Social Welfare

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

Berkeley Social Welfare educates students for leadership in the field of social welfare and the profession of social work.  Since 1944 we have prepared over 11,000 social work professionals and social work scholars for leadership in a range of research, teaching, advanced practice, and management roles. We offer two graduate degrees: the professional Master of Social Welfare (MSW); and the academic Doctor of Philosophy in Social Welfare (PhD).

Master of Social Welfare (MSW)

Berkeley Social Welfare offers a two-year, full-time program of study leading to the fully accredited Master of Social Welfare (MSW) degree. Students are prepared to practice with specialized skills at specific intervention levels, and are thoroughly grounded in social science knowledge, social welfare policies, and social service organizations. MSW students complete a generalist practice foundation curriculum, and an advanced curriculum in one of five areas of specialized practice, known as concentrations: Aging; Child and Family Services; Community Mental Health; Health; or Management and Planning. All students also complete both a foundation and an advanced agency-based field practicum. Additional special program options include the School Social Work Credential program; a certificate in Social Work with Latinos; and combined master's degree programs with the Goldman School of Public Policy and the School of Public Health.

The PhD in Social Welfare

Berkeley Social Welfare's doctoral program develops scholars who challenge conventional wisdom and make significant contributions to the field of social welfare and the profession of social work through excellent research, teaching, policy development, and administration. Berkeley doctoral students become proficient in research methodology and experts in their area of interest, and ultimately demonstrate scholarly competence by publishing their dissertation. 

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Admissions

Applying to Graduate Study in Social Welfare

All applicants to graduate study in Social Welfare apply online through the Berkeley Graduate Division's Graduate Admissions Office. The School of Social Welfare only admits for the fall semester; applicants can apply for fall admission beginning in September the year before planning to attend. For more information on eligibility requirements, instructions on the application process and a link to the online Graduate Application for Admission and Fellowships, please visit Applying for Graduate Admission.

The School of Social Welfare Admissions Office guides potential graduate applicants through the application process via online resources, admissions advising in-person and by phone advising, group presentations and recruitment events. For more information about our programs, application requirements, admission process, or informational sessions and recruitment events, please visit Berkeley Social Welfare Admissions.

Admission to the MSW Program

To be eligible for admission to the Master of Social Welfare (MSW) Program at Berkeley, applicants must meet all of the following requirements:

  1. Possession of a bachelor’s degree or recognized equivalent from an accredited institution.
  2. A satisfactory scholastic average, generally a minimum grade-point average of B or better (3.0 on a 4-point scale).
  3. Sufficient undergraduate preparation and training for graduate study in social welfare. Applicants for admission to the MSW program must have strong academic preparation in the liberal arts and sciences, including coursework in the social and behavioral sciences.
  4. A course in introductory statistics, research methods, or quantitative reasoning. This requirement must be satisfied prior to matriculation if you are offered admission.
  5. The equivalent of one full year of paid or voluntary experience related to social welfare or human services. For applicants to the Management and Planning (MAP) Concentration, the recommended minimum experience requirement is two years.
  6. For international applicants from a country or political entity where English is not the official language, a satisfactory score on the TOEFL exam or other acceptable equivalent evidence of English language proficiency to do graduate work is required.
  7. Applicants to joint master’s degree programs (e.g., MSW/MPH; MSW/MPP) and the Combined MSW/PhD Program must meet eligibility requirements for and admissions standards of both programs, including any examination requirements (GRE, etc.) of other programs. The GRE is not required for the MSW-only program. 

Admission to the PhD Program

Berkeley Social Welfare prefers applicants who hold a master's degree in social work or social welfare, or have comparable preparation in a closely related field; and who show evidence of intellectual and other qualifications essential to successful doctoral study. Applicants must possess the intellectual qualifications essential to successful performance in the program, and in reviewing applications we seek to determine whether the applicant’s particular objectives can be met in our doctoral program at Berkeley.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Social Welfare

To be granted the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Social Welfare, students must satisfy all of the following requirements:

  1. Complete a course of study in the school and related departments of the University specified by the school, designed to achieve proficiency in the areas of social work theory, social welfare policy and/or administration, history and philosophies of social welfare, and social research methods.
  2. Pass qualifying examinations indicating proficiency in the areas mentioned above.
  3. Pass an oral examination before a committee appointed in accordance with rules of the Graduate Council.
  4. Be admitted to candidacy for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy according to procedures established by the Academic Senate.
  5. Complete a dissertation dealing with some problem of significance to the field of social welfare and of such character as to show power to prosecute independent investigation.
  6. Spend a minimum of at least two years of graduate study in residence at the University of California, Berkeley.
Minimum Total Unit Requirement

There is no total unit requirement for the PhD degree in Social Welfare, but doctoral students must enroll full-time (12 units/semester, no more than 4 of which may be earned by working as a graduate student researcher or graduate student instructor) until taking and passing the qualifying exam.

Required Coursework

Doctoral coursework includes seminars in research methods, statistics, theory, and other related course; along with individual tutorials with members of the faculty. Doctoral students are required to complete a series of statistics courses during their first two years in the program, as outlined below.

Required Courses for the Social Welfare PhD
PB HLTH 142Introduction to Probability and Statistics in Biology and Public Health4
or EDUC 293A Data Analysis in Education Research
PB HLTH 145Statistical Analysis of Continuous Outcome Data4
or EDUC 275B Data Analysis in Educational Research II
PB HLTH 241Statistical Analysis of Categorical Data (or comparable course in another department)4
SOC WEL 279Seminar in the History and Philosophy of Social Welfare2
SOC WEL 287Research Resources and Processes2
SOC WEL 289AResearch Methods and Techniques in Social Welfare4
SOC WEL 295Dissertation Seminar2
AT LEAST ONE Additional Elective in Qualitative or Quantitative Research
AT LEAST ONE Additional Elective in Social Science Theory
Qualifying Examination

The qualifying examination is a three-hour oral exam assessing mastery of the student's chosen fields of study, and written materials submitted for the examination. It is conducted by a committee of five faculty members proposed by the student and approved by the Graduate Division. When passed, this examination marks completion of required course work, mastery of the fields of study, and advancement to candidacy.

Dissertation

Once advanced to candidacy, doctoral students pursue a research agenda that will offer an original contribution to knowledge in the field. The dissertation is the final demonstration of scholarly, research, and professional abilities. Upon final signature of approval by the dissertation committee and submission to the Graduate Division, students are awarded the doctoral degree.

Master's Degree Requirements (MSW)

Requirements for the Master of Social Welfare (MSW) Degree

To be eligible for conferral of the Master of Social Welfare (MSW) degree, students must satisfy all of the following requirements:

  1. Minimum Total Unit Requirement:  A minimum total of 54 units is required for the MSW degree, at least half of which must be from graduate level coursework (courses numbered 200-299). One unit of graduate credit typically requires a minimum of three hours per week of effort on the part of the student, including time spent in class, in the field, and in reading and other preparation.
  2. Field Education Requirement:  A total of 25 units of field education are required for graduation, inclusive of all required integrative field seminars and field practicum units earned in agency-based placement.
  3. Social Research Methods Requirement: All MSW students complete a sequence of courses in methods of social research (SOC WEL 282A & SOC WEL 282B), which culminates in a research project to satisfy the Berkeley master’s capstone requirement.
  4. Diversity-Competent Social Work Practice Requirement:  Students must complete an approved course in diversity-competent practice, valued at 2 units or higher.
  5. Elective Requirement:  Students must complete a sufficient number of units in approved, professionally relevant elective course work required to reach the minimum total unit requirement. The number of required courses varies according to concentration area and any chosen special program options, so the number of elective units required in each area will also vary.
  6. Academic Standing Requirement:  To be awarded the MSW degree a student must have maintained a grade point average not lower than 3.0 (B) in all upper division and graduate academic courses undertaken in graduate residence at the University of California.

Plan of Study

The MSW Curriculum

The Berkeley MSW Program is a two-year, full-time program. All students follow a prescribed, full-time (minimum 12 units/semester) program of work, outlined below. Students have the option of taking up to 20.5 units per semester. All MSW students begin their program of study in a generalist practice foundation curriculum in the first semester, and progress sequentially to and through an advanced curriculum in one of five areas of specialized practice, known as concentrations:

  • Aging
  • Child and Family Services
  • Community Mental Health
  • Health Services
  • Management and Planning
Foundations of Social Work

During fall of the first year of study, all MSW students must complete the following courses:

Required Foundation Courses
SOC WEL 200Theories for Multilevel Practice2
SOC WEL 220Introduction to Social Welfare Policy2
SOC WEL 240Historical, Philosophical, and Intellectual Foundations of Social Work2
SOC WEL 241Foundations of Multilevel Practice3
Advanced Practice

During spring of the first year of study, MSW students begin the advanced curriculum in their chosen area of specialized practice.

Required Courses for Specialized Practice in Aging
SOC WEL 210CAging Processes2
SOC WEL 226Social Policy and Gerontology2
SOC WEL 246Direct Practice in Aging Settings2
Required Courses for Specialized Practice in Child and Family Services
SOC WEL 230Social Policy: Children and Families2
SOC WEL 243Direct Practice in Child and Family Settings2
Required Courses for Specialized Practice in Community Mental Health
SOC WEL 205Psychosocial Problems and Psychopathology2
SOC WEL 222Mental Health and Social Policy2
SOC WEL 244Direct Practice in Mental Health Settings2
Required Courses for Specialized Practice in Health Services
SOC WEL 238CHealth Policy--A Social Welfare Perspective2
SOC WEL 245Direct Practice in Health Settings2
Required Courses for Specialized Practice in Management and Planning
SOC WEL 210IGroup, Organizational, and Community Dynamics2
SOC WEL 251Program Development2
SOC WEL 252Program Implementation2
MAP Policy Course Requirement
Advocacy Skills for Social Change: Social Welfare Policy Practice
Mental Health and Social Policy
Social Policy and Gerontology
Social Policy: Children and Families
Health Policy--A Social Welfare Perspective
Field Education

All MSW students must complete a total of 25 field education units, inclusive of agency-based field placement practicum and required integrative field seminar units. Students are generally in field placement sites two days a week in the first year, and three days a week in the second year.

In the first year of study students must complete the following required field education courses:

Required Foundation Field Seminars
SOC WEL 290AFOUNDATION FIELD INTEGRATION SEMINAR2
SOC WEL 290BFoundation Field Integration Seminar II1
Required Foundation Field Practicum
SOC WEL 410AFoundation Field Practicum4
SOC WEL 410BFoundation Field Practicum4

In the second year of study students must complete the following required field education courses:

Required Advanced Field Seminars
SOC WEL 292AADVANCED FIELD INTEGRATION SEMINAR1
SOC WEL 292BAdvanced Field Integration Seminar II1
Required Advanced Field Practicum
SOC WEL 412AAdvanced Field Practicum6
SOC WEL 412BAdvanced Field Practicum6
Social Research Methods

 All MSW students must complete a sequence of courses in methods of social research (research sequence), which culminates in a research project that satisfies the Berkeley master’s degree capstone requirement.  In the second year of study all MSW students must complete the following courses with a grade of B or better:

SOC WEL 282ASeminar in Social Welfare Research2
SOC WEL 282BSeminar in Social Welfare Research2
Diversity-sensitive & Competent Social Work Practice

All MSW students must complete an approved course in diversity-competent practice, valued at 2 units or higher. See Diversity Courses for more information on courses that satisfy this requirement.

Elective Courses

MSW students must complete a sufficient number of units in approved, professionally relevant elective course work required to reach the minimum total unit requirement. Since the number of required courses varies according to area of specialized practice, the total number of elective units required in each area will also vary. See Elective Courses for more information on courses that satisfy this requirement. Some special program options also have additional elective course requirements (see below).

Additional Required Coursework

MSW students pursuing certain special program options have additional coursework requirements as listed below:

Required for Students in the Title IV-E Child Welfare Training Program:
SOC WEL 250NPublic Child Welfare Services2
Required for Students Seeking Credentials in School Social Work:
SOC WEL 232Social Work and Education Policy2
SOC WEL 250TSocial Work Practice in School Settings2
Required for Students Seeking the Social Work with Latinos Certificate
SOC WEL 250JSocial Work with Latino Populations2

Courses

Course descriptions for all Social Welfare courses appear below the following tables.

Diversity Courses

MSW students must complete a course in diversity-competent practice, valued at 2 units or higher. The following courses may be used to satisfy this requirement:

African American Studies
AFRICAM 111Race, Class, and Gender in the United States3
AFRICAM 137Multicultural Communities3
Asian American Studies
ASAMST 131Asian Diaspora(s) from an Asian American Perspective4
Demography
DEMOG 240Human Migration2
Education
EDUC 200DPsychosocial Development: Identity, Culture, and Education3
EDUC 280AProseminar: Sociocultural Critique of Education3
Environmental Science, Policy & Management
ESPM C254Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in Health Status3
ESPM 262Race, Identity, and the Environment3
Gender & Women's Studies
GWS 130ACGender, Race, Nation, and Health4
Native American Studies
NATAMST 149Gender in Native American Society4
Public Health
PB HLTH 202BEthnic and Cultural Diversity in Health Status3
PB HLTH 204FCulture, Public Health Practice, and Eliminating Health Disparities: From Ideas to Action in the 21st Century3
PB HLTH 204GResearch Advances in Health Disparities: Multidisciplinary Perspectives2
PB HLTH 212AInternational Maternal and Child Health2
PB HLTH 212CMigration and Health: A U.S.-Mexico Binational Perspective2-3
PB HLTH 219CCommunity-Based Participatory Research in Public Health3-4
PB HLTH 222AHealth Care Technology Policy2
Sociology
SOCIOL 131ACRace and Ethnic Relations: U.S. American Cultures4
SOCIOL 133Sociology of Gender4
Social Welfare
SOC WEL 250JSocial Work with Latino Populations2
SOC WEL 250KSocial Work and Disability2
SOC WEL 250LHuman Sexuality2
SOC WEL 250MDeath and Dying2
SOC WEL 255Community Organizing2
SOC WEL 260Forensic Social Work2
SOC WEL 274Immigrants and Refugees in the U.S2
SOC WEL 275Diversity-Sensitive and Competent Social Work2
SOC WEL 298Group Study for Graduate Students (Narrative Therapies for Vulnerable Populations)2

Elective Courses

Students must complete a sufficient number of units in professionally relevant elective course work required to reach the minimum total unit requirement. Since the number of required courses varies according to area of specialized practice, the total number of elective units required in each area will also vary. For all students at least 4 elective units must be from the following list of courses that may be used to satisfy this requirement.

African American Studies
AFRICAM 107Race and Public Policy3
Anthropology
ANTHRO 115Introduction to Medical Anthropology4
ANTHRO 149Psychological Anthropology4
ANTHRO 158Religion and Anthropology4
Asian American Studies
ASAMST 141Law in the Asian American Community4
ASAMST 145ACPolitics, Public Policy, and Asian American Communities4
Business Administration
MBA 209FFundamentals of Business3
MBA 292AStrategy and Leadership for Social Impact2,3
MBA 292SSocial Sector Solutions: Social Enterprise3
Chicano Studies
CHICANO 172Chicanos and the Educational System4
CHICANO 174Chicanos, Law, and Criminal Justice4
CHICANO 176Chicanos and Health Care3
City & Regional Planning
CY PLAN 113AEconomic Analysis for Planning3
CY PLAN 115Urbanization in Developing Countries4
CY PLAN 220The Urban and Regional Economy3
CY PLAN 230U.S. Housing, Planning, and Policy3
Demography
DEMOG 220Human Fertility4
Development Practice
DEVP 233Law, Politics, and Policymaking3
Economics
ECON 157Health Economics4
Education
EDUC 114AEarly Development and Education4
EDUC 200ACulture and Cognitive Development: Theoretical Perspectives3
EDUC 200BSocial Development3
EDUC 207CDiagnosis of Human Handicaps4
EDUC 207DAssessment and Education of Exceptional Pupils in Regular Classes2
EDUC 213DEducational Interventions for the School Psychologist3
EDUC 260AIssues in Educational Administration and Policy3
EDUC 261AOrganization Theory in Education and Other Social Services3
Legal Studies
LEGALST 155Government and the Family4
LEGALST 160Punishment, Culture, and Society4
LEGALST 163Adolescence, Crime and Juvenile Justice4
LEGALST 168Sex, Reproduction and the Law4
LEGALST 170Crime and Criminal Justice4
LEGALST 182Law, Politics and Society4
LEGALST 183Psychology of Diversity and Discrimination in American Law4
Native American Studies
NATAMST 101Native American Tribal Governments4
Political Science
POL SCI 171California Politics4
POL SCI 181Public Organization and Administration4
POL SCI 273Urban Politics4
Psychology
PSYCH 130Clinical Psychology3
PSYCH 131Developmental Psychopathology3
PSYCH 141Development During Infancy3
PSYCH 160Social Psychology3
PSYCH 180Industrial-Organizational Psychology3
Public Health
PB HLTH 201FCommunity-Based Research and Interventions to Promote Health: Theory and Methods3
PB HLTH 202GAdvanced Alcohol Research Seminar1
PB HLTH 203ATheories of Health and Social Behavior3
PB HLTH 204DCommunity Organizing and Community Building for Health3,4
PB HLTH 205Program Planning, Development, and Evaluation4
PB HLTH 206BFood and Nutrition Policies and Programs3
PB HLTH 210Maternal and Child Health Specialty Area Core Course3
PB HLTH 212DExpanded Foundations of Global Health2
PB HLTH 213AFamily Planning, Population Change, and Health3
PB HLTH 217CAging and Public Health3
PB HLTH C217DBiological and Public Health Aspects of Alzheimer's Disease3
PB HLTH 218BEvaluation of Health and Social Programs4
PB HLTH 221Mental Health Policies, Programs, and Services2
PB HLTH 221BUnderstanding and Overcoming Health Care Disparities2
PB HLTH 222AHealth Care Technology Policy2
PB HLTH 223CStrategic Management and the Health Sector2,3
PB HLTH 226DGlobal Health Economics3
PB HLTH 255ASocial Epidemiology3
PB HLTH 281Public Health and Spirituality2
Public Policy
PUB POL C164Impact of Government Policies on Poor Children and Families4
PUB POL 220Law and Public Policy4
PUB POL 251Microeconomic Organization and Policy Analysis3
PUB POL 260Public Leadership and Management4
PUB POL 270Kid-First Policy: Family, School, and Community4
PUB POL 280Ethics, Policy, and the Power of Ideas4
Sociology
SOCIOL 111Sociology of the Family4
SOCIOL 140Politics and Social Change4
SOCIOL 150Social Psychology4
SOCIOL 151Personality and Social Structure4
SOCIOL 280AAAdvanced Study in Substantive Sociological Fields: Sociology of Poverty3
SOCIOL 280LAdvanced Study in Substantive Sociological Fields: Gender3
Social Welfare
SOC WEL 205Psychosocial Problems and Psychopathology2
SOC WEL 210AStress and Coping in Adulthood2
SOC WEL 210BInfant Development2
SOC WEL 210CAging Processes2
SOC WEL 210IGroup, Organizational, and Community Dynamics2
SOC WEL 232Social Work and Education Policy2
SOC WEL 236International Social Welfare2
SOC WEL 250ASocial Work with Groups2
SOC WEL 250BFamily Therapy2
SOC WEL 250CBrief Therapy and Crisis Intervention2
SOC WEL 250NPublic Child Welfare Services2
SOC WEL 250PChild Psychopathology: Issues in Assessment and Treatment2
SOC WEL 250TSocial Work Practice in School Settings2
SOC WEL 250USubstance Abuse Treatment2
SOC WEL 250XDomestic Violence: Assessment and Intervention2
SOC WEL 250YInternational Social Development2
SOC WEL 250ZCognitive Behavioral Methods2
SOC WEL 254Advocacy Skills for Social Change: Social Welfare Policy Practice2
SOC WEL 255Community Organizing2
SOC WEL 257Financial Management1
SOC WEL 260Forensic Social Work2
SOC WEL 265HSocial Work Practice in Integrated Behavioral Health Care2
SOC WEL 265MMotivational Interviewing2
SOC WEL 272Health and Human Services in Mexico3
SOC WEL 274Immigrants and Refugees in the U.S2
SOC WEL 275Diversity-Sensitive and Competent Social Work2
SOC WEL 298Group Study for Graduate Students (Narrative Therapies for Vulnerable Populations)1-12

Social Welfare Course Descriptions

SOC WEL 200 Theories for Multilevel Practice 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course examines the foundations of social work practice theories and strategies for connecting theory and practice. It provides an overview of the impact of the social environment, the impact of the “ecology” of human behavior and the way social institutions and practices provide structure over the life course. Practice implications are explored in terms of assessing client social and psychological needs. The course covers biophysical perspectives
, crisis and intervention, cognitive-behavioral theories, systems/ecological frameworks, social psychological theories, social constructionism, humanism and existentialism, critical race and conflict theories, multilevel practice theories, and examination of individual and group differences.
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SOC WEL 205 Psychosocial Problems and Psychopathology 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Developmental abnormalities and deviations which result in dysfunctional behavior in the individual. Examines problems and disorders of children and adults from psychological and social perspectives.

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SOC WEL 210A Stress and Coping in Adulthood 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Descriptions, measurements, and major theories concerning the etiology of stress and coping in the adult (25-60) years.

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SOC WEL 210B Infant Development 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Topics and issues in infant development, including infant mental health, parent-child relationships, behavior assessment, predictors of disturbance, and intervention with high risk infants.

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SOC WEL 210C Aging Processes 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Sociological, psychological, physiological, and cultural factors relevant to understanding the complexity of the aging process. Normative and maladaptive aspects of the aging process are examined in terms of their implications for personal and societal adaptation.

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SOC WEL 210I Group, Organizational, and Community Dynamics 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Course examines theories of group, organization, and community dynamics. Topics include group leadership and decision-making, organizational goals, structure, and change, and community power and demographics.

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SOC WEL 212 Child Development from Infancy to Adolescence in Its Social Context 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017
This course examines the bio-psycho-social development of children and adolescents as a basis for understanding 1) cognitive and affective developments allowing the child to construct individual and social life at increasingly complex levels of differentiation and affiliation; 2) use of developmental levels as paradigms for healthy functioning; 3) a range of childhood experiences impacting well-being and development; and 4) the utility of normal child development
as a heuristic for understanding developmental theories of bio-psycho-social difficulties. Particular focus on issues of self- regulation, internal representation, affect, cognition, relatedness, and separation. All of these themes are illustrated through practice application.
Child Development from Infancy to Adolescence in Its Social Context: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 220 Introduction to Social Welfare Policy 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Analysis of issues in social welfare policy and recent trends shaping the development of the American welfare state.

Introduction to Social Welfare Policy: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 222 Mental Health and Social Policy 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Mental health policies and programs at the national, state, and local levels; major factors influencing the provision of mental health services; reciprocal relationships between mental health policy and social work practice.

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SOC WEL 226 Social Policy and Gerontology 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
U.S. social policy and programs for the aging are analyzed with respect to the knowledge required to assess the needs for societal supports and major issues and trends in the delivery of social services.

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SOC WEL 230 Social Policy: Children and Families 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Introduction to current problems, programs, and policies in child, youth, and family welfare.

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SOC WEL 232 Social Work and Education Policy 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
This course examines the intersection between social work practice and the educational system. It focuses on the school as a social system and the current policy context of education. It presents current topics in educational policy and critically analyzes them from a social work perspective. A focus is placed on the potential roles played not only by school social workers, but the social work profession
in general, in actively collaborating with educational systems to support optimal developmental pathways for children and adolescents.
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SOC WEL W232 Social Work and Education Policy 2 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session
This course examines the intersection between social work practice and the educational system. It focuses on the school as a social system and the current policy context of education. It presents current topics in educational policy and critically analyzes them from a social work perspective. A focus is placed on the potential roles played not only by school social workers, but the social work profession in general, in actively collaborating with
educational systems to support optimal developmental pathways for children and adolescents. The web-based version (SOC WEL W232) is conducted entirely online.
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SOC WEL 236 International Social Welfare 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
This seminar explores key international social welfare issues from the perspective of the globalization of social, economic, and political activities. Although its primary focus is on social policies and social services, attention will also be given to the role of professional social work in the international context. While emphasizing theoretical and analytical issues, practical and professional matters with particular reference to social
work and social development will also be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to acquire knowledge of international social welfare activities as well as the analytical skills to address and debate complex international issues.
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SOC WEL 238C Health Policy--A Social Welfare Perspective 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Reviews major issues and programs in the health care field. Course considers the social context of health care; the roles of the public, voluntary, and private sectors; and the implications of policies and programs for society and the individual client.

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SOC WEL 240 Historical, Philosophical, and Intellectual Foundations of Social Work 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Introduction to masters-level education in social work and to the intellectual, historical, sociopolitical, and ethical foundations of the U.S. social work profession. Through examination of the profession’s framing values, history, contextual influences, and current directions in a global society, students will begin to develop an orientation to practice, research, and policy-making informed by professional ethics and obligations and anchored
in a commitment to plurality and social justice. Students will be oriented to social work professional ethics and ethical decision-making, and to social justice as the framing value for social work practice.
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SOC WEL 241 Foundations of Multilevel Practice 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course is designed to introduce generalist skills and knowledge for social work practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities, within a framework of social work's core values and fundamental practice responsibilities. These core values include social justice and client empowerment. A generalist approach to understanding fundamental practice responsibilities includes cultural responsiveness, commitment to professional
competence, and demonstration of practice effectiveness.
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SOC WEL 243 Direct Practice in Child and Family Settings 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Direct intervention models for addressing the behavioral, emotional, and situational problems of children and families in child welfare, mental health, medical, school, and community settings.

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SOC WEL 244 Direct Practice in Mental Health Settings 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Planning, implementing, and evaluating services for clients with major mental disorders or at risk of developing mental illness. Review of intervention models addressing the needs of clients for basic resources, social rehabilitation, and clinical treatment.

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SOC WEL 245 Direct Practice in Health Settings 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Examines the range of therapeutic modalities used by social workers in health care; the interaction of health care policies and practices; interdisciplinary issues; and the ethical dimensions of practice.

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SOC WEL 246 Direct Practice in Aging Settings 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Clinical case management with older adults. Comprehensive multidimensional assessment, advocacy and empowerment, and the range of direct intervention models for addressing the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial concerns of older adults and their families.

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SOC WEL 250A Social Work with Groups 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Theory and practice regarding the formation, sustenance, and termination of groups. Emphasis on the role of the social worker in facilitating inter-personal processes in groups.

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SOC WEL 250B Family Therapy 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Theoretical frameworks and intervention skills for family work.

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SOC WEL 250C Brief Therapy and Crisis Intervention 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2014
Examines the clinical application of crisis intervention and brief psychotherapy from an historic and psychodynamic perspective. Provides assessment criteria for assignment to these forms of treatment and techniques for intervention.

Brief Therapy and Crisis Intervention: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 250J Social Work with Latino Populations 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
This graduate-level course prepares social workers in training and students in allied fields to provide culturally sensitive and competent services to members of major U.S. Latino populations. The course is designed to enhance cultural sensitivity by using multiple relevant social science theories and frameworks to teach about social and cultural experiences of U.S. Latinos; to enhance culturally competent practice skills by teaching a comprehensive
Latino practice model; and to provide a selective review of best/promising practices for various psychosocial and health problems within Latino populations. Latino diversity is addressed from a social justice perspective, emphasizing undocumented Latinos and immigration policy issues.
Social Work with Latino Populations: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 250K Social Work and Disability 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2012, Spring 2011
Using a theoretical framework grounded in the values of self-determination, dignity, and respect, this course will address issues in the disabilities field including demographics, etiology, policy and programs, and the disability resources network. Practice skills in communications, assessment, and micro- and macro-level intervention will be reviewed.

Social Work and Disability: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 250L Human Sexuality 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
This course will provide a forum for the exploration of multiple issues related to human sexuality and the diversity of sexual experience, including the human sexual response cycle; childhood and adolescent sexuality development; sexual problems, causes and treatment approaches (including systems approaches to working with couples); sexual orientation and gender identity development; sexuality and living with a disability; sexual violence and
consent; sexuality and HIV/AIDS; and the law and ethics related to professional sexual misconduct and boundary violations. Teaching methods will include interactive lecture, small group discussions, video presentations, and guest speakers from throughout the Bay Area who specialize in a range of sexuality issues.
Human Sexuality: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 250M Death and Dying 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2014
This course explores death and dying from a variety of perspectives: psychological, philosophical, cultural, spiritual, and phenomenological. Emphasis is placed on understanding the experiences of dying persons and their loved ones, as well as the interplay between the process of dying and the process of living. Implications for social work interventions are discussed. This course is both academic and experiential, relying on a wide variety of
materials: autobiography, fiction, scholarly and theoretical writings, case examples, films, poetry, and guest lectures.
Death and Dying: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 250N Public Child Welfare Services 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course is designed for students preparing for careers in public child welfare. Addresses the range of documentation required for legal purposes, practice issues for social workers within the court setting, and skills required in presenting testimony.

Public Child Welfare Services: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 250P Child Psychopathology: Issues in Assessment and Treatment 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
Course surveys assessment and empirically based treatment approaches to various psychosocial problems in childhood and adolescence. Specific emphasis is placed on internalizing and externalizing disorders. Course is taught using a development psychopathological framework. Students must possess a working knowledge of DSM-IV-TR nosology.

Child Psychopathology: Issues in Assessment and Treatment: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 250T Social Work Practice in School Settings 2 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Fall 2016, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
This course (1) provides students with an understanding of how current educational policies and practices impact the day-to-day lives of academically and socially vulnerable students; (2) builds student skills in identifying and selecting the multiple points of intervention relevant to social work practice in schools, including individual intervention with children, family intervention, building links
between families and school staff, advocacy, classroom-based intervention, and collaboration with teachers; and (3) presents assessment and intervention strategies guided by an ecosystemic and resilience perspective which focus on student and family strengths and suggests multiple intervention options.
Social Work Practice in School Settings: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 250U Substance Abuse Treatment 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
Course provides an introductory overview of various theories and methodologies currently used in the diagnosis and treatment of substance abuse disorders. Though the bulk of the course will be devoted to the disease model and corresponding interventions, some attention will be given to prevention and epidemiology. Emphasis will be placed on the unique practice role of social work in the prevention/intervention of substance abuse problems.

Substance Abuse Treatment: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 250X Domestic Violence: Assessment and Intervention 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
This practice-oriented course will teach graduate level social work students how to engage, assess, and intervene effectively with individuals, families, and children impacted by intimate partner violence. We will review the scope, impact, and causes of the problem; relevant screening and assessment skills; effective clinical intervention paradigms and techniques for victims, perpetrators, and children; and future directions. Significant time will
be devoted to examining this problem in disadvantaged and diverse populations and, identifying emotional coping strategies for the developing clinician.
Domestic Violence: Assessment and Intervention: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 250Y International Social Development 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
This seminar focuses on the theory and practice of social development and, in particular, engages members of the seminar in an analysis of the social development practice strategies that are now widely used in community settings not only in the developing but in the western countries as well. The course is primarily designed for MSW students who have an interest in issues of development and international social welfare, but doctoral and undergraduate
students may enroll.
International Social Development: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 250Z Cognitive Behavioral Methods 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
The purpose of this course is to increase students' understanding of and competencies in cognitive-behavior methods. Throughout the course practice decisions and related research will be closely integrated. Although further guided experience will be needed to develop high levels of related skills, especially concerning assessment and relationship factors as these are needed to maximize success, students will have the opportunity to develop
a beginning understanding of basic behavior principles.
Cognitive Behavioral Methods: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 251 Program Development 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This is a required practice course for students in the Management and Planning concentration. Using a community-based service delivery framework, the purpose of the course is to provide the competency and skill set necessary for effective program design including task group management, community engagement, and collaborative resource development. The course will focus on designing community-wide interventions in a diverse society through analyzing
social problems, identifying community capacities and needs, developing effectiveness-based programs, and conducting evaluation.
Program Development: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 252 Program Implementation 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This required Management and Planning practice course builds upon the conceptual and critical thinking skills found in the foundation MAP courses in order to focus on strategic management and leading skills in this course. It is designed to introduce students to the distinctive role of the manager in public and nonprofit human service organizations. Drawing on the management sciences and social work practice in administration, this seminar-style
course focuses on a range of managerial processes with special attention to the analytical and interpersonal aspects of program implementation. The course is built upon the three domains identified in research on program management: leadership roles; analytic roles; and interactional roles.
Program Implementation: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 254 Advocacy Skills for Social Change: Social Welfare Policy Practice 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Course introduces the practice of social welfare policy making. Focusing on the California State Legislature, students in the first half of the course are taught policy analysis skills, lobbying, testifying, working with legislators, legislative staff, and the media, and forwarding a policy agenda. In the second half of the course, students examine the internal environment of agency change, address the use of management information systems
and outcomes measurement as strategies for information collection, and learn skills for effectively using information to improve agency decision making.
Advocacy Skills for Social Change: Social Welfare Policy Practice: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 255 Community Organizing 2 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Introduction to the theory and practice of community organization.

Community Organizing: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 257 Financial Management 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course provides both theoretical knowledge and practical skills for managing scarce resources in social service organizations. Students will learn tools and techniques for effective planning and budgeting as well as how to design information systems to control, evaluate, and revise plans. Accounting principles and systems will be examined from a management perspective with an emphasis on designing systems to meet the unique management
information needs of different organizations. The use and development of internal and external financial statements will be covered. Students will learn the tools and techniques of financial statement analysis, interpretation, and presentation. The course is designed to develop the core financial management skills needed by senior and middle managers in large and small social service organizations.
Financial Management: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 260 Forensic Social Work 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Focuses on issues arising within the practice of forensic social work in correctional settings (jails, prisons, and probation and parole departments), especially practice with people whose social positions and/or mental health struggles render them disproportionately affected by incarceration. Uses a person-in-environment perspective to explore the phenomenology of corrections, paying particular attention to the intersection of social identities
and psychological capacities among individuals who are incarcerated, the complexities of the systems within which social workers attempt to create change, and the historical and contemporary role of incarceration in the United States.
Forensic Social Work: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 265H Social Work Practice in Integrated Behavioral Health Care 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Summer 2014 First 6 Week Session
Students in this practice course will be introduced to the foundation of integrated behavioral health practice, including population-based screening instruments and functional assessment for use in primary care. Students will become familiar with primary care medical culture and psychopharmacological interventions for depression and anxiety. A main emphasis of this class is skill acquisition in evidence-based behavioral interventions
for a variety of conditions commonly seen in IBH settings. These include: behavioral activation, mindfulness relaxation strategies, sleep-hygiene techniques, and problem solving treatment
Social Work Practice in Integrated Behavioral Health Care: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 265M Motivational Interviewing 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Motivational interviewing (MI) is a modern clinical paradigm that dialectically integrates humanistic, client-centered principles with goal-focused strategies. Students in this course will be introduced to all key aspects of MI including its major tenets, its theoretical base, the available empirical evidence on its efficacy, and its overall compatibility with social work. Moreover, students will learn all of the associated clinical skills
for the four processes of motivational interviewing: 1) engaging; 2) focusing; 3) evoking; and 4) deciding and planning.
Motivational Interviewing: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 272 Health and Human Services in Mexico 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 8 Week Session
This service learning course is a comprehensive, integrated learning program conducted in Mexico. Through continuous cross-cultural immersion, Latino and non-Latino social work students build language skills; study culturally informed and derived engagement and intervention practices; and acquire competencies relevant to preparation for providing social welfare services to Latino clients. Ultimately
, social work students will gain a transnational perspective that will shape their approach to providing services to Latino communities in the U.S. Includes lectures given by local academics, mental health professionals, community members and indigenous healers; language instruction; field placement/service learning; and an integration seminar.
Health and Human Services in Mexico: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 274 Immigrants and Refugees in the U.S 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Fall 2013
Overview of immigration policy in the U.S. from an international and historical perspective. Theories of migration, transnationalism, and adaptation will be addressed, along with skills required for working with refugees and immigrants facing difficulties. Addresses the impact of policy on who comes to the U.S. and the circumstances newcomers and their families face once here.

Immigrants and Refugees in the U.S: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 275 Diversity-Sensitive and Competent Social Work 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Course prepares students to understand, provide, and evaluate diversity-sensitive social work services. The course (1) builds sensitivity to human diversity by addressing multiple status dimensions (race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, social class, etc.), (2) involves students in the process of diversity sensitization through experience self-reflection and interactive exercises, and (3) promotes diversity competent practice skills.

Diversity-Sensitive and Competent Social Work: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 279 Seminar in the History and Philosophy of Social Welfare 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Primarily for doctoral students. A review of efforts to conceptualize the field of social welfare and to analyze its tendencies.

Seminar in the History and Philosophy of Social Welfare: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 280 Introduction to Social Welfare Research 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
Introduction to the theory and practice of research in social welfare.

Introduction to Social Welfare Research: Read More [+]

SOC WEL W280 Introduction to Social Welfare Research 2 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 8 Week Session
The goal of this course is to develop a working knowledge of research designs and methods for the purpose of evaluating social work practice and programs.

Introduction to Social Welfare Research: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 282A Seminar in Social Welfare Research 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Problem formulation, design, and implementation.

Seminar in Social Welfare Research: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 282B Seminar in Social Welfare Research 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Problem formulation, design, and implementation.

Seminar in Social Welfare Research: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 287 Research Resources and Processes 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Students will be introduced to the tasks and tools of library research in social welfare, including reference works, bibliographic aids, and computer databases. Individual faculty members will present their research, emphasizing methodology, outcomes, and contributions to social welfare.

Research Resources and Processes: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 289A Research Methods and Techniques in Social Welfare 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course provides doctoral students a firm foundation in research processes and methods. Topics include problem formulation, use of theory, conceptualization, measurement, causal inference, sampling, and design methods. A core goal is to provide insight into the opportunities and challenges social work researchers face as they apply social science and related theory and methods to real world problems and settings. Course activities will
guide students to future coursework in research methodologies and analysis, as well as position paper and dissertation proposal development. Sessions combine a focus on the conceptual and technical aspects of the research process and consider issues across quantitative and qualitative approaches.
Research Methods and Techniques in Social Welfare: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 290A FOUNDATION FIELD INTEGRATION SEMINAR 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016
Integrative seminar designed to augment and strengthen student experiential learning capacities in the context of agency-based field practicum training. Students participate in a wide array of activities and discussions to cultivate self-reflection and develop an enduring sense of authentic professional identity. Students will learn how to engage in peer-based validation, support, and corrective feedback, and examine how to strategically approach learning in agency
contexts in order to become professionally competent and creative social workers. To become more knowledgeable advocates for a range of communities and social concerns, students will examine a wide range of practice dilemmas and challenges in which divergent experiences matter.
FOUNDATION FIELD INTEGRATION SEMINAR: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 290B Foundation Field Integration Seminar II 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2017
Continuation of integrative seminar exploring field placement issues and common agency and practice-based concerns. Run as a consultation group, this seminar encourages students to draw from a wide range of academic, field, and life experiences, to pose questions to and learn from one another, and to continue to examine how to strategically approach competency-based professional learning in agency contexts. Students are guided to deepen learning from assigned field
placement tasks and academic coursework by participating effectively in peer consultation. The spring semester seminar also supports students as they engage in the second year placement process.
Foundation Field Integration Seminar II: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 291 Preparing for an Academic Career in Social Work 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2013
This 2 unit seminar is intended for doctoral colleagues who are preparing to embark on a career as social work scholars and educators. The seminar is designed to facilitate an understanding of the nature of research universities and the role of social work education in these universities. It focuses on preparing doctoral colleagues for academic positions within research universities, and to understand their roles and expectations with regard to scholarship, teaching
and service. It seeks to acquaint them with the evolution of professional social work education, with particular reference to research universities and to discuss current topics, issues and concerns in the field.
Preparing for an Academic Career in Social Work: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 292A ADVANCED FIELD INTEGRATION SEMINAR 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2016
Advanced Field Integration Seminar provides a cohort-based learning community for 2nd-year MSW students as they develop leadership skills in the advanced field practicum. This advanced seminar deepens students’ abilities to critically appraise and function effectively in organizational contexts. Students use self-reflection, foundation and specialty knowledge domains, and analytical thinking to identify complex, problem-solving approaches with the overall goal of providing
evidence-informed, quality services to clients and communities. Students take increasing responsibility for planning, facilitating, and evaluating the seminar, allowing for deep discussion of relevant, advanced topics and advancing student group facilitation skills.
ADVANCED FIELD INTEGRATION SEMINAR: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 292B Advanced Field Integration Seminar II 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2017
Continuation of 2nd-year integrative seminar, providing opportunities to gain a sense of consolidation and closure, and to transition into the role of entry-level professional. Students will continue to take responsibility for planning, facilitating, and evaluating the seminar, including facilitating and evaluating advanced topical conversations identified by the cohort with guidance from the seminar instructor. This will allow for deep discussion of relevant, advanced
topics and advance student skills in group facilitation. Students will identify strategies for lifelong learning and developing a strong professional support base.
Advanced Field Integration Seminar II: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 293 Social Welfare Theory: Policy Implications 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2012
The course deals primarily with macro-theories of a sociological and political-economy nature that offer 1) conceptual representations of welfare systems, 2) explanations of the dynamics and functions of welfare systems, and 3) analyses and assessments of the different normative perspectives that inform policy making in social welfare. The latter aspect is given particular emphasis and the major normative theoretical perspectives in the field
will be reviewed with reference to their policy implications for social welfare in the United States. The major theoretical perspectives to be discussed include institutionalism, welfare pluralism, neo-liberalism, Marxism, traditionalism, regulationism, critical theory, multiculturalism, feminism, ecologism, and developmentalism. This course is designed for doctoral students but is open to other qualified graduate students with instructor permission.
Social Welfare Theory: Policy Implications: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 295 Dissertation Seminar 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2012
The purpose of this seminar is (1) to develop research skills by integrating issues of research design with measurement, data analysis, and report writing, and (2) to prepare students for their dissertation research by directly addressing issues related to the development of a dissertation prospectus.

Dissertation Seminar: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 296 Individual Study for Graduate Students 1 - 12 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Designed to permit qualified graduate students to pursue special study in a subject area of their choosing under the direction of a faculty member.

Individual Study for Graduate Students: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 298 Group Study for Graduate Students 1 - 12 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Intensive examination of selected social welfare topics.

Group Study for Graduate Students: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 299 Individual Research for Graduate Students 1 - 12 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Designed to permit qualified graduate students to pursue research in a subject area of their choosing under the direction of a faculty member.

Individual Research for Graduate Students: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 301 Training in Teaching 1 - 6 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Supervised teaching assistance.

Training in Teaching: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 375 Teaching in Social Welfare 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Interactive seminar that prepares doctoral students for teaching in social welfare. Includes examination of education from the perspective of both student and teacher, and their interface. It reviews philosophies and theories of adult education, and underscores the importance of critical reflection for both teacher and student. The course covers the practice of teaching in social welfare, and addresses specific skills, such as syllabus design
, instructional methods, coverage of diversity content, student assignment and evaluation, use of technology, advising, mentoring, and working with students with special needs. Students will share their own learning and teaching experiences, and develop the beginnings of a teaching portfolio.
Teaching in Social Welfare: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 401 Field Practicum 1 - 10 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Supervised field work in social agencies and university-based group meetings.

Field Practicum: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 403 Training in Research 1 - 6 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Supervised research assistance.

Training in Research: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 410A Foundation Field Practicum 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016
The foundation field practicum advances the experiential learning capacities and professional competencies of first year MSW students. Students are placed in an approved field internship placement setting for two days a week with an agency-based field instructor. Available placements provide a range of generalist learning opportunities along all phases of the intervention cycle (engagement, assessment, intervention, and/or evaluation) and various levels of the social
ecology (individuals, families, groups, and/or communities). These opportunities allow the student to practice, receive observationally-based feedback, refine professional competencies, and ultimately, have their competencies assessed.
Foundation Field Practicum: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 410B Foundation Field Practicum 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017
The foundation field practicum advances the experiential learning capacities and professional competencies of first year MSW students. Students are placed in an approved field internship placement setting for two days a week with an agency-based field instructor. Available placements provide a range of generalist learning opportunities along all phases of the intervention cycle (engagement, assessment,intervention, and/or evaluation) and various levels of the social
ecology (individuals, families, groups, and/or communities). These opportunities allow the student to practice, receive observational-based feedback, refine professional competencies, and ultimately, have their competencies assessed.
Foundation Field Practicum: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 412A Advanced Field Practicum 6 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016
Advanced Field Practicum advances the experiential learning capacities, professional competencies, and leadership capacities of second year MSW students. Available placements provide a range of complex learning opportunities along various phases of the intervention cycle; at various levels of the social ecology; and meet specific concentration-based standards. Students in Advanced Field Practicum generally assume a higher degree of professional responsibility for clinical
care and/or administrative projects. These opportunities allow the student to practice, receive observational-based feedback, refine professional competencies, and have professional competencies assessed.
Advanced Field Practicum: Read More [+]

SOC WEL 412B Advanced Field Practicum 6 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017
Advanced Field Practicum advances the experiential learning capacities, professional competencies, and leadership capacities of second year MSW students. Available placements provide a range of complex learning opportunities along various phases of the intervention cycle; at various levels of the social ecology; and meet specific concentration-based standards. , Students in Advanced Field Practicum generally assume a higher degree of professional responsibility for
clinical care and/or administrative projects, especially in the spring semester. These opportunities allow the student to practice, receive observational-based feedback, and refine professional competencies, and ultimately, for their competencies to be assessed.
Advanced Field Practicum: Read More [+]

Faculty and Instructors

Faculty

Adrian Aguilera, Assistant Professor. Culture and SES and mental health, mental health services research in low-income populations, Latino & minority mental health, health disparities, cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression, mobile technology (mHealth) and mental health, digital health.
Research Profile

Michael J. Austin, Professor. Strategic planning, social welfare, social service management, organizational development.
Research Profile

Jill Duerr Berrick, Professor. Family policy, child and family poverty, child abuse and neglect, foster care, kinship care, Child welfare services.
Research Profile

Julian Chow, Professor. East Asian studies, social welfare, community practice and service delivery in urban poverty, ethnic, and immigrant neighborhoods, community analysis and needs assessment, program planning and development, and cultural competency services.
Research Profile

Jeffrey Edleson, Professor. Program evaluation, family violence, child maltreatment, engaging men, violence prevention.
Research Profile

Neil Gilbert, Professor. Social welfare, comparative welfare state analysis, child welfare, evaluation research, family policy, social security.
Research Profile

Anu Gomez, Assistant Professor. Reproductive health, violence against women, health disparities.
Research Profile

James Midgley, Professor. Development, social development, social policy, community development, International social welfare, global poverty and inequality.
Research Profile

Kurt C. Organista, Professor. Social welfare, race/ethnicity, HIV prevention, social behavior.
Research Profile

Tina K. Sacks, Assistant Professor.

Andrew E. Scharlach, Professor. Aging, social welfare, family issues, aging-friendly communities, long-term care policies.
Research Profile

Steven P. Segal, Professor. Psychiatry, methodology, social welfare, mental health and social policy.
Research Profile

Valerie Shapiro, Assistant Professor. Social work, prevention, mental health, intervention, effective, preventive, sustainability, adoption, community, coalition, collaboration, strength, school, assessment, screening, resilience, translation, dissemination, implementation, doctoral, education, communities that care, social emotional, youth, children, DESSA.
Research Profile

Jennifer Skeem, Professor. Psychology, mental health, criminal justice, risk assessment, intervention.
Research Profile

Paul R. Sterzing, Assistant Professor.

Susan Irene Stone, Associate Professor. School-based psycho-social services, school-effects, archival data analysis.
Research Profile

Field Consultants

Robert H. Ayasse, Field Consultant.

Luna Calderon, Field Consultant.

Andrea I. Dubrow, Field Consultant.

Christina Feliciana, Field Consultant.

Susana C. Fong, Field Consultant.

Jennifer L. Jackson, Field Consultant.

Gregory S. Merrill, Field Consultant.

Catharine J. Ralph, Field Consultant.

Lecturers

Sarah Accomazzo, Lecturer.

Claudia L. Albano, Lecturer.

Jamie Bachman, Lecturer.

Sevaughn Banks, Lecturer.

Caroline R. Cangelosi, Lecturer.

Eveline Chang, Lecturer.

Elizabeth Horevitz, Lecturer.

Barbara L. Ivins, Lecturer.

Jennifer Lawson, Lecturer.

Richard J. Nizzardini, Lecturer.

Amanda E. Reiman, Lecturer.

John Peter Shields, Lecturer.

Stanley B. Taubman, Lecturer.

Keshia Williams, Lecturer.

Emeritus Faculty

Anne-Therese Ageson, Professor Emeritus.

Bari Cornet, Professor Emeritus.

Eileen Gambrill, Professor Emeritus. Social welfare, professional ethics and education, social learning theory, behavioral methods.
Research Profile

Jewelle T. Gibbs, Professor Emeritus.

Bart Grossman, Professor Emeritus.

Rafael Herrera, Professor Emeritus.

Ralph M. Kramer, Professor Emeritus.

Peter G. Manoleas, Professor Emeritus.

Mary Ann Mason, Professor Emeritus. Law, social welfare, family and children policy.
Research Profile

Lorraine T. Midanik, Professor Emeritus. Social welfare, research methodology, health behavior and policy.
Research Profile

Leonard S. Miller, Professor Emeritus.

Henry Miller, Professor Emeritus.

Robert Pruger, Professor Emeritus.

William M. Runyan, Professor Emeritus. Human behavior, social welfare, life history.
Research Profile

Paul Terrell, Professor Emeritus.

Yu-Wen Ying, Professor Emeritus. Social welfare, race/ethnicity, immigrant and refugee family relationships, mental health disorders.
Research Profile

Contact Information

School of Social Welfare

120 Haviland Hall

Phone: 510-642-4341

Fax: 510-643-6126

socialwelfare@berkeley.edu

Visit School Website

Dean

Jeffrey Edelson, PhD

swdean@berkeley.edu

Director of Admissions & Student Affairs

Robert Teague, MSSW

bteague@berkeley.edu

Director of Career & Professional Development

Emerald Templeton, MS

etempleton@berkeley.edu

Graduate Programs & Admissions Adviser

Joshua Dullaghan, MS-MFCC

120 Haviland Hall

Phone: 510-642-4406

jdullaghan@berkeley.edu

Social Welfare Faculty & Staff Directory

Please see:

http://socialwelfare.berkeley.edu/people

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