Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences/Nuclear Engineering Joint Major

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

Bachelor of Science (BS)

The joint major programs are designed for students who wish to undertake study in two areas of engineering in order to qualify for employment in either field or for positions in which competence in two fields is required. These curricula include the core courses in each of the major fields. While they require slightly increased course loads, they can be completed in four years. 

The electrical engineering and computer sciences (EECS)/nuclear engineering (NE) joint major combines the traditional electrical engineering (EE) program with one in the nuclear sciences. Nuclear engineering shares with electrical engineering a concern for electrical power generation, automatic control, computer sciences, and plasmas.

Admission to the Joint Major

Admission directly to a joint major is closed to freshmen and junior transfer applicants. Students interested in a joint program may apply to change majors during specific times in their academic progress. Please see the College of Engineering joint majors website for complete details.

Visit Program Website

Major Requirements

In addition to the University, campus, and college requirements, students must fulfill the below requirements specific to their major program.

General Guidelines

  1. All technical courses taken in satisfaction of major requirements must be taken for a letter grade.

  2. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student’s major and minor programs.

  3. A minimum overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required for all work undertaken at UC Berkeley.

  4. A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required for all technical courses taken in satisfaction of major requirements.

For information regarding residence requirements and unit requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.

For a detailed plan of study by year and semester, please see the Plan of Study tab.

Lower Division Requirements

MATH 1ACalculus4
MATH 1BCalculus4
MATH 53Multivariable Calculus4
MATH 54Linear Algebra and Differential Equations4
CHEM 1A
1AL
General Chemistry
and General Chemistry Laboratory 1
4
or CHEM 4A General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis
PHYSICS 7A
PHYSICS 7B
PHYSICS 7C
Physics for Scientists and Engineers
and Physics for Scientists and Engineers
and Physics for Scientists and Engineers
12-13
or PHYSICS 5A
PHYSICS 5B
PHYSICS 5BL
PHYSICS 5C
PHYSICS 5CL
Introductory Mechanics and Relativity
and Introductory Electromagnetism, Waves, and Optics
and Introduction to Experimental Physics I
and Introductory Thermodynamics and Quantum Mechanics
and Introduction to Experimental Physics II
ENGIN 40Engineering Thermodynamics4
MAT SCI 45Properties of Materials3
MAT SCI 45LProperties of Materials Laboratory1
EECS 16ADesigning Information Devices and Systems I4
EECS 16BDesigning Information Devices and Systems II4
COMPSCI 61AThe Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs4
or ENGIN 7 Introduction to Computer Programming for Scientists and Engineers
COMPSCI 61BData Structures4
or COMPSCI 61BL Data Structures and Programming Methodology

Upper Division Requirements

NUC ENG 100Introduction to Nuclear Energy and Technology3
NUC ENG 101Nuclear Reactions and Radiation4
NUC ENG 104Radiation Detection and Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory4
NUC ENG 150Introduction to Nuclear Reactor Theory4
NUC ENG 170ANuclear Design: Design in Nuclear Power Technology and Instrumentation3
EL ENG 105Microelectronic Devices and Circuits4
EL ENG 117Electromagnetic Fields and Waves4
EL ENG 120Signals and Systems4
STAT 134Concepts of Probability4
or EL ENG 126 Probability and Random Processes
Ethics Requirement 13-4
NUC ENG upper division Technical Electives: Select 9 units in consultation with faculty adviser (see below).9
EECS upper division Technical Electives: Select 8 units in consultation with faculty adviser (see below).8

Nuclear Engineering Technical Electives

Students must complete at least 9 units of upper division nuclear engineering courses from the following groups. The groups are presented to aid undergraduate students in focusing their choices on specific professional goals; however, the electives selected need not be from any single group. Courses listed from other departments in these groups may be taken to provide further depth but may not be used toward the 9 units.

Beam and Accelerator Applications
PHYSICS 110AElectromagnetism and Optics4
PHYSICS 110BElectromagnetism and Optics4
PHYSICS 129Particle Physics4
PHYSICS 139Special Relativity and General Relativity3
PHYSICS 142Introduction to Plasma Physics4
NUC ENG 155Introduction to Numerical Simulations in Radiation Transport3
NUC ENG 180Introduction to Controlled Fusion3
Bionuclear Engineering
BIO ENG C165Medical Imaging Signals and Systems4
EL ENG 120Signals and Systems4
NUC ENG 107Introduction to Imaging3
NUC ENG 162Radiation Biophysics and Dosimetry3
Fission Power Engineering
MEC ENG 106Fluid Mechanics3-4
or CHM ENG 150A Transport Processes
MEC ENG 109Heat Transfer3-4
or CHM ENG 150A Transport Processes
NUC ENG 120Nuclear Materials4
NUC ENG 124Radioactive Waste Management3
NUC ENG 155Introduction to Numerical Simulations in Radiation Transport3
NUC ENG 161Nuclear Power Engineering4
NUC ENG 167Risk-Informed Design for Advanced Nuclear Systems3
NUC ENG 175Methods of Risk Analysis3
Fusion Power Engineering
PHYSICS 110AElectromagnetism and Optics4
PHYSICS 110BElectromagnetism and Optics4
PHYSICS 142Introduction to Plasma Physics4
NUC ENG 120Nuclear Materials4
NUC ENG 180Introduction to Controlled Fusion3
NUC ENG 155Introduction to Numerical Simulations in Radiation Transport3
Homeland Security and Nonproliferation
CHEM 143Nuclear Chemistry2
PHYSICS 110AElectromagnetism and Optics4
PHYSICS 110BElectromagnetism and Optics4
PHYSICS 111AInstrumentation Laboratory3
PHYSICS 111BAdvanced Experimentation Laboratory1-3
NUC ENG 107Introduction to Imaging3
NUC ENG 130Analytical Methods for Non-proliferation3
NUC ENG 155Introduction to Numerical Simulations in Radiation Transport3
NUC ENG 175Methods of Risk Analysis3
Materials in Nuclear Technology
MAT SCI 102Bonding, Crystallography, and Crystal Defects3
MAT SCI 104Materials Characterization4
MAT SCI 112Corrosion (Chemical Properties)3
MAT SCI 113Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials3
NUC ENG 120Nuclear Materials4
NUC ENG 124Radioactive Waste Management3
NUC ENG 155Introduction to Numerical Simulations in Radiation Transport3
NUC ENG 161Nuclear Power Engineering4
Nuclear Fuel Cycles and Waste Management
CHM ENG 150ATransport Processes4
CHM ENG 150BTransport and Separation Processes4
ENGIN 120Principles of Engineering Economics3
MAT SCI 112Corrosion (Chemical Properties)3
NUC ENG 120Nuclear Materials4
NUC ENG 124Radioactive Waste Management3
NUC ENG 155Introduction to Numerical Simulations in Radiation Transport3
NUC ENG 161Nuclear Power Engineering4
NUC ENG 175Methods of Risk Analysis3
Radiation and Health Physics
NUC ENG 120Nuclear Materials4
NUC ENG 155Introduction to Numerical Simulations in Radiation Transport3
NUC ENG 162Radiation Biophysics and Dosimetry3
NUC ENG 180Introduction to Controlled Fusion3
Risk, Safety and Systems Analysis
CIV ENG 193Engineering Risk Analysis3
CHM ENG 150ATransport Processes4
ENGIN 120Principles of Engineering Economics3
IND ENG 166Decision Analytics3
NUC ENG 120Nuclear Materials4
NUC ENG 124Radioactive Waste Management3
NUC ENG 155Introduction to Numerical Simulations in Radiation Transport3
NUC ENG 161Nuclear Power Engineering4
NUC ENG 167Risk-Informed Design for Advanced Nuclear Systems3
NUC ENG 175Methods of Risk Analysis3

Electrical Engineering Technical Electives

Students must complete at least 8 units of upper division electrical engineering courses from the following groups:

Electromagnetics and Plasmas
EL ENG 118Introduction to Optical Engineering3
EL ENG C239Partially Ionized Plasmas3
Electronics
EL ENG 130Integrated-Circuit Devices4
EL ENG 140Linear Integrated Circuits4
EL ENG 143Microfabrication Technology4
EECS 151
151LA
Introduction to Digital Design and Integrated Circuits
and Application Specific Integrated Circuits Laboratory
5
or EECS 151
151LB
Introduction to Digital Design and Integrated Circuits
and Field-Programmable Gate Array Laboratory
Power Systems and Control
EL ENG 113Power Electronics4
EL ENG C128Feedback Control Systems4
EL ENG 134Fundamentals of Photovoltaic Devices4
EL ENG 137AIntroduction to Electric Power Systems4
EL ENG 137BIntroduction to Electric Power Systems4

Five-Year BS/MS

This program is geared toward students who would like to pursue an education beyond the BS/BA, allowing them to achieve greater breadth and/or depth of knowledge, and who would like to try their hand at research as well. It is not intended for students who have definitely decided to pursue a PhD immediately following graduation. Those students are advised to apply for a PhD program at Berkeley or elsewhere during their senior year. Students who have been accepted into the five-year BA/MS or BS/MS are free to change their minds later and apply to enter the PhD program or apply to a PhD program at another university. Note that admission is competitive with all our PhD applicants.

The program is focused on interdisciplinary training at a graduate level; with at least 8 units of course work outside EECS required. Students will emerge as leaders in their technical and professional fields.

  • Focused on interdisciplinary study and more experience in aligned technical fields such as physics, materials science, statistics, biology, etc., and/or professional disciplines such as management of technology, business, law and public policy.
  • If admitted to the program, students must begin the graduate portion in the semester immediately following the conferral of the bachelor's degree.
  • Only one additional year (two semesters) is permitted beyond the bachelor's degree.
  • Only available to Berkeley EECS and L&S CS undergraduates.
  • Participants in program may serve as graduate student instructors with approval from their faculty research adviser and the 5th Year MS Committee.
  • Participants in program are self-funded.

For further information regarding this program, please see the department's website

College Requirements

Students in the College of Engineering must complete no fewer than 120 semester units with the following provisions: 

  1. Completion of the requirements of one engineering major program study. 
  2. A minimum overall grade point average of 2.00 (C average) and a minimum 2.00 grade point average in upper division technical coursework required of the major.
  3. The final 30 units and two semesters must be completed in residence in the College of Engineering on the Berkeley campus.
  4. All technical courses (math, science and engineering) that can fulfill requirements for the student's major must be taken on a letter graded basis (unless they are only offered P/NP). 
  5. Entering freshmen are allowed a maximum of eight semesters to complete their degree requirements. Entering junior transfers are allowed a maximum of four semesters to complete their degree requirements. (Note: junior transfers admitted missing three or more courses from the lower division curriculum are allowed five semesters.) Summer terms are optional and do not count toward the maximum. Students are responsible for planning and satisfactorily completing all graduation requirements within the maximum allowable semesters. 
  6. Adhere to all college policies and procedures as they complete degree requirements.
  7. Complete the lower division program before enrolling in upper division engineering courses. 

Humanities and Social Sciences (H/SS) Requirement

To promote a rich and varied educational experience outside of the technical requirements for each major, the College of Engineering has a six-course Humanities and Social Sciences breadth requirement, which must be completed to graduate. This requirement, built into all the engineering programs of study, includes two reading and composition courses (R&C), and four additional courses within which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. Follow these guidelines to fulfill this requirement:

  1. Complete a minimum of six courses from the  approved Humanities/Social Sciences (H/SS) lists
  2. Courses must be a minimum of 3 semester units (or 4 quarter units).
  3. Two of the six courses must fulfill the College's Reading and Composition (R&C) requirement. These courses must be taken for a letter grade (C- or better required). The first half (R&C Part A) must be completed by the end of the freshman year; the second half (R&C Part B) must be completed by no later than the end of the sophomore year. Please see the Reading and Composition Requirement page for a complete list of R&Cs available and a list of exams that can be applied toward the R&C Part A requirement. Students can also use the Class Schedule to view R&C courses offered in a given semester.  Note: Only R&C Part A can be fulfilled with an AP, IB, or A-Level exam score. Test scores do not fulfill R&C Part B for College of Engineering students.
  4. The four additional courses must be chosen from the five areas listed in #13 below. These four courses may be taken on a pass/no pass basis.
  5. Special topics courses of 3 semester units or more will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis.
  6. Two of the six courses must be upper division (courses numbered 100-196).
  7. One of the six courses must satisfy the campus American Cultures (AC) requirement. Note that any American Cultures course of 3 units or more may be used to meet H/SS 
  8. A maximum of two exams (Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, or A-Level) may be used toward completion of the H/SS requirement. View the list of exams that can be applied toward H/SS requirements.
  9. No courses offered by any engineering department other than BIO ENG 100, COMPSCI C79, ENGIN 125, ENGIN 157AC, ENGIN 185, and MEC ENG 191K may be used to complete H/SS requirements.
  10. Language courses may be used to complete H/SS requirements. View the list of language options.
  11. Courses may fulfill multiple categories. For example, CY PLAN 118AC satisfies both the American Cultures requirement and one upper division H/SS requirement.
  12. Courses numbered 97, 98, 99, or above 196 may not be used to complete any H/SS requirement.
  13. The College of Engineering uses modified versions of five of the College of Letters and Science (L&S) breadth requirements lists to provide options to our students for completing the H/SS requirement. The five areas are:
  • Arts and Literature
  • Historical Studies
  • International Studies
  • Philosophy and Values
  • Social and Behavioral Sciences

Within the guidelines above, choose courses from any of the Breadth areas listed above. (Please note that you cannot use courses on the Biological Science or Physical Science Breadth list to complete the H/SS requirement.) To find course options, go to the Class Schedule, select the term of interest, and use the Breadth Requirements filter.

Class Schedule Requirements

  • Minimum units per semester: 12.0
  • Maximum units per semester:  20.5
  • Minimum technical courses: College of Engineering undergraduates must enroll each semester in no fewer than two technical courses (of a minimum of 3 units each, with the exception of Engineering 25, 26 and 27) required of the major program of study in which the student is officially declared. (Note: For most majors, normal progress will require enrolling in 3-4 technical courses each semester). Students who are not in compliance with this policy by the end of the fifth week of the semester are subject to a registration block that will delay enrollment for the following semester. 
  • All technical courses (math, science, engineering) that satisfy requirements for the major must be taken on a letter-graded basis (unless only offered as P/NP).

Minimum Academic (Grade) Requirements

  • A minimum overall and semester grade point average of 2.00 (C average) is required of engineering undergraduates. Students will be subject to dismissal from the University if during any fall or spring semester their overall UC GPA falls below a 2.00, or their semester GPA is less than 2.00. 
  • Students must achieve a minimum grade point average of 2.00 (C average) in upper division technical courses required for the major curriculum each semester.
  • A minimum overall grade point average of 2.00, and a minimum 2.00 grade point average in upper division technical course work required for the major is needed to earn a Bachelor of Science in Engineering.

Unit Requirements

To earn a Bachelor of Science in Engineering, students must complete at least 120 semester units of courses subject to certain guidelines:

  • Completion of the requirements of one engineering major program of study. 
  • A maximum of 16 units of special studies coursework (courses numbered 97, 98, 99, 197, 198, or 199) is allowed towards B.S. degree, and no more than 4 units in any single term can be counteds.
  • A maximum of 4 units of physical education from any school attended will count towards the 120 units.
  • Passed (P) grades may account for no more than one third of the total units completed at UC Berkeley, Fall Program for Freshmen (FPF), UC Education Abroad Program (UCEAP), or UC Berkeley Washington Program (UCDC) toward the 120 overall minimum unit requirement. Transfer credit is not factored into the limit. This includes transfer units from outside of the UC system, other UC campuses, credit-bearing exams, as well as UC Berkeley Extension XB units.

Normal Progress

Students in the College of Engineering must enroll in a full-time program and make normal progress each semester toward the bachelor's degree. The continued enrollment of students who fail to achieve minimum academic progress shall be subject to the approval of the dean. (Note: Students with official accommodations established by the Disabled Students' Program, with health or family issues, or with other reasons deemed appropriate by the dean may petition for an exception to normal progress rules.) 

UC and Campus Requirements

University of California Requirements

Entry Level Writing

All students who will enter the University of California as freshmen must demonstrate their command of the English language by fulfilling the Entry Level Writing Requirement. Satisfaction of this requirement is also a prerequisite to enrollment in all Reading and Composition courses at UC Berkeley.

American History and American Institutions

The American History and Institutions requirements are based on the principle that a U.S. resident graduated from an American university should have an understanding of the history and governmental institutions of the United States.

Campus Requirement

American Cultures

The American Cultures requirement is a Berkeley campus requirement, one that all undergraduate students at Berkeley need to pass in order to graduate. You satisfy the requirement by passing, with a grade not lower than C- or P, an American Cultures course. You may take an American Cultures course any time during your undergraduate career at Berkeley. The requirement was instituted in 1991 to introduce students to the diverse cultures of the United States through a comparative framework. Courses are offered in more than fifty departments in many different disciplines at both the lower and upper division level.

The American Cultures requirement and courses constitute an approach that responds directly to the problem encountered in numerous disciplines of how better to present the diversity of American experience to the diversity of American students whom we now educate.

Faculty members from many departments teach American Cultures courses, but all courses have a common framework. The courses focus on themes or issues in United States history, society, or culture; address theoretical or analytical issues relevant to understanding race, culture, and ethnicity in American society; take substantial account of groups drawn from at least three of the following: African Americans, indigenous peoples of the United States, Asian Americans, Chicano/Latino Americans, and European Americans; and are integrative and comparative in that students study each group in the larger context of American society, history, or culture.

This is not an ethnic studies requirement, nor a Third World cultures requirement, nor an adjusted Western civilization requirement. These courses focus upon how the diversity of America's constituent cultural traditions have shaped and continue to shape American identity and experience.

Visit the Class Schedule or the American Cultures website for the specific American Cultures courses offered each semester. For a complete list of approved American Cultures courses at UC Berkeley and California Community Colleges, please see the American Cultures Subcommittee’s website. See your academic adviser if you have questions about your responsibility to satisfy the American Cultures breadth requirement.

Plan of Study

For more detailed information regarding the courses listed below (e.g., elective information, GPA requirements, etc.), please see the Major Requirements tab.

Freshman
FallUnitsSpringUnits
CHEM 4A or 1A and 1AL4MATH 1B4
MATH 1A4COMPSCI 61B or 61BL4
COMPSCI 61A or ENGIN 74PHYSICS 7A or 5A13-4
Reading & Composition Part A Course44Reading & Composition Part B Course44
 16 15-16
Sophomore
FallUnitsSpringUnits
EECS 16A4EECS 16B4
MAT SCI 453MATH 544
MAT SCI 45L1PHYSICS 7C or 5C and 5CL14-5
MATH 534Humanities/Social Sciences Course43-4
PHYSICS 7B or 5B and 5BL14-5 
 16-17 15-17
Junior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
EL ENG 1204NUC ENG 1014
ENGIN 404NUC ENG 1504
NUC ENG 1003STAT 134 or EL ENG 1264
Humanities/Social Sciences course with Ethics content2,43-4Humanities/Social Sciences course43-4
 14-15 15-16
Senior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
EL ENG 1054EL ENG 1174
NUC ENG 1044NUC ENG 170A3
Technical Electives39Technical Electives38
 Humanities/Social Sciences course43-4
 17 18-19
Total Units: 126-133

Student Learning Goals

 

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

MISSION
  1. Preparing graduates to pursue postgraduate education in electrical engineering, computer science, or related fields.
  2. Preparing graduates for success in technical careers related to electrical and computer engineering, or computer science and engineering.
  3. Preparing graduates to become leaders in fields related to electrical and computer engineering or computer science and engineering.
LEARNING GOALS
ECE
  1. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.
  2. An ability to configure, apply test conditions, and evaluate outcomes of experimental systems.
  3. An ability to design systems, components, or processes that conform to given specifications and cost constraints.
  4. An ability to work cooperatively, respectfully, creatively, and responsibly as a member of a team.
  5. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  6. An understanding of the norms of expected behavior in engineering practice and their underlying ethical foundations.
  7. An ability to communicate effectively by oral, written, and graphical means.
  8. An awareness of global and societal concerns and their importance in developing engineering solutions.
  9. An ability to independently acquire and apply required information, and an appreciation of the associated process of life-long learning.
  10. A knowledge of contemporary issues.
  11. An in-depth ability to use a combination of software, instrumentation, and experimental techniques practiced in circuits, physical electronics, communication, networks and systems, hardware, programming, and computer science theory.
CSE
  1. An ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the program’s student outcomes and to the discipline.
  2. An ability to analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution.
  3. An ability to design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component, or program to meet desired needs.
  4. An ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal.
  5. An understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security and social issues and responsibilities.
  6. An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences.
  7. An ability to analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations, and society.
  8. Recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in continuing professional development.
  9.  An ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practice.

Nuclear Engineering

MISSION

The mission of the Department of Nuclear Engineering is to maintain and strengthen the University of California's only center of excellence in nuclear engineering education and research and to serve California and the nation by improving and applying nuclear science and technology. The mission of the undergraduate degree program in Nuclear Engineering is to prepare our students to begin a lifetime of technical achievement and professional leadership in academia, government, the national laboratories, and industry.

LEARNING GOALS

The foundation of the UC Berkeley Nuclear Engineering (NE) program is a set of five key objectives for educating undergraduate students. The NE program continuously reviews these objectives internally to ensure that they meet the current needs of the students, and each spring the Program Advisory Committee meets to review the program and recommend changes to better serve students. The NE Program Advisory Committee was established in 1988 and is composed of senior leaders from industry, the national laboratories, and academia.

Nuclear engineering at UC Berkeley prepares undergraduate students for employment or advanced studies with four primary constituencies: industry, the national laboratories, state and federal agencies, and academia (graduate research programs). Graduate research programs are the dominant constituency. From 2000 to 2005, sixty-eight percent of graduating NE seniors indicated plans to attend graduate school in their senior exit surveys. To meet the needs of these constituencies, the objectives of the NE undergraduate program are to produce graduates who as practicing engineers and researchers do the following:

  1. Apply solid knowledge of the fundamental mathematics and natural (both physical and biological) sciences that provide the foundation for engineering applications.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of nuclear processes, and the application of general natural science and engineering principles to the analysis and design of nuclear and related systems of current and/or future importance to society.
  3. Exhibit strong, independent learning, analytical and problem-solving skills, with special emphasis on design, communication, and an ability to work in teams.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the broad social, ethical, safety, and environmental context within which nuclear engineering is practiced.
  5. Value and practice life-long learning.

Courses

Select a subject to view courses

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

Nuclear Engineering

Faculty and Instructors

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

Pieter Abbeel, Associate Professor. Artificial Intelligence (AI), Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Machine Learning.
Research Profile

Elad Alon, Professor. Integrated Circuits (INC), Micro/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), Communications & Networking (COMNET), Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA).
Research Profile

Venkat Anantharam, Professor. Communications & Networking (COMNET), Artificial Intelligence (AI), Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Security (SEC), Signal Processing (SP).
Research Profile

Murat Arcack, Professor. Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO).
Research Profile

Ana Claudia Arias, Associate Professor. Physical Electronics (PHY), Flexible and Printed Electronics, Energy (ENE).

Krste Asanovic, Professor. Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC), Integrated Circuits (INC), Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT),Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA).
Research Profile

Babak Ayazifar, Professor. Education (EDUC), Signal processing and system theory EDUCATION: Development of pedagogical techniques and assessment tools , Signal Processing (SP), Graph signal processing.

Jonathan Bachrach, Adjunct Assistant Professor. Programming Systems (PS), Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC), Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA).

Ruzena Bajcsy, Professor. Artificial Intelligence (AI), Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO), Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Graphics (GR), Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), Computer vision, Bridging information technology to humanities and social sciences, Security (SEC).
Research Profile

Brian A. Barsky, Professor. Computer science, geometric design and modeling, computer graphics, computer aided cornea modeling and visualization, medical imaging, virtual environments for surgical simulation.
Research Profile

Peter L. Bartlett, Professor. Statistics, machine learning, statistical learning theory, adaptive control.
Research Profile

Alexandre M. Bayen, Professor. Transportation, modelling and control of distributed parameters systems, large scale infrastructure systems, water distribution.
Research Profile

Jeffrey Bokor, Professor. Physical Electronics (PHY), Nanotechnology.
Research Profile

Bernhard Boser, Professor. Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO), Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA), Integrated Circuits (INC),Physical Electronics (PHY).
Research Profile

Eric Brewer, Professor. Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT), Energy (ENE), Security (SEC), Developing regions, Programming languages.
Research Profile

Duncan Callaway, Associate Professor.

John Canny, Professor. Computer science, activity-based computing, livenotes, mechatronic devices, flexonics.
Research Profile

Jose M. Carmena, Professor. Brain-machine interfaces, neural ensemble computation, neuroprosthetics, sensorimotor learning and control.
Research Profile

Constance Chang-Hasnain, Professor. Microsystems and materials, Nano-Optoelectronic devices.

Alessandro Chiesa, Assistant Professor. Security (SEC), Theory (THY).

John Chuang, Professor. Computer networking, computer security, economic incentives, ICTD.
Research Profile

Phillip Colella, Professor in Residence.

Steven Conolly, Professor. Medical imaging instrumentation and control.
Research Profile

Thomas Courtade, Assistant Professor. Communications & Networking (COMNET).
Research Profile

David E. Culler, Professor. Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC), Energy (ENE), Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT),Programming Systems (PS), Security (SEC), Parallel architecture, High-performance networks, Workstation clusters.
Research Profile

Trevor Darrell, Professor in Residence. Artificial Intelligence (AI), Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Computer Vision.

James W. Demmel, Professor. Computer science, scientific computing, numerical analysis, linear algebra.
Research Profile

+ John DeNero, Assistant Teaching Professor. Artificial Intelligence (AI), Education (EDUC).

Anca Dragan, Assistant Professor. Artificial Intelligence (AI), Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Human-Computer Interaction (HCI).

Prabal Dutta, Associate Professor.

Alexei (Alyosha) Efros, Associate Professor. Computer Vision, Graphics (GR), Artificial Intelligence (AI).
Research Profile

Laurent El Ghaoui, Professor. Decision-making under uncertainty, convex optimization, robust solutions, semidefinite programming, exhaustive simulation.
Research Profile

Ronald S. Fearing, Professor. Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO).

Armando Fox, Professor. Programming systems (PS), Education (EDUC), Operating Systems and Networking (OSNT).
Research Profile

Michael Franklin, Adjunct Professor. Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT), AMPLab.

Gerald Friedland, Adjunct Assistant Professor.

+ Robert J. Full, Professor. Energetics, comparative biomechanics, arthropod, adhesion, comparative physiology, locomotion, neuromechanics, biomimicry, biological inspiration, reptile, gecko, amphibian, robots, artificial muscles.
Research Profile

Jack L. Gallant, Professor. Vision science, form vision, attention, fMRI, computational neuroscience, natural scene perception, brain encoding, brain decoding.
Research Profile

Dan Garcia, Teaching Professor. Education (EDUC), Computational Game Theory, Graphics (GR).

Sanjam Garg, Assistant Professor. Theory (THY), Security (SEC).
Research Profile

Ali Ghodsi, Adjunct Assistant Professor. Database Management Systems (DBMS), Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT).

Ken Goldberg, Professor. Robotics, art, social media, new media, automation.
Research Profile

Joseph Gonzalez, Assistant Professor. Artificial Intelligence (AI), Database Management Systems (DBMS).

Moritz Hardt, Assistant Profesor.

Bjoern Hartmann, Associate Professor. Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), Graphics (GR), Programming Systems (PS).

Marti A. Hearst, Professor. Information retrieval, human-computer interaction, user interfaces, information visualization, web search, search user interfaces, empirical computational linguistics, natural language processing, text mining, social media.
Research Profile

Joseph M. Hellerstein, Professor. Database Management Systems (DBMS), Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT).
Research Profile

Paul N. Hilfinger, Teaching Professor. Programming Systems (PS), Scientific Computing (SCI), Software engineering, Parallel programming techniques.
Research Profile

Joshua Hug, Assistant Teaching Professor. Education (EDUC), Computer Science education.

Ali Javey, Professor. Physical Electronics (PHY), Energy (ENE), Micro/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology.
Research Profile

Michael I. Jordan, Professor. Computer science, artificial intelligence, bioinformatics, statistics, machine learning, electrical engineering, applied statistics, optimization.
Research Profile

Anthony D. Joseph, Professor. Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT), Security (SEC), Computer and Network Security, Distributed systems, Mobile computing, Wireless networking, Software engineering, and operating systems.
Research Profile

+ Richard Karp, Professor. Computational molecular biology, genomics, DNA molecules, structure of genetic regulatory networks, combinatorial and statsitical methods.
Research Profile

Randy H. Katz, Professor. Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC), Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT), Distributed and networked systems design and implementation.
Research Profile

Kurt Keutzer, Professor. Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC), Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA), Scientific Computing (SCI).
Research Profile

Daniel Klein, Professor. Artificial Intelligence (AI), Natural Language Processing, Computational Linguistics, Machine Learning.
Research Profile

John D. Kubiatowicz, Professor. Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT), Security (SEC), Computer architecture, Quantum computer design, Internet-scale storage systems, Peer-to-peer networking.
Research Profile

Andreas Kuehlmann, Adjunct Professor. Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA).
Research Profile

Edward A. Lee, Professor. Embedded Software, Real-Time Systems, Cyber-Physical Systems, Concurrency, Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA), Programming Systems (PS),Signal Processing (SP).
Research Profile

Luke Lee, Professor. Biophotonics, biophysics, bionanoscience, molecular imaging, single cell analysis, bio-nano interfaces, integrated microfluidic devices (iMD) for diagnostics and preventive personalized medicine.
Research Profile

Sergey Levine, Assisstant Professor.

Chunlei Liu, Associate Professor.

Tsu-Jae King Liu, Professor. Physical Electronics (PHY), Micro/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS).
Research Profile

Michael Lustig, Associate Professor. Medical Imaging, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Signal Processing (SP), Scientific Computing (SCI), Physical Electronics (PHY), Communications & Networking (COMNET), Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO), Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR).

Michel Maharbiz, Professor. Neural interfaces, bioMEMS, microsystems, MEMS, microsystems for the life sciences.
Research Profile

Jitendra Malik, Professor. Artificial Intelligence (AI), Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO), Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Graphics (GR), Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), Signal Processing (SP),.
Research Profile

Elchanan Mossel, Professor. Applied probability, statistics, mathematics, finite markov chains, markov random fields, phlylogeny.
Research Profile

Rikky Muller, Assistant Professor. Integrated Circuits (INC), Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO), Micro/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS).

George Necula, Professor. Software engineering, programming systemsm, security, program analysis.
Research Profile

Ren Ng, Assistant Professor. Imaging Systems, Computational Photography,, Signal Processing (SP), Optics.

Clark Nguyen, Professor. Micro/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), Integrated Circuits (INC), Physical Electronics (PHY), Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA).
Research Profile

Ali Niknejad, Professor. Integrated Circuits (INC), Microwave and mm-Wave Circuits and Systems, Physical Electronics (PHY), Signal Processing (SP), Applied Electromagnetics, Communications & Networking (COMNET), Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA).
Research Profile

Borivoje Nikolic, Professor. Integrated Circuits (INC), Communications & Networking (COMNET), Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA), Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC).
Research Profile

James O'Brien, Professor. Computer graphics, fluid dynamics, computer simulation, physically based animation, finite element simulation, human perception, image forensics, video forensics, computer animation, special effects for film, video game technology, motion capture .

Bruno Olshausen, Professor. Visual perception, computational neuroscience, computational vision.
Research Profile

Lior Pachter, Professor. Mathematics, applications of statistics, combinatorics to problems in biology.
Research Profile

Shyam Parekh, Adjunct Associate Professor. Communications & Networking (COMNET).

Abhay Parekh, Adjunct Professor. Communications & Networking (COMNET).

Eric Paulos, Associate Professor. Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), New Media arts.

Vern Paxson, Professor. Security (SEC), Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT).
Research Profile

Kristofer Pister, Professor. Micro/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Micro-robotics, Integrated Circuits (INC), Low-power circuits.
Research Profile

+ Kameshwar Poolla, Professor. Cybersecurity, modeling, control, renewable energy, estimation, integrated circuit design and manufacturing, smart grids.
Research Profile

Raluca Ada Popa, Assistant Professor. Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT), Security (SEC).

Jan M. Rabaey, Professor. Communications & Networking (COMNET), Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA), Energy (ENE), Integrated Circuits (INC), Signal Processing (SP), Computer architecture.
Research Profile

Jonathan Ragan-Kelley, Assistant Professor.

Prasad Raghavendra, Associate Professor. Theory (THY).

Ravi Ramamoorthi, Professor. Graphics (GR), Scientific Computing (SCI), Signal Processing (SP), Computer Vision.

Kannan Ramchandran, Professor. Communications & Networking (COMNET), Signal Processing (SP), Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR).
Research Profile

Gireeja Ranade, Assistant Professor.

Satish Rao, Professor. Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO), Theory (THY).
Research Profile

Sylvia Ratnasamy, Associate Professor. Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT).

Benjamin Recht, Associate Professor. Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Signal Processing (SP), Machine Learning (ML), Optimization (OPT).

Jaijeet Roychowdhury, Professor. Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA), Scientific Computing (SCI), Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO).

Stuart Russell, Professor. Artificial intelligence, computational biology, algorithms, machine learning, real-time decision-making, probabilistic reasoning.
Research Profile

Anant Sahai, Associate Professor. Communications & Networking (COMNET), Information Theory, Cognitive Radio and Spectrum Sharing, Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Distributed and Networked Control, Signal Processing (SP), Theory (THY), Information Theory.
Research Profile

Sayeef Salahuddin, Associate Professor. Physical Electronics (PHY), Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA), Energy (ENE), Scientific Computing (SCI).

Seth R. Sanders, Professor. Energy (ENE), Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Integrated Circuits (INC), Power and electronics systems.
Research Profile

Alberto L. Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, Professor. Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA), Embedded System Design, Design methodologies and tools, Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Hybrid systems, Design methodologies and tools, Communications & Networking (COMNET), Wireless sensor network design, Design methodologies and tools.
Research Profile

S. Shankar Sastry, Professor. Computer science, robotics, arial robots, cybersecurity, cyber defense, homeland defense, nonholonomic systems, control of hybrid systems, sensor networks, interactive visualization, robotic telesurgery, rapid prototyping.
Research Profile

Koushik Sen, Associate Professor. Programming Systems (PS), Software Engineering, Programming Languages, and Formal Methods: Software Testing, Verification, Model Checking, Runtime Monitoring, Performance Evaluation, and Computational Logic , Security (SEC).
Research Profile

Sanjit Seshia, Professor. Electronic design automation, theory, computer security, program analysis, dependable computing, computational logic, formal methods.
Research Profile

Scott Shenker, Professor. Internet Architecture, Software-Defined Networks, Datacenter Infrastructure, Large-Scale Distributed Systems, Game Theory and Economics,Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT).
Research Profile

Jonathan Shewchuk, Professor. Scientific Computing (SCI), Theory (THY), Graphics (GR).
Research Profile

Alistair Sinclair, Professor. Theory (THY), Randomized algorithms, applied probability, statistical physics.
Research Profile

Dawn Song, Professor. Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT), Security (SEC), Programming Systems (PS).
Research Profile

Yun Song, Professor. Computational biology, population genomics, applied probability and statistics.
Research Profile

Costas J. Spanos, Professor. Energy (ENE), Integrated Circuits (INC), Physical Electronics (PHY), Semiconductor manufacturing, Solid-State Devices.
Research Profile

Ian Stoica, Professor. Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT), Security (SEC), Networking and distributed computer systems, Quality of Service (Q of S) and resources management, modeling and performance analysis.

Vladimir Stojanovic, Associate Professor. Integrated Circuits (INC), Micro/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC), Physical Electronics (PHY), Communications & Networking (COMNET), Integrated Photonics, Circuit design with Emerging-Technologies.
Research Profile

Bernd Sturmfels, Professor. Mathematics, combinatorics, computational algebraic geometry.
Research Profile

Vivek Subramanian, Professor. Physical Electronics (PHY), Energy (ENE), Integrated Circuits (INC).
Research Profile

Claire Tomlin, Professor. Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO), Control theory, hybrid and embedded systems, biological cell networks.
Research Profile

Luca Trevisan, Professor. Theory (THY), (Computational Complexity, Randomness in Computation, Combinatorial Optimization), Security (SEC).

Stavros Tripakis, Adjunct Associate Professor. Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA), Computer-Aided System Design, Formal Methods, Verification, Synthesis, Embedded and Cyber-Physical Systems, Programming Systems (PS).

David Tse, Adjunct Professor. Communications & Networking (COMNET).
Research Profile

Doug Tygar, Professor. Privacy, technology policy, computer security, electronic commerce, software engineering, reliable systems, embedded systems, computer networks, cryptography, cryptology, authentication, ad hoc networks.
Research Profile

Umesh Vazirani, Professor. Quantum computation, hamiltonian complexity, analysis of algorithms.
Research Profile

Alexandra von Meier, Adjunct Professor. Energy (ENE), Electric Grids, Power Distribution.

David Wagner, Professor. Security (SEC).
Research Profile

Martin Wainwright, Professor. Statistical machine learning, High-dimensional statistics, information theory, Optimization and algorithmss .
Research Profile

Laura Waller, Associate Professor. Physical Electronics (PHY), Signal Processing (SP), Computational imaging, Optics and Imaging, Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO), Graphics (GR).
Research Profile

Jean Walrand, Professor. Communications & Networking (COMNET), Performance evaluation, Game theory.
Research Profile

John Wawrzynek, Professor. Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC).
Research Profile

Adam Wolisz, Adjunct Professor. Communications & Networking (COMNET), Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC), System Performance Evaluation.

Ming C. Wu, Professor. Si photonics, optoelectronics, nanophotonics, optical MEMS, Optofluidics, Micro/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), Physical Electronics (PHY).

Eli Yablonovitch, Professor. Optoelectronics Research Group, high speed optical communications, photonic crystals at optical and microwave frequencies, the milli-Volt switch, optical antennas and solar cells , Physical Electronics (PHY).
Research Profile

Katherine A. Yelick, Professor. Programming Systems (PS), Scientific Computing (SCI), Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO), parallel programming techniques.
Research Profile

Nir Yosef, Assistant Professor. Computational biology.
Research Profile

Bin Yu, Professor. Neuroscience, remote sensing, networks, statistical machine learning, high-dimensional inference, massive data problems, document summarization .
Research Profile

Avideh Zakhor, Professor. Signal Processing (SP), Artificial Intelligence (AI), Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Graphics (GR).
Research Profile

Emeritus Faculty

David Attwood, Professor Emeritus. Short wavelength electromagnetics, Soft X-ray microscopy, Coherence, EUV lithography.
Research Profile

Elwyn R. Berlekamp, Professor Emeritus. Computer science, electrical engineering, mathematics, combinatorial game theory, algebraic coding theory.
Research Profile

Manuel Blum, Professor Emeritus. Recursive function, cryptographic protocols, program checking.

Robert K. Brayton, Professor Emeritus. Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA), Advanced methods in combinational and sequential logic synthesis and formal verification.
Research Profile

Robert W. Brodersen, Professor Emeritus. Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA), Integrated Circuits (INC), Signal Processing (SP).

Thomas F. Budinger, Professor Emeritus. Image processing, biomedical electronics, quantitative aging, cardiovascular physiology, bioastronautics, image reconstruction, nuclear magnetic resonance, positron emission, tomography, reconstruction tomography, inverse problem mathematics.
Research Profile

Leon O. Chua, Professor Emeritus. Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO), Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Cellular neural networks, Cellular automata, Complexity,, Nanoelectronics, Nonlinear circuits and systems, Nonlinear dynamics, Chaos,.
Research Profile

Mike Clancy, Professor Emeritus. Science education, cognitive development, educational software.
Research Profile

Richard J. Fateman, Professor Emeritus. Artificial Intelligence (AI), Scientific Computing (SCI), Computer algebra systems, Programming environments and systems, Programming languages and compilers, Symbolic mathematical computation, Document image analysis, multimodal input of mathematics.
Research Profile

Jerome A. Feldman, Professor Emeritus. Artificial Intelligence (AI), Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO), Security (SEC), cognitive science.
Research Profile

Domenico Ferrari, Professor Emeritus. UC Berkeley Unix Project, high-speed network testbeds and the design of real-time communication services and network protocols for multimedia traffic.

Susan L. Graham, Professor Emeritus. Graphics (GR), Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), Programming Systems (PS), Scientific Computing (SCI), Software development environments, software engineering.
Research Profile

Paul R. Gray, Professor Emeritus. Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA), Integrated Circuits (INC).
Research Profile

T. Kenneth Gustafson, Professor Emeritus. Solid-State Devices, Basic electromagnetic and quantum applications.

Michael A. Harrison, Professor Emeritus. Multimedia, User interfaces, Software environments.

Brian K. Harvey, Professor Emeritus. Education (EDUC).
Research Profile

David A. Hodges, Professor Emeritus. Integrated Circuits (INC).

Chenming Hu, Professor Emeritus. Semiconductor Device Technologies.
Research Profile

William M. Kahan, Professor Emeritus. Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC), Scientific Computing (SCI), Computer architecture, Scientific computing, Numerical analysis.
Research Profile

Edward L. Keller, Professor Emeritus. Computational neuroscience, bioengineering, neurophysiology of the oculomotor system.

Kam Y. Lau, Professor Emeritus. Communications & Networking (COMNET), Optoelectronic devices, Microwave and millimeter wave signal transport over optical fiber links.
Research Profile

Edwin R. Lewis, Professor Emeritus.
Research Profile

Allan J. Lichtenberg, Professor Emeritus. Nano-Optoelectronics, Electromagnetics/Plasmas, Energy (ENE).
Research Profile

Michael A. Lieberman, Professor Emeritus. Plasma-assisted materials processing, Energy (ENE).
Research Profile

Kenneth K. Mei, Professor Emeritus. Nano-Optoelectronics, Electromagnetics/Plasmas.

David G. Messerschmitt, Professor Emeritus. Communications & Networking (COMNET), Signal Processing (SP), Business and economics issues in the software industry.

Robert G. Meyer, Professor Emeritus. Integrated Circuits (INC).
Research Profile

Nelson Morgan, Professor Emeritus. Signal Processing (SP).

+ Richard Muller, Professor Emeritus. Astrophysics, geophysics, physics, elementary particle physics, cosmic micro wave background, supernovae for cosmology, origin of the earth's magnetic flips, Nemesis theory, glacial cycles, red sprites, lunar impacts, iridium measurement.
Research Profile

Andrew R. Neureuther, Professor Emeritus. Integrated Circuits (INC), Solid-State Devices.
Research Profile

William G. Oldham, Professor Emeritus. Integrated circuits, Semiconductor manufacturing.
Research Profile

Beresford N. Parlett, Professor Emeritus.

David A. Patterson, Professor Emeritus. Professor in the Graduate School: Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC), Computer Architecture and Systems: Parallel Computing performance, correctness, productivity,Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO), Cancer tumor genomics, Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT).
Research Profile

Elijah Polak, Professor Emeritus. Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Numerical methods for engineering optimization.
Research Profile

Chittoor V. Ramamoorthy, Professor Emeritus. Software engineering.

Lawrence A. Rowe, Professor Emeritus. Multimedia Technology.
Research Profile

Steven E. Schwarz, Professor Emeritus. Solid-State Devices, Nano-Optoelectronics, Electromagnetics/Plasmas.

Carlo H. Sequin, Professor Emeritus. Geometric modeling, Artistic geometry, Mathematical visualizations , Graphics (GR), Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), CAD tools.

Jerome R. Singer, Professor Emeritus.

Alan J. Smith, Professor Emeritus. Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC), Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT), Computer System Performance Analysis, I/O Systems, Cache Memories, Memory Systems.

Michael Stonebraker, Professor Emeritus. Database Technology.

Aram J. Thomasian, Professor Emeritus.
Research Profile

Theodore Van Duzer, Professor Emeritus. Superconductor Electronics.
Research Profile

Pravin Varaiya, Professor Emeritus. Communications & Networking (COMNET), Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Energy (ENE), Control, Networks, Power systems, Transportation.

William J. (Jack) Welch, Professor Emeritus. Nano-Optoelectronics, Electromagnetics/Plasmas.
Research Profile

Richard M. White, Professor Emeritus. Energy (ENE), Solid-State Devices.

Eugene Wong, Professor Emeritus. Communications & Networking (COMNET).
Research Profile

Felix F. Wu, Professor Emeritus. Electric power systems analysis, generation and transmission systems planning and investment, power system control and communications, electric energy industry restructuring .
Research Profile

Lotfi A. Zadeh, Professor Emeritus. Artificial intelligence, linguistics, control theory, logic, fuzzy sets, decision analysis, expert systems neural networks, soft computing, computing with words, computational theory of perceptions and precisiated natural language.
Research Profile

Faculty

Rebecca Abergel, Assistant Professor. Effects of heavy element exposure and contamination on different biological systems.
Research Profile

Lee A. Bernstein, Adjunct Professor.

Massimiliano Fratoni, Assistant Professor. Nuclear reactor design, fuel cycle analysis, fusion reactors.
Research Profile

Ehud Greenspan, Professor. Professor of the Graduate School.

Peter Hosemann, Associate Professor. Microscopy, nanomaterials, Nuclear materials, material science, radiation damage, corrosion in liquid metals, materials development, materials under extremes, nuclear applications, ion beam microscopy, nanoscale mechanical testing.
Research Profile

Daniel M. Kammen, Professor. Public policy, nuclear engineering, energy, resources, risk analysis as applied to global warming, methodological studies of forecasting, hazard assessment, renewable energy technologies, environmental resource management.
Research Profile

Ka-Ngo Leung, Professor. Professor of the Graduate School, Plasma and Ion Beam technology in microfabrication processes.

Edward C. Morse, Professor. Applied plasma physics: fusion technology: microwaves, experimental investigation of RF plasma heating, experimental studies of compact toroids spectral method for magnetohydrodynamic stability.
Research Profile

Eric B. Norman, Professor. Professor of the Graduate School, nuclear astrophysics, experimental nuclear physics, homeland security, neutrinos.
Research Profile

Per F. Peterson, Professor. Nuclear engineering, heat and mass transfer, reactor thermal hydraulics, nuclear reactor design, radioactive waste, nuclear materials management.
Research Profile

Raluca O. Scarlat, Assistant Professor. Chemical and termophysical characterization of high-temperature molten salts and other inorganic fluids, and heat and mass transport pertaining to energy systems Electrochemistry, corrosion, thermodynamics Nuclear reactor safety analysis, licensing and design, and engineering ethics .
Research Profile

Rachel Slaybaugh, Assistant Professor. Computational methods, high performance computing, neutron transport.
Research Profile

Karl A. Van Bibber, Professor. Experimental nuclear physics, Particle Astrophysics, Accelerator Technology and Neutron Sources.
Research Profile

Kai Vetter, Professor.

Jasmina L. Vujic, Professor. Nuclear engineering, numerical methods in reactor physics, neutron and photon transport, reactor core design and analysis, shielding, radiation protection, biomedical application of radiation, optimization techniques for vector, parallel computers.
Research Profile

Lecturers

Ralph E. Berger, Lecturer.

Alan Michael Bolind, Lecturer.

Emeritus Faculty

T. Kenneth Fowler, Professor Emeritus. Plasma physics, nuclear engineering, magnetic fusion, confinement and stability of plasmas for thermonuclear fusion, fusion reactor design, spehromak compact toroid plasma confinement configuration.
Research Profile

Lawrence M. Grossman, Professor Emeritus. Nuclear engineering, reactor physics, numerical approximation methods in neutron diffusion, transport theory, control and optimization theory in nuclear reactor engineering.
Research Profile

Selig N. Kaplan, Professor Emeritus. Radiation reactions, interaction of radiation of matter, detection and measurement of ionizing radiation.
Research Profile

William E. Kastenberg, Professor Emeritus. Risk management, risk assessment, nuclear reactor safety, ethical issues in emerging technologies.
Research Profile

Donald R. Olander, Professor Emeritus. Nuclear engineering, nuclear materials: reactor fuel behavior, hydriding of zirconium and uranium, high-temperature kinetic and thermodynamic behavior of nuclear reactor fuels, performance of degraded nuclear fuels.
Research Profile

Contact Information

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and Nuclear Engineering Program

Visit Program Website

Department Office

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

253 Cory Hall

Phone: 510-642-3214

Fax: 510-643-7846

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/

Department Chair, Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

James Demmel, PhD

389 Soda Hall

Phone: 510-642-7699

demmel@cs.berkeley.edu

Department Office

Nuclear Engineering

4149 Etcheverry Hall

Phone: 510-642-5760

Fax: 510-643-9685

http://www.nuc.berkeley.edu/

Department Chair, Nuclear Engineering

Peter Hosemann, PhD

4151 Etchverry Hall

Phone: 510-642-3477

Faculty Adviser

Michael Lustig, PhD (Department of Materials Science and Engineering)

506 Cory Hall

Phone: 510-643-9338

mlustig@eecs.berkeley.edu

Faculty Adviser

Massimiliano Fratoni, PhD (Department of Engineering)

4111 Etcheverry Hall

Phone: 510-664-9079

maxfratoni@berkeley.edu

Engineering Student Services Adviser

Kathy Barrett

Phone: 510-642-7594

http://engineering.berkeley.edu/ESS

ess@coe.berkeley.edu

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