Medical Anthropology

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

The Joint UCB/UCSF PhD in Medical Anthropology is one of the pioneering programs in the discipline both nationally and globally. The program provides disciplinary leadership and outstanding and comprehensive training leading to the PhD degree. No other program offers the Joint Program's combination of excellence in critical medical anthropology, studies of science, technology and modernity, intersections of medicine and social theory, and cutting edge scholarship.

Topics of active research include:

  • Violence and trauma
  • Genomics and ethics
  • Transplantation and organ and tissue commodification
  • Citizenship, immigration, and the body
  • Psychiatry, ethnopsychiatry, and psychoanalysis
  • Youth and child survival
  • Hunger, infectious disease, development, and governmentality
  • Traditional medicine and its modernity
  • Sexuality, gender, and the commodity form
  • Geriatrics and dementia
  • Death, dying, and the politics of "bare life"

The core faculty on the Berkeley side of the joint program form an organized research group called Critical Studies in Medicine, Science, and the Body. This group links medical anthropology, science and technology studies, postcolonial and psychoanalytic anthropology, and linguistic anthropology. There are seven faculty in the group: Nancy Scheper-Hughes, Program Director of Medical Anthropology; Paul Rabinow, Director of the Project on Genomics and Society; Lawrence Cohen, Co-director of Medical Anthropology; Stefania Pandolfo (Interim Program Director for 2011-12), Charles L. Briggs, Stanley Brandes, and Cori Hayden. Together with colleagues at Berkeley and UCSF and with graduate students and postdoctoral scholars in the Joint UCB-UCSF Medical Anthropology Program and in the Department of Anthropology, these scholars have created both the most diverse and the most contemporary program in the field.

The expansion of traditional medical anthropology at Berkeley into Critical Studies in Medicine, Science, and the Body reflects several disciplinary breakthroughs associated with our faculty. Though variants of "medical anthropology" are almost as old as the parent discipline of anthropology, the organized field emerged in post-war North America as an effort to link international public health, ethnomedicine, and allied social science in the service of the anthropology of development. The field shared both the promise and the limits of modernization theory more generally. Both the critical Marxist and symbolic/interpretive challenges of the 1970s and 1980s thickened debate, along with closer links to historical analyses of the scholarly medical traditions and to the development of qualitative methodologies concurrent with the expansion of NIH, NIMH, and other governmental programs of research support.

Despite the rapid growth of the field at this time, most research remained auxiliary to the categorical if not the political and economic imperatives of biomedicine. With the arrival of Nancy Scheper-Hughes, Berkeley became a leader in defining what she famously termed a "critically applied medical anthropology." Critically applied medical anthropology refused the theory/applied divide that characterized so many departments and programs, arguing the impossibility of separating "theoretical" debate in cultural anthropology and the human sciences on the one hand and more "applied" commitment to the health and survival of communities and groups, on the other. Scheper-Hughes's articulation of a critical anthropology of hunger offers a powerful example of the change in the field she was instrumental in creating.

The rise of this movement at Berkeley led to a period in the late 1980s and early 1990s with two dominant programs in graduate training, critical medical anthropology in the Joint Program at Berkeley and UCSF and interpretive medical anthropology at Harvard. Lawrence Cohen came from Harvard in 1992 to join Scheper-Hughes, and the teaching and joint research that has resulted from their collaboration represent a critical and ongoing conversation bringing together the leading formations in the field. Cohen has worked to link debates between critical, interpretive, and biocultural medical anthropologies to broader theoretical questions of materialization that have emerged in feminist and queer scholarship.

The rapid growth of science studies and the increasing centrality of both science and the body to contemporary debate in the academy posed new challenges to medical anthropology. Paul Rabinow has studied the new genomics intensively, work leading to three books and to the development of what he has termed an anthropology of reason. Against too-easy criticism of scientific and medical practice that did not question what Michel Foucault called the "speaker's benefit" of the critic, Rabinow offered a method and a form of analysis that offered a way out of the endless battles of the "Culture Wars." Berkeley anthropology emerged as the most powerful alternative to the dominant approaches to the sociology of science and science studies.

From the mid-1990s and on, these two streams of medical anthropology and the anthropology of reason have been in closer and sharper interaction. Scheper-Hughes wrote a famous article calling for a "Barefoot Anthropology;" Rabinow offered his own vision of a "Well-Heeled Anthropology," and Medical Anthropology Program affliliates Professors Laura Nader and Aihwa Ong both authored important responses to this debate. Far from pushing students towards either pole, the debate constituted a space for encouraging students to link critical, interpretive, and genealogic analysis. Charles L. Briggs and Clara Mantini-Briggs are studying challenges to neoliberal health policies and new understandings of health, citizenship, and the state emerging from revolutionary healthcare in Venezuela.

In a world of linking new genomics, bioinformatics, and pharmacotherapy to corporate medicine and public-private hybrid structures internationally, "bioethics" has become ever more ubiquitous and empty a critical practice. The question of ethics and more generally of human futures links the current work of Cohen, Rabinow, and Scheper-Hughes. To this question and to the related investigation of trauma, loss, and healing, Stefania Pandolfo brings a rigorous anthropological conversation incorporating contemporary philosophy and psychoanalysis and her research in a Moroccan psychiatric hospital.

Pandolfo's work provides a bridge allowing for analysis linking medical anthropology and recent social theories of language, melancholy and the body. Pandolfo has offered extensive training to graduate students in the anthropology of medicine, science, and psychiatry, linking a reexamination of existential psychiatry and a close engagement with the work of scholars from Benjamin and Blanchot to Freud, Lacan, and Binswanger to both Mahgrebi and European clinical and theoretical work.

By tracing genealogies of the unexamined imbrication of theories of language, knowledge, performativity, and representation with research on biomedicine, public health, and traditional medicine, the Joint UCB-UCSF Medical Anthropology Program enables students to critically synthesize linguistic and critical medical anthropology in such a way as to transform both realms of anthropological inquiry. Charles L. Briggs has explored these connections through research on narrative and statistic representations of epidemic disease Latin America; urban violence and its problematic representations; and a five-country study of how understandings of health, disease, citizenship, and the state are profoundly shaped by news coverage of health, all in collaboration with Clara Mantini-Briggs.

Other Berkeley anthropology faculty affiliated with the Medical Anthropology Program bring important resources to graduate student training in the critical analysis of medicine, science, and psychiatry. Laura Nader was instrumental in helping to define the field and remains a leading scholar of medicine and the state. Stanley Brandes has studied many topics of relevance to the field, including alcohol and culture and questions of death and the body.

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Admissions

Admission to the University

Minimum Requirements for Admission

The following minimum requirements apply to all graduate programs and will be verified by the Graduate Division:

  1. A bachelor’s degree or recognized equivalent from an accredited institution;
  2. A grade point average of B or better (3.0);
  3. If the applicant comes from a country or political entity (e.g., Quebec) where English is not the official language, adequate proficiency in English to do graduate work, as evidenced by a TOEFL score of at least 90 on the iBT test, 570 on the paper-and-pencil test, or an IELTS Band score of at least 7 (note that individual programs may set higher levels for any of these); and
  4. Sufficient undergraduate training to do graduate work in the given field.

Applicants Who Already Hold a Graduate Degree

The Graduate Council views academic degrees not as vocational training certificates, but as evidence of broad training in research methods, independent study, and articulation of learning. Therefore, applicants who already have academic graduate degrees should be able to pursue new subject matter at an advanced level without need to enroll in a related or similar graduate program.

Programs may consider students for an additional academic master’s or professional master’s degree only if the additional degree is in a distinctly different field.

Applicants admitted to a doctoral program that requires a master’s degree to be earned at Berkeley as a prerequisite (even though the applicant already has a master’s degree from another institution in the same or a closely allied field of study) will be permitted to undertake the second master’s degree, despite the overlap in field.

The Graduate Division will admit students for a second doctoral degree only if they meet the following guidelines:

  1. Applicants with doctoral degrees may be admitted for an additional doctoral degree only if that degree program is in a general area of knowledge distinctly different from the field in which they earned their original degree. For example, a physics PhD could be admitted to a doctoral degree program in music or history; however, a student with a doctoral degree in mathematics would not be permitted to add a PhD in statistics.
  2. Applicants who hold the PhD degree may be admitted to a professional doctorate or professional master’s degree program if there is no duplication of training involved.

Applicants may apply only to one single degree program or one concurrent degree program per admission cycle.

Required Documents for Applications

  1. Transcripts: Applicants may upload unofficial transcripts with your application for the departmental initial review. If the applicant is admitted, then official transcripts of all college-level work will be required. Official transcripts must be in sealed envelopes as issued by the school(s) attended. If you have attended Berkeley, upload your unofficial transcript with your application for the departmental initial review. If you are admitted, an official transcript with evidence of degree conferral will not be required.
  2. Letters of recommendation: Applicants may request online letters of recommendation through the online application system. Hard copies of recommendation letters must be sent directly to the program, not the Graduate Division.
  3. Evidence of English language proficiency: All applicants from countries or political entities in which the official language is not English are required to submit official evidence of English language proficiency. This applies to applicants from Bangladesh, Burma, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Latin America, the Middle East, the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia, most European countries, and Quebec (Canada). However, applicants who, at the time of application, have already completed at least one year of full-time academic course work with grades of B or better at a US university may submit an official transcript from the US university to fulfill this requirement. The following courses will not fulfill this requirement:
    • courses in English as a Second Language,
    • courses conducted in a language other than English,
    • courses that will be completed after the application is submitted, and
    • courses of a non-academic nature.

If applicants have previously been denied admission to Berkeley on the basis of their English language proficiency, they must submit new test scores that meet the current minimum from one of the standardized tests.

Where to Apply

Visit the Berkeley Graduate Division application page

Admission to the Program

The Department of Anthropology at Berkeley, and the Graduate Group in Anthropology at the University of California at San Francisco, currently offer a joint PhD in medical anthropology. Students may apply to enter the program through either the Berkeley or the San Francisco campus but not to both. The point of entry determines the student's home base during the program. Financial aid, primary advising, and other routine services are provided by the campus through which the student enters the program. All students, however, benefit by taking required coursework on both campuses and by the participation of the faculty on both sides of the program on all qualifying examinations and on the doctoral dissertation committees. The degree is the same and bears the name of both campuses.

Applications to all graduate programs are considered once each year for admission the following fall semester. The application period opens in early September, and the deadline for receipt of both department and Graduate Division applications is December 1. Applications are screened by the anthropology faculty, and selections are made on the basis of academic excellence, letters of recommendation, GRE scores, relevant experience, and a strong statement of intellectual and professional purpose.

The minimum requirement for admission to the Berkeley doctoral program in anthropology and in medical anthropology is a BA. The UCSF program in medical anthropology requires a master's degree in anthropology or a related discipline, or a postbaccalaureate professional degree.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

Normative Time Requirements

Normative Time to Advancement

Normative time to advancement is three years of coursework.

Normative Time in Candidacy

Normative time in candidacy is one to two years of dissertation research, and one to two years of writing the dissertation.

Total Normative Time

Total normative time is 6 years.

Time to Advancement

Curriculum  

ANTHRO 240AFundamentals of Anthropological Theory5
or ANTHRO 240B Fundamentals of Anthropological Theory
Select one of the following:
ANTHRO 205A (UCSF)
Fundamentals of Anthropological Theory
Select one of the following:
ANTHRO 11 (UCSF)
Topics in Medical Anthropology (UCB)
ANTHRO electives per approved study list

Foreign Language(s)

In addition to English, the program requires at least one other language. This language may be a language of international scholarship, a literary language, or a field language. The required language must be directly relevant to the research.

Field Papers

Students will write two field statements on topics in medical anthropology (for example, comparative medical systems, the anthropology of the body, reproduction, psychiatry and anthropology, political economy of health, science and biotechnology, or shamanism). The third field statement is usually on the student's chosen ethnographic/geographical area (for example, Latin American peasants, urban India, or post-colonial southern Africa). Each field statement is prepared with a faculty sponsor. Medical anthropology students usually work with three professors from the Anthropology Department. Field statements should not exceed 20 pages, excluding the bibliography.

Prospectus

The dissertation prospectus is the intellectual justification and research plan for the dissertation. Medical Anthropology students must get their prospectus signed by all three dissertation committee members and file it at the end of their third year, either before or after the PhD oral qualifying examination. There is no designated length for a medical dissertation prospectus, but the average proposal should be about 10-12 pages plus bibliography.

Time in Candidacy

Advancement

When the student has passed the oral qualifying examination, submitted his or her dissertation prospectus, proposed his or her dissertation committee (see Dissertation Committee below) he or she may be advanced to candidacy for the PhD by the dean of the Graduate Division.

Dissertation

This committee typically consists of four professors: the student's adviser as the committee chair, an inside member from the UCB Anthropology Department, an inside member from the Medical Anthropology program at UCSF, and an outside member from another department at UCB. The dissertation committee chair and the outside member must be members of the UCB Academic Senate.

Required Professional Development

Teaching

Graduate students are encouraged to serve at least two semesters as a graduate student instructor (GSI) in the course of earning the PhD. The department believes it is training its students to be college and university professors with a high regard for excellence in teaching as well as research. GSI-ships in Anthropology are awarded to students at least once in their careers as graduate students and students are also encouraged to apply to other departments on campus.

Courses

Medical Anthropology

ANTHRO 202 Primate Behavior 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 1998

Primate Behavior: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 204 Primate Evolution 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007

Primate Evolution: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 209 Human Adaptation 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007

Human Adaptation: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 210 Special Topics in Physical Anthropology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Spring 2012

Special Topics in Physical Anthropology: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 217 Discourse and of the Body 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2011
This course juxtaposes discourse analysis and approaches to health and biomedicine, querying how ideologies of language and communication provide implicit foundations for work on health, disease, medicine, and the body and how biopolitical discourses and practices inform constructions of discourse.

Discourse and of the Body: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 219 Topics in Medical Anthropology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2014, Spring 2014
Comparative study of mental illness and socially generated disease: psychiatric treatment, practitioners, and institutions.

Topics in Medical Anthropology: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 221 Pre-Columbian Central America 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2010

Pre-Columbian Central America: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 226 Archaeology of the Pacific 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2009, Spring 2003, Spring 2000
Subject matter will vary; current issues and debates in the archaeology of the Pacific, e.g., trade, exchange, colonization, maritime adaptations, etc.

Archaeology of the Pacific: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 227 Historical Archaeology Research 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Spring 2013
Historical archaeology seminar. Subject matter will vary from year to year.

Historical Archaeology Research: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 228 Method 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Fall 2011, Fall 2009
Various topics and issues in the methods of archaeological analysis and interpretation: style, ceramics, architectural analysis, lithic analysis, archaeozoology, etc.

Method: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 229A Archaeological Research Strategies 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Required for all first and second year graduate students in archaeology. Three hours of seminar discussion of major issues in the history and theory of archaeological research and practice (229A), and of the research strategies and design for various kinds of archaeological problems (229B). To be offered alternate semesters.

Archaeological Research Strategies: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 229B Archaeological Research Strategies 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Required for all first and second year graduate students in archaeology. Three hours of seminar discussion of major issues in the history and theory of archaeological research and practice (229A), and of the research strategies and design for various kinds of archaeological problems (229B). To be offered alternate semesters.

Archaeological Research Strategies: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 229C Writing the Field in Archaeology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
This seminar is intended to guide students in the definition of a field within archaeology, from initial conceptualization to writing of a field statement, dissertation chapter, or review article.

Writing the Field in Archaeology: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 230 Special Topics in Archaeology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016

Special Topics in Archaeology: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 231 Advanced Topics in Bioarchaeology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Spring 2009
This advanced seminar course explores how we reconstruct past lifeways from archaeological skeletal remains. It deals with the skeletal biology of past populations, covering both the theoretical approaches and methods used in the analysis of skeletal and dental remains.

Advanced Topics in Bioarchaeology: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 232 Advanced Topics in Bone Biology: Biocultural and Evolutionary Perspectives 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2013, Spring 2011
This advanced seminar course will discuss influences on bone health and maintence from a unique biocultural and evolutionary perspective.

Advanced Topics in Bone Biology: Biocultural and Evolutionary Perspectives: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 235 Special Topics in Museum Anthropology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2012, Spring 2011
Contemporary issues in museum studies from an anthropological perspective.

Special Topics in Museum Anthropology: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 240A Fundamentals of Anthropological Theory 5 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Anthropological theory and practice--following the rest of the world--have been undergoing important restructuring in the past decade. The course is organized to reflect this fact. We will begin by looking at recent debates about the nature and purpose of anthropology. This will provide a starting point for reading a series of classic ethnographies in new ways as well as examining some dimensions of the current research agenda in cultural anthropology.

Fundamentals of Anthropological Theory: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 240B Fundamentals of Anthropological Theory 5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Anthropological theory and practice--following the rest of the world--have been undergoing important restructuring in the past decade. The course is organized to reflect this fact. We will begin by looking at recent debates about the nature and purpose of anthropology. This will provide a starting point for reading a series of classic ethnographies in new ways as well as examining some dimensions of the current research agenda in cultural
anthropology.
Fundamentals of Anthropological Theory: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 250A Seminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Psychological Anthropology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Fall 2010, Fall 2006

Seminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Psychological Anthropology: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 250E Seminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Anthropology of Politics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2013, Spring 2012

Seminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Anthropology of Politics: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 250F Seminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Religion 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2011, Fall 2003

Seminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Religion: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 250G Seminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Anthropology of Ethics 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Fall 1999, Fall 1996

Seminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Anthropology of Ethics: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 250J Seminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Ethnographic Field Methods 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015

Seminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Ethnographic Field Methods: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 250N Seminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Classic Ethnography 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013

Seminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Classic Ethnography: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 250R Seminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Dissertation Writing 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014

Seminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Dissertation Writing: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 250V Seminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Tourism 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015

Seminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Tourism: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 250X Seminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Special Topics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016

Seminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Special Topics: Read More [+]

ANTHRO C254 Topics in Science and Technology Studies 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course provides a strong foundation for graduate work in STS, a multidisciplinary field with a signature capacity to rethink the relationship among science, technology, and political and social life. From climate change to population genomics, access to medicines and the impact of new media, the problems of our time are simultaneously scientific and social, technological and political, ethical and economic.

Topics in Science and Technology Studies: Read More [+]

ANTHRO C261 Theories of Narrative 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Summer 2006 10 Week Session, Spring 2006
This course examines a broad range of theories that elucidate the formal, structural, and contextual properties of narratives in relation to gestures, the body, and emotion; imagination and fantasy; memory and the senses; space and time. It focuses on narratives at work, on the move, in action as they emerge from the matrix of the everyday preeminently, storytelling in conversation--as key to folk genres--the
folktale, the legend, the epic, the myth.
Theories of Narrative: Read More [+]

ANTHRO C262A Theories of Traditionality and Modernity 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This seminar explores the emergence of notions of tradition and modernity and their reproduction in Eurocentric epistemologies and political formations. It uses work by such authors as Anderson, Butler, Chakrabarty, Clifford, Derrida, Foucault, Latour, Mignolo, Pateman, and Poovey to critically reread foundational works published between the 17th century and the present--along with philosophical texts with which they are in dialogue--in terms of
how they are imbricated within and help produce traditionalities and modernities.
Theories of Traditionality and Modernity: Read More [+]

ANTHRO C262B Theories of Traditionality and Modernity 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This seminar explores the emergence of notions of tradition and modernity and their reproduction in Eurocentric epistemologies and political formations. It uses work by such authors as Anderson, Butler, Chakrabarty, Clifford, Derrida, Foucault, Latour, Mignolo, Pateman, and Poovey to critically reread foundational works published between the 17th century and the present--along with philosophical texts with which they are in dialogue--in terms
of how they are imbricated within and help produce traditionalities and modernities.
Theories of Traditionality and Modernity: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 270A Seminars in Linguistic Anthropology: Semantics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2010

Seminars in Linguistic Anthropology: Semantics: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 270B Seminars in Linguistic Anthropology: Fundamentals of Language in Context 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Spring 2011
Intensive introduction to the study of language as a cultural system and speech as socially embedded communicative practice. This is the core course for students wishing to take further coursework in linguistic anthropology.

Seminars in Linguistic Anthropology: Fundamentals of Language in Context: Read More [+]

ANTHRO C273 Science and Technology Studies Research Seminar 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
This course will cover methods and approaches for students considering professionalizing in the field of STS, including a chance for students to workshop written work.

Science and Technology Studies Research Seminar: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 280B Seminars in Area Studies: Africa 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Spring 2011
Courses will vary from year to year. See Departmental Internal Catalogue for detailed descriptions of course offerings for each semester.

Seminars in Area Studies: Africa: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 280C Seminars in Area Studies: South Asia 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Spring 2014
Courses will vary from year to year. See Departmental Internal Catalogue for detailed descriptions of course offerings for each semester.

Seminars in Area Studies: South Asia: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 280D Seminars in Area Studies: China 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Courses will vary from year to year. See Departmental Internal Catalogue for detailed descriptions of course offerings for each semester.

Seminars in Area Studies: China: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 280X Seminars in Area Studies: Special Topics in Area Studies 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2008, Fall 1999, Spring 1998
Courses will vary from year to year. See Departmental Internal Catalogue for detailed descriptions of course offerings for each semester.

Seminars in Area Studies: Special Topics in Area Studies: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 290 Survey of Anthropological Research 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Required each term of all registered graduate students prior to their advancement to Ph.D. candidacy.

Survey of Anthropological Research: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 296A Supervised Research 2 - 12 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Practice in original field research under staff supervision. One unit of credit for every four hours of work in the field.

Supervised Research: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 296B Supervised Research 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Analysis and write-up of field materials.

Supervised Research: Read More [+]

ANTHRO N296A Supervised Research 1 - 6 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Summer 2016 8 Week Session, Summer 2015 8 Week Session
Practice in original field research under staff supervision. One unit of credit for every four hours of work in the field.

Supervised Research: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 298 Directed Reading 1 - 8 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Individual conferences intended to provide directed reading in subject matter not covered by available seminar offerings.

Directed Reading: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 299 Directed Research 1 - 12 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Individual conferences to provide supervision in the preparation of an original research paper or dissertation.

Directed Research: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 301 Professional Training: Teaching 1 - 6 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Group consultation with instructor. Supervised training with instructor on teaching undergraduates.

Professional Training: Teaching: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 375 Graduate Pedagogy Seminar 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Training in both the logistics and the pedagogical issues of undergraduate teaching.

Graduate Pedagogy Seminar: Read More [+]

ANTHRO 602 Individual Study for Doctoral Students 1 - 12 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
In preparation for Ph.D. examinations. Individual study in consultation with adviser. Intended to provide an opportunity for qualified students to prepare themselves for the various examinations required of candidates for the Ph.D. May not be used for unit or residence requirements for the degree.

Individual Study for Doctoral Students: Read More [+]

Faculty and Instructors

Faculty

Sabrina C. Agarwal, Associate Professor. Bioarchaeology, skeletal biology, gender research, biological and evolutionary anthropology, osteology and osteoporosis, health and disease, paleopathology.
Research Profile

Stanley H. Brandes, Professor. Cultural anthropology, ritual and religion, food and drink, alcohol use, visual anthropology, Mediterranean Europe, Latin America, Spain, Mexico.
Research Profile

Charles L. Briggs, Professor. Linguistic and medical anthropology, social theory, modernity, citizenship and the state, race, and violence.

Lawrence Cohen, Professor. Social cultural anthropology, medical and psychiatric anthropology, critical gerontology, lesbian and gay studies, feminist and queer theory.
Research Profile

Terrence W. Deacon, Professor. Neuroscience, anthropology, cognitive neuroscience, evolutionary biology, neurobiology, semiotics, primates, linguistic theory.
Research Profile

Nicholas Dirks, Professor. History and anthropology of South Asia, social and cultural theory, history of imperialism, historiography, cultural studies, globalization.
Research Profile

Mariane C. Ferme, Associate Professor. Material culture and agrarian landscapes, gender, historical anthropology, Sierra Leone, contemporary Africa, political culture, transitional justice in post-conflict societies.
Research Profile

Daniel Fisher, Assistant Professor. Social Cultural Anthropology; Anthropology of Media; Aboriginal Australia; Music and Sound; Art and Expressive Practice; Photography; Ethnographic Film and Video; Citizenship and the State; Bureaucracy.

Junko Habu, Professor. Japan, anthropology, archaeology, climate change, sustainability, East Asia, Jomon hunter-gatherers.
Research Profile

William F. Hanks, Professor. Social and cultural anthropology, linguistics, shamanism, language, Yucatan Mexico, Maya culture.
Research Profile

Christine Hastorf, Professor. Anthropology, archaeology, paleoethnobotany/archaeobotany, ancient plant use, foodways, Andean South America, ritual, agriculture.
Research Profile

Cori Hayden, Associate Professor. Latin America, Mexico, social and cultural anthropology, kinship, anthropology of science, technology, and medicine, post-colonial science, gender, queer studies.
Research Profile

Charles Hirschkind, Associate Professor. Islam, anthropology, religious practice, media technologies, political community, Middle East, Europe.
Research Profile

James Holston, Professor. Citizenship, Brazil, architecture, law, planning, the United States, cities, democracy, political and social anthropology, urban ethnography, the Americas.
Research Profile

Rosemary Joyce, Professor. Latin America, anthropology, gender, archaeology, sexuality, museums, cultural heritage, ethics, Central America, feminism.
Research Profile

Kent Lightfoot, Professor. California archaeology, coastal hunter-gatherers, North American archaeology, archaeology of colonialism, indigenous landscape management.
Research Profile

Xin Liu, Professor. History and/of anthropology, contemporary trends in social theory, social/cultural anthropology, comparative societies, capitalism and culture, America and China/East Asia.
Research Profile

Lisa A. Maher, Assistant Professor. Archaeology, hunter-gatherers, prehistory, geoarchaeology, landscape use, stone tools technology, emergence of social complexity.
Research Profile

Saba Mahmood, Professor. Religion, secularism, gender, ethics and politics, minorities, Islam, the Middle East, and South Asia.
Research Profile

Donald S. Moore, Associate Professor. Ethnicity, development, cultural politics, race, and identity, spatiality and power, governmentality, environment, postcolonial theory, Africa.
Research Profile

Laura Nader, Professor. Latin America, Mexico, social anthropology, comparative ethnography of law, dispute resolution, conflict, controlling processes, comparative family organizations, the anthropology of professional mind-sets, ethnology of the Middle East, contemporary U.S.
Research Profile

Karen Nakamura, Professor. Cultural anthropology; Disability Studies; LGBT movements; minority social movements and identity politics; visual anthropology and ethnographic filmmaking, Japan.

Aihwa Ong, Professor. Cultural anthropology, anthropology, transnationalism, citizenship, global cities, migration, Southeast Asia, urbanism.
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Stefania Pandolfo, Professor. Cultural anthropology, Islam, Middle East, theories of subjectivity, postcolonial criticism, anthropology and literature, the Maghreb, mental illness.
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Paul M. Rabinow, Professor. Cultural anthropology, social thought, modernity, biotechnology, genome mapping, France, Iceland.
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Nancy Scheper-Hughes, Professor. Critical medical anthropology, violence, genocide, inequality, marginality, childhood, family, psychiatry, deinstitutionalization, medical ethics, fieldwork ethics, globalization medicine, social/ political illness, disease, AIDS, Ireland, Brazil, cuba.
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Jun Sunseri, Assistant Professor. Historical archaeology, zooarchaeology, ceramic material science, GIS, landscape archaeology, experimental archaeology, community-engaged scholarship, outreach, foodways, actualistic research.
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Laurie Wilkie, Professor. Anthropology, historical archaeology, oral history, material culture and ethnic identity, family and gender relations; North America, Northern California, Caribbean. Bahamas, African consumerism, creolization, multi-ethnic community.
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Alexei Yurchak, Associate Professor. Language, Discourse, power, social theory, late socialism, theories of ideology, subjectivity, popular culture, ideology, Soviet and post-Soviet culture and society, post-socialism, telecommunications, linguistics, speech synthesis.
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Lecturers

Christopher J. Ames, Lecturer.

Nathan Kwame Braun, Lecturer.

Kimberly E. Christensen, Lecturer.

Mather M. George, Lecturer.

Ruth Goldstein, Lecturer.

Emeritus Faculty

Overton B. Berlin, Professor Emeritus.

Elizabeth F. Colson, Professor Emeritus. Religion, anthropology, migration, social organization, Zambia, women's lives, social change, politics, anthropological history, anthropological theory, ethnography of Africa, ethnography of North America.
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Margaret W. Conkey, Professor Emeritus. Anthropology, gender, archaeology, prehistoric art, hunter-gatherers, feminist perspectives, Paleolithic art, rock art.
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Phyllis C. Dolhinow, Professor Emeritus. Anthropology, development, ecology, physical anthropology, primate social behavior, human behavior, evolution.
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Nelson H. Graburn, Professor Emeritus. Social and cultural anthropology, kinship, art, tourism, Japan, circumpolar, China, Heritage, Inuit.
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John A. Graham, Professor Emeritus.

Eugene A. Hammel, Professor Emeritus. Kinship, social anthropology, stratification, statistical and formal analysis, computer applications, peasant society and culture, demography, Balkans.
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Patrick V. Kirch, Professor Emeritus. Historical anthropology, Oceania, ethnoarchaeology, Melanesia, Polynesia, environmental archaeology, prehistoric agricultural systems, human paleoecology, ethnobotany.
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Herbert P. Phillips, Professor Emeritus.

Jack M. Potter, Professor Emeritus. Anthropology, social anthropology, U.S., Thailand, classical social theory, peasants, change, ethnographic film, China.
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M. Steven Shackley, Professor Emeritus. Northwest Mexico, anthropology, archaeology, North America, geochemical analysis.
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William S. Simmons, Professor Emeritus.

Ruth Tringham, Professor Emeritus. Archaeology, Central European, Eastern European, Mediterranean, Anatolian prehistory, early agriculturalists, neolithic, bronze age, prehistoric architecture, household archaeology, feminist practice of archaeology, multimedia (hypermedia).
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Contact Information

Department of Anthropology

232 Kroeber Hall

Phone: 510-642-3391

Visit Department Website

Program Director

Nancy Scheper-Hughes, PhD

305 Kroeber Hall

Phone: 510-642-8341

nsh@berkeley.edu

Head Graduate Adviser

Stefania Pandolfo, PhD

201 Kroeber Hall

Phone: 510-642-9229

pandolfo@berkeley.edu

Graduate Student Affairs Officer

Ned Garrett

232 Kroeber Hall

Phone: 510-642-3406

ned@berkeley.edu

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