challenges of sifting, processing and synthesizing large and diverse sources of information. In this course, students will learn and apply fundamental computing, statistics and modeling concepts to a series of real-world ecological and environment
Data Science in Global Change Ecology: Read More [+]

ESPM 158 Biodiversity Conservation in Working Landscapes 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Most of the world's lands and seas occur outside of protected ares, so this course examines biodiversity conservation in "working landscapes" like farms, ranches, and urban areas. Students will study fundamental concepts in ecology and conservation biology, and evaluate case studies to assess how conservation approaches have evolved and which are working. Students will gain skills in evaluating and summarizing scientific literature
, and in-depth knowledge of conservation in practice.
Biodiversity Conservation in Working Landscapes: Read More [+]

ESPM C159 Human Diet 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
Since we eat every day, wouldn't it be useful to learn more about human dietary practices? A broad overview of the complex interrelationship between humans and their foods. Topics include the human dietary niche, biological variation related to diet, diet and disease, domestication of staple crops, food processing techniques and development of regional cuisines, modern diets and their problems, food taboos, human attitudes toward foods, and
dietary politics.
Human Diet: Read More [+]

ESPM 160AC American Environmental and Cultural History 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
History of the American environment and the ways in which different cultural groups have perceived, used, managed, and conserved it from colonial times to the present. Cultures include American Indians and European and African Americans. Natural resources development includes gathering-hunting-fishing; farming, mining, ranching, forestry, and urbanization. Changes in attitudes and behaviors toward nature and past and present conservation
and environmental movements are also examined.
American Environmental and Cultural History: Read More [+]

ESPM 161 Environmental Philosophy and Ethics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
A critical analysis of human environments as physical, social-economic, and technocultural ecosystems with emphasis on the role of ideologies, beliefs, attitudes, and behavior. An examination of contemporary environmental literature and the philosophies embodied therein.

Environmental Philosophy and Ethics: Read More [+]

ESPM 162 Bioethics and Society 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Exploration of the ethical dilemmas arising from recent advances in the biological sciences: genetic engineering, sociobiology, health care delivery, behavior modification, patients' rights, social or private control of research.

Bioethics and Society: Read More [+]

ESPM 163AC Environmental Justice: Race, Class, Equity, and the Environment 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2015
Overview of the field of environmental justice, analyzing the implications of race, class, labor, and equity on environmental degradation and regulation. Environmental justice movements and struggles within poor and people of color communities in the U.S., including: African Americans, Latino Americans, and Native American Indians. Frameworks and methods for analyzing race, class, and labor. Cases of environmental injustice, community and
government responses, and future strategies for achieving environmental and labor justice.
Environmental Justice: Race, Class, Equity, and the Environment: Read More [+]

ESPM 164 GIS and Environmental Science 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The objectives of the course are 1) review the GIS workflow (acquisition, representation, validation, analysis, and output), 2) to understand the issues surrounding, and algorithms used in a particular GIS application, 3) to learn about advanced topics in geospatial science across environmental and social sciences, and 4) to develop an operational GIS project in a chosen area.

GIS and Environmental Science: Read More [+]

ESPM 165 International Rural Development Policy 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Comparative analysis of policy systems governing natural resource development in the rural Third World. Emphasis on organization and function of agricultural and mineral development, with particular consideration of rural hunger, resource availability, technology, and patterns of international aid.

International Rural Development Policy: Read More [+]

ESPM 166 Natural Resource Policy and Indigenous Peoples 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
Critical analysis of the historical transformation of indigenous peoples and their environments in North America and the Third World. The origins and specific patterns of socio-economic problems in these areas, existing and alternative future development policies and their effects.

Natural Resource Policy and Indigenous Peoples: Read More [+]

ESPM C167 Environmental Health and Development 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
The health effects of environmental alterations caused by development programs and other human activities in both developing and developed areas. Case studies will contextualize methodological information and incorporate a global perspective on environmentally mediated diseases in diverse populations. Topics include water management; population change; toxics; energy development; air pollution; climate change; chemical use, etc.

Environmental Health and Development: Read More [+]

ESPM 168 Political Ecology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Fall 2015
Analysis of environmental problems in an international context with a focus on political and economic processes, resource access, and representations of nature. Discussion of the ways in which film, literature, and the news media reflect and influence environmental politics. Approaches to policy analysis arising from recent social theory.

Political Ecology: Read More [+]

ESPM 169 International Environmental Politics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session
The dynamics of international politics are examined over the last 25 years. Attention is paid to different perspectives in global environmental politics, the actors involved, how well international agreements address the problems they are supposed to solve, and the main debates in the field, including trade-environmental conflicts, security, and environmental justice issues. Issues covered vary, but
may include climate change, biodiversity, population, and toxics.
International Environmental Politics: Read More [+]

ESPM C170 Carbon Cycle Dynamics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
The focus is the (unsolved) puzzle of the contemporary carbon cycle. Why is the concentration of atmospheric CO2 changing at the rate observed? What are the terrestrial and oceanic processes that add and remove carbon from the atmosphere? What are the carbon management strategies under discussion? How can emission protocols be verified? Students are encouraged to gain hands-on experience with the available data, and learn modeling
skills to evaluate hypotheses of carbon sources and sinks.
Carbon Cycle Dynamics: Read More [+]

ESPM 172 Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2013, Spring 2010, Fall 2009
This course introduces the concepts and principles of photogrammetry and remote sensing, specifically aerial photography, as important data collection and analysis tools for natural resources management in spatial sciences such as ecology, geography, geology, civil engineering, and environmental design. Photo measures of scale, area, and object height, flight planning, an introduction to the electromagnetic spectrum, photo interpretation and
mapping, digital remote sensing, and data management in geographic information systems will be discussed.
Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing: Read More [+]

ESPM 173 Introduction to Ecological Data Analysis 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2014
Introduces concepts and methods for practical analysis of data from ecology and related disciplines. Topics include data summaries, distributions, and probability; comparison of data groups using t-tests and analysis of variance; comparison of multi-factor groups using analysis of variance; evaluation of continuous relationships between variables using regression and correlation; and a glimpse at more advanced topics. In computer laboratories
, students put concepts into practice and interpret results.
Introduction to Ecological Data Analysis: Read More [+]

ESPM 174 Design and Analysis of Ecological Research 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2014, Fall 2012
Surveys major designs and analyses for biological field and laborabory studies. Topics include data distributions; regression; analysis of variance; fixed and random effects; blocking, split plots, and repeated measures; maximum likelihood; Generalized Linear Models; basic computer programming. Relies on math to interpret and manipulate equations supported by computer simulations. Examples include population, ecosystem, behavioral, and evolutionary
ecology.
Design and Analysis of Ecological Research: Read More [+]

ESPM 175A Senior Research Seminar in Environmental Sciences 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Students design and conduct a senior thesis project, which requires identifying a testable question or problem, designing and executing a research protocol, analyzing data, deriving conclusions, and presenting the research in a scientific paper and an oral presentation. Lectures and assignments exphasize research design, data analysis, scientific writing, and scientific communication.

Senior Research Seminar in Environmental Sciences: Read More [+]

ESPM 175B Senior Research Seminar in Environmental Sciences 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Students design and conduct a senior thesis project, which requires identifying a testable question or problem, designing and executing a research protocol, analyzing data, deriving conclusions, and presenting the research in a scientific paper and an oral presentation. Lectures and assignments exphasize research design, data analysis, scientific writing, and scientific communication.

Senior Research Seminar in Environmental Sciences: Read More [+]

ESPM 175L Senior Research Laboratory in Environmental Sciences 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Independent laboratory or field research in support of the required senior seminar project.

Senior Research Laboratory in Environmental Sciences: Read More [+]

ESPM H175A Senior Research Seminar in Environmental Sciences 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
ESPM H175A and H175B are honors courses that eligible Environmental Sciences students may substitute for ESPM 175A and 175B. Students design and conduct a senior thesis project, which requires identifying a research question or problem, designing and executing a research protocol, analyzing data, deriving conclusions, and presenting the research in a scientific paper and an oral presentation.Lectures and assignments emphasize research design, data
analysis, scientific writing, and scientific communication.
Senior Research Seminar in Environmental Sciences: Read More [+]

ESPM H175B Senior Research Seminar in Environmental Sciences 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015
ESPM H175A and H175B are honors courses that eligible Environmental Sciences students may substitute for ESPM 175A and 175B. Students design and conduct a senior thesis project, which requires identifying a research question or problem, designing and executing a research protocol, analyzing data, deriving conclusions, and presenting the research in a scientific paper and an oral presentation. Lectures and assignments emphasize research design, data analysis
, scientific writing, and scientific communication.
Senior Research Seminar in Environmental Sciences: Read More [+]

ESPM H175L Senior Research Laboratory in Environmental Sciences 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
ESPM H175L is an honors course that eligible Environmental Sciences students may substitute for ESPM 175L. Independent laboratory or field research in support of the required senior seminar project.

Senior Research Laboratory in Environmental Sciences: Read More [+]

ESPM 177 Sustainable Water and Food Security 4 Units

Terms offered: Not yet offered
In this class we will study basic principles of environmental sustainability from the perspective of water and food security, and apply them to human use of land and land based resources. An analysis of major mechanisms of land degradation and of the major technological advances that are expected to burst food production worldwide will be used as the basis for a discussion on the extent to which the Earth can sustainably feed humanity.

Sustainable Water and Food Security: Read More [+]

ESPM 178B Environmental Science Education Practicum 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2010, Spring 2009
Framed around the topic of sustainability, the course engages students from different science majors to apply the content knowledge from their discipline to build curriculum pieces for presentation in high school classrooms. Students develop pedagogical content knowledge and relate teaching theory to practice. Additional topics covered include classroom management and leadership, lesson planning, presentation skills, and readings in science
education.
Environmental Science Education Practicum: Read More [+]

ESPM C179A GC-Maker Lab I: Skills and Theory 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016
In the environmental and biological sciences, one of the biggest challenges in transitioning from student to researcher is learning how to measure something without an off-the-shelf device. This course will provide the theoretical background and the practice of building a Gas Chromatograph (GC) system for environmental research. The first semester is for students who seek to develop fundamental skills in instrumental development and design. The second semester (c179b)
is only open to those who have taken this first semester course and will entail the construction of a working gas chromatograph system. This class will be especially useful for students who wish to pursue research following graduation.
GC-Maker Lab I: Skills and Theory: Read More [+]

ESPM C179B GC-Maker Lab II: Instrument development 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017
In the environmental and biological sciences, one of the biggest challenges in transitioning from student to researcher is learning how to measure something without an off-the-shelf device. This course will involve the actual building a gas chromatograph (GC) system for environmental research. In addition, we will provide the option of building a mini datalogging sensor for measuring basic environmental parameters using the Arduino platform. This course offered in
the spring semester is only open to those who have taken this first semester course (c179A), which covers the fundamental skills required to undertake this project. This class is designed for upper division undergraduates to early graduate students.
GC-Maker Lab II: Instrument development: Read More [+]

ESPM C180 Air Pollution 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
This course is an introduction to air pollution and the chemistry of earth's atmosphere. We will focus on the fundamental natural processes controlling trace gas and aerosol concentrations in the atmosphere, and how anthropogenic activity has affected those processes at the local, regional, and global scales. Specific topics include stratospheric ozone depletion, increasing concentrations of green house gasses, smog, and changes in the oxidation
capacity of the troposphere.
Air Pollution: Read More [+]

ESPM 181A Fire Ecology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Fundamentals of wildland fire including fire behavior modeling, fire history methods, prescribed fire techniques, fire ecology, fire management, fire in the urban-wildland intermix, wildland fire, and ecosystem sustainability. Laboratories on inventory methods, fire history, modeling of fire behavior and risk, and prescribed burning.

Fire Ecology: Read More [+]

ESPM 182 Forest Operations Management 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2012
Examination of "on the ground" activities necessary to manage forests. Planning, design, and implementation of activities such as road building, forest harvesting, erosion control, and fire suppression are the central focus of the course. Aspects of timber harvest planning, archaeological surveys related to forest management, road closure, stream bank stabilization, and legislative control of forest operations will also be explored.

Forest Operations Management: Read More [+]

ESPM 183 Forest Ecosystem Management and Planning 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2010
Introduces students to concepts and quantitative tools needed for the sustainable management and planning of multi-use forest ecosystems. Topics covered include: forest regulation; estimation of ecological, economic, and social values; construction of dynamic forest models; methods for optimal decision-making; development of forest management plans; and ethics of natural resource management. Application to current issues in temperate and
tropical forest management are discussed. Quantitative, analytical, and communication skills are emphasized. Oral presentation required.
Forest Ecosystem Management and Planning: Read More [+]

ESPM C183 Forest Ecosystem Management 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Introduces students to concepts and quantitative tools needed for the sustainable management of multi-use forest ecosystems. Topics covered include: estimation of ecological, economic, and social values: construction of dynamic forest models, methods for optimal decision-making, and development of forest management plans. Application to current issues in temperate and tropical forest management are discussed. Quantitative, analytical, and
communication skills are emphasized. Oral presentation required.
Forest Ecosystem Management: Read More [+]

ESPM 184 Agroforestry Systems 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2010, Fall 2009, Fall 2008
Agroforestry principles and systems in use worldwide are examined, with emphasis on contemporary temperate agroforestry system design and management. Economic, biologic, social, and political conditions for successful agroforestry systems are analyzed. Some laboratory sessions will be field trips that will extend beyond the scheduled lab time.

Agroforestry Systems: Read More [+]

ESPM 185 Applied Forest Ecology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Concepts and applications of silviculture for the establishment, growth, composition, and quality of forest trees and stands. Silviculture is presented as a tool to meet multiple resource and ecosystem management objectives related to wildlife habitat, watershed resources, forest health, or timber production. Two weekend field trips will be scheduled in lieu of several laboratories.

Applied Forest Ecology: Read More [+]

ESPM 186 Management and Conservation of Rangeland Ecosystems 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Begins with the evolution and domestication of grazing animals, continues through ranching and rangeland stewardship practices, and explores new institutional arrangements for conservation and restoration. Woodlands, grasslands, and shrublands provide biodiversity, wildlife habitat, watershed, recreation, open space, and forage. Human practices and ecosystem dynamics meet in rangeland management. Methods for changing, predicting, or assessing
the results.
Management and Conservation of Rangeland Ecosystems: Read More [+]

ESPM 187 Restoration Ecology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
This course covers ecological theories that inform the practice of ecological restoration, with particular focus on local (Bay Area) restoration and linkages with social, political, and economic factors. Laboratories focus on assessment techniques and cumulate with formulation of a restoration management plan. Laboratories will be based at the Richmond Field Station, served by campus shuttle.

Restoration Ecology: Read More [+]

ESPM 188 Case Histories in Wildlife Management 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
Seminar format with presentation and discussion by each student, with long term paper requirement. Examination in depth of current issues in wildlife management.

Case Histories in Wildlife Management: Read More [+]

ESPM 190 Seminar in Environmental Issues 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
Interdisciplinary study of issues for advanced students. Designed to develop skills in critical analysis of specific issues. Different topics will be available each semester reflecting faculty and student interest. Major research project required.

Seminar in Environmental Issues: Read More [+]

ESPM C191 The American Forest: Its Ecology, History, and Representation 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2007, Fall 2004
The American forest will be examined in terms of its ecology, history, and representations in paintings, photographs, and literary essays. This examination seeks to understand the American forest in its scientific and economic parameters, as well as the historic, social, and ideological dimensions which have contributed to the evolution of our present attitudes toward the forest.

The American Forest: Its Ecology, History, and Representation: Read More [+]

ESPM C192 Molecular Approaches to Environmental Problem Solving 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Seminar in which students consider how modern biotechnological approaches, including recombinant DNA methods, can be used to recognize and solve problems in the area of conservation, habitat and endangered species preservation, agriculture and environmental pollution. Students will also develop and present case studies of environmental problems solving using modern molecular methods.

Molecular Approaches to Environmental Problem Solving: Read More [+]

ESPM C193A Environmental Education 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
Theory and practice of translating ecological knowledge, environmental issues, and values into educational forms for all age levels and all facets of society, including schools. Concentrated experience in participatory education.

Environmental Education: Read More [+]

ESPM 194 Senior Seminar in Conservation and Resource Studies 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2012, Fall 2011, Spring 2011
Seminar in which students synthesize their knowledge, skills, and interests into a holistic perspective. A one-hour oral presentation in the area of interest and a senior thesis synthesizing the area of interest are required. Required final semester for all CRS majors.

Senior Seminar in Conservation and Resource Studies: Read More [+]

ESPM 194A Senior Seminar in Conservation and Resource Studies 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Seminar in which students synthesize their knowledge, skills, and interests into a holistic perspective. A one-hour oral presentation in the area of interest and a senior thesis synthesizing the area of interest are required. Required final semester for all CRS majors.

Senior Seminar in Conservation and Resource Studies: Read More [+]

ESPM 194B Capstone Course in Society and Environment 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Senior capstone project in the student's primary area of concentration and presentation to the ESPM Society and Environment faculty and majors. Required of all graduating seniors in the ESPM and Society and Environment major. Students who have completed ESPM 195, H196, or 197 may substitute that course for ESPM 194B.

Capstone Course in Society and Environment: Read More [+]

ESPM 195 Senior Thesis 3 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Subject must be approved by faculty sponsor during final semester of the junior year and course initiated in the first semester of the senior year. Credit option: Conservation Resource Studies majors who have successfully completed 195 may petition for exemption from 194.

Senior Thesis: Read More [+]

ESPM H196 Honors Research 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Supervised independent honors research specific to aspects of environmental science, policy, and management, followed by a written report to department. Submission of no more than 300 words required for approval.

Honors Research: Read More [+]

ESPM 197 Field Study in Environmental Science, Policy, and Management 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Supervised experience in off-campus organizations relevant to specific aspects of environmental science, policy, and management. Regular individual meetings with faculty sponsor and written reports required.

Field Study in Environmental Science, Policy, and Management: Read More [+]

ESPM 198 Directed Group Studies for Advanced Undergraduates 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Group study of special topics in environmental science, policy, and management that are not covered in depth in regular courses in the department.

Directed Group Studies for Advanced Undergraduates: Read More [+]

ESPM 198BC Berkeley Connect 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. Over the course of a semester, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor (following a faculty-directed curriculum), meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising, attend lectures and panel discussions featuring department
faculty and alumni, and go on field trips to campus resources. Students are not required to be declared majors in order to participate.

Berkeley Connect: Read More [+]

ESPM 199 Supervised Independent Study and Research 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Spring 2016
Enrollment restrictions apply; see the Courses and Curricula section of this catalog. Supervised independent study and research specific to aspects of environmental science, policy, and management.

Supervised Independent Study and Research: Read More [+]

Contact Information

Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management

130 Mulford Hall

Phone: 510-643-7430

Fax: 510-643-5438

Visit Department Website

Department Chair

George Roderick, PhD

145 Mulford Hall

Phone: 643-3326

http://nature.berkeley.edu/advising/majors/society-and-environment

roderick@berkeley.edu

Undergraduate Student Advising

Office of Instruction and Student Affairs, CNR

260 Mulford Hall

Phone: 510-642-0542

Fax: 510-643-3132

cnrteaching@berkeley.edu

Undergraduate Staff Adviser

Christine Tobolski

260 Mulford Hall

Phone: 510-642-7895

ctobolski@berkeley.edu

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