Military Affairs

University of California, Berkeley

Overview

The Military Affairs Program, within the Division of Undergraduate and Interdisciplinary Studies (UGIS), comprises the three distinct military officers' commissioning programs: Air Force Reserved Officers' Training Corps (ROTC), Army ROTC, and Naval ROTC. The purpose of the program is to integrate the educational offerings of the separate military services into the regular University curricula. In performing academic functions, the Military Affairs Unit operates the same as any other program within UGIS. Its military faculty members, though nominated by the three military services, are subject to the same selection process as other UC Berkeley faculty members, and the Academic Senate's Committee on Courses must approve its curriculum. Military Affairs courses are open to all Berkeley students, as well as to students from other East Bay colleges under cross-enrollment agreements or through UC Berkeley Extension.

No undergraduate majors or minors or graduate degrees are offered in any of the following programs; they are designed to supplement a student's degree program.

Aerospace Studies (Air Force ROTC)

The Department of Aerospace Studies offers students in virtually all academic areas the opportunity to qualify for a commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the United States Air Force while simultaneously completing university degree requirements. Each eligible student must have at least three full academic years remaining in his/her bachelor's degree program; under certain circumstances, an Air Force Reserve Officers' Training Corps (AFROTC) cadet may finish the AFROTC program while simultaneously completing one year of a graduate degree program.

Students interested in AFROTC are eligible to compete for scholarships which cover the costs of tuition, books, and most fees.  In addition, a $300–$500 monthly living allowance is paid to each student on scholarship. Cadets competing for scholarships should contact the Recruiting Flight Commander at 510-642-3572 or visit the AFROTC Scholarships website.

The AFROTC Detachment at Berkeley emphasizes student participation and involvement.  Classes are conducted as seminars and call for active student discussion. In addition, there is a weekly two-hour leadership laboratory that is mandatory for all AFROTC cadets. In this laboratory, students become involved in the management of their own cadet organization. Cadets also participate in volunteer projects, visits to Air Force bases, and various community outreach programs.

Completion of the program to earn a commission as an Air Force 2nd Lieutenant requires enrollment during each semester in a specified course in Aerospace Studies or Military Affairs. The normal sequence for the four-year program is as follows: freshman, (fall) and (spring); sophomores, AEROSPC 2A (fall) and (spring); juniors, (fall) and (spring); seniors, (fall) and (spring). The freshman and sophomore courses are each one credit hour, and the junior and senior courses are both three credits each.

Aerospace Studies courses are open to all University students; students from other institutions may participate in the AFROTC program through cross-enrollment arrangements or through the University Extension.

For further information on enrollment requirements and procedures, contact the Recruiting Flight Commander at 510-642-3572, afrotc@military.berkeley.edu, and check out the AFROTC Detachment 85 website

Military Science (Army ROTC)

The Army Officer Education Program offers a variety of credit courses focused on the study of the military as an institution, adventure training opportunities, and a program of laboratory work in practical military skills. The program provides an opportunity to examine service in the Army while earning a baccalaureate degree. A student who completes the program may earn a commission in the Regular Army, Army Reserve, or National Guard.

Graduate or undergraduate students can complete the Military Science requirements through a four-year, three-year, or two-year program. The four-year and three-year programs involve the Basic and Advanced Courses; the two-year program involves only the Advanced Course. The Army Reserve Officers' Training Course (ROTC) Basic Course consists of two distinct components: the classroom introduction to the Army profession and officership of the Military Science and Leadership (MSL) I year, and the experiential examination of leadership, decision-making, and group process of the MSL-II year.  Both Basic Course years are designed to enhance student interest in ROTC and the Army.  

MSL-I lessons provide an overview of the key subjects of pre-commissioning, which will be treated in much greater depth in the Advanced Course. The MSL-II year places cadets in a wide variety of group exercises designed to emphasize various professional leadership competencies and insights. These events are held both inside the classroom and in outdoor settings. The instructor, acting as facilitator, helps guide student processing, or after-action reviews, of the events to derive the leadership, group dynamics, and problem-solving lessons that the exercises offer. In addition to military skills, practical "life skills" are emphasized throughout the two years.

Cadets may also be required to attend Basic Camp, a four-week summer ROTC training experience at Fort Knox, Kentucky. By the end of the Basic Course, cadets should possess a basic understanding of the unique aspects of the officer corps, individual fitness, and healthy lifestyle. The lessons are designed to maximize cadet participation, inspire intellectual curiosity, and stimulate self-study. Upon completion of the course, cadets are eligible to enter the Advanced Course.

The Army ROTC Advanced Course is composed of four courses, MIL SCI 131, MIL SCI 132, MIL SCI 141, and MIL SCI 142, and Advanced Camp, which is a mandatory four-week leader development training course conducted during the summer at Fort Knox, Kentucky. 

The Advanced Course is designed to teach all knowledge, skills, and attitudes for commissioning as a new second lieutenant, and to establish a sound foundation for a career as a commissioned Army officer. The content and methods of the Advanced Course assume no prior cadet experience or other military training. This approach is taken because the Advanced Course comprises the minimum curriculum that an individual must complete in order to be commissioned. Advanced Course lessons are carefully sequenced and linked and are progressive in their treatment of key officer knowledge and competencies. Students are encouraged to synthesize lessons to form broader perspectives, deeper insights, and more robust problem-solving abilities by the use of earlier lessons. Topics are designed to facilitate entry into military service at the completion of the MIL SCI 142 term.

The two-year program begins with direct placement in the Advanced Course. It is available to undergraduate or graduate students, who have completed any of the following: enlisted military service, completion of ROTC Basic Camp, or three years of Junior ROTC. Students must also be academic juniors or higher with at least two academic years left until completion of their degree when they enter the Advanced Course.

Naval Science (Naval ROTC)

The Department of Naval Science offers a program of instruction for men and women leading to commissions in either the US Navy or US Marine Corps.  Naval Science courses are open to all university students or, subject to approval, may be taken through UC Berkeley Extension.

Students enrolled in the Naval ROTC program will normally complete the following courses during their first two years as part of their overall academic load:  NAV SCI 1, NAV SCI 2, NAV SCI 3, and NAV SCI 10.  Navy Option students will then complete the following courses during their junior and senior years:  NAV SCI 12A, NAV SCI 12B, NAV SCI 401, and NAV SCI 412.  Marine Option students will participate in a Marine seminar and complete the History of Littoral Warfare (MIL AFF 154) and Evolution of Warfare (MIL AFF 20).  All Navy Option scholarship students must complete one year of calculus and one year of calculus-based physics by the end of their sophomore and junior years respectively.

Students are also required to attend weekly professional development laboratories each Thursday. These three-hour sessions offer the student midshipman an active role in the management and direction of the midshipman battalion and provide time for the midshipmen to explore professional topics. Student midshipmen also participate in four-to-six week summer training cruises throughout the world.  While at sea and serving alongside Sailors and Officers, they apply theoretical aspects of their education and training to the real-world environment of the U.S. Navy. Marine Option midshipmen attend Marine Corps Officer Candidates School in the summer between their junior and senior year.

To learn more about various NROTC scholarship opportunities, selection criteria, and the application process, please visit http://www.nrotc.navy.mil/scholarships.html

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Courses

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Aerospace Studies

AEROSPC 1A Foundations of the U.S. Air Force 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course introduces students to the United States Air Force (USAF) and Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) with an overview of the basic characteristics, missions, and organization of the Air Force; additional topics include officership and professionalism, Air Force career opportunities, military customs and courtesies, and an introduction to USAF basic communication skills. Additionally, AFROTC cadets must attend weekly Leadership
Lab. Leadership Lab is a weekly laboratory that touches on the topics of Air Force customs and courtesies, health and physical fitness, and drills and ceremonies.
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AEROSPC 1B Foundations of the U.S. Air Force 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
A survey course designed to introduce cadets to the U.S. Air Force and the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC). Featured topics include the history and structure of the U.S. Air Force, the Air Force’s capabilities, career opportunities, benefits, Air Force installations, and communications skills. Additionally, AFROTC cadets must attend Leadership Lab. Leadership Lab is a weekly laboratory that touches on the topics of Air Force
customs and courtesies, health and physical fitness, and drills and ceremonies.
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AEROSPC 2A The Evolution of U.S. Air Force Air and Space Power 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course examines the general aspects of air/space power through historical study and analysis, providing students with knowledge of the capabilities, functions, and doctrinal employment of air/space forces. It covers the period from the first balloons and dirigibles to the employment of air/space power during the Cold War, utilizing historical/operational examples to highlight the development of USAF core competencies, capabilities, and missions
that underpin the evolution of today’s USAF. This course emphasizes oral/written communication skills development. AFROTC cadets must also attend Leadership Lab, a weekly lab providing practical experience in areas like customs and courtesies, health/physical fitness, and drill and ceremonies.
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AEROSPC 2B The Evolution of U.S. Air Force Air and Space Power 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course examines the general aspects of air/space power through a historical perspective, as well as fundamental truths associated with war (e.g., principles of war and tenets of air/space power). As a whole, this course provides students with a knowledge level understanding for the element and employment of air/space power, from an institutional, doctrinal, and historical perspective. Students will also conduct writing and briefing assignments
to meet Air Force communication skills requirements. Additionally, AFROTC cadets must attend Leadership Lab, a weekly laboratory that provides practical experience in key areas to include Air Force customs and courtesies, health/physical fitness, and drill and ceremonies.
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AEROSPC 100 Leadership Laboratory 0.0 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Leadership Lab (LLAB) represents the hands-on portion of the Aerospace Studies courses. It presents a dynamic and integrated grouping of leadership developmental activities. LLAB is a student planned, organized, and executed practicum intended to maximize cadet leadership experience and preparation for easy transition to their active duty assignments. It is conducted under the supervision of AFROTC cadre. The course focuses on the leadership
experiences of senior and junior cadets and provides training in basic military knowledge and skills to underclass cadets. Cadets are trained on proper uniform wear, grooming and appearance requirements, physical fitness, knowledge of military customs and courtesies, and military drill and ceremony.
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AEROSPC 135A Air Force Leadership Studies 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course is a study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, and communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Lecture, text, case studies, and class discussion will be used to examine all aspects of leadership including counseling, mentoring, empowering, problem solving, accountability and authority. Students will develop upon basic written and oral communications skills primarily through written assignments
and oral presentations.
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AEROSPC 135B Air Force Leadership Studies 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course is a study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, and communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Lecture, text, case studies, and class discussion will be used to examine all aspects of leadership including counseling, mentoring, empowering, problem solving, accountability and authority. Students will develop upon basic written and oral communications skills primarily through written
assignments and oral presentations.
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Military Affairs

MIL AFF 1 Military Physical Fitness 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
This course teaches the fundamentals of physical fitness employed by the U.S. military to condition ROTC cadets for the physical demands they will face as military officers. The course consists of rigorous physical training under the supervision of military officers and noncommissioned officers. The goal of this course is to not only enhance one's level of physical fitness, but also to develop leadership qualities in the conduct and planning
of physical fitness training. Physical training will include, but is not limited to: running up to five miles, team sports, aerobics, and other activities.
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MIL AFF 20 Evolution of Warfare 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2013, Spring 2010
Progressive analysis of the evolution of warfare from the ancient world to the present. Emphasis placed on causes of continuity and/or change of methods, as well as the influence of economic, moral, political, and technological factors on strategic thought.

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MIL AFF 24 Freshman Seminars 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2001, Spring 2000
The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester.

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MIL AFF 145A National Security Forces in Contemporary American Society 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Conceptually examines the Armed Forces as an integral element of American society. Examines contemporary issues in civil-military relations and the national and international environment in which U.S. defense policy is formulated and implemented.

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MIL AFF 145B Preparation for Active Duty 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course focuses on commissioning of cadets and their transition to active duty. The primary focus of instruction is officership, professionalism, and leadership. Topics for specific discussion include the military justice system, military ethics, core values, military professionalism and current issues affecting the Air Force, and a general introduction to base functions designed to ease cadets' transition to active duty. This course
combines lecture and discussion with increased emphasis on the students' written and oral communication skills.
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MIL AFF 154 Fundamentals of Maneuver Warfare 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Spring 2011
This course prepares future military officers and other leaders for service by studying modern tactical principles, current military developments, and other aspects of warfare and their interactions with and influences on maneuver warfare doctrine.

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MIL AFF 199 Supervised Independent Study and Research 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Supervised independent study and research for undergraduate students who desire to pursue topics of their own selection.

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Military Science

MIL SCI 1 Leadership Laboratory 0.0 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
The instruction includes organization and management of military units, physical training, drill and ceremonies, land navigation techniques, survival skills, and extensive first aid training.

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MIL SCI 2 Introduction to the Army and Critical Thinking 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The purpose of this one credit hour seminar style course is to introduce the student to issues and competencies that are central to a commissioned officer's responsibilities. These initial lessons establish a framework for understanding officership, leadership, and the Army values. Additionally, the semester addresses "life skills" including comprehensive fitness, goal setting, cultural understanding, and time management. This course
is designed to give accurate insight into the Army profession and the officer's role within the Army and to lay the foundation for further leadership development.
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MIL SCI 3 Introduction to the Profession of Arms 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course overviews leadership fundamentals such as setting direction, problem-solving, listening, presenting briefings, providing feedback, and using effective writing skills. Students will explore dimensions of leadership attributes and core leader competencies in the context of practical, hands-on, and interactive exercises.

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MIL SCI 100 Leadership and Decision Making 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The purpose of this two credit hour course is to develop the student’s knowledge of self-awareness, self-confidence, and individual leadership skills. Through experiential learning activities, students develop problem solving and critical thinking skills, and apply communication, feedback, and conflict resolution skills. The course includes an introduction to the Army’s operations order and troop leading procedures in the context of decision making
applications.
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MIL SCI 101 Army Doctrine and Team Development 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course examines the challenges of leading tactical teams in the complex contemporary operating environment (COE). This course highlights the application of Army doctrine for offensive and defensive operations as context for tactical decision making and team building. Further study of the theoretical basis of the Army Leadership Requirements Model explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in the face of ethical and cultural dilemmas.

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MIL SCI 131 Training Management and the Warfighting Functions 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course studies the practice and application of the fundamentals of Army leadership, officership, Army values and ethics, personal development, and small unit tactics. Students will focus on how to train fundamental tactical skills and explore the Army’s capabilities and limitations within each warfighting function.

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MIL SCI 132 Applied Leadership in Small Unit Operations 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course examines the role communications, values, and ethics play in effective leadership at the platoon level. Topics covered include ethical decision-making, consideration of others, emotional intelligence, and a survey Army leadership doctrine. There is also added emphasis on improving each student's oral and written communication abilities.

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MIL SCI 141 The Army Officer 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course explores the application of mission command and the Army profession to address the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations. Students will examine differences in culture, military law, principles of war, and rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism. Students will also explore aspects of interacting with non-government organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host nation support.
The course places significant emphasis on developing the characteristics of an effective Army officer by utilizing historical case studies and scenarios to prepare students to face complex ethical leadership challenges.
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MIL SCI 142 Company Grade Leadership 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course explores leadership in a complex operational environment and applies the Army’s operating concept and doctrine to conduct battle analysis briefings and to research the impacts of global partners, threats, challenges, and opportunities (PTCO). It introduces practical platoon leader knowledge for unit relationships, maintenance, supply, and finance requirements. Students will examine the Art of Command by using mission command scenarios
to prepare them to face the complex ethical demands inherent in serving as a commissioned officer in the United States Army.
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Naval Science

NAV SCI 1 Introduction to Naval Science 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This curriculum provides guidelines for introducing students to the organization of the Department of Defense and the naval service, the long-held customs and traditions of the service, basic leadership, ethics and character development, the duties of a junior officer, and basic information concerning shipboard procedures and safety. It is the intent of this course to stimulate the students' interest for study and investigation in future courses.

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NAV SCI 2 Sea Power and Maritime Affairs 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Traces the U.S. historical evolution of sea power, its concepts, theories and applications. Emphasizes the impact of world situation, U.S. national interest, changing technology, and naval leadership on the evolving concept of sea power. Relates historical developments to current trends. Examines briefly the U.S. Merchant Marine's and the former Soviet Navy's impact on sea power policy formulation.

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NAV SCI 3 Leadership and Management I 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course will cover basic management, decision making, and moral leadership. The student will learn to establish meaningful goals, prioritize among competing demands, and plan and forecast in a task-centered organization. The course includes exposure to measures of organizational effectiveness, methods to overcome resistance to change, effective communications, and techniques to aid in counseling, team building, and resolution of disciplinary
and personnel matters.
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NAV SCI 10 Naval Ship Systems I 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2014
Principles of design and operation of ships. Emphasis on description and analysis of major types of propulsion plants, both conventional and nuclear. Principles of thermodynamic cycles, electrical theory, power generation and distribution, auxiliary machinery systems. Ship construction, strength and stability in intact and damaged conditions. Factors and design criteria for seaworthiness, structural integrity, and operational employment.

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NAV SCI 12A Navigation and Naval Operations I 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Theory, principles, and procedures of terrestrial and celestial navigation and piloting techniques. A study of coordinating systems, including the celestial coordinate system, nautical charts and publications, position fixing, dead reckoning, nautical astronomy, the theory and methods of celestial navigation, and the theory and prediction of tides and current.

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NAV SCI 12B Navigation and Naval Operations II 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
Introduction to the various aspects of ship operations at sea. Principles of terrestrial navigation including the rules of the road for prevention of collisions at sea, vector analysis of relative motion, ship behavior and characteristics in maneuvering, precise ship positioning, use of aids to navigation, meteorology, and electronic navigation.

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Contact Information

Military Affairs Program

Visit Department Website

Aerospace Studies

Hearst Gym

Phone: 510-642-3572

Military Sciences

Hearst Gym

Phone: 510-642-3374

Naval Sciences

Hearst Gym

Phone: 510-642-3551

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