Art History

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

History of Art Major Program

The Major in History of Art is designed to give students solid grounding in the artistic traditions, practices, and contexts that comprise historical and contemporary visuality. Equally it introduces the discipline’s history, methods, and debates. It prepares students to do independent research, to evaluate evidence, to create coherent and sustained arguments, and to develop skills in academic writing. In a series of increasingly focused courses — lower division, upper division, seminar, and honors program — the major provides a format for students to learn how to analyze and interpret visual, material, and textual evidence from specific cultural settings and historical circumstances. Major requirements are also designed to maximize exposure to different historical periods, geographical regions, and topics, while allowing flexibility for students to pursue specific interests by selecting a Focus of Study.

Declaring the Major

To declare the major in the History of Art Department, a student must complete two courses taught in the department and receive a grade of C- or higher in each course. All subsequent courses a student wishes to apply to the major must also receive a grade of C- or higher. Once these prerequisites are met, students may formally petition to declare the major by making an appointment with an Undergraduate Adviser at any time during the fall and spring semesters. (Students in residence at UC Berkeley are strongly urged to complete all lower division requirements and one upper division course by the end of their sophomore year.) Transfer students should plan to take two history of art courses in their first semester.

Majors who declare early, especially in the sophomore year, enjoy several advantages:

1. A more thorough preparation for seminars and time to study more closely with several members of the faculty.

2. Greater flexibility in coordinating major requirements with College of Letters & Science (L&S) requirements and in planning a sequence of courses that allows for special courses or programs of study, e.g., study abroad, curatorial internships, independent study, a double-major, and the honors program.

3. Time for a generally higher level of study in the senior year, and opportunity to experiment with and prepare for diverse career opportunities.

Honors Program

Students with at least a 3.7 grade point average (GPA) in the History of Art major are eligible for admission into the honors program. Candidates for honors in History of Art are required to complete satisfactorily, within their senior year, an honors thesis consisting of at least two semesters of continuing academic work under faculty supervision (usually a seminar, directed research, or independent study course in the first semester plus, in the second semester, HISTART H195).  Those who have completed the program will graduate with honors, high honors, or highest honors in the major depending upon their final GPA in all upper division courses taken to fulfill the major requirements. Please see the department's honors program webpage for further information.

Minor Program

The minor program in the History of Art Department is designed to provide a structured and broad program for those students majoring in other disciplines but with a strong interest in the history of art. For information regarding declaring the minor, please contact the department.

Visit Department Website

Major Requirements

In addition to the University, campus, and college requirements, listed on the College Requirements tab, students must fulfill the below requirements specific to their major program.

The History of Art Major Program (41-52 units)

I. Lower Division Requirements (4 courses)

A. Three History of Art Courses (9-12 units)

Majors must complete 9 to 12 units of lower division course work in the History of Art Department. These units may come from courses taken in the department, courses taken at other institutions granted transfer credit for the major by the department, or from AP Art History (score of 4 or 5). Courses that qualify for lower division requirements include:

4 unit lecture courses: HISTART 10 HISTART 11, HISTART 34, HISTART 35, HISTART 51, HISTART 62, etc.
3 unit lecture courses.

Additional requirement: These three courses must include one course in Western art and one course in non-Western art.

B. One Art Practice/Materials Course (2-4 units)

Students must complete 2, 3, or 4 units in a course that introduces specific art making practices and/or the study of the materials of art. This course must be approved in advance by an undergraduate adviser in the History of Art Department. It may be taken P/NP. Applicable courses are typically offered in the Practice of Art Department, College of Environmental Design, and program in New Media Studies. Students may also take courses that involve the making of art occasionally taught in the department.

II. Upper Division Requirements (7 or 8 courses)

In their upper division coursework in History of Art (total 26-28 units; 8 of these units in seminars), each student must take courses in four of the following five geographical areas and one course in each of the chronological periods.

Geographical: 
  1. Europe and the Mediterranean 
  2. Asia and the Pacific 
  3. The Americas 
  4. Middle East and Africa
  5. Transcultural
Chronological:
  1. Prehistoric-1200
  2. 1200-1800
  3. 1800-present

Upper division lecture courses (3 or 4 units) and seminars (2 or 4 units) may fulfill these breadth requirements. Upper division classes (lecture or seminar) can fulfill both a geographical requirement and a chronological requirement.

A. Five Lecture Courses (18-20 units)

Up to two of these courses may be 3 unit courses.

B. Seminars (8 units)

Students in the major are required to complete 8 units of seminar study, of which 4 units (incorporating a research paper component) must be in their Focus of Study. The remaining 4 units may be taken as follows:

A second 4-unit seminar with research paper.

Or

Two 2-unit seminars without research papers. Individual faculty members will decide when a given seminar can be taken for 2 units. Two-unit seminars require active participation and completion of weekly readings and writing assignments. Four-unit seminars add a final research paper.

III. Additional Requirements (1 or 2 courses)

A. Theories/Methods Course (4 units)

All students in the major are required to take either HISTART 100 or HISTART 101. These courses, offered in fall and spring semesters, focus on historiography and theoretical/philosophical models in the History of Art, on practical methods of art historical inquiry, or a combination thereof. Students should take HISTART 100 or HISTART 101 early in their work in the major. We encourage students intending to pursue graduate training in the History of Art or related disciplines to take both courses.

B. Upper Division Course Outside the Department (3 or 4 units)

Required only for students who declared prior to Fall 2017.

Students must take, for a letter grade, one upper division lecture course or seminar in another department. The course should support each student's Focus of Study in art history. It must be approved in advance by an Undergraduate Faculty Advisor in History of Art. Courses that may be approved are typically offered by Arts and Humanities and Social Science departments and the College of Environmental Design

Focus of Study

Four upper division courses taught in the department and the required one course taught outside the department will comprise the Focus of Study. Students who declared prior to Fall 2017 are also required to include the one course taught outside the Department. Each student must select a Focus of Study by no later than the second semester of the junior year. By selecting a focus, students engage a specific field/period/topic in a cluster of relevant courses taught within and outside the department. The focus must be approved by an undergraduate adviser. Examples include (but are not limited to):

  • The Ancient World
  • The Renaissance World
  • The Body in Art
  • Art and Religion Popular Culture
  • Art and Gender
  • Modernities and the Arts
  • Globalism and the Arts
  • Urban Culture
  • Material Culture 

Additional Information

1. All courses to be counted toward completion of the Major, with the exception of the Art Practice requirement which may only be taken Pass/Not Pass, must be taken for a letter grade, earning a C- minus or higher.

2. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student's major and minor programs, with the exception of minors offered outside of the College of Letters & Science.

3. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 must be maintained in both upper and lower division courses used to fulfill the major requirements.

4. With prior department approval, one upper division lecture course may be substituted for one of the lower division survey courses. 

5. Two Summer Session lecture courses—in History of Art—and an art practice course may be credited to completion of the major. 

6. Except for specific courses named as corequisites, courses taken in other departments for credit in the major must be approved in advance by a faculty adviser.

For information regarding residence requirements and unit requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.

Minor Requirements

Students who have a strong interest in an area of study outside their major often decide to complete a minor program. These programs have set requirements and are noted officially on the transcript in the memoranda section, but are not noted on diplomas.

The History of Art Minor Program (18-20 units)

The Minor Program in the History of Art Department is designed to provide a structured and broad program for those students majoring in other disciplines but with a strong interest in the history of art. Students minoring in the History of Art will take at least five courses (upper division lecture or seminar) with a minimum grade of C. Up to two of these courses may be 3 unit courses. These should include courses in two separate chronological periods and two different geographical categories as specified below. Students should be aware of college requirements regarding overlap between major and minor programs.

Geographical:
  1. Europe and the Mediterranean
  2. Asia and the Pacific
  3. The Americas
  4. Middle East and Africa
  5. Transcultural
Chronological:
  1. Prehistoric-1200
  2. 1200-1800
  3. 1800-present

Three of these courses must be taken in the History of Art Department at Berkeley. Students minoring in History of Art are strongly encouraged to also take a lower division lecture course in art history and a course in art practice/materials. Students may apply one Summer Session course to their minor requirements. Work for the minor must be completed within the 130-unit minimum limit for graduation. 

Additional Information

1. All courses taken to fulfill the minor requirements must be taken for graded credit.

2. A minimum of three of the upper division courses taken to fulfill the minor requirements must be completed at UC Berkeley.

3. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required for courses used to fulfill the minor requirements.

4. Courses used to fulfill the minor requirements may be applied toward the Seven Course Breadth requirement, for Letters & Science students.

5. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student's major and minor programs.

6. Effective fall 2015, all minor requirements must be completed prior to the last day of finals during the semester before you plan to graduate. If you cannot finish all courses required for the minor by that time, please see a College of Letters & Science adviser.

7. All minor requirements must be completed within the unit ceiling. (For further information regarding the unit ceiling, please see the College Requirements tab.)

College Requirements

Undergraduate students in the College of Letters & Science must fulfill the following requirements in addition to those required by their major program.

For detailed lists of courses that fulfill college requirements, please review the College of Letters & Sciences page in this Guide.

Entry Level Writing

All students who will enter the University of California as freshmen must demonstrate their command of the English language by fulfilling the Entry Level Writing requirement. Fulfillment of this requirement is also a prerequisite to enrollment in all reading and composition courses at UC Berkeley. 

American History and American Institutions

The American History and Institutions requirements are based on the principle that a US resident graduated from an American university, should have an understanding of the history and governmental institutions of the United States.

American Cultures

American Cultures is the one requirement that all undergraduate students at Cal need to take and pass in order to graduate. The requirement offers an exciting intellectual environment centered on the study of race, ethnicity and culture of the United States. AC courses offer students opportunities to be part of research-led, highly accomplished teaching environments, grappling with the complexity of American Culture.

Quantitative Reasoning

The Quantitative Reasoning requirement is designed to ensure that students graduate with basic understanding and competency in math, statistics, or computer science. The requirement may be satisfied by exam or by taking an approved course.

Foreign Language

The Foreign Language requirement may be satisfied by demonstrating proficiency in reading comprehension, writing, and conversation in a foreign language equivalent to the second semester college level, either by passing an exam or by completing approved course work.

Reading and Composition

In order to provide a solid foundation in reading, writing, and critical thinking the College requires two semesters of lower division work in composition in sequence. Students must complete a first-level reading and composition course by the end of their second semester and a second-level course by the end of their fourth semester.

Breadth Requirements

The undergraduate breadth requirements provide Berkeley students with a rich and varied educational experience outside of their major program. As the foundation of a liberal arts education, breadth courses give students a view into the intellectual life of the University while introducing them to a multitude of perspectives and approaches to research and scholarship. Engaging students in new disciplines and with peers from other majors, the breadth experience strengthens interdisciplinary connections and context that prepares Berkeley graduates to understand and solve the complex issues of their day.

Unit Requirements

  • 120 total units, including at least 60 L&S units

  • Of the 120 units, 36 must be upper division units

  • Of the 36 upper division units, 6 must be taken in courses offered outside your major department

Residence Requirements

For units to be considered in "residence," you must be registered in courses on the Berkeley campus as a student in the College of Letters & Science. Most students automatically fulfill the residence requirement by attending classes here for four years. In general, there is no need to be concerned about this requirement, unless you go abroad for a semester or year or want to take courses at another institution or through UC Extension during your senior year. In these cases, you should make an appointment to meet an adviser to determine how you can meet the Senior Residence Requirement.

Note: Courses taken through UC Extension do not count toward residence.

Senior Residence Requirement

After you become a senior (with 90 semester units earned toward your BA degree), you must complete at least 24 of the remaining 30 units in residence in at least two semesters. To count as residence, a semester must consist of at least 6 passed units. Intercampus Visitor, EAP, and UC Berkeley-Washington Program (UCDC) units are excluded.

You may use a Berkeley Summer Session to satisfy one semester of the Senior Residence requirement, provided that you successfully complete 6 units of course work in the Summer Session and that you have been enrolled previously in the college.

Modified Senior Residence Requirement

Participants in the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP) or the UC Berkeley Washington Program (UCDC) may meet a Modified Senior Residence requirement by completing 24 (excluding EAP) of their final 60 semester units in residence. At least 12 of these 24 units must be completed after you have completed 90 units.

Upper Division Residence Requirement

You must complete in residence a minimum of 18 units of upper division courses (excluding EAP units), 12 of which must satisfy the requirements for your major.

Student Learning Goals

Learning Goals for the Major

Lower Division:

  1. Students are introduced to principles of visual analysis.
  2. Learn to think about images within a historical and cultural context.
  3. Learn to craft coherent arguments about works of art by integrating visual analysis with historical/cultural context.
  4. Develop familiarity with specific sites, objects, artists, cultures, and facts pertaining to them.
  5. Students learn to understand techniques and skills used in the creation of works of art.

Upper Division:

  1. Students’ skills in all of the above are reinforced.
  2. They learn to analyze key texts relating to the artworks under discussion.
  3. Write longer papers that include research.
  4. Understand in depth the dynamic relationship between visual art and its historical, social, cultural, economic, and political contexts.
  5. In small seminars, students pursue independent research projects.
  6. Undertake intensive interrogations of particular problems in the history of art.
  7. In History of Art courses, HISTART 100 and HISTART 101, students come to understand the history and tools of the discipline.

Advising

Department Advising

Declared majors must see an undergraduate adviser at least once each semester during the registration period (advisers are listed on the department website and in the department office). These advising meetings provide majors with the opportunity to work closely with a faculty member who can help them develop an overall program of study well-suited to individual strengths and career goals. The advisers also apprise majors of special courses and opportunities, both in the History of Art Department and elsewhere. Please note that faculty advisers are typically not available during the summer and winter breaks. Advising appointments can be made by signing up online.

In addition to general advising and coursework approval, advisers must approve all changes in registration, including withdrawals and add-drop changes, certain special study courses  (HISTART 193 Directed Research, HISTART 194 Museum Internship, HISTART H195 Special Study for Honors Candidates in the History of Art, HISTART C196W Special Field Research, HISTART 199 Supervised Independent Study), and some special programs. Appointments should be made well in advance of deadlines.

Each semester during the course enrollment period every History of Art major must see an adviser to discuss her/his program of study and to obtain an adviser code in order to gain access to the course enrollment system. Students should sign up for an advising appointment prior to their enrollment phase, having considered carefully the department’s course descriptions and having planned a schedule of proposed courses to be discussed with the adviser. Special additional office hours are held during enrollment periods, and advisers may decline to provide last-minute advising. Adviser codes will only be given out over the phone or via email if a student is studying abroad or is physically incapacitated.

Department undergraduate advisers do not administer or approve coursework or degree requirements in the College of Letters & Science other than the requirements of the major. For L&S requirements, students should make an appointment to see an L&S adviser in 206 Evans Hall.

Suggestions for All Majors

Foreign languages are not required in lower or upper division courses but a reading knowledge of European or Asian languages may be helpful in seminars and other research courses. Students planning on graduate study in the History of Art are urged to develop a reading knowledge of German and French or Italian as early as possible. Special language requirements pertain for graduate study in ancient and Asian art.

Recommended course load in History of Art will vary according to the student, course level, and individual course requirements. In general, no more than two History of Art courses per semester are recommended. A student’s final academic year may include a greater number of courses in History of Art, especially if all L&S breadth requirements have been fulfilled.

Special programs, such as study abroad, internships, and double majoring require considerable advance planning. If you are interested in any of these, discuss your plans early with your adviser. Courses taken through study abroad must be discussed in advance with an adviser and will not be formally approved until after completion and until satisfactory documentation has been submitted. In order for courses taken abroad to satisfy major requirements, the breadth and depth of the course, the work demanded, and your performance must all meet Berkeley upper division standards. Your performance will be evaluated by your adviser upon your return to campus to determine whether major requirements have been satisfied. Please see the department Study Abroad Information sheet.

Students with special intellectual or preprofessional interests may wish to enroll in independent study or research courses (HISTART 193, HISTART 199), in a second seminar (192), or in additional, related courses in other departments. These students should discuss their interests with their advisers as early as possible.

Letters of Recommendation

Students should plan to request letters of recommendation from those faculty members with whom they have studied most closely, especially in seminars and other special study courses. General letters of reference for employment, internships, or graduate school/professional programs, may be placed on file with the Career Center (2440 Bancroft Way).

Graduate Study 

Students who anticipate applying to graduate schools should discuss their plans with their adviser or with the faculty member whose field most closely corresponds to their interests. If you plan to begin graduate study in the fall after your graduation from Berkeley, you will have to prepare applications in the fall of your senior year. Most schools have deadlines in December though February, especially if the application is made for both admission and fellowship support. Arrangements should also be made in the fall of your senior year for taking the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or other graduate entrance exams that many schools require.

Academic Opportunities

Department and University Honors

Honors in Art History: Students with a 3.7 GPA in the major may complete and submit an honors thesis by enrolling in HA195 (4 units, graded). A student whose thesis receives a grade of A- or better will receive Departmental Honors (Honors, High Honors, or Highest Honors). The Honors Thesis is a two-semester project conducted under faculty supervision, as follows: a seminar, directed research, or independent study course in the first semester, followed by HA195 in the second. For specific details regarding the Honors Program, students should speak with a faculty undergraduate advisor and read the Guidelines for the Preparation of Theses.

University honors are awarded to students on the basis of overall GPA as follows: Distinction, High Distinction, and Highest Distinction (roughly equivalent to cum laude, magna cum laude, and summa cum laude). Requisite GPAs for University honors change each year. In 2016-2017 they were: Distinction: 3.724; High Distinction: 3.845; Highest Distinction: 3.947.

Maybelle M. Toombs Awards recognize the potential talent and ability of students based upon their record in the major up to the beginning of the senior year. By that time, the students must have completed at least two semesters of coursework as a History of Art major at Berkeley. Criteria for the award are outstanding grade point average and receiving financial aid. The award carries a stipend payable in the student's senior year for research and travel.

For the Departmental Citation, presented at Commencement to a graduating senior, the Departmental Award Committee considers grades to be the principal criterion, but it also takes into account the character of the student's overall program, its ambition and depth; the student's ability to sustain a high level of excellence throughout his or her undergraduate work, from the freshman to the senior year, in the Art History Department as well as in other subjects; and the ways in which this broad experience is brought to bear in an honors thesis of high quality, one that notably demonstrates the ability to do research in the discipline and a genuine independence of mind and maturity of judgment.

Brochures, Announcements, and Files 

Announcements and brochures on graduate study, internships, work experience, fellowships, study abroad, training programs, and special lectures and symposia are posted on the departmental bulletin board or distributed by email. If you are interested in a particular program and need more information, please contact the undergraduate student services adviser.

Undergraduate Association

The History of Art Undergraduate Student Association (H.Art) is an official campus group that exists to serve the interests of the department's majors. In the past, the association has compiled an internship directory, hosted a student-faculty brunch, sponsored special lunchtime talks with faculty and graduate students, and assisted in organizing career seminars. All majors are invited and encouraged to participate in the association. If you would like more information please leave a message in the association's mailbox in 416 Doe or speak with the undergraduate student services adviser. 

http://arthistoryucb.blogspot.com/

Courses

Art History

HISTART R1B Reading and Writing about Visual Experience 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session
How do mechanisms of perception structure responses to visual art? What is at stake when words describe images? By means of intensive looking, thinking, speaking, and writing, this course introduces the student to a series of problems and issues in the description and analysis of works of art. Because the course is also an introduction to the historical study of art, it is intended for students with no previous course
work in the field. Satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition requirement.
Reading and Writing about Visual Experience: Read More [+]

HISTART 10 Introduction to Western Art: Ancient to Medieval 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Summer 2011 First 6 Week Session, Fall 2010
An introduction to the art of Egypt, Greece, Rome, and the European Middle Ages. Works of painting, sculpture, and architecture are presented chronologically and interpreted within their particular historical circumstances. The course focuses on themes such as the social and ideological functions of art, strategies of realism and abstraction, rhetorics of the material and immaterial, patronage and the construction of viewing
, etc. It enables students to acquire the perceptual and critical skills to enjoy, interpret, and question works of art. Like 11, this course is recommended for potential majors and for students in other disciplines, both humanities and sciences.
Introduction to Western Art: Ancient to Medieval: Read More [+]

HISTART 10B History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2014 10 Week Session
An historical survey of selected works of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to the present. Stress is placed on the acquistion of perceptual and critical skills, the analysis and interpretation of style and meaning, and the ability to relate works to a broader visual tradition and historical context.

History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern: Read More [+]

HISTART N10 Introduction to Western Art: Ancient to Medieval 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 1998 10 Week Session
An introduction to the art of ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome, and the European Middle Ages. Painting, sculpture, and architecture are presented chronologically and considered in relation to their historical and cultural circumstances. The course aims to provide students with a basic knowledge of how artworks balance past tradition with innovation; how people actually looked at artworks and what they valued in them; how works of art were commissioned and
displayed; how artists went about their work; and how genre and medium affected an artwork's appearance. The question of artistic quality will be central to the course. In the process, the student will acquire a critical vocabulary for thinking and writing about art. Recommended both for potential majors and for students with a general interest in the topic.
Introduction to Western Art: Ancient to Medieval: Read More [+]

HISTART 11 Introduction to Western Art: Renaissance to the Present 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
An introduction to the historical circumstances and visual character of Western art from the Renaissance to the present. Not a chronological survey, but an exploration of topics and themes central to this period. For example: What tasks did painting and sculpture perform in the past? For whom, at whose expense? How do the rise of landscape painting, the cult of the artist, and the new emphasis on the nude relate to the emergence of modern
society? Do stylistic labels like Classicism, Realism, Impressionism, and Modernism help us answer such questions? This course is recommended for potential majors and for students in other disciplines, both humanities and sciences.
Introduction to Western Art: Renaissance to the Present: Read More [+]

HISTART N11 Western Art from the Renaissance to the Present 4 Units

Terms offered: Not yet offered
This course is an introduction to the visual arts of Europe and the USA from the 14th century to the present day. This course will attempt to situate works of art into long, general trends in art practice of the Western tradition, though it will prioritize sustained focus on single case-studies which punctuate the five centuries of art for which this course offers a historical account; attention will also gather around particular representative artists’ careers.
We’ll explore how the fine arts can be considered as part of wider visual culture(s) in the Western tradition, and the ways art within such a broad tradition can function both as a stabilizing and as a transformative force within social/political/religious/racial/etc contexts.
Western Art from the Renaissance to the Present: Read More [+]

HISTART 12 History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2009 10 Week Session, Summer 2009 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2008 First 6 Week Session
A historical survey of selected works of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to the present. Stress is placed on the acquisition of perceptual and critical skills, the analysis and interpretation of style and meaning, and the ability to relate works to a broader visual tradition and historical context.

History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern: Read More [+]

HISTART 14 The Origins of Art 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018
This course will explore ways in which the “the origins of art”—of human creativity in the visual and spatial arts—have been considered by a variety of artists, critics, and scholars.

The Origins of Art: Read More [+]

HISTART 15A London Museums 4 Units

Terms offered: Not yet offered
The course introduces students to the rich museum culture of London, England through lectures, seminars, and site visits.

London Museums: Read More [+]

HISTART 24 Freshman Seminar 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2014
The Freshman Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Freshman Seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics may vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to fifteen freshman.

Freshman Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 27 Visual Cultures of Africa 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016
Rather than follow a master chronology that would attempt to contain Africa’s multiple cultural formations in a single narrative, this course will introduce students to African art through an investigation of a range of aesthetic traditions and movements across sub-Saharan Africa that are meaningfully reinvigorated in contemporary artistic production and popular visual culture. Our continual return to the cultural politics of the present will provide an anchor and
roadmap for our inquiry; we will see contemporary visual culture as staging interventions that push at Western ideas of “primitive African tradition,” while bringing to the fore conventions that, when tracked, reveal alternative traditions legible within an art historical context.
Visual Cultures of Africa: Read More [+]

HISTART 30 Art of India 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Spring 2008
This course surveys the arts of India from 2000 BC to the present, including painting, sculpture, and architecture. It treats prehistoric material (Indus Valley), Buddhist sculpture and painting, Hindu temples and their images, miniature painting, and modern art. Art will be considered in relation to its religious, political, and social contexts. The course will normally focus on major monuments, seen from multiple viewpoints, or upon problems
and issues that relate the art of this area to traditions of other parts of the world (or differentiate it from them). No previous background is presumed, and students will be introduced to basic art-historical methods of viewing and analysis.
Art of India: Read More [+]

HISTART N31 Arts of East Asia 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2003 10 Week Session, Summer 2001 10 Week Session
This course surveys the artistic traditions of China, Korea, and Japan over six millennia. Through lectures and readings, students are introduced to themes central to the development of art in East Asia. We begin with the form, meaning, and function of archaeological remains, then turn to consider the role of art in Buddhist ritual and worship. Lectures on secular painting will focus on the complex interactions of text
and image, and on alternative modes of visualizing exeamplary conduct. Theoretical issues and visual analysis of individual works will be introduced through weekly guided discussions.
Arts of East Asia: Read More [+]

HISTART 32 The Arts of Korea 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2010, Summer 2010 10 Week Session, Summer 2010 Second 6 Week Session
This course will introduce the arts and culture of Korea from the prehistoric period through the early twentieth century. Significant examples of painting, ceramics, sculpture, metalwork, and photography will be closely examined in their political, social, and cultural contexts. Korean art will also be presented in its East Asian context and compared to Chinese and Japanese art. No prior knowledge of Korean
art or history, or Chinese or Korean languages, is expected.
The Arts of Korea: Read More [+]

HISTART 33 Buddhist Art of Asia 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2004 10 Week Session, Summer 2002 10 Week Session, Summer 2000 10 Week Session
A survey of Buddhist art and architecture of Asia from 566 B.C.E. to the 19th century, including India, China, Japan, Tibet, Sri Lanka, and Southeast Asia. How works of art and architecture reflect or engage with the doctrine and practice of different schools of Buddhism. Topics include the making of "the Buddha image," the relationship between patronage, styles, and the ritual use
of arts, the notion of sacred space, and the political usage of Buddha images. Discussion of issues such as the body, gender, and sexuality in the light of Buddhist arts and cultural context.
Buddhist Art of Asia: Read More [+]

HISTART 34 Arts of China 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Fall 2011
An introduction to the arts of China, designed for newcomers to the history of art or to the study of Chinese culture. Lectures will survey six millennia of Chinese art thematically and chronologically, including the burial arts of the Neolithic period through the Tang dynasty (4th M. BCE-10th C. CE), Buddhist and Daoist ritual arts, and painting and calligraphy. Lectures, readings, and discussions will introduce students to various systems
of Chinese thought, modes of visual analysis, and art historical method.
Arts of China: Read More [+]

HISTART 35 Art and Architecture in Japan 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2013
This course is an introduction to art and architecture in Japan. It is intended for newcomers to the history of art and/or to the study of Japanese history and culture. Lectures will proceed chronologically, beginning with the archaeological objects and tumuli of neolithic Japan and ending with the popular graphic arts of the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries and modern transformations of art.

Art and Architecture in Japan: Read More [+]

HISTART 36 ASIA MODERN: Art + Architecture, 1800-present 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017
This course is an introduction to the art and architecture of modern South, Southeast, and East Asia. Using a comparative perspective, each week will focus on a set of case studies—the work of particular artists and art movements or the architecture of specific Asian cities—to reconstruct an expansive history of modern art and architecture in Asia from 1800 to the present. Class lectures will be completed by a close examination of modern Asian art collections on campus
and in the Bay Area. We will also engage with numerous diasporic Asian artists who live and work in the area.

ASIA MODERN: Art + Architecture, 1800-present: Read More [+]

HISTART 39 Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 2 Units

Terms offered: Not yet offered
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39A Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2009, Fall 2008, Fall 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39B Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39C Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39D Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39E Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39F Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39G Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39H Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39I Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39J Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39K Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39L Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39M Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39N Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39O Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39P Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39Q Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39R Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39S Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39T Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39U Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39V Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39W Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39X Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39Y Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 39Z Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART 41 Introduction to Greek and Roman Art 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2011, Fall 2004
An introduction to the major works, themes, and agendas of Greek and Roman art and architecture. Participants will learn to acquire the perceptual and critical skills necessary for understanding these works; to analyze and interpret them; and to relate them to broader visual traditions, historical contexts, and social/cultural issues. Wherever possible, newly discovered work will be illustrated and discussed.

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HISTART 51 Introduction to Medieval Art 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012, Spring 2005, Spring 2004
A selective, thematic exploration of the visual arts from the decline of the Roman empire to the beginnings of Early Modern period. The emergence of new artistic media, subject matter, and strategies of making and viewing will be discussedagainst the ever-shifting historical circumstances of medieval Europe. Emphasis will be placed on the methods of interpreting the works, especially in relation to then-current social practices and cultural
values.
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HISTART 62 Introduction to Italian Renaissance Art 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Using a few selected examples drawn from Florence, Rome, Milan, and Venice, this course will introduce most types of art and architecture produced in the Italian Renaissance--including city squares, churches, palaces and libraries, and their painted and sculptural decoration. Special attention will be paid to various approaches used in interpreting works of art.

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HISTART C62 Introduction to Italian Renaissance Art 4 Units

Terms offered: Not yet offered

Using a few selected examples drawn from Florence, Rome, Milan, and Venice, this course will introduce most types of art and architecture produced in the Italian Renaissance--including city squares, churches, palaces and libraries, and their painted and sculptural decoration. Special attention will be paid to various approaches used in interpreting works of art.

Introduction to Italian Renaissance Art: Read More [+]

HISTART 65 Arts of the Renaissance and Reformation 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2003 10 Week Session
The West's "modern" era had its beginnings in the 15th and 16th centuries. Social and economic organization, religious and political thought, were reconfigured into forms we recognize today. Within these configurations, art took on new roles: a commodity in a nascent capitalist society, a vehicle of propaganda by church and state, an expression of an individual's genius. In aesthetic terms, it took on properties which defined the modern.
Italy and the Netherlands each contributed to the revolution in pictorial expression. This course investigates those contributions and considers how art expressed the world view of this age.
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HISTART 80 Introduction to Modern Art 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
An introduction to the major movements, themes, and artists of modern art, starting with its origins in the nineteenth century. Close attention will be paid to exhibition histories, the development of new forms of media, and shifts in visual culture within the context of the rise of modernity and modernization. No previous knowledge of the subject is presumed; students will be exposed to various modes of art historical interpretation and formal analysis.

Introduction to Modern Art: Read More [+]

HISTART N80 Introduction to Modern Art 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session
An introduction to the major movements, themes, and artists of modern art, starting with its origins in the nineteenth century. Close attention will be paid to exhibition histories, the development of new forms of media, and shifts in visual culture within the context of the rise of modernity and modernization. No previous knowledge of the subject is presumed; students will be exposed to various modes of art historical interpretation and formal
analysis.
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HISTART 87AC Visual Cultures of California 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017
The course examines a series of artistic formations & critiques of identity among the diverse collection of individuals, cultures, and institutions that compose the geographic area now know as the state of California. The story of California is one that includes encounters, domination, solidarity, coexistence, revolution, & more ways as diverse people manage living together. Many of these modes of encounter occurred in, were facilitated by, or are preserved
in the state’s visual & material culture. The class draws on the rich resources of Bay Area museums, built environment, and historic sites to examining a broad set of case studies that may range from Native American landscape architecture to recent exhibitions of contemporary California.
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HISTART 88 Arts of Latin America 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014
An introduction to the arts and visual culture of Latin America from the earliest monumental art traditions of prehistory to the present. The course is not a comprehensive survey of all traditions of art in Latin America, but rather a sampling of critical moments that is designed to serve as an introduction to this field of study. We will take a long view of enduring traditions as well as periods of rupture and crisis. Lecture and discussion will frequently
center on the active roles of the arts in society, religion, and politics from the earliest Pre-Columbian settings to the present day. No prior knowledge of Latin American art history is expected. This course is designed for both majors and non-majors in the humanities and sciences.
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HISTART 98 Directed Group Study for Freshmen and Sophomores 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2014
Instruction for a small group of students on a topic initiated by those students.

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HISTART 100 Theories and Methods of Art History 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
How art has been studied in the past and how it is currently studied, its historiography and methodology. Consideration of the earliest writers (Pliny, Vasari) but also modern approaches, from traditional style analysis and connoisseurship through the "founders" of modern art history (Panofsky, Riegl) to more recent approaches, e.g. psychoanalysis, feminism, social history, anthropology, semiotics, etc.

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HISTART N100 Theories and Methods of Art History 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2015 10 Week Session, Summer 2015 Second 6 Week Session
How art has been studied in the past and how it is currently studied, its historiography and methodology. Consideration of the earliest writers (Pliny, Vasari) but also modern approaches, from traditional style analysis and connoisseurship through the "founders" of modern art history (Panofsky, Riegl) to more recent approaches, e.g., psychoanalysis, feminism, social history
, anthropology, semiotics, etc.
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HISTART 101 Theories & Methods for a Global History of Art 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2015
The purpose of this lecture course is to provide students with a toolbox for writing art history in many periods in a global field. We will proceed systematically, learning how to describe and analyze objects, do bibliographic research, use different methodological approaches, and learn to apply them with specific objects/works selected by the student.

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HISTART N104 Gender and Representation 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2002 10 Week Session
A consideration of historical and theoretical issues posed for visual media by attention to issues of gender. Previous course work in art history recommended. Detailed descriptions of current and future offerings available in 416 Doe Library.

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HISTART 107 Images and the Law 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This course explores issues at the intersection of the law and the visual arts. What is the relationship between the law and the visual arts? Does the law constrain the creation of art, or does it establish conditions under which artists can exercise their creativity more freely? When and how should the legal system be employed to promote or curtail the creation, display, or preservation of works of art?

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HISTART N107 Images and the Law 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session
This course explores issues at the intersection of the law and the visual arts. What is the relationship between the law and the visual arts? Does the law constrain the creation of art, or does it establish conditions under which artists can exercise their creativity more freely? When and how should the legal system be employed to promote or curtail the creation, display, or preservation of works of art?

Images and the Law: Read More [+]

HISTART 108 Cities and the Arts 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2015 Second 6 Week Session
The study of various urban centers at particular times in relation to the art produced there. Emphasis may be placed on the rise of artistic centers and professional communities, the representation of places of power, learning or recreation, the construction of urbanity, the reaction to cities, etc. Detailed descriptions of current and future offerings available in room 416 Doe
Library.
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HISTART 109 Digital Humanities, Visual Cultures 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017
“Digital humanities” describes how digital formats and tools can be used to produce knowledge about cultural materials. This course introduces students to techniques used to study visual culture and related disciplines, possibly including mapping, network analysis, digital (re)construction of objects and environments; digital editions of texts or online exhibitions; digital manipulation of images; and content-management systems and structured data. The class also provides
a framework to help students think critically about the values that underpin existing DH projects.

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HISTART C109 Digital Humanities, Visual Cultures 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017
“Digital humanities” describes how digital formats and tools can be used to produce knowledge about cultural materials. This course introduces students to techniques used to study visual culture and related disciplines, possibly including mapping, network analysis, digital (re)construction of objects and environments; digital editions of texts or online exhibitions; digital manipulation of images; and content-management systems and structured data. The class also
provides a framework to help students think critically about the values that underpin existing DH projects.

Digital Humanities, Visual Cultures: Read More [+]

HISTART 120 The "Origins" of Art 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
For millions of years, hominid creatures quite like us made nothing like what we now take to be images or ornaments-"art." Why not? Between 32,000 and 26,000 BC, images and ornaments appear and proliferate. Why? When a workman shovels dirt, the pile is mere garbage. An artist exhibits an identical pile in a gallery as "art." What makes the difference? Detailed examination of paleolithic & prehistoric arts, children's drawings, & some
contemporary practices.
The "Origins" of Art: Read More [+]

HISTART C120A The Art of Ancient Mesopotamia: 3500-1000 BCE 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2011, Fall 2006
The art and architecture of early Mesopotamia will be explored in terms of the social, political, and cultural context of ancient Sumer, Babylonia, and Assyria during the period of urbanization and early kingdoms. The course provides an integrated picture of the arts of Mesopotamia and neighboring regions from 3500-1000 BCE with an emphasis on the development of visual narrative, the use of art in the expression of authority and legitimacy, and artistic interconnections
between cultures. Collections on campus or in the area will be incorporated whenever possible.
The Art of Ancient Mesopotamia: 3500-1000 BCE: Read More [+]

HISTART C120B The Art of Ancient Mesopotamia: 1000-330 BCE 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012, Fall 2009, Fall 2004
The royal art and architecture of later Mesopotamia will be explored in terms of the social, political, and cultural context of the great empires of Assyria, Babylon, and Persia. The course provides an integrated picture of the arts of Mesopotamia and neighboring regions from 1000-330 BCE with an emphasis on the development of visual narrative, the use of art in the expression of authority and legitimacy, and artistic interconnections between cultures.
Collections on campus or in the area will be incorporated whenever possible.
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HISTART C121A Topics in Islamic Art 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
The course will treat in depth topics in Islamic architecture and topics in Islamic art. Subjects addressed may include painting, calligraphy, and book production.

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HISTART C121B Topics in Islamic Art 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2007, Fall 2005, Spring 2003
The course will treat in depth topics in Islamic architecture and topics in Islamic art. Subjects addressed may include painting, calligraphy, and book production.

Topics in Islamic Art: Read More [+]

HISTART 127 The Arts of Africa 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 1996 10 Week Session
A survey of the arts of black sub-Saharan Africa, including aspects of the Caribbean. Emphasizes major aesthetic/cultural complexes such as the Yoruba, the Manding, and the Kongo. The tension between "traditional arts" and contemporary studio practices, as well as all artistic traditions will be discussed within their social context. Aspects of mythology, history, social values, music, and dance as they relate to artistic traditions included.
Films which emphasize this interaction to be shown.
The Arts of Africa: Read More [+]

HISTART 130A Early Chinese Art, Part I 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2013, Spring 2010
Chinese art of the Neolithic and Bronze Age. From the earliest period to the end of the Han dynasty (early third century A.D.), especially ceramics, bronzes, jade, and lacquer.

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HISTART 131A Sacred Arts in China 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2013, Spring 2011
The history of the visual arts as used in Chinese religious practice, from the third century C.E. through the late imperial period. The course explores different modes of giving visible form to the sacred, expecially in the Daoist and Buddhist traditions, and tracks the movement of objects and visual concepts across Asia and between Daoists and Buddhists, monasteries, the imperial court, and elite and popular lay groups.

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HISTART 131B The Classical Painting Tradition in China 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2014, Summer 2008 Second 6 Week Session
The history of the art of painting in China from the third century C.E. through the late imperial period. The course takes a chronological and thematic approach to the classical tradition of Chinese painting and other arts of the brush expressed in a variety of elite and popular genres, considering them in the context of aesthetic and narrative theory, biography, economic history, social life, and politics.

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HISTART 131C Art and Propaganda in Modern China 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012
The history of Chinese art from the end of the Qing dynasty in 1912 to the present, including the reformist movements of the early 20th century; the new urbanism and its visual articulation in advertising, photography, and popular arts; national style; politicized painting and woodblock prints in the Western style; Communist socialist realism; and the meaning of the avant-garde as both Communist ideological movement and anti-authoritarian concept.

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HISTART 132 AsiaAmerica: Asian American Art and Architecture 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018
This course focuses on modern and contemporary Asian American art and architecture from the mid-1800s to the present. Using a comparative perspective, each week utilizes case studies—works by particular artists, architects, or art groups—to examine what Asian American art looked like at specific historical junctures and what it meant to be an Asian American artist. A range of material practices, including painting, sculpture, installation, performance, new media,
architecture, and graphic illustration are considered.
AsiaAmerica: Asian American Art and Architecture: Read More [+]

HISTART 134A Topics in Buddhist Art and Architecture: Buddhist Temple Art & Architecture in Japan 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2014, Spring 2012
Primarily the architecture and sculpture of Japanese Buddhist temples, 7th to 13th centuries.

Topics in Buddhist Art and Architecture: Buddhist Temple Art & Architecture in Japan: Read More [+]

HISTART 134B Topics in Buddhist Art and Architecture: Buddhist Icons in Japan 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Spring 2012
This course introduces the study of Buddhist icons in Japan, principally paintings and sculpture but also texts, within broader Buddhist ritual and visual cultures from ca. 500 CE to the early 20th century.

Topics in Buddhist Art and Architecture: Buddhist Icons in Japan: Read More [+]

HISTART 134C Topics in Buddhist Art and Architecture: Buddhist Art in the Modern/Contemporary World 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015
This course explores representations of the Buddha and other Buddhist detities in the modern and contemporary world, including pre-modern works of painting and sculpture, images made by contemporary artists, and images within popular culture.

Topics in Buddhist Art and Architecture: Buddhist Art in the Modern/Contemporary World: Read More [+]

HISTART 136A South Asian Art: Ancient 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2012, Fall 2008
Beginning with the earliest remains of cities, towns, and palaces in the Indus Valley region in present day India and Pakistan, this course traces the production of art and architecture in South Asia from 2500 BCE to 1200 CE. Focusing on the painting, sculpture, and architectural traditions of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, we will examine the aesthetic conventions, theological ideals, and political formations that emerged in early South
Asia.
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HISTART 136B South Asian Art: Early Modern 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2010, Spring 2009, Spring 2006
South Asian art, architecture, calligraphy, painting, and urban cultures in the early modern period. Emphasis will be placed on interactions with the Islamic world and Europe.

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HISTART 136C The Art of India: 1350 A.D. to the Present 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Fall 2009, Spring 2007
A selective survey of major developments in Muslim and Rajput painting from 1350 to the present.

The Art of India: 1350 A.D. to the Present: Read More [+]

HISTART 137 The Art of Southeast Asia 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2010, Fall 2007, Fall 2004
The art of Cambodia, Vietnam, Thailand, Burma, and Indonesia focusing on the period from 400 to 1500 A.D. Sculpture and architecture will be considered as a balance of Indian and indigenous elements.

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HISTART C140 Minoan and Mycenaean Art 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2010, Fall 2005
This course analyzes the art, architecture, and archaeology of prehistoric Greece, concentrating on the Minoan and Mycenaean palatial arts of the Bronze Age (3000-1200 BCE). The evocative yet still enigmatic remains of palaces and funerary complexes, frescoes and vase paintings, and precious worked pieces will be closely examined in terms of their forms and cultural contexts. The place of prehistoric Greece in the international world of the eastern Mediterranean
will also be explored.
Minoan and Mycenaean Art: Read More [+]

HISTART 141A The Art of Ancient Greece: Archaic Greek Art and Architecture (750-480 B.C.) 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2010, Spring 2007
The early development of the major genres of Greek art in the era of the emerging city-states.

The Art of Ancient Greece: Archaic Greek Art and Architecture (750-480 B.C.): Read More [+]

HISTART 141B The Art of Ancient Greece: Classical Greek Art and Architecture (500-320 B.C.) 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2016, Spring 2011
The maturity of the major genres of Greek art in Periclean Athens and the other leading centers.

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HISTART 141C The Art of Ancient Greece: Hellenistic Art and Architecture (330-30 B.C.) 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2012, Spring 2009
A survey of the major genres of Greek art in the Hellenic world from Italy to India.

The Art of Ancient Greece: Hellenistic Art and Architecture (330-30 B.C.): Read More [+]

HISTART N142 Introduction to Archaeology: The Tel Dor Excavation 2 or 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2006 10 Week Session, Summer 2005 10 Week Session, Summer 2004 10 Week Session
A training school for those with no previous experience in archaeology or ancient art. Volunteers are taught the elements of modern field archaeology, with discussion sessions on site stratigraphy, pottery, and other artifacts. Evening lectures on Israeli, Greaco-Roman, and Near Eastern archaelogy.

Introduction to Archaeology: The Tel Dor Excavation: Read More [+]

HISTART 145 Roman Art 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2009, Fall 2008, Fall 2007
The art of Rome and of the Roman Empire, from its sources in the Republican era to the Age of Constantine the Great.

Roman Art: Read More [+]

HISTART 145A Roman Painting 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016
This course presents the surviving evidence for a wide range of pictorial representation in the Roman world, and addresses the many functions of painting in Roman life.

Roman Painting: Read More [+]

HISTART 145B Ancient Portraiture and Biography 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Important individuals in Greek and Roman society were commemorated both in honorific portraits—bronze and marble statues set up in public places—and in biographies written to record for posterity their lives and achievements. We will be reading a selection of Greek and Latin biographical texts (in translation) and comparing them with statuary monuments that represent the same individuals. We will be seeking to elicit the points of contact between the two commemorative
traditions, visual and literary, and to understand the sometimes similar functions they serve. But we will also be attempting to bring out the differences in the way that biographical texts and portrait images operate, and the consequences this has for historians.
Ancient Portraiture and Biography: Read More [+]

HISTART C145A Pictorial Representation in the Roman World 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017
This course presents surviving evidence of pictorial representation in the Roman world. Including the earliest remains from the city of Rome; the suites of painted rooms in the houses of Pompeii and Herculaneum on the Bay of Naples; and Roman mosaics from Italy, North Africa, and the eastern Mediterranean.

Topics: ‘four styles’ of Pompeian interior decoration; the architect Vitruvius’ denunciation of contemporary painting in the early Augustan period; the
reproduction of Greek ‘old master’ paintings from pattern books; the surviving paintings of the Domus Aurea, the emperor Nero’s ‘Golden House’ in Rome; the painting of marble statues and reliefs; and the colored mummy portraits preserved by the sands of the Egyptian desert.

Pictorial Representation in the Roman World: Read More [+]

HISTART 151 Art in Late Antiquity 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016, Spring 2012
Imperial art from Gallienus through the collapse of the western empire. Christian art from the beginning around 200 through the age of Justinian. Revivals in the seventh and eighth centuries. A look back from the court of Charlemagne and contemporary Constantinople.

Art in Late Antiquity: Read More [+]

HISTART 155A Relics, Reliquaries and Cult Images 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015
A survey of the visual arts in Europe from about 800-1400 A.D. This lecture course explores the origins and transformations of Christian pre-modern visual culture. This class will analyze the revival of monumental sculpture in the context of liturgy, architecture, materiality of the minor arts and reliquaries, as well as medieval theories on perception. Emphasis is placed upon the broad artistic influence of the monastic, pilgrimage, and crusading movements.The elaboration
of new iconographic themes and the influence of small scale precious works will receive special attention.
Relics, Reliquaries and Cult Images: Read More [+]

HISTART 156A Gothic Art in Northern Europe: 1150-1270 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2002
Gothic art and architecture from its origins in France about 1130. Emphasis on the related developments of architecture, sculpture, and stained glass at the major cathedrals, the impact of the early universities and scientific study, and the political role of the visual arts in the early nation states.

Gothic Art in Northern Europe: 1150-1270: Read More [+]

HISTART C156B Art and Science 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2013
This course explores the intersections of art and science in medieval, modern, and contemporary history. It focuses on the ways in which artistic and scientific practices have shaped and legitimated each other through the ages. The course takes the form of an overview that spans from the awakening of European culture through the reception of new knowledge from the Near East to the most recent encounters between art and technoscience in the 21st century.

Art and Science: Read More [+]

HISTART C158 Art and Science 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014
In this course we explore the intersections of art and science in medieval, modern, and contemporary history. Our aim is twofold. First, to explore the close interaction between these two fields, and the way in which they have shaped each other through the ages. Second, to focus our attention on specific instances of art/science interaction, using them as prisms through which one can reach a fuller understanding of major historical transformations.

Art and Science: Read More [+]

HISTART 160 Renaissance Art in Florence 1400-1600 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2009, Fall 2005
A selective survey of major developments in Florentine Renaissance painting, sculpture, and architecture organized by genre. Particular emphasis on the relationship between art and religion and the ideology of Florentine republicanism and ducal absolutism. Issues of gender, the status of artists, and the function, audience, and patronage of art will also be considered.

Renaissance Art in Florence 1400-1600: Read More [+]

HISTART 161 Renaissance Art in Rome 1400-1600 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2010, Spring 2010, Spring 2007
A selective survey of major developments in Roman Renaissance painting, sculpture, and architecture organized by genre. Particular emphasis on the relationship between art and religion and the ideology of a theocratic papacy. Issues of gender, the status of artists, and the function, audience, and patronage of art will also be considered.

Renaissance Art in Rome 1400-1600: Read More [+]

HISTART 162 Renaissance Art in Venice 1400-1600 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2010, Spring 2008
A selective survey of major developments in Venetian Renaissance painting, sculpture, and architecture organized by genre. Particular emphasis on the relationship between art and religion and the ideology of the Venetian commune. Issues of gender, the status of artists, and the function, audience, and patronage of art will also be considered.

Renaissance Art in Venice 1400-1600: Read More [+]

HISTART 166 Van Eyck to Brueghel 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2011, Fall 2006, Fall 1999
The great age of Netherlandish art, from its roots in manuscript illumination through the masters of panel painting (Van Eyck, Van der Weyden, Bosch, Brueghel) up to the time of the iconoclasm of 1566. Focus on the relation of painting to the beholder; iconic vs. narrative images; rise of genres; art's expression of social and economic ideals; and class and gender issues.

Van Eyck to Brueghel: Read More [+]

HISTART 169A Elizabethan Renaissance: Art, Culture, and Visuality 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2012
The Elizabethan Renaissance course will review texts, minor arts, costume, self-presentation, performance, pageantry, architecture, decoration, and other non-traditional routes of addressing issues of visual culture and representation, and their political and social meanings. The courses's goals are to explore the role of visuality in Renaissance England, and to develop research skills. Students learn to analyze primary sources, both visual and written
, and to read secondary sources critically.
Elizabethan Renaissance: Art, Culture, and Visuality: Read More [+]

HISTART 170 Southern Baroque Art 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2014, Fall 2011
The major artists (among them Caravaggio, Bernini, Velazquez, and Poussin) and the major concerns (including genres such as history painting, landscape, low-life, and notions of imitation and illusionism) of seventeenth century art in Italy, France, and Spain.

Southern Baroque Art: Read More [+]

HISTART 171 Visual Culture in Early Modern Spain and Colonial Latin America 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2012
The mutual impact of European conquest on the visual and material cultures of Spain and Colonial Latin America. Paintings by El Greco, Velazquez, Zurburan, and Ribera are discussed in relation to the trans-Atlantic transmission of material objects including Mexican pictorial codices, European prints, architecture, screen paintings (biombos), featherwork, and enconchados.

Visual Culture in Early Modern Spain and Colonial Latin America: Read More [+]

HISTART 172 The Dutch Golden Age 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2013, Spring 2011, Fall 2007
The rise of a rich visual culture in 17th-century Holland that expressed the ideals, aspirations, and identity of the first bourgeois capitalist society. Rembrandt, Vermeer, and others in the context of contemporary aesthetic concerns (realism, optics) and social issues (domestic values, poverty and wealth, colonialism, national identity).

The Dutch Golden Age: Read More [+]

HISTART 173 The Age of Rubens 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2005, Spring 2003
The culture of early 17th-century Europe as it was known (and created) by Sir Peter Paul Rubens, painter, scholar, and diplomat. Begins in Flanders and travels (with Rubens) to Italy, Spain, France and England, examining politics, religion and visual culture in each place. Key issues include the concept of artistic tradition; art and politics; crafting social status; workshop practice.

The Age of Rubens: Read More [+]

HISTART 174 Types of Dutch and Flemish Painting in the 17th Century 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
A general study of Netherlandish painting of the seventeenth century organized according to the genres or types of painting done at the time. The historical and social as well as the art historical contexts for the development in the Netherlands of such genres as history painting, portraiture, landscapes, still-life, and low-life and the kinds of meanings with which they were endowed.

Types of Dutch and Flemish Painting in the 17th Century: Read More [+]

HISTART 175 Visual Culture in Early Modern France: Renaissance to Enlightenment 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2013
French art from the 16th century to the mid 18th century. Beginning with the architecture, painting, prints, and decorative arts of the School of Fontainebleau, the course addresses the development of the Royal Academy and its interaction with popular culture, which culminates in the display of ambitious art in the public space of the pre-revolutionary Salon exhibition.

Visual Culture in Early Modern France: Renaissance to Enlightenment: Read More [+]

HISTART 179 Eighteenth-Century British Art 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2001 10 Week Session
The story of art in 18th-century Britain involves the struggle to develop a national artistic identity which was distinct from the artistic traditions of Italy, Holland, and France. This course will address the meaning and function of history painting, portraiture, marine painting, and landscapes in relation to a rapidly expanding art market, taking into account the way that gender, class, and race played into the visual marking of status and power.
We will also look at the ways in which visual culture helped to shape Britain's national identity as an emerging imperial power.
Eighteenth-Century British Art: Read More [+]

HISTART 180A Nineteenth-Century Europe: Age of Revolution 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2010, Spring 2005
Topics in late 18th- and early 19th-century European art, either focusing on a pertinent theme and/or nation (e.g. Romanticism and gender in France) or introducing the art of Europe as a whole during this tumultuous period of revolution and reaction.

Nineteenth-Century Europe: Age of Revolution: Read More [+]

HISTART 180C Nineteenth-Century Europe: The Invention of Avant-Gardes 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2014, Fall 2010
Visual arts in the later 19th century. Impressionism and after. The nature of avant-garde culture and its relation to emerging consumer culture. May emphasize Paris, or the struggle for cultural mastery in Europe.

Nineteenth-Century Europe: The Invention of Avant-Gardes: Read More [+]

HISTART N180A 19th-Century Europe: Age of Revolution 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2002 10 Week Session
Topics in late 18th- and early 19th- century European art, either focusing on a pertinent theme and/or nation (e.g., Romanticism and gender in France) or introducing the art of Europe as a whole during this tumultuous period of revolution and reaction.

19th-Century Europe: Age of Revolution: Read More [+]

HISTART N180B The Body in Avant-Garde French Art 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 1998 10 Week Session
This course studies 19th-century art's search for a new visual language with which to represent the body. It explores ways in which sculptural and painted bodies convey, hide, and displace sexuality to create or prohibit desire, and how they produce different notions of femininity and masculinity. Artists to be discussed: Manet, Monet, Gauguin, Degas, Renoir, Pissarro, Morrisot, Cassatt, Rodin, Carpeaux, Cezanne, Millet, Courbet, Daumier, Claudel.

The Body in Avant-Garde French Art: Read More [+]

HISTART N180C Nineteenth-Century Europe: The Invention of Avant-Gardes 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2010 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2009 10 Week Session, Summer 2009 Second 6 Week Session
Visual arts in the later 19th century. Impressionism and after. The nature of avant-garde culture and its relation to emerging consumer culture. May emphasize Paris or the struggle for cultural mastery in Europe.

Nineteenth-Century Europe: The Invention of Avant-Gardes: Read More [+]

HISTART N181 French Art of the 19th Century 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2004 10 Week Session, Summer 1999 10 Week Session, Summer 1997 10 Week Session
Introduction to French art from the Revolution to the First World War. Proceeds chronologically, putting visual art in the context of French political and social development.

French Art of the 19th Century: Read More [+]

HISTART 182 Histories of Photography 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2013, Summer 2011 10 Week Session, Summer 2011 First 6 Week Session
Topics in 19th- and 20th-century histories of photography; for example, photography in relation to modernism, gender, pictorial genres, or consumerism.

Histories of Photography: Read More [+]

HISTART N182 Histories of Photography 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
Topics in 19th- and 20th-century histories of photography, for example, photography in relation to modernism, gender, pictorial genres, or consumerism.

Histories of Photography: Read More [+]

HISTART 183 Art and Colonialism 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2008, Fall 2007, Fall 2000
Consideration of the relationship between visual representation and conquest, colonialism and imperialism. Topics include the history of visual ethnographies, representations and constructions of "race," exoticism, orientalism, and primitivism.

Art and Colonialism: Read More [+]

HISTART 183E American Painting and Photography from the Civil War to WW II 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
The focus of this course will be significant works by American art-makers, analyzed in the context of the dramatic transformations which occured in American Art from the 1860's to the 1940's. Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of both indigenous and adopted modes of representation within their historical and art historical contexts. Students will be encouraged to acquire the ability to closely "read" and interpret visual images as primary historical
"texts."
American Painting and Photography from the Civil War to WW II: Read More [+]

HISTART 185 From Manet to Mondrian 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2001 10 Week Session, Summer 1987 10 Week Session
Study of major artists and movements in European art from 1860-1930. Will begin with Modernism in the work of Manet and proceed to an examination of Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Symbolism, Expressionism, Fauvism, Cubism, Futurism, and early abstract art. Directions in the 20th century such as Dadaism and Surrealism will be addressed. Art will be considered in the cultural, political, social, and aesthetic contexts
in which it was made. Emphasis is on painting, but important sculptors will be included.
From Manet to Mondrian: Read More [+]

HISTART 185A American Art (1800-Present) 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2012
Looking at major developments in architecture, decorative arts, photography, and painting from Romanticism to post-modernism, this course addresses art and its social context over the last two centuries in what is now the United States. Issues include patronage, audience, technology, and the education of the artist as well as style and cultural expression. Field trips.

American Art (1800-Present): Read More [+]

HISTART 185B American Architecture: Domestic Forms 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2009, Fall 2005
Taking as a point of departure specific exemplary houses, both vernacular and high-style architectural forms are studied from the perspectives of the history of style, of technology and of social use. Both the class as a whole and the student research projects take a case-study approach. Field trips.

American Architecture: Domestic Forms: Read More [+]

HISTART N185C Contemporary American Art 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2002 10 Week Session, Summer 2001 10 Week Session
In-depth study of visual culture in America, from 1960 to the present day, with particular attention to theoretical issues and the intersections of art with the culture at large. Previous course work in history of art recommended.

Contemporary American Art: Read More [+]

HISTART 186A Art in the Early 20th Century 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2013, Fall 2012, Summer 2008 Second 6 Week Session
A consideration of major issues in art of the early 20th century. May focus on a particular place and period (e.g., Art in Paris or 1900-1914) or on a major artistic problem (e.g., Abstraction and Figuration).

Art in the Early 20th Century: Read More [+]

HISTART 186C Art in the Later 20th Century 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2011
A consideration of major issues in art of the present day. Emphases may include conceptual, video, performance, installation and digital art, as well as painting, sculpture and experimental practices.

Art in the Later 20th Century: Read More [+]

HISTART N186C Art in the Later 20th Century 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2010 10 Week Session, Summer 2010 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2007 Second 6 Week Session
This course will take a close look at some of the art produced in Europe and America in the decades following the Second World War. In addition to painting, sculpture, and photography, we will also examine video, performance, and intermedia art. Of particular interest will be defining the balance of concerns demonstrated by artists during this time between form and content, abstraction
and representation, and the intersection of their artworks with culture at large--including issues of technology, the body, commercial economy, and public space. Along with a wide range of images, our discussions will consider theoretical and critical texts.
Art in the Later 20th Century: Read More [+]

HISTART 187AC Race and Representation in the Twentieth Century in the United States 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Summer 2016 First 6 Week Session, Spring 2014
The course examines a series of artistic formations and critiques of racial, ethnic, gender, class and religious identity among the diverse collection of individuals, cultures, and institutions that compose the United States. Material, formal, social, and political contexts will all be considered as we address a wide range of art practices and media.

Race and Representation in the Twentieth Century in the United States: Read More [+]

HISTART 188 Latin American Art 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013
In this course, students will examine how Latin American artists have utilized local indigenous traditions as well as global avant-grade innovations within the context of specific national histories and landscapes. Additionally, students will look at murals, painting, photography, printmaking, street actions, and new media from Colombia, Cuba, Guatemala, and Mexico, as well as contemporary Californian Chicano artistic practices.

Latin American Art: Read More [+]

HISTART 188A Latin American Art: Before Columbus 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2014
This course presents the indigenous artistic traditions of parts of what is now Latin America, from the earliest monuments of the formative periods (e.g. Olmec and Chavín), through acclaimed eras of aesthetic and technological achievement (e.g. Maya and Moche), to the later Inca and Mexica (i.e. Aztec) imperial periods. Our subject encompasses multiple genre including painting and sculpture, textiles and metalwork, architecture and performance. More than
a recitation of periods, styles, and monuments, the course will assess the varieties of evidence available for interpretations of artworks that were created in diverse social, religious, and political settings.
Latin American Art: Before Columbus: Read More [+]

HISTART 189 Museums: An Introduction to the History and Practice of Collecting and the Public View 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2007, Summer 2001 10 Week Session
This course will consider museums from historical, practical, and contemporary ethical perspectives. We will visit four of the museums on the Berkeley campus, and from the various viewpoints of humanities, social science, and natural science, we will examine collecting, exhibition, research, and audience in the early 21st-century museum setting. The course will require reading, discussion, four short writing assignments, and one final
exam.
Museums: An Introduction to the History and Practice of Collecting and the Public View: Read More [+]

HISTART C189 The American Forest: Its Ecology, History, and Representation 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2007, Fall 2004
The American forest will be examined in terms of its ecology, history, and representations in paintings, photographs, and literary essays. This examination seeks to understand the American forest in its scientific and economic parameters, as well as the historic, social, and ideological dimensions which have contributed to the evolution of our present attitudes toward the forest.

The American Forest: Its Ecology, History, and Representation: Read More [+]

HISTART 190A Special Topics in Fields of Art History: Asian 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2013, Spring 2011
Topics explore themes and problems, often reflect current research interests of the instructor, and supplement regular curricular offerings. Open to all interested students, including graduate students. Some background in art history desirable. For specific questions concerning preparation for a 190 course, please see individual instructor. Detailed descriptions of current and future offerings in this series available in 416 Doe Library.

Special Topics in Fields of Art History: Asian: Read More [+]

HISTART 190B Special Topics in Fields of Art History: Ancient 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2014, Fall 2013
Topics explore themes and problems, often reflect current research interests of the instructor, and supplement regular curricular offerings. Open to all interested students, including graduate students. Some background in art history desirable. For specific questions concerning preparation for a 190 course, please see individual instructor. Detailed descriptions of current and future offerings in this series available in 416 Doe Library.

Special Topics in Fields of Art History: Ancient: Read More [+]

HISTART 190C Special Topics in Fields of Art History: Medieval 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2010, Fall 2009
Topics explore themes and problems, often reflect current research interests of the instructor, and supplement regular curricular offerings. Open to all interested students, including graduate students. Some background in art history desirable. For specific questions concerning preparation for a 190 course, please see individual instructor. Detailed descriptions of current and future offerings in this series available in 416 Doe Library.

Special Topics in Fields of Art History: Medieval: Read More [+]

HISTART 190D Special Topics in Fields of Art History: 15th-16th Century 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2008, Spring 2005, Fall 2004
Topics explore themes and problems, often reflect current research interests of the instructor, and supplement regular curricular offerings. Open to all interested students, including graduate students. Some background in art history desirable. For specific questions concerning preparation for a 190 course, please see individual instructor. Detailed descriptions of current and future offerings in this series available in 416 Doe Library.

Special Topics in Fields of Art History: 15th-16th Century: Read More [+]

HISTART 190DH Digital Humanities for Art Historians 6 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
An introduction to methods of digital imaging and computational visualization that are relevant to art historical investigation. Topics may include digital photography, modeling/rendering, and network visualization. Some background in art history desirable. For specific questions concerning preparation, please contact the instructor.

Digital Humanities for Art Historians: Read More [+]

HISTART 190E Special Topics in Fields of Art History: 17th-18th Century 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2009, Spring 2007
Topics explore themes and problems, often reflect current research interests of the instructor, and supplement regular curricular offerings. Open to all interested students, including graduate students. Some background in art history desirable. For specific questions concerning preparation for a 190 course, please see individual instructor. Detailed descriptions of current and future offerings in this series available in 416 Doe Library.

Special Topics in Fields of Art History: 17th-18th Century: Read More [+]

HISTART 190F Special Topics in Fields of Art History: 19th-20th Century 3 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2013, Summer 2012 First 6 Week Session
Topics explore themes and problems, often reflect current research interests of the instructor, and supplement regular curricular offerings. Open to all interested students, including graduate students. Some background in art history desirable. For specific questions concerning preparation for a 190 course, please see individual instructor.

Special Topics in Fields of Art History: 19th-20th Century: Read More [+]

HISTART 190G Special Topics in Fields of Art History: American/British 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Fall 2013, Spring 2010
Topics explore themes and problems, often reflect current research interests of the instructor, and supplement regular curricular offerings. Open to all interested students, including graduate students. Some background in art history desirable. For specific questions concerning preparation for a 190 course, please see individual instructor. Detailed descriptions of current and future offerings in this series available in 416 Doe Library.

Special Topics in Fields of Art History: American/British: Read More [+]

HISTART 190H Special Topics in Fields of Art History: Contemporary 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014
Topics explore themes and problems, often reflect current research interests of the instructor, and supplement regular curricular offerings. Open to all interested students, including graduate students. Some background in art history desirable. For specific questions concerning preparation for a 190 course, please see individual instructor. Detailed descriptions of current and future offerings in this series available in 416 Doe Library.

Special Topics in Fields of Art History: Contemporary: Read More [+]

HISTART 190M Special Topics in Fields of Art History: Global Modernism 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Topics explore themes and problems that often reflect current research interests of the instructor, and supplement regular curricular offerings. Open to all interested students, including graduate students. Some background in art history desirable. For specific questions concerning preparation for a 190 course, please see individual instructor. Detailed descriptions of current and future offerings in this series available in 416 Doe Libr
ary.
Special Topics in Fields of Art History: Global Modernism: Read More [+]

HISTART 190T Transcultural 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2016, Fall 2014
Topics explore themes and problems, often reflect current research interests of the instructor, and supplement regular curricular offerings. Open to all interested students, including graduate students. Some background in art history desirable. For specific questions concerning preparation for a 190 course, please consult individual instructor. Detailed descriptions of current and future offerings in this series available on arthistory.berkeley.edu.
Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Final exam not required.
Transcultural: Read More [+]

HISTART N190 Special Topics in Fields of Art History 0.0 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Topics explore themes and problems, often reflect current research interests of the instructor, and supplement regular curricular offerings. Open to all interested students, including graduate students. Some background in art history desirable. For specific questions concerning preparation for a 190 course, please see individual instructor. Detailed descriptions of current and future offerings in this series available in 416 Doe Library.

Special Topics in Fields of Art History: Read More [+]

HISTART N190A Special Topics in Fields of Art History: Asian 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2010 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2009 First 6 Week Session
Topics explore themes and problems, often reflect current research interests of the instructor, and supplement regular curricular offerings. Open to all interested students, including graduate students. Some background in art history desirable. For specific questions concerning preparation for a 190 course, please see individual instructor. Detailed descriptions of current and future offerings in this series available
in 416 Doe Library.
Special Topics in Fields of Art History: Asian: Read More [+]

HISTART N190B Special Topics in Fields of Art History: Ancient 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2007 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2006 10 Week Session, Summer 1997 10 Week Session
Topics explore themes and problems, often reflect current research interests of the instructor, and supplement regular curricular offerings. Open to all interested students, including graduate students. Some background in art history desirable. For specific questions concerning preparation for a 190 course, please see individual instructor. Detailed descriptions of current and future offerings
in this series available in 416 Doe Library.
Special Topics in Fields of Art History: Ancient: Read More [+]

HISTART N190C Special Topics in Fields of Art History: Medieval 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 1996 10 Week Session
Topics explore themes and problems, often reflect current research interests of the instructor, and supplement regular curricular offerings. Open to all interested students, including graduate students. Some background in art history desirable. For specific questions concerning preparation for a 190 course, please see individual instructor. Detailed descriptions of current and future offerings in this series available in 416 Doe Library.

Special Topics in Fields of Art History: Medieval: Read More [+]

HISTART N190D Special Topics in Fields of Art History: 15th-16th Century 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2012 10 Week Session, Summer 2012 Second 6 Week Session
Topics explore themes and problems, often reflect current research interests of the instructor, and supplement regular curricular offerings. Open to all interested students, including graduate students. Some background in art history desirable. For specific questions concerning preparation for a 190 course, please see individual instructor. Detailed descriptions of current and future offerings in this series available
in 416 Doe Library.
Special Topics in Fields of Art History: 15th-16th Century: Read More [+]

HISTART N190E Special Topics in Fields of Art History: 17th-18th Century 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2003 10 Week Session, Summer 1997 10 Week Session
Topics explore themes and problems, often reflect current research interests of the instructor, and supplement regular curricular offerings. Open to all interested students, including graduate students. Some background in art history desirable. For specific questions concerning preparation for a 190 course, please see individual instructor. Detailed descriptions of current and future offerings in this series available in
416 Doe Library.
Special Topics in Fields of Art History: 17th-18th Century: Read More [+]

HISTART N190F Special Topics in Fields of Art History: 19th-20th Century 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2007 10 Week Session, Summer 2007 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2006 10 Week Session
Topics explore themes and problems, often reflect current research interests of the instructor, and supplement regular curricular offerings. Open to all interested students, including graduate students. Some background in art history desirable. For specific questions concerning preparation for a 190 course, please see individual instructor. Detailed descriptions of current and future offerings
in this series available in 416 Doe Library.
Special Topics in Fields of Art History: 19th-20th Century: Read More [+]

HISTART N190G Special Topics in Fields of Art History: American/British 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Topics explore themes and problems, often reflect current research interests of the instructor, and supplement regular curricular offerings. Open to all interested students, including graduate students. Some background in art history desirable. For specific questions concerning preparation for a 190 course, please see individual instructor. Detailed descriptions of current and future offerings in this series available in 416 Doe Library.

Special Topics in Fields of Art History: American/British: Read More [+]

HISTART N190H Special Topics in Fields of Art History: Precolumbian/Latin American 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Topics explore themes and problems, often reflect current research interests of the instructor, and supplement regular curricular offerings. Open to all interested students, including graduate students. Some background in art history desirable. For specific questions concerning preparation for a 190 course, please see individual instructor. Detailed descriptions of current and future offerings in this series available in 416 Doe Library.

Special Topics in Fields of Art History: Precolumbian/Latin American: Read More [+]

HISTART 192A Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: Asian 2 or 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Concentration on specific problems or works in a particular area of art history. Assigned readings, discussion, and a substantial paper. For specific topics and enrollment, see listings outside 416 Doe Library.

Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: Asian: Read More [+]

HISTART 192AC Undergraduate Seminar: Folk Art in America 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2008, Fall 2003
This seminar will look at specific case studies of the production and use of architecture, paintings, and quilting within specific communities in what is now the United States. We will look, for instance, at Shaker watercolors and design; Puritan painting and city planning; Amish, Hawaiian, and Hmong quilting; the ledger drawings and domestic structures of specific Native American groups; and the sacred architecture of the Hispanic southwest. Our timeframe
spans four centuries but our "geographies" will be very focused. We will consider vernacular or folk production within the context of politics and economics as well as aesthetic and social theory.
Undergraduate Seminar: Folk Art in America: Read More [+]

HISTART 192B Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: Ancient 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Concentration on specific problems or works in a particular area of art history. Assigned readings, discussion, and a substantial paper. For specific topics and enrollment, see listings outside 416 Doe Library.

Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: Ancient: Read More [+]

HISTART 192C Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: Medieval 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2013, Fall 2012
Concentration on specific problems or works in a particular area of art history. Assigned readings, discussion, and a substantial paper. For specific topics and enrollment, see listings outside 416 Doe Library.

Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: Medieval: Read More [+]

HISTART 192CU Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: Curatorial 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Concentration on specific problems or works in a particular area of art history. Assigned readings, discussion, and a substantial paper. For specific topics and enrollment, see listings outside 416 Doe Library.

Curators are actively engaged in museum related affairs, which might include: research on museum collections, matters of administration and policy, donors, approval of loans and exchanges. In addition, curators are expected
to share their research with the public and community through exhibitions and publications.
Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: Curatorial: Read More [+]

HISTART 192D Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: 15th-16th Century 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2014
Concentration on specific problems or works in a particular area of art history. Assigned readings, discussion, and a substantial paper. For specific topics and enrollment, see listings outside 416 Doe Library.

Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: 15th-16th Century: Read More [+]

HISTART 192DH Undergraduate Seminar: Digital Imaging and Forensic Art History 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2014
An introduction to digital modeling and rendering as forms of art-historical investigation. A series of case studies will allow students to explore the research possibilities presented by this new medium. Students will construct their own digital models as part of a research project.

Undergraduate Seminar: Digital Imaging and Forensic Art History: Read More [+]

HISTART 192E Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: 17th-18th Century 2 or 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Concentration on specific problems or works in a particular area of art history. Assigned readings, discussion, and a substantial paper. For specific topics and enrollment, see listings outside 416 Doe Library.

Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: 17th-18th Century: Read More [+]

HISTART 192F Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: 19th-20th Century 2 or 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016
Concentration on specific problems or works in a particular area of art history. Assigned readings, discussion, and a substantial paper. For specific topics and enrollment, see listings outside 416 Doe Library.

Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: 19th-20th Century: Read More [+]

HISTART 192G Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: Undergraduate Seminar: American Art, Architecture, and Design 2 or 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Problems in American and British art, architecture, design of the 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th, or 21st centuries; art institutions, collecting, or related topics.

Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: Undergraduate Seminar: American Art, Architecture, and Design: Read More [+]

HISTART 192H Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: Modern/Contemporary Art 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2012, Fall 2008
This undergraduate semiar examines the resurgence of craft within contemporary art and theory. In a time when much art is outsourced--fabricated by large stables of assistants--what does it mean when artists return to traditional, and traditionally laborious, methods of handiwork such as knitting, ceramics, or woodworking? Our readings will consider historical and theoretical questions of process, materiality, skill, bodily effort, gendered labor
, and alternative economies of production.
Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: Modern/Contemporary Art: Read More [+]

HISTART 192L Undergraduate Seminar: Latin American 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
This seminar will focus on a particular theme or corpus of art and visual culture from the Pre-Columbian, colonial, and/or modern and contemporary periods of areas of what is now Latin America. Topics will vary with each offering.

Undergraduate Seminar: Latin American: Read More [+]

HISTART 192M Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: Global Modernism 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2014
This seminar will focus on a particular theme or corpus of art and visual culture from a cross-cultural perspective within a modern context. Topics will vary with each offering. Assigned readings, discussion, and a substantial paper. For specific topics and enrollment, see listings outside 416 Doe Library.

Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: Global Modernism: Read More [+]

HISTART 192T Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: Transcultural 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Concentration on specific problems in art history as a transcultural inquiry, across multiple or varying cultural contexts. Assigned readings, discussion, and a substantial paper. For specific topics and enrollment, see listings on arthistory.berkely.edu.

Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Research and Interpretation: Transcultural: Read More [+]

HISTART 193 Directed Research 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
Intended for advanced undergraduates wishing to continue research on topics already begun in a lecture or seminar or to pursue at a high level specialized topics not ordinarily covered in the curriculum. Usually results in a substantial paper. For general independent study see 199; for honors research, see H195.

Directed Research: Read More [+]

HISTART 194 Museum Internship 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Study and practical professional experience, usually for no fewer than 10 hours per week, involving a substantial project of a curatorial nature. Jointly supervised by a member of the professional staff of the participating museum and a faculty member. Internships ordinarily must be arranged well in advance; for further information, inquire at 416 Doe Library.

Museum Internship: Read More [+]

HISTART H195 Special Study for Honors Candidates in the History of Art 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Directed study leading to the completion of the honors thesis. Consult the description of the Honors Program in Art History.

Special Study for Honors Candidates in the History of Art: Read More [+]

HISTART C196A UCDC Core Seminar 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Fall 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2012, Spring 2012
This course is the UCDC letter-graded core seminar for 4 units that complements the P/NP credited internship course UGIS C196B. Core seminars are designed to enhance the experience of and provide an intellectual framework for the student's internship. UCDC core seminars are taught in sections that cover various tracks such as the Congress
, media, bureaucratic organizations and the Executive Branch, international relations, public policy and general un-themed original research.
UCDC Core Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTART C196B UCDC Internship 6.5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Fall 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2012, Spring 2012
This course provides a credited internship for all students enrolled in the UCDC and Cal in the Capital Programs. It must be taken in conjunction with the required academic core course C196A. C196B requires that students work 3-4 days per week as interns in settings selected to provide them with exposure to and experienc in government
, public policy, international affairs, media, the arts or other areas or relevance to their major fields of study.
UCDC Internship: Read More [+]

HISTART C196W Special Field Research 10.5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2014, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
Students work in selected internship programs approved in advance by the faculty coordinator and for which written contracts have been established between the sponsoring organization and the student. Students will be expected to produce two progress reports for their faculty coordinator during the course of the internship, as well as a final paper for the course
consisting of at least 35 pages. Other restrictions apply; see faculty adviser.
Special Field Research: Read More [+]

HISTART 198 Supervised Group Study 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Instruction for a small group of students on a topic initiated by those students.

Supervised Group Study: Read More [+]

HISTART 199 Supervised Independent Study 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
For students wishing to pursue an interest not represented in the curriculum by developing an individual program of study supervised by a faculty member. Study may involve readings, projects, papers, fieldwork, etc. For continuing or advanced research projects, see 193.

Supervised Independent Study: Read More [+]

HISTART N199 Supervised Independent Study 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2011 10 Week Session, Summer 2006 10 Week Session, Summer 2004 10 Week Session
For students wishing to pursue an interest not represented in the curriculum by developing an individual program of study supervised by a faculty member. Study may involve readings, projects, papers, fieldwork, etc. For continuing or advanced research projects, see 193.

Supervised Independent Study: Read More [+]

Faculty and Instructors

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

Diliana Angelova, Assistant Professor. Gender, early Christian art, Byzantine art, late antique art, the Virgin Mary, early Christian empresses, imperial iconography, power and material culture, the empress Helena, the relic of the True Cross, urban development of Constantinople, textiles, ivories, mythology in Byzantine art, myth and genre in Archaic and Classical Greek art, romantic love in ancient and medieval art.
Research Profile

Patricia Berger, Professor. China, buddhist art, East Asian studies, history of art, Asian architecture and art.
Research Profile

Julia Q. Bryan-Wilson, Associate Professor. Contemporary art, feminist theory, queer theory.
Research Profile

Whitney Davis, Professor.

Beate Fricke, Associate Professor. Medieval art and architecture, idolatry, iconoclasm, history of allegory, formation of communities, incest, anthropophagy, animation, emergence of life and procreation, theories and practices in use of images and relics, visual and material culture, Carolingian Art, Gothic Art, Ottonian Art.
Research Profile

+ Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby, Professor.

Christopher Hallett, Professor. Classics, Roman art, visual culture, portraiture, Hellenistic art, Roman Asia Minor, Hellenistic and Roman Egypt.
Research Profile

Imogen Hart, Assistant Adjunct Professor.

Elizabeth A. Honig, Associate Professor. Painting, Rome, baroque, Renaissance, Antwerp, digital humanities, Brueghel, Rubens.
Research Profile

Lauren Kroiz, Assistant Professor. History and theory of photography and new media, race and ethnic studies, the relationships between regionalism, nationalism and globalism.

Henrike Lange, Assistant Professor.

Anneka Lenssen, Assistant Professor.

Gregory Levine, Associate Professor. East Asian studies, history of art, Japanese art and architecture, histories of collecting, history of museums, Buddhist art and architecture, Buddhist visual culture.
Research Profile

Margaretta M. Lovell, Professor. Architecture, design, American art.
Research Profile

Sabrina Sonia Maras, Assistant Adjunct Professor.

Todd Olson, Professor.

Sugata Ray, Assistant Professor. Early modern, visual culture, Hinduism, Islam, architecture, Urban cultures, environmental studies, ecology, aesthetics, globalization, postcolonial studies, colonialism, museums, historiography, art history, India, South Asia.
Research Profile

+ Andrew F. Stewart, Professor. Archaeology, classics, Greek sculpture, ancient art and architecture, the Hellenistic east after Alexander, the Renaissance reception of antiquity.
Research Profile

Lisa Trever, Assistant Professor. Pre-Columbian Art History, Latin American Art History, archaeology, visual studies, historiography, Illustration.
Research Profile

Lecturers

Ivy Mills, Lecturer.

Catherine Mary Telfair, Lecturer.

Emeritus Faculty

+ Svetlana Alpers, Professor Emeritus.

Timothy J. Clark, Professor Emeritus.

Jacques De Caso, Professor Emeritus. History of European art of the XVIIIIth and XIXth centuries.
Research Profile

Loren Partridge, Professor Emeritus. Urbanism, architecture, Italian Renaissance painting, sculpture, Rome, Florence, Venice, Italian courts, churches, palaces, villas, fresco decoration.
Research Profile

Peter Selz, Professor Emeritus.

Anne Wagner, Professor Emeritus.

David H. Wright, Professor Emeritus. Art from Augustus to Charlemagne, palaeography and codicology, late Roman numismatics.
Research Profile

Contact Information

Department of the History of Art

416 Doe Library #6020

Phone: 510-643-7290

Fax: 510-643-2185

art_history@berkeley.edu

Visit Department Website

Department Chair

Patricia Berger

416 Doe Library

Phone: 510-643-7290

bcwade@berkeley.edu

Undergraduate Student Services Adviser

Amy Tamayo

416 Doe Library

Phone: 510-643-7290

atamayo@berkeley.edu

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