Undergraduate Interdisciplinary Studies (UGIS)

Courses

UGIS 5A Doing Research: Critical Inquiry at Berkeley 1 Unit

Terms offered: Summer 2007 Second 6 Week Session
Introduces the nature of research and the research university's role in the production of knowledge. Explores differences and similarities among modes of inquiry in sciences, social sciences, and humanities by looking at UCB faculty and their various approaches to current problems. Examines challenges and rewards of doing research. Profiles undergraduate researchers. Online course for new freshmen culminates in (optional) welcome week activities.

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UGIS W5 Doing Research: Critical Inquiry at Berkeley 1 Unit

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Introduces the nature of research and the research university's role in the production of knowledge. Explores differences and similarities among modes of inquiry in sciences, social sciences, and humanities by looking at UCB faculty and their various approaches to current problems. Examines challenges and rewards of doing research. Profiles undergraduate researchers. Online course for new freshmen culminates in (optional) welcome week activities. This course is
web-based.
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UGIS C10 The Eye and Vision in a Changing Environment 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2010, Spring 2009, Spring 2008
Course covers introduction to the basis of common sight reducing visual disorders with major public health implications for society--e.g., myopia, cataracts, diabetic hypertensive eye disorders, developmental disorders (e.g., lazy eye), and environmentally induced disease and disorders (solar eye burns, cataracts). Major approaches to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of common disorders will be addressed in terms of the biological
and optical sciences underlying the treatment or prevention. Impact of eye care on society and health and care delivery will be reviewed.
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UGIS 39B Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

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UGIS 80A It's Elementary! Exploring Science with Young Students 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2014
This course introduces the fundamentals of K-5 science education through demonstrations, skill modeling, and discussion. Topics include inquiry-based and cooperative learning strategies; team building and management tools; and assessment techniques. Students are placed in an elementary school and are provided the support needed to successfully participate in the classroom. This seminar offers an opportunity to explore teaching, foster children's
natural curiosity, and inspire local students.
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UGIS 80B It's Elementary! Exploring Math with Young Students 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2014
This course introduces the fundamentals of K-5 math education through demonstrations, skill modelng, and discussion. Topics include inquiry-based and cooperative learning strategies; team building and management tools; and assessment techniques. Students are placed in an elementary school and are provided the support needed to successfully participate in the classroom. This seminar offers an opportunity to explore teaching, foster children's
natural curiosity, and inspire local students.
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UGIS 81A Teaching Science with Middle School Students 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2014
This course introduces the fundamentals of sixth to eighth grade science education through demonstrations, skill modeling, and discussion. Topics include inquiry-based pedagogy, assessment techniques, empirically-based lesson revision, and adolescent development. Students are placed in a middle school and are provided the support needed to successfully participate in the classroom. This seminar offers an opportunity to explore teaching, foster
children's natural curiosity, and inspire local students.
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UGIS 81B Teaching Math with Middle School Students 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2014
This course introduces the fundamentals of sixth to eighth grade math education through demonstrations, skill modeling, and discussion. Topics include inquiry-based pedagogy, assessment techniques, empirically-based lesson revision, and adolescent development. Students are placed in a middle school and are provided the support needed to successfully participate in the classroom. This seminar offers an opportunity to explore teaching, foster children's
natural curiosity, and inspire local students.
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UGIS 82 K-8 Teaching and Inquiry-Based Lesson Design in the Science and Mathematics Classroom 2 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
This course surveys basic approaches to K-8 science and math teaching through modeling inquiry-based teaching and discussion. Topics include inquiry-based pedagogy, assessment techniques, lesson plan design and revision, and child development. Students are placed in science and math learning environments with upper elementary and middle school children to practice teaching. This seminar offers an opportunity to explore teaching
, foster children's natural curiosity, and inspire local students.
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UGIS 82M K-8 Teaching in the Mathematics Classroom 2 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This course surveys basic approaches to K-8 math teaching through modeling inquiry-based teaching and discussion. Topics include inquiry-based pedagogy, assessment techniques, lesson plan design and revision, and child development. Students are placed in math learning environments with upper elementary and middle school children to practice teaching. This seminar offers an opportunity to explore teaching, foster children's natural curiosity, and inspire local students.

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UGIS 82S K-8 Teaching in the Science Classroom 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015
This course surveys basic approaches to K-8 science teaching through modeling inquiry-based teaching and discussion. Topics include inquiry-based pedagogy, assessment techniques, lesson plan design and revision, and child development. Students are placed in science learning environments with upper elementary and middle school children to practice teaching. This seminar offers an opportunity to explore teaching, foster children's natural curiosity, and inspire local
students.
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UGIS C92 Imagining Arab Civilization 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This course examines major aspects of Arab culture through literature, art, film, and other media. Questions of religious, political, and philosophical nature co-exist in Arab culture with literary conventions and aesthetic norms. The course explores the dynamic interaction among these abiding concerns of Arab culture from pre-Islamic times to the present.

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UGIS 98 Directed Group Study for Lower Division Students 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Seminars for the group study of topics not covered by regularly scheduled courses. Topics may vary from semester to semester.

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UGIS 110 Introduction to Disability Studies 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course focuses on the social and personal meaning of disability and chronic illness. We will explore definitions and conceptual models for the study of disability, the history of disabled people, bio-ethical perspectives, the depiction of disability in literature and the arts, public attitudes, and legal and social policies. The course will investigate the interaction of disability with social factors such as gender, sexual orientation, race
, ethnicity, and class. The course is for students with and without disabilities, and may be of special interest to students preparing for careers in the health professions, education, law, architecture, social work, or gerontology.
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UGIS 112 Women and Disability 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course will explore the intersection of women's experience and disability issues, emphasizing the social and personal impact of disability and chronic illness on relationships, identity, employment, health, body image, sexuality, reproduction, motherhood, and aging. Through real stories of women's lives which reached the media in the last decade and before, students will move toward a dynamic understanding of the impact of a range of
physical, emotional, and mental disabilities in the context of current social forces and public policy. We will explore historic perspectives as well as current trends in medicine, independent living, care-giving, insurance, public benefits, law, and community activism as they affect and are affected by disabled women and girls and their families. We will discuss controversial ethical issues such as prenatal screening, wrongful birth law suits, and physician-assisted suicide. Course readings will draw on the rich literature of disabled women's anthologies, biography and autobiograhpy, scholarly and popular literature of disability, feminist analyses, creative writing, women's art, film, and theatre.
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UGIS 113 Disability Studies in Practice 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
A graded service-learning internship course in disability studies. Students will draw lessons from working in collaboration with major disability rights and independent living organizations. Each student will do an internship at one of these organizations for six hours a week. In an additional one-hour a week seminar together, students will first prepare for the internships, setting objectives for skills to be learned and planning effective projects
, and then analyze and reflect on the work done, both in order to create greater understanding of each intern's individual experiences and in order to think critically about how "service" and "organizing" can address the needs and goals of the disability community. Students must apply in advance for admission into this course.
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UGIS 120 Introduction to Applied Language Studies 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course is an introduction to the study of language as applied to real world problems in specific situations in which people use and learn languages, e.g., language learning and teaching, language socialization, bilingualism and multilingualism, language policy and planning, computer-mediated communication, stylistics, translation, intercultural communication, language and symbolic power, political and commercial rhetoric. Fieldwork consists
of observation and analysis of language-related real world problems.
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UGIS C133 Death, Dying, and Modern Medicine: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
This course will study the end of life--dying and death--from the perspective of medicine and history. It seeks to confront the humanist with the quotidian dilemmas of modern clinical practice and medicine's deep engagement with death more generally. It invites pre-med, pre-law, and public policy students to understand these matters in light of the historical and, more broadly, literary and artistic perspectives of the humanities.

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UGIS C135 Visual Autobiography 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2008, Fall 2007, Fall 2003, Spring 2002
Since visual and literary studies have historically been viewed as separate disciplines, we will use theories from both to study those forms of self-representation that defy disciplinary boundaries, or what we call "visual autobiography." The course aims to help students become conversant with the elements of alphabetic literacy (reading and writing) and visual literacy (observing and making) in order to develop a third distinctive
textual/visual literacy.
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UGIS C136 The American Forest: Its Ecology, History, and Representation 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2007
The American forest will be examined in terms of its ecology, history, and representations in paintings, photographs, and literary essays. This examination seeks to understand the American forest in its scientific and economic parameters, as well as the historic, social, and ideological dimensions which have contributed to the evolution of our present attitudes toward the forest.

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UGIS 140 The Hand-Printed Book in Its Historical Context 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
The "Hand-Printed Book" is a studio course taught in the Bancroft press room. Using antique presses and 19th century type, each class produces by hand a rare first edition of a work from the Bancroft collections that has never been published before. As students learn how hand-produced books have been made in the west for the last 500 years, they are also taught about the history of the book, using examples from Bancroft's rare books
and manuscripts collection.
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UGIS C153 Judaism in Late Antiquity 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2007, Spring 2006, Spring 2004
This class will examine the emergence and development of classical Judaism, its piety, institutions, thought, and literature.

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UGIS C155 Jewish Civilization: Modern Period 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2013
This is the fourth course in a four-course sequence in the history of Jewish culture and civilization. It explores the major themes in Jewish history from 1750 to the present, with special attention paid to the transformation of Jewish communal and individual identity in the modern world. Topics to be treated include the breakdown of traditional society, enlightenment and emancipation, assimilation, Hasidism, racial anti-Semitism,
colonialism, Zionism, and contemporary Jewish life in Europe, North America, and Israel. The multicultural nature of Jewish history will be highlighted throughout the course through the treatment of non-European Jewish narratives alongside the more familiar Ashkenazi perspective.
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UGIS 156 Human Rights Interdisciplinary Minor Capstone Workshop 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
The HRI Capstone Workshop structures the process of turning research projects into conference papers in preparation for the HRI conference. The course allows students to tackle common research and writing problems together in a series of group advising sessions.

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UGIS W157 Experiential Learning: Context, Self-Reflection and Professional Development 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Spring 2017, Summer 2016 10 Week Session
This course facilitates your learning and self-reflection about various types of organizational contexts, structures, and cultures and about the development of practical strategies to promote successful internship experiences. A series of audio-visual lectures, practical exercises, writing assignments, projects, and online group discussions will guide you through all stages of your internship experience. The
course will also present a range of theories, methods, and real-world example for examining management and organizational theory and practice.
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UGIS W158 Global Citizenship 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session
With this course, you will be able to add a new dimension to your internship experience: a reflection on global citizenship. You will be challenged to use your internship experience as an opportunity to critically explore cultural differences, modes of conduct and values. A series of audio-visual lectures, practical exercises, writing assignments, projects, and online group discussions will stimulate you to leave the comfort
zone of what you are familiar with and to explore alternative views on right and wrong, good and bad and the beautiful and the ugly. The course will also encourage you to interact with locals and to engage with the city/region/country where you live during your internship.

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UGIS 160A Art 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
This course delves into various facets of the Arts in Washington, D.C., whether involving public arts through museums such as the Smithsonian, or performance venues such as theatres; art history and public issues involving arts sponsorship and presentation.

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UGIS 162A Political Science: Behind the Bully Bulpit - The History of Presidental Speech 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2012, Spring 2011
As history has shown, there is no bully pulpit in the world like the American presidency. Whether it was Roosevelt declaring war on the Japanese or Regan declaring war on government bureaucracy, they, like all presidents, understood the power of their words to make history and to change it. This course will study the history of the presidency through their speeches. We will read and analyze remarks delivered from the podium in economic booms
and busts, in times of social unrest, and even in moments of humor. By reading others and drafting our own, we will also learn the elements of an effective speech and how to craft and deliver one. A few former and current presidential speechwriters will be featured as guests throughout the semester. Course requirements include the 750-word op-ed, preparation and delivery of a 10-minute speech, writing a mid-term paper based on course materials and sitting for a final exam.
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UGIS 162B Sports, Politics, and Society 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Few things have characterized mass culture in the 20th century more consistently and thoroughly than sports. We will look at the phenomenon ubiquitous to all advanced industrial societies where disorganized contests, competitions, and games mutated into what we have come to know as modern team sports. We will see how this transformation was virtually identical in every industrial society and should thus be seen as a fine gauge of modernity.

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UGIS 162C Race and Politics in the American City 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Spring 2010
The purpose of this seminar is to equip students to think deeply and critically about racial politics in the American city in general--and about racial politics in the American city of Washington, D.C. in particular. The seminar will begin with an introduction to a set of concepts fundamental to our subject--race, consciousness, racism, political action - and then move on to central features of city politics with race prominently in mind.

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UGIS 162E Political Science: Environmental Policymaking and the Politics of Climate Change 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
World leaders at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) held in Copenhagen this past December announced that they reached "a meaningful agreement" that will lead to a global treaty to address climate change. Many observers see the politics of the Copenhagen Accord as a glimpse into the new world order in which international diplomatic power will increasingly be shared by the United States (U.S.) and emerging
powers, such as China. Climate change policy also offers a lens through which the U.S. domestic environmental policymaking process can be viewed and its evolution better understood. This course will examine the dynamics of global environmental treaty-making after first studying the development of U.S. environmental protection efforts. Students will then analyze the international and domestic efforts that led up to the Copenhagen Accord and assess what is needed and likely to result from the next UNFCCC meeting to be held in Mexico City in 2010.
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UGIS 162H Political Science: Interest Group Politics: Lobbying and Influences 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2012, Spring 2011
This course will explore the role of interest groups and lobbyists in the American political process. We will discuss what makes an influential lobbyist in Washington. We will examine the ways in which organized interests try to achieve their goals, and what determines whether or not they are successful. We will investigate whether the tens of thousand of lobbyists roaming the streets of Washington improve or detract from the quality of American democracy.

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UGIS 162I Political Science: Lobbying, Money, and Influence in Washington 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
This course will be an intense examination of lobbying in Washington with particular attention given to the role of money and campaign finance in the operation of what has become a highly sophisticated and poorly understood network of advocacy and influence. The approach of the instructor is to provide a basic understanding of three different but interrelated knowledge sets: the Congress, political money, and lobbying by interest groups.

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UGIS 162J Political Science: U.S. Supreme Court: Judicial Politics and Constitutional Interpretation 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2011
This course will introduce students to the Supreme Court of the United States and its work. Besides covering the Court's historical origins, its institutional power and limitations, and its current cases, this course will attempt to de-mystify one of the nation's most cloistered governmental institutions. Students will learn the nuts and bolts of what happens to a case from the day a petition to review a dispute arrives at the Supreme Court until the day the justices
issue a final opinion.
Political Science: U.S. Supreme Court: Judicial Politics and Constitutional Interpretation: Read More [+]

UGIS 162K Spies! The Politics of Intelligence 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
In this course, students will be introduced to recent issues concerning intelligence, such as intelligence failure, reform, and oversight, with a focus on how the change in U.S. intelligence in the post-9/11 context has increasingly emphasized domestic or "homeland" intelligence. Students will gain an understanding of the different types of intelligence, the range of responsibilities that the different Intelligence Community members
hold, and the relationship between intelligence and the policymaking process.
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UGIS 162L Middle East Politics and the Arab "Spring" 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Spring 2014
This course provides an overview of modern Middle Eastern politics with the aim of gaining a deeper understanding of the recent events of the Arab "Spring." This course begins with a historical analysis outlining the development of the states in the Middle East. Through this course, students will gain an understanding of the dynamics of the Middle Eastern politics and society.

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UGIS 162M U.S. Foreign Policy in the Middle East 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
What are the United States' interests in the Middle East? Who and what determine those interests? And how are those interests pursued? This course addresses these questions in two parts. Students should leave this class with a strong understanding of the challenges that the U.S. faces in the Middle East, as well as an informed viewpoint regarding how well America is meeting those challenges.

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UGIS 162N American Political Journalism 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
This class will explore the relationships among politics, news media, and government. It will do so by focusing on particular news events in which the role of the media becomes an integral part of the story.

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UGIS 162O The Science of Politics: Campaigns and Elections 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
This class will teach you how to better understand the fundamental factors that drive elections in America and to learn some of the skills employed by political professionals. Many of your assignments will require you to apply the lessons of this class to real time events. Our goal in this class is to go beyond the spin and hyperbole of many election commentators and understand how voters decide and how strategists persuade.

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UGIS 162P Beyond Sovereignty 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2013
The decline of traditional sovereignty is the focus of this course. The nature of that transformation--what is causing it, why, and with what implications--will be the object of our concern. While time frames are elusive, the bulk of our attention will be on the post-Cold War world.

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UGIS 162R Looking at the World: U.S. Foreign Policy and National Security 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2013 8 Week Session
This course combines two areas of continual fascination in Washington and beyond - US foreign policy and policies regarding national security. The course provides students with a framework to understand policy analysis, development, and implementation while introducing them to a range of the most pressing substantive policy issues the US is currently facing. The course will alternate between foreign policy issues and functional organizational tools
used to address these issues.
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UGIS 162S U.S. Foreign Policy Toward Africa 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2013
This course will focus on the evolution of U.S. foreign policy toward Africa from African independence until present day. Specific themes include economic development, China's economic expansion, foreign aid, democracy, and human rights. Specific attention will focus on the role of race and ethnic politics and their influence on U.S. policy.

U.S. Foreign Policy Toward Africa: Read More [+]

UGIS 162T Foreign Policy in Asia 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
What are the most pressing foreign policy challenges in Asia today? How do American foreign policymakers respond to crises in Asia?
To what extent does domestic politics influence or inform our policy making? This course seeks to help students develop the analytical skills necessary to understand American policy toward Asia, especially in preparation for a career in foreign policy.

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UGIS 162U 21st Century Diplomacy 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course will provide an overview of the different types of diplomatic engagement that are being utilized by governments, multilateral institutions, and other actors that impact international relations. It will consider what the goals of diplomacy should be in today's interconnected world and what are the most effective tools to support our national security, foreign policy, and economic interests. The course will also examine variations such as diplomacy
related to defense, development, and economic issues. Guest speakers with a variety of diplomatic experiences will provide a context for contemporary diplomacy.
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UGIS 162V Economics of Public Policy 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016
The purpose of this course is to give students a comprehensive overview of the major issues facing U.S. fiscal policy, with special emphasis on structural issues, such as the problems facing the major entitlement programs: social security, and Medicare/Medicaid. The course will emphasize the economic aspects of fiscal issues, but will also address their historical roots and political aspects.

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UGIS 165 A Window Into How Washington Works 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Spring 2009
The federal government effects policy (e.g., enhancing public safety, protecting the environment, promoting a viable and growing economy, etc.) primarily in three ways: taxing, spending, and regulating. This course will explore how regulations -- an important instrument of government and one of the easiest ways for a President to make his/her mark -- are developed, amended, or repealed, with an emphasis on how the various institutions of the
federal government are involved in the process and how they interact with the other interested entities.
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UGIS 172A The Communicator's Dilemma 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015
The course examines trends in a media landscape transformed by technology over the last three decades, from the post-Watergate era to the early soundings of the 2016 presidential campaign. The course will lean hard on guest speakers to give it topicality, urgency, and a sense of personal connection. We will also dissect media in its many forms to see if the old standards of objectivity have given way to a new model that verges on advocacy.

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UGIS 172C Politics and Poems: Writing Verse in D.C. 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016
The course is space for writing and discussing poems in the nation's capital. The course is as much about reading poems as writing (and revising) them. Students will attend at least one live literary event as well as visit a museum or gallery to use the visual or plastic arts as a springboard for their poetry. Finally, students will acquire and hone the vocabulary necessary to offer constructive feedback on one another's work.

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UGIS 173 Museums and Society: The Power of Display in Washington DC 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2010, Fall 2009, Spring 2009
This course explores museums as dynamic sites of intellectual and cultural debate, and as institutions vested with the authority to define aesthetics, history, heritage, and even citizenship. Now more than ever, as the process of globalization raises questions about the fluidity, preservation, and "authenticity" of culture, museums of all kinds are attracting great interest both as places to visit and as a subject of critical analysis
in their own right. As places defined by the collection, display, and interpretation of objects, museums are bound up in questions of permanence and transience, difference and identity, equity and privilege--issues that lie at the heart of what is termed the "new museology." But as institutional repositories of community memory or indigenous knowledge, they are also bound up in questions of representation, access and ownership--issues that move the debate over museum collections squarely into the politics of local, state, and national control over heritage. If ownership and control are the new realities of international heritage policy (and law), museums have quickly emerged as important sites on which and through which these claims are being made.
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UGIS 175 Washington Ethics: Crisis, Reform, and Reaction 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
This course explores the history, theory, and practice of public attempts to reform electoral and political processes at the national level. Emphasis will be on key players and institutions in Washington, D.C., and key theories underlying our conceptions of good government and politics.

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UGIS 176 Ensuring Food Safety: Role of Producers, Consumers, and Public Health Agencies 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
The course offers students an opportunity to gain insights into how the knowledge and expertise they acquire during their university studies can be applied to facilitating or enhancing efforts by public health agencies (local, state, national, and international) and by food producers, food manufacturers, food distributors, and other pertinent industry, to ensure food safety.

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UGIS 176A Negotiating with Terrorists 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012
This course will serve to teach and discuss the topic "Negotiating with Terrorists." The focus will be on negotiations with collective terrorist movements, not on bargaining with hostage takers in the course of single-event hostage taking incidences. The course will be organized in four thematic blocks with three classes each. All of the classes will be based on working on analytic themes. During classes, case studies will be equally discussed to foster understanding
of these matters.
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UGIS 176B Green Governance 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
How do we create a sustainable world? What is the role of energy and environmental policy? Will technical innovation lead to better solutions? What is the role of the consumer? Should business climate change planning be under government mandate or voluntary? Will market-based solutions work? What metrics should we use to determine the relative effectiveness of various policies? These are the sorts of questions we will ask in this course.

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UGIS 177 The Politics of Education 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Students will study the ways power and politics affect and are affected by such issues as reform and innovation, centralization and decentralization within federal systems of governance, privatization and school choice, race and ethnicity, poverty and inequality, professionalism and bureaucratization, and testing and accountability.

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UGIS 187 Project-Based Instruction 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Framed around the topic of sustainability, the course engages students from different math, science, and engineering majors in the process of applying the content knowledge from their discipline to build project-based curricula for presentation as part of a 45-hour field placement in a local high school classroom. Students develop pedagogical content knowledge and relate teaching theory to practice through readings, classroom activities, discussion
, lesson planning, and field observations.
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UGIS 188 Research Methods for Science and Mathematics K-12 Teachers 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Students undertake several in-depth research projects to develop methods for engaging in authentic research in the science or mathematics content area related to their major. Interactive lectures and labs are designed to meet the needs of future teachers by practicing specific techniques--including statistics, mathematical modeling, and scientific writing--needed to address scientific questions so that they may guide their future K-12 students
to develop skills in problem solving and research.
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UGIS 189 Integrating Research Methods into K-12 Teaching in Mathematics and Science 1 or 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 8 Week Session
This course is designed to provide connections between research methods and science and math content learned in a research lab with teaching in the K-12 classroom. Hands-on inquiry-based science and math lessons are modeled and discussed. Students write research proposals, create posters demonstrating their research accomplishments, develop K-12 lesson plans that align with their research, and
assemble digital portfolios on standards-based teaching and assessment.
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UGIS 190 Independent Study - Research Methods 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2015 10 Week Session
Students enrolled will develop an independent research project under the supervision of a research mentor. Students will submit a formal research proposal and a final research paper, guided by the instructor.

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UGIS 192A Supervised Research: Humanities 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship Program (URAP). Directed individual research on topics connected to faculty scholarship.

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UGIS 192B Supervised Research: Social Sciences 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship Program (URAP). Directed individual research on topics connected to faculty scholarship.

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UGIS 192C Supervised Research: Biological Sciences 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship Program (URAP). Directed individual research on topics connected to faculty scholarship.

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UGIS 192D Supervised Research: Physical Sciences 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship Program (URAP). Directed individual research on topics connected to faculty scholarship.

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UGIS 192E Supervised Research: Interdisciplinary Studies 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship Program (URAP). Directed individual research on topics connected to faculty scholarship.

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UGIS C196A UCDC Core Seminar 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course is the UCDC letter-graded core seminar for 4 units that complements the P/NP credited internship course UGIS C196B. Core seminars are designed to enhance the experience of and provide an intellectual framework for the student's internship. UCDC core seminars are taught in sections that cover various tracks such as the Congress, media, bureaucratic organizations and the Executive Branch, international relations, public
policy and general un-themed original research.
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UGIS C196B UCDC Internship 6.5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course provides a credited internship for all students enrolled in the UCDC and Cal in the Capital Programs. It must be taken in conjunction with the required academic core course C196A. C196B requires that students work 3-4 days per week as interns in settings selected to provide them with exposure to and experienc in government, public policy, international affairs, media, the arts or other areas or relevance to their major
fields of study.
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UGIS C196W Special Field Research 10.5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2014
Students work in selected internship programs approved in advance by the faculty coordinator and for which written contracts have been established between the sponsoring organization and the student. Students will be expected to produce two progress reports for their faculty coordinator during the course of the internship, as well as a final paper for the course consisting of at least 35 pages. Other restrictions
apply; see faculty adviser.
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UGIS 196N UCDC Summer Internship 6 - 8 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Summer 2016 8 Week Session, Summer 2015 8 Week Session
This course provides a credited internship for all students enrolled in the Cal-in-the-Capital/UCDC summer program. 196N requires that students work 3-4 days per week as interns in settings selected to provide them with exposure to and experience in government, public policy, international affairs, media, the arts, or other areas of relevance to their major fields of study.

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UGIS 198 Directed Group Study for Upper Division Students 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Seminars for group study of topics not covered by regularly scheduled courses. Topics may vary from semester to semester. Students must have completed 60 units to be eligible to enroll.

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UGIS 303 Apprentice Teaching in Science and Mathematics 2 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
The course is designed to support new science and mathematics teachers in earning a credential for teaching in California secondary schools. Students demonstrate that they have developed the skills to meet the state credentialing requirements by undertaking an inquiry project on their own teaching practice. Effective teaching methods for the science and mathematics classrooms are emphasized, including strategies for lesson planning, assessment
, and English language learner support.
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UGIS 304 Supervised Teaching in Mathematics and Science for Secondary Schools 5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Fieldwork for Cal Teach single subject math or science teaching credential.

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