History

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

The Department of History offers a program of instruction ranging widely over the historical record of human experience. The chronological, geographical, and topical range affords great flexibility to students working toward degrees in history and to those who wish to give a historical dimension to their studies in other disciplines. History at Berkeley is a highly flexible major that allows students to follow their interests. It is also a major that places strong value on original student research, with all students completing capstone projects on topics they choose in consultation with members of the faculty.

Declaring the Major

Students may declare the major after completing three letter-graded courses in the Department of History with a 2.0 grade point average (GPA) or better. This must include at least two lower division courses.

Honors Program

To graduate with honors in History, a major must achieve a general GPA of 3.5, a departmental GPA of 3.7, and a minimum grade of "A-" in HISTORY 101. To be eligible for graduation with high or highest honors in History, a major must achieve a general GPA of 3.5, a departmental GPA of 3.7, and a grade of "A" in HISTORY 101. The student must also receive a nomination for high or highest honors from the 101 instructor. The decision to award high or highest honors rests with the Honors Committee.

A major who is eligible for honors after completing HISTORY 101 and is interested in continued research may pursue a second thesis project under the rubric HISTORY H195. The second project may substitute for the 101 thesis in determining eligibility for high or highest honors if the student meets the GPA standards and receives a nomination from the H195 instructor.

Minor Program

The Department of History offers a minor in History.

Students are encouraged to meet with the minor adviser to file a "History Minor Application" as soon as they have completed one course towards the minor. In addition to turning in the application, students who have taken their lower division minor course elsewhere should provide an unofficial copy of transcript showing the course that satisfies the minor and the grade received.

All students must submit a completed “History Minor Application” and an L&S “Minor Completion” petition by the minor declaration deadline once they have enrolled in or completed the course that will complete the minor. The deadline is May first for the spring and November first for the fall. The application and completion forms may be submitted simultaneously. 

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Major Requirements

In addition to the University, campus, and college requirements, listed on the College Requirements tab, students must fulfill the following requirements specific to their major program.

General Guidelines

  1. All courses taken to fulfill the major requirements below must be taken for graded credit, other than courses listed which are offered on a Pass/No Pass basis only. Other exceptions to this requirement are noted as applicable.
  2. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student's major and minor programs.
  3. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 must be maintained in both upper and lower division courses used to fulfill the major requirements.

For information regarding residence requirements and unit requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.

Summary of Major Requirements

Lower division Requirements: Four courses
Upper division Requirements: Eight courses
Pre-modern History Requirement: One course, used in fulfillment of either lower or upper division requirements
Field of Concentration: At least four of the eight upper division courses must constitute a Field of Concentration (see below)
At least one section of HISTORY 103
One section of HISTORY 101

 Lower Division Requirements

Select one survey course in the history of the United States from the following: 1
Introduction to the History of the United States: The United States from Settlement to Civil War
Introduction to the History of the United States: The United States from Civil War to Present
Select one survey course in the history of Europe from the following: 1
Origins of Western Civilization: The Ancient Mediterranean World
Origins of Western Civilization: Medieval Europe
European Civilization from the Renaissance to the Present
Select one survey course in the history of another world area from the following: 1
After the Roman Empire: the East
History of China: Origins to the Mongol Conquest
Introduction to Chinese History from the Mongols to Mao
Latin American History: Becoming Latin America, 1492 to 1824
Latin American History: Modern Latin America
African History
India
The Middle East
Introduction to the History of Japan
One elective: Select any additional course listed above or one of the following: 2
Comparative World History
Science and Society
HISTORY 39 A-Z Freshman Sophomore Seminar
1

 Students may substitute one upper division course for one of these requirements, in consultation with the Undergraduate Adviser. The substitute course will not then fulfill one of the eight upper division requirements.

2

 Please note that HISTORY R1BHISTORY 24HISTORY 84, and HISTORY 98 do not fulfill this requirement.

Upper Division Requirements

Select eight courses, including the following:

At least one section of HISTORY 103
One section of HISTORY 101
HISTORY 100Special Topics4
HISTORY 100ACSpecial Topics in the History of the United States4
HISTORY 100APSpecial Topics in Ancient History (Premodern)4
HISTORY 100BSpecial Topics in European History4
HISTORY 100BPSpecial Topics in Medieval History (Premodern)4
HISTORY 100DSpecial Topics in the History of the United States4
HISTORY 100ESpecial Topics in Latin American History4
HISTORY 100FSpecial Topics in Asian History4
HISTORY 100HSpecial Topics in African History4
HISTORY 100LSpecial Topics in Legal History4
HISTORY 100MSpecial Topics in the History of the Middle East4
HISTORY 100SSpecial Topics in the History of Science4
HISTORY 100USpecial Topics in Comparative History4
HISTORY 100UPSpecial Topics in Comparative History (Premodern)4
HISTORY N100Special Topics in History: Short Course (Summer Session)2
HISTORY 101Seminar in Historical Research and Writing for History Majors5
HISTORY 103AProseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Ancient4
HISTORY 103BProseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Europe4
HISTORY 103CProseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: England4
HISTORY 103DProseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: United States4
HISTORY 103EProseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Latin America4
HISTORY 103FProseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Asia4
HISTORY 103HProseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Africa4
HISTORY 103SProseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: History of Science4
HISTORY 103UProseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Studies in Comparative History4
HISTORY 104The Craft of History4
HISTORY 105AAncient Greece: Archaic and Classical Greek History4
HISTORY 105BAncient Greece: The Greek World: 403-31 BCE4
HISTORY 106AAncient Rome: The Roman Republic4
HISTORY 106BAncient Rome: The Roman Empire4
HISTORY N106AThe Roman Republic (Summer Session)4
HISTORY N106BThe Roman Empire (Summer Session)4
HISTORY 108Byzantium4
HISTORY 109AThe Rise of Islamic Civilization, 600-12004
HISTORY 109BThe Middle East, 1000-17504
HISTORY 109CThe Middle East From the 18th Century to the Present4
HISTORY N109CThe Middle East From the 18th Century to the Present (Summer Session)4
HISTORY 111ATopics in the History of Southest Asia: Southeast Asia to the 18th Century4
HISTORY 111BTopics in the History of Southest Asia: Modern Southeast Asia4
HISTORY C111BCourse Not Available4
HISTORY 111CTopics in the History of Southest Asia: Political and Cultural History of Vietnam4
HISTORY 111DVietnam at War4
HISTORY 112BAfrica: Modern South Africa, 1652-Present4
HISTORY N112BModern South Africa, 1652-Present (Summer Session)4
HISTORY 112CColonialism and Nationalism in Africa4
HISTORY 113ATraditional Korean History4
HISTORY 113BModern Korean History4
HISTORY 114AIndia: Medieval and Early Modern India to the Coming of the British4
HISTORY 114BIndia: Modern South Asia4
HISTORY 116AChina: Early China4
HISTORY 116BChina: Two Golden Ages: China During the Tang and Song Dynasties4
HISTORY 116CChina: Modern China4
HISTORY 116DChina: Twentieth-Century China4
HISTORY 116GImperial China and the World4
HISTORY 117ATopics in Chinese History: Chinese Popular Culture4
HISTORY 117DTopics in Chinese History: The Chinese Body: Gender and Sex, Health, and Medicine4
HISTORY 118AJapan: Japan, Archaeological Period to 18004
HISTORY 118BJapan: Japan 1800-19004
HISTORY 118CJapan: Empire and Alienation: The 20th Century in Japan4
HISTORY 119ATopics in Japanese History: Postwar Japan4
HISTORY N119APostwar Japan (Summer Session)4
HISTORY 120ACAmerican Environmental and Cultural History4
HISTORY 121BThe Colonial Period and American Revolution: The American Revolution4
HISTORY 122ACAntebellum America: The Advent of Mass Society4
HISTORY 123Civil War and Reconstruction4
HISTORY 124AThe Recent United States: The United States from the Late 19th Century to the Eve of World War II4
HISTORY N124AThe United States from the Late 19th Century to the Eve of the World War II (Summer Session)4
HISTORY 124BThe Recent United States: The United States from World War II4
HISTORY N124BThe United States from World War II to the Vietnam Era (Summer Session)4
HISTORY 125AHistory of African-Americans and Race Relations in the United States: The History of Black People and Race Relations, 1550-18614
HISTORY 125BHistory of African-Americans and Race Relations in the United States: Soul Power: African American History 1861-19804
HISTORY N125BSoul Power: African American History 1861-2008 (Summer Session)4
HISTORY 126AThe American West since 18504
HISTORY 126BThe American West since 18504
HISTORY 127ACCalifornia4
HISTORY 130American Foreign Policy4
HISTORY 131BSocial History of the United States: Creating Modern American Society: From the End of the Civil War to the Global Age4
HISTORY N131BSocial History of the United States: 1914-Present (Summer Session)4
HISTORY C132BIntellectual History of the United States since 18654
HISTORY 134AThe Age of the City: The Age of the City, 1825-19334
HISTORY 135American Indian History: Precontact to the Present4
HISTORY 136Gender Matters in 20th Century America4
HISTORY 136ACGender Matters in 20th Century America4
HISTORY 137ACThe Repeopling of America4
HISTORY 138History of Science in the U.S.4
HISTORY 138THistory of Science in the US CalTeach4
HISTORY C139BThe American Immigrant Experience4
HISTORY C139CCivil Rights and Social Movements in U.S. History4
HISTORY 140BMexico: Modern Mexico4
HISTORY 141BSocial History of Latin America: Social History of Modern Latin America4
HISTORY 143Brazil4
HISTORY N143Brazil (Summer Session)4
HISTORY 146Latin American Women4
HISTORY 149BMedieval Italy: Italy in the Age of Dante (1000-1350)4
HISTORY 150BMedieval England: From the Conquest to 12904
HISTORY 151ABritain 1485-Present: Tudor Stuart Britain, 1485-16604
HISTORY 151BBritain 1485-Present: Britain, 1660-18514
HISTORY 151CBritain 1485-Present: The Peculiar Modernity of Britain, 1848-20004
HISTORY N151CThe Peculiar Modernity of Britain, 1848-2000 (Summer Session)4
HISTORY 152ATopics in the History of the British Isles: Ireland Since the Union4
HISTORY 154Canada4
HISTORY 155AMedieval Europe: From the Late Empire to the Investiture Conflict4
HISTORY 155BMedieval Europe: From the Investiture Conflict to the Fifteenth Century4
HISTORY C157The Renaissance and the Reformation4
HISTORY 158AModern Europe: Old Regime and Revolutionary Europe, 1715-18154
HISTORY 158BModern Europe: Europe in the 19th Century4
HISTORY 158CModern Europe: Old and New Europe, 1914-Present4
HISTORY N158COld and New Europe, 1914-Present (Summer Session)4
HISTORY 159AEuropean Economic History4
HISTORY 159BEuropean Economic History4
HISTORY 160The International Economy of the 20th Century4
HISTORY N160The International Economy of the 20th Century (Summer Session)4
HISTORY 162AEurope and the World: Wars, Empires, Nations 1648-19144
HISTORY 162BWar and Peace: International Relations since 19144
HISTORY N162AEurope and the World: Wars, Empires, Nations 1648-1914 (Summer Session)4
HISTORY 163AModern European Intellectual History: European Intellectual History from the Enlightenment to 18704
HISTORY 163BModern European Intellectual History: European Intellectual History, 1870 to the Present4
HISTORY 164AThe Birth of Modern Thought: European Intellectual History, 1500-18004
HISTORY 164BModern European Intellectual History: European Intellectual History from Enlightenment to 18704
HISTORY 164CModern European Intellectual History: European Intellectual History 1870 to the Present4
HISTORY 165ATopics in Modern European History: The Reformations of Christendom4
HISTORY 165BTopics in Modern European History: The World, the Picture, and the Page: The Revolution in European Culture since the late 18th Century4
HISTORY 165DThe Social and Cultural History of Early Modern Europe4
HISTORY 166AModern France: Early Modern France to 17154
HISTORY 166BModern France: Old Regime and Revolutionary France4
HISTORY 166CModern France4
HISTORY 167AModern Germany: Early Modern Germany4
HISTORY 167BModern Germany: The Rise and Fall of the Second Reich: Germany 1770-19184
HISTORY 167CModern Germany: Germany 1914 to the Present4
HISTORY 168ASpain and Portugal: The Spanish and Portuguese Empires in the Golden Age: 1450-17004
HISTORY 169AModern Italy: Renaissance and Baroque Italy 1350-18004
HISTORY 170The Netherlands4
HISTORY 171ARussia: Russia to 17004
HISTORY 171BRussia: Imperial Russia: From Peter the Great to the Russian Revolution4
HISTORY 171CRussia: The Soviet Union, 1917 to the Present4
HISTORY 172Russian Intellectual History4
HISTORY 173BHistory of Eastern Europe: The Habsburg Empire, 1740-19184
HISTORY 173CHistory of Eastern Europe: History of Eastern Europe: From 1900 to the Present4
HISTORY 174ATopics in the History of Eastern Europe: A History of Poland-Lithuania4
HISTORY 174BTopics in the History of Eastern Europe: Poles and Others: the Making of Modern Poland4
HISTORY C175BJewish Civilization: Modern Period4
HISTORY C176Course Not Available4
HISTORY 177AArmenia: Armenia from Ethnogenesis to the Dark Ages4
HISTORY 177BArmenia: From Pre-modern Empires to the Present4
HISTORY 178History of the Holocaust4
HISTORY 180The Life Sciences since 17504
HISTORY 180THistory of the Life Sciences Since 1750 (Cal Teach)4
HISTORY 181BTopics in the History of the Physical Sciences: Modern Physics: From the Atom to Big Science4
HISTORY 182AScience, Technology, and Society4
HISTORY 182ATScience, Technology, and Society (Cal Teach)4
HISTORY C182CIntroduction to Science, Technology, and Society4
HISTORY 183AHealth and Disease4
HISTORY 185AHistory of Christianity: History of Christianity to 12504
HISTORY 185BHistory of Christianity: History of Christianity from 12504
HISTORY 186International and Global History since 19454
HISTORY C187The History and Practice of Human Rights4
HISTORY C188BArt and Science4
HISTORY C191Death, Dying, and Modern Medicine: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives4
HISTORY C192Course Not Available3
HISTORY C194Dutch Culture and Society: Amsterdam and Berkeley in the Sixties4
HISTORY 199Supervised Independent Study and Research (May count towards the eight upper division requirements if taken for four units, one time only. See advisor.)1-4

Field of Concentration Requirement

The four courses constituting the Field of Concentration must include HISTORY 101; the three additional courses may include HISTORY 103 (Proseminar). They may also include one appropriate upper division course, of at least 3 units, from another department, in consultation with the Undergraduate Adviser.

A Field of Concentration shall be defined by one of the following rubrics: (1) A period; (2) A geographical area; or (3) A thematic approach.

For further information regarding declaring a Field of Concentration and samples of possible fields, please see the Department's website.

Pre-Modern Requirement

At least one course used to fulfill the major requirements must be devoted entirely to pre-modern history, to be selected from courses focused on one or more of the following eras: antiquity, the classical period, and the medieval period. Courses dealing solely with the early modern period do not satisfy this requirement.

HISTORY 2Comparative World History ("Ancient Empires")4
HISTORY 3After the Roman Empire: the East4
HISTORY 4AOrigins of Western Civilization: The Ancient Mediterranean World4
HISTORY 4BOrigins of Western Civilization: Medieval Europe4
HISTORY 6AHistory of China: Origins to the Mongol Conquest4
HISTORY 100APSpecial Topics in Ancient History4
HISTORY 100UPSpecial Topics in Comparative History ("Premodern")4
HISTORY 105AAncient Greece: Archaic and Classical Greek History4
HISTORY 105BAncient Greece: The Greek World: 403-31 BCE4
HISTORY 106AAncient Rome: The Roman Republic4
HISTORY 106BAncient Rome: The Roman Empire4
HISTORY 108Byzantium4
HISTORY 109AThe Rise of Islamic Civilization, 600-12004
HISTORY 109BThe Middle East, 1000-17504
HISTORY 111ATopics in the History of Southest Asia: Southeast Asia to the 18th Century4
HISTORY 114AIndia: Medieval and Early Modern India to the Coming of the British4
HISTORY 116AChina: Early China4
HISTORY 116BChina: Two Golden Ages: China During the Tang and Song Dynasties4
HISTORY 117ATopics in Chinese History: Chinese Popular Culture4
HISTORY 117DTopics in Chinese History: The Chinese Body: Gender and Sex, Health, and Medicine4
HISTORY 118AJapan: Japan, Archaeological Period to 18004
HISTORY 149BMedieval Italy: Italy in the Age of Dante (1000-1350)4
HISTORY 150BMedieval England: From the Conquest to 12904
HISTORY 155AMedieval Europe: From the Late Empire to the Investiture Conflict4
HISTORY 155BMedieval Europe: From the Investiture Conflict to the Fifteenth Century4
HISTORY 171ARussia: Russia to 17004
HISTORY 177AArmenia: Armenia from Ethnogenesis to the Dark Ages4
HISTORY 185AHistory of Christianity: History of Christianity to 12504

Minor Requirements

Students who have a strong interest in an area of study outside their major often decide to complete a minor program. These programs have set requirements and are noted officially on the transcript in the memoranda section, but they are not noted on diplomas.

General Guidelines

  1. The History minor consists of six four-unit courses: one lower division and five upper division, from at least two of the seven historical fields below.
  2. All courses taken to fulfill the minor requirements must be taken for a letter grade.
  3. All of the upper division courses taken to fulfill the History minor requirements must be completed at UC Berkeley.
  4. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required for courses used to fulfill the minor requirements.
  5. Courses used to fulfill the minor requirements may be applied toward the Seven-Course Breadth requirement, for Letters & Science students.
  6. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student's major and minor programs.
  7. All minor requirements must be completed prior to the last day of finals during the semester in which you plan to graduate. If you cannot finish all courses required for the minor by that time, please see a College of Letters & Science adviser.
  8. All minor requirements must be completed within the unit ceiling. (For further information regarding the unit ceiling, please see the College Requirements website.)

Requirements

Lower Division
Select one of the following courses:
Comparative World History
After the Roman Empire: the East
Origins of Western Civilization: The Ancient Mediterranean World
Origins of Western Civilization: Medieval Europe
European Civilization from the Renaissance to the Present
History of China: Origins to the Mongol Conquest
Introduction to Chinese History from the Mongols to Mao
Introduction to the History of the United States: The United States from Settlement to Civil War
Introduction to the History of the United States: The United States from Civil War to Present
Latin American History: Becoming Latin America, 1492 to 1824
Latin American History: Modern Latin America
African History
India
The Middle East
Introduction to the History of Japan
Science and Society
39 A-Z Freshman Sophomore Seminar
Upper Division
Select five courses from the following:
Africa
Special Topics in African History
Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Africa
Africa: Modern South Africa, 1652-Present
Modern South Africa, 1652-Present (Summer Session)
Colonialism and Nationalism in Africa
Asia
Special Topics in Asian History
Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Asia
Topics in the History of Southest Asia: Southeast Asia to the 18th Century
Topics in the History of Southest Asia: Modern Southeast Asia
HISTORY C111B
Course Not Available
Topics in the History of Southest Asia: Political and Cultural History of Vietnam
Traditional Korean History
Modern Korean History
India: Medieval and Early Modern India to the Coming of the British
India: Modern South Asia
China: Early China
China: Two Golden Ages: China During the Tang and Song Dynasties
China: Modern China
China: Twentieth-Century China
Imperial China and the World
Topics in Chinese History: Chinese Popular Culture
Topics in Chinese History: The Chinese Body: Gender and Sex, Health, and Medicine
Japan: Japan, Archaeological Period to 1800
Japan: Japan 1800-1900
Japan: Empire and Alienation: The 20th Century in Japan
Topics in Japanese History: Postwar Japan
Postwar Japan (Summer Session)
Europe
Special Topics in Ancient History
Special Topics in Medieval History
Special Topics in European History
Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Ancient
Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Europe
Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: England
Ancient Greece: Archaic and Classical Greek History
Ancient Greece: The Greek World: 403-31 BCE
Ancient Rome: The Roman Republic
The Roman Republic (Summer Session)
Ancient Rome: The Roman Empire
The Roman Empire (Summer Session)
Medieval Italy: Italy in the Age of Dante (1000-1350)
Medieval England: From the Conquest to 1290
Britain 1485-Present: Tudor Stuart Britain, 1485-1660
Britain 1485-Present: Britain, 1660-1851
Britain 1485-Present: The Peculiar Modernity of Britain, 1848-2000
The Peculiar Modernity of Britain, 1848-2000 (Summer Session)
Topics in the History of the British Isles: Ireland Since the Union
Medieval Europe: From the Investiture Conflict to the Fifteenth Century
Medieval Europe: From the Late Empire to the Investiture Conflict
The Renaissance and the Reformation
Modern Europe: Old Regime and Revolutionary Europe, 1715-1815
Modern Europe: Europe in the 19th Century
Modern Europe: Old and New Europe, 1914-Present
Old and New Europe, 1914-Present (Summer Session)
European Economic History
European Economic History
The International Economy of the 20th Century (Summer Session)
Europe and the World: Wars, Empires, Nations 1648-1914
Europe and the World: Wars, Empires, Nations 1648-1914 (Summer Session)
The Birth of Modern Thought: European Intellectual History, 1500-1800
Modern European Intellectual History: European Intellectual History from Enlightenment to 1870
Modern European Intellectual History: European Intellectual History 1870 to the Present
Topics in Modern European History: The Reformations of Christendom
Topics in Modern European History: The World, the Picture, and the Page: The Revolution in European Culture since the late 18th Century
The Social and Cultural History of Early Modern Europe
Modern France: Early Modern France to 1715
Modern France: Old Regime and Revolutionary France
Modern France
Modern Germany: Early Modern Germany
Modern Germany: The Rise and Fall of the Second Reich: Germany 1770-1918
Modern Germany: Germany 1914 to the Present
Spain and Portugal: The Spanish and Portuguese Empires in the Golden Age: 1450-1700
Modern Italy: Renaissance and Baroque Italy 1350-1800
The Netherlands
Russia: Russia to 1700
Russia: Imperial Russia: From Peter the Great to the Russian Revolution
Russia: The Soviet Union, 1917 to the Present
Russian Intellectual History
History of Eastern Europe: The Habsburg Empire, 1740-1918
History of Eastern Europe: History of Eastern Europe: From 1900 to the Present
Topics in the History of Eastern Europe: A History of Poland-Lithuania
Topics in the History of Eastern Europe: Poles and Others: the Making of Modern Poland
History of the Holocaust
History of Christianity: History of Christianity to 1250
History of Christianity: History of Christianity from 1250
Dutch Culture and Society: Amsterdam and Berkeley in the Sixties
Latin America
Special Topics in Latin American History
Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Latin America
Mexico: Modern Mexico
Social History of Latin America: Social History of Modern Latin America
Brazil
Brazil (Summer Session)
Latin American Women
Near and Middle East
Special Topics in the History of the Middle East
Byzantium
The Rise of Islamic Civilization, 600-1200
The Middle East, 1000-1750
The Middle East From the 18th Century to the Present
The Middle East From the 18th Century to the Present (Summer Session)
Armenia: Armenia from Ethnogenesis to the Dark Ages
Armenia: From Pre-modern Empires to the Present
United States
Special Topics in the History of the United States
Special Topics in the History of the United States
Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: United States
American Environmental and Cultural History
The Colonial Period and American Revolution: The American Revolution
Antebellum America: The Advent of Mass Society
Civil War and Reconstruction
The Recent United States: The United States from the Late 19th Century to the Eve of World War II
The United States from the Late 19th Century to the Eve of the World War II (Summer Session)
The Recent United States: The United States from World War II
The United States from World War II to the Vietnam Era (Summer Session)
History of African-Americans and Race Relations in the United States: The History of Black People and Race Relations, 1550-1861
History of African-Americans and Race Relations in the United States: Soul Power: African American History 1861-1980
Soul Power: African American History 1861-2008 (Summer Session)
The American West since 1850
The American West since 1850
California
American Foreign Policy
Social History of the United States: Creating Modern American Society: From the End of the Civil War to the Global Age
Social History of the United States: 1914-Present (Summer Session)
Intellectual History of the United States since 1865
The Age of the City: The Age of the City, 1825-1933
American Indian History: Precontact to the Present
Gender Matters in 20th Century America
The Repeopling of America
History of Science in the U.S.
History of Science in the US CalTeach
The American Immigrant Experience
Civil Rights and Social Movements in U.S. History
Canada
Comparative
Special Topics in Legal History
Special Topics in the History of Science
Special Topics in Comparative History
Special Topics in Comparative History
Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: History of Science
Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Studies in Comparative History
The Craft of History
The International Economy of the 20th Century
War and Peace: International Relations since 1914
Jewish Civilization: Modern Period
The Life Sciences since 1750
History of the Life Sciences Since 1750 (Cal Teach)
Topics in the History of the Physical Sciences: Modern Physics: From the Atom to Big Science
Science, Technology, and Society
Science, Technology, and Society (Cal Teach)
Health and Disease
International and Global History since 1945
The History and Practice of Human Rights
Death, Dying, and Modern Medicine: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
HISTORY C192
Course Not Available

College Requirements

Undergraduate students in the College of Letters & Science must fulfill the following requirements in addition to those required by their major program.

For detailed lists of courses that fulfill college requirements, please review the College of Letters & Sciences page in this Guide.

Entry Level Writing

All students who will enter the University of California as freshmen must demonstrate their command of the English language by fulfilling the Entry Level Writing requirement. Fulfillment of this requirement is also a prerequisite to enrollment in all reading and composition courses at UC Berkeley. 

American History and American Institutions

The American History and Institutions requirements are based on the principle that a US resident graduated from an American university should have an understanding of the history and governmental institutions of the United States.

American Cultures

American Cultures is the one requirement that all undergraduate students at Cal need to take and pass in order to graduate. The requirement offers an exciting intellectual environment centered on the study of race, ethnicity and culture of the United States. AC courses offer students opportunities to be part of research-led, highly accomplished teaching environments, grappling with the complexity of American Culture.

Quantitative Reasoning

The Quantitative Reasoning requirement is designed to ensure that students graduate with basic understanding and competency in math, statistics, or computer science. The requirement may be satisfied by exam or by taking an approved course.

Foreign Language

The Foreign Language requirement may be satisfied by demonstrating proficiency in reading comprehension, writing, and conversation in a foreign language equivalent to the second semester college level, either by passing an exam or by completing approved course work.

Reading and Composition

In order to provide a solid foundation in reading, writing and critical thinking the College requires two semesters of lower division work in composition in sequence. Students must complete a first-level reading and composition course by the end of their second semester and a second-level course by the end of their fourth semester.

Breadth Requirements

The undergraduate breadth requirements provide Berkeley students with a rich and varied educational experience outside of their major program. As the foundation of a liberal arts education, breadth courses give students a view into the intellectual life of the University while introducing them to a multitude of perspectives and approaches to research and scholarship. Engaging students in new disciplines and with peers from other majors, the breadth experience strengthens interdisciplinary connections and context that prepares Berkeley graduates to understand and solve the complex issues of their day.

Unit Requirements

  • 120 total units, including at least 60 L&S units

  • Of the 120 units, 36 must be upper division units

  • Of the 36 upper division units, 6 must be taken in courses offered outside your major department

Residence Requirements

For units to be considered in "residence," you must be registered in courses on the Berkeley campus as a student in the College of Letters & Science. Most students automatically fulfill the residence requirement by attending classes here for four years. In general, there is no need to be concerned about this requirement, unless you go abroad for a semester or year or want to take courses at another institution or through UC Extension during your senior year. In these cases, you should make an appointment to meet an adviser to determine how you can meet the Senior Residence Requirement.

Note: Courses taken through UC Extension do not count toward residence.

Senior Residence Requirement

After you become a senior (with 90 semester units earned toward your BA degree), you must complete at least 24 of the remaining 30 units in residence in at least two semesters. To count as residence, a semester must consist of at least 6 passed units. Intercampus Visitor, EAP, and UC Berkeley-Washington Program (UCDC) units are excluded.

You may use a Berkeley Summer Session to satisfy one semester of the Senior Residence requirement, provided that you successfully complete 6 units of course work in the Summer Session and that you have been enrolled previously in the college.

Modified Senior Residence Requirement

Participants in the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP) or the UC Berkeley Washington Program (UCDC) may meet a Modified Senior Residence requirement by completing 24 (excluding EAP) of their final 60 semester units in residence. At least 12 of these 24 units must be completed after you have completed 90 units.

Upper Division Residence Requirement

You must complete in residence a minimum of 18 units of upper division courses (excluding EAP units), 12 of which must satisfy the requirements for your major.

Plan of Study

Students are encouraged to familiarize themselves with the History major requirements before making a program plan. For more detailed information regarding the courses listed below (e.g., elective information, GPA requirements, etc.), see the College Requirements and Major Requirements tabs.

Freshman
FallUnitsSpringUnits
Lower Division US History (Historical Studies Breadth)4Lower Division European History (Social and Behavioral Sciences) Breadth)4
Reading and Composition A4Reading and Composition B4
American Cultures Requirement4L&S Breadth4
L&S Breadth3Lower Division Elective3
 15 15
Sophomore
FallUnitsSpringUnits
Lower Division Other World Area History4Lower Division History Elective4
L&S Breadth4American Cultures Requirement4
Lower Division Elective4L&S Breadth3
Lower Division Elective3L&S Breadth4
 15 15
Junior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
Upper Division History (1 of 6)4Upper Division History (3 of 6)4
Upper Division History (2 of 6)4Upper Division History (4 of 6)4
Lower or Upper Division Elective4Lower or Upper Division Elective4
Lower or Upper Division Elective3Upper Division L&S Non-Major Department Elective3
 15 15
Senior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
Upper Division History (5 of 6)4Upper Division History (6 of 6)4
One of the following proseminars:4HISTORY 1015
 Lower or Upper Division Elective3
 Lower or Upper Division Elective3
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Upper Division L&S Non-Major Department Elective4 
Lower or Upper Division Elective3 
 15 15
Total Units: 120
1

 This is a sample program plan. This plan assumes that the student has completed the Entry Level Writing, American History and Institutions, Quantitative Reasoning, and Foreign Language requirements prior to admission.

2

 Students are strongly advised to work with an academic adviser to determine a personal program plan. Your program plan will differ depending on previous credit received, your course schedule, and available offerings.

3

 At least one of the 12 courses required for the major must be devoted entirely to premodern history.

4

 Field of Concentration requirement: HISTORY 101 plus at least 3 other upper division History courses. Students must submit the Field of Concentration form (online) two semesters prior to graduation. For a 4-year plan, submit form the spring term of the third year.

Accelerated Program Plans

For students considering graduating in less than four years, it's important to acknowledge the reasons to undertake such a plan of study. While there are advantages to pursuing a three-year degree plan such as reducing financial burdens, they are not for everyone and do involve sacrifices; especially with respect to participating in co-curricular activities, depth of study,  and summer internships, which typically lead to jobs upon graduation. All things considered, please see the tables for three and three and a half year degree options.

3.5 and 3 Year Plans

Student Learning Goals

Mission

The History major helps students learn to think critically and deeply about the historical processes that have shaped the world we live in. History majors are exposed to a temporally and geographically broad range of historical experience, but they are also required to concentrate on a world region or theme or a period in history, both in order to develop depth of understanding and in order to prepare for the capstone of the History Major: an article-length, primary-source based, original research project. The major is designed to develop critical reading, thinking, and writing skills that will be needed to succeed in this capstone course.

Learning Goals for the Major

  1. Distinguish and characterize significant periods of historical experience in multiple societies from different parts of the globe.
  2. Describe events and developments in the history of multiple societies in terms of continuity, change, and causation.
  3. Understand interpretive debates about the past.
  4. Appreciate the complexities involved in interpreting societies and social change: for example, the local and the global, particular and general, contingent and structural.
  5. Identify different kinds of historical evidence and understand their role in the production of historical knowledge.

Skills

  1. Recall factual claims about the past and synthesize them into coherent interpretive arguments.
  2. Read documents closely and critically.
  3. Formulate a well-organized, well-supported argument.
  4. Demonstrate clear writing in the form of essays of varying lengths.
  5. Make cogent oral arguments about reading assignments in the context of a seminar discussion.
  6. Conduct original research with primary sources.
  7. Locate good, relevant secondary scholarship, and distinguish good from poor scholarship.
  8. Observe ethical practices of citation and intellectual self-presentation.

Career & Internship Information

Career Services Overview

The UC Berkeley Career Center prepares undergraduates, graduate students, and alumni to make informed decisions about their futures by providing comprehensive resources, programs, and counseling on career development, internships, employment, and graduate school.  Whether it be through a resume critique, an alumni networking event, or an interviewing skills workshop, the Career Center is committed to help all students achieve:

  • Career Clarity: providing students the opportunity to identify their career direction.
  • Career Competitiveness: providing students the opportunities to enhance their marketability via real world experiences.
  • Career Connections: providing students opportunities to engage with alumni and employers.

Common Career Paths for History Majors

Career Destinations Survey

Every year the Career Center surveys graduating seniors about their post-graduation plans to better understand the career outcomes of our alumni including: career fields, job titles, specific employers, entry-level salaries, and graduate/professional school destinations. The data profiles by major provide an impressive overview of the diverse interests and achievements of recent graduates from UC Berkeley, including specific data for the History Department. Each survey year includes the August, December, and May graduating cohorts for that survey year. This data is designed to provide students, alumni, and employers with critical information about where Cal students go after graduation. As expected, college major does not restrict the employment or graduate school options that Cal students pursue. With careful planning, you can develop career-related skills and experiences that can prepare you for almost any job or graduate school field.

Sample Career Pathways

History majors go on to pursue a wide variety of career options including, but not limited to:

  • Local, state and federal government: Public policy, city and regional planning, judicial services, program administration, social services, intelligence, law enforcement, foreign service, research.
  • Politics: Elected or appointed leadership, campaign management, staff administration, special interest advocacy, lobbying.
  • Law: Prosecution, defense, corporate, public interest, mediation.
  • Nonprofit: Administration, management, public relations, fundraising/development, program coordination, grant writing, volunteer management.
  • Museums, curatorial and archival management: Acquisition, preservation, exhibition, research.
  • Education:
    • Primary and post-secondary: teaching, administration, library services.
    • Higher education: teaching, research, administration, student affairs, admissions, advising, community relations.
  • Business:  Sales, management, office administration, human resources, training, public relations, writing/editing.
  • Media: Editing, publishing, writing, sales, digital media, public relations, broadcasting.

Visit our Connecting Majors to Careers resource to explore additional career paths most commonly associated with over 80 majors, including History.

Career and Internship Resources

The Career Center offers a wide variety of programs and resources to support students of all majors and class levels.

  • Job Search Tools: Resume and cover letter writing, job search strategies, networking tools, interviewing skills, and more.
  • Career Counseling: A wide variety of scheduled and drop-in appointment options based on major and topic.
  • Internships: Internship listings, search strategies, FAQs, and more.
  • Career Exploration: Resources to explore career options, identify career goals, and develop effective career plans.
  • Events and Workshops: Over 70 events each semester including workshops, alumni networking events, career panels, conferences, and on-campus Career Chats.
  • Career Fairs and Employer Information Sessions: We offer 14 career fairs each year across a variety of career fields and partner with numerous employers for on-campus information sessions.
  • Graduate and Professional School: Counseling and resources to help students research and apply for graduate and professional school including medical school and law school.

*The above services are available to all currently enrolled UC Berkeley students and members of the Career Center’s Alumni Advantage program.

Courses

HISTORY 1 Global History 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017
History 1 introduces students to core dynamics of global history. Traversing the experience of human societies from earliest origins to the complex, chaotic, and cacophonous twenty-first century, the course highlights recurrent themes including the origins and development of political order; the evolution of interstate (or international) relations; and the historical advance of globalization. From this vast panorama, students will acquire a broad, even foundational
, perspective on the human past and new insight into transcendent problems in the human experience.
Global History: Read More [+]

HISTORY R1 The Practice of History 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2006, Spring 2005, Spring 2004
Intended for non-majors as well as prospective majors, this course introduces students to the discipline of history as a humanistic inquiry into the experiences of people in time and space. How do historians interpret and debate the past? How do they gather and make use of their materials and sources? Readings include the works of classical historians from different cultural traditions, contemporary historical debates, and an exploration
of historical sources available at Berkeley. Satisfies half of the Reading and Composition requirement.
The Practice of History: Read More [+]

HISTORY R1B Reading and Composition in History 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Reading and composition courses based upon primary historical documents and secondary historical scholarship. These courses provide an introduction to core issues in the interpretation of historical texts and introduce students to the distinctive ways of reading primary and secondary sources. Courses focus on specific historical topics but address general issues of how historians read and write. Satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition
requirement.
Reading and Composition in History: Read More [+]

HISTORY 2 Comparative World History 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This lower-division lecture course introduces students to the study of history in multiple periods and regions. It will typically be co-taught by faculty members with different geographical and chronological expertise and will center around a particular theme, such as cities, food cultures, or war and society. No prior course-work in the history of any particular part of the world will be expected.

Comparative World History: Read More [+]

HISTORY 3 After the Roman Empire: the East 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2012, Fall 2010
A general introduction to the study of history, this course focuses on Byzantium and the Islamic world, two medieval successors to the Roman empire in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Near East. This course has three aims: to provide an outline of events that transpired in this area from the 4th-15th centuries; to explain how a modern historian can approach medieval sources in order to reconstruct various aspects of the past; and to discuss the
commonalities of pre-industrial societies, and how lessons learnt in this class can be applied to the study of other time periods and geographic locations.
After the Roman Empire: the East: Read More [+]

HISTORY 4A Origins of Western Civilization: The Ancient Mediterranean World 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course offers an introductory survey of the history of the ancient Mediterranean world, from the rise of city states in Mesopotamia c.3000 BC to the transformation of the Roman Empire in the 5th and 6th centuries AD. The emphasis will be on the major developments in the political and social history of the ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome, with special attention to those institutions, practices, ideas, and objects that have had an
enduring influence on the development of western civilization.
Origins of Western Civilization: The Ancient Mediterranean World: Read More [+]

HISTORY 4B Origins of Western Civilization: Medieval Europe 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Introductory study of major historical events in the origins of western civilization. Emphasis on class discussions, readings in the sources, and writing of essays.

Origins of Western Civilization: Medieval Europe: Read More [+]

HISTORY 5 European Civilization from the Renaissance to the Present 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
This course is an introduction to European history from around 1500 to the present. The central questions that it addresses are how and why Europe--a small, relatively poor, and politically fragmented place-- became the motor of globalization and a world civilzation in its own right. Put differently how did "western" become an adjective that, for better and often for worse, stands in place of "modern".

European Civilization from the Renaissance to the Present: Read More [+]

HISTORY W5 European Civilization from the Renaissance to the Present 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
A survey of European history from the Renaissance to the present. This course is web-based.

European Civilization from the Renaissance to the Present: Read More [+]

HISTORY 6 Chinese Civilization 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012
Chinese history from ancient times to the present, with a strong emphasis on primary sources. This course presents the dominant narratives and interpretations of Chinese history, as well as providing a critical understanding of how these views became dominant.

Chinese Civilization: Read More [+]

HISTORY 6A History of China: Origins to the Mongol Conquest 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The history of China from its beginnings to the destruction of the Song Dynasty by the Mongols in the 13th century. Topics to be covered include the emergence of Chinese civilization, the Chinese language, early rhetoric and philosophy, the creation of the first empire, law, Buddhism and religious Taoism, the socioeconomic revolution of the 10th to 12th centuries, identities (male and female, Chinese and "barbarian"), lyric poetry, and
painting and calligraphy.
History of China: Origins to the Mongol Conquest: Read More [+]

HISTORY 6B Introduction to Chinese History from the Mongols to Mao 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This is an introduction to Chinese history from the 13th through the 20th centuries -- from the Mongols and Khubilai Khan's conquest of southern China to the amazing turnaround following the death of Mao Zedong in 1976 and the opening of the era of reform that has led to China's emergence as a major economic and strategic power today. The course assumes no prior knowledge of Chinese history.

Introduction to Chinese History from the Mongols to Mao: Read More [+]

HISTORY 7A Introduction to the History of the United States: The United States from Settlement to Civil War 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the beginning of the European colonization of North America to the end of the Civil War. It is also an introduction to the ways historians look at the past and think about evidence. There are two main themes: one is to understand the origin of the "groups" we call European-Americans, Native-Americans, and African-Americans; the second, is to understand how democratic
political institutions emerged in the United States in this period in the context of an economy that depended on slave labor and violent land acquisition.
Introduction to the History of the United States: The United States from Settlement to Civil War: Read More [+]

HISTORY 7B Introduction to the History of the United States: The United States from Civil War to Present 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Spring 2017, Summer 2016 8 Week Session
What does it mean to be American? Whatever your answer is to this question, chances are it is deeply connected to the themes and events we will discuss in this class. Here we will track America's rise to global power, the fate of freedom in a post-Emancipation political setting, and the changing boundaries of nation, citizenship, and community. We will use landmark events to sharpen our themes, but we will also
take care to analyze the equally important (and shifting) patterns of where and how Americans lived, worked, and played.
Introduction to the History of the United States: The United States from Civil War to Present: Read More [+]

HISTORY 8A Latin American History: Becoming Latin America, 1492 to 1824 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
This course covers the history of Latin America from the time of Columbus to around 1870. It thus reckons with almost four centuries of encounter, colonization, accommodation, and struggle that frame the ways that Latin America was becoming Latin American. Lectures and a mix of secondary and primary source readings and images produced during the colonial period serve as points of entry for discussion in section meetings.

Latin American History: Becoming Latin America, 1492 to 1824: Read More [+]

HISTORY 8B Latin American History: Modern Latin America 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
This introductory course surveys the history of modern Latin America from independence to the present, with a strong emphasis on the twentieth century. Our focus will be on broad transfomations in politics, place, identity, and work.

Latin American History: Modern Latin America: Read More [+]

HISTORY 10 African History 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2015
An introductory survey of the history of Africa.

African History: Read More [+]

HISTORY 11 India 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Spring 2014

India: Read More [+]

HISTORY 12 The Middle East 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Spring 2014

The Middle East: Read More [+]

HISTORY 14 Introduction to the History of Japan 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
A brisk introduction to the nearly two millennia of recorded Japanese history. As a survey, the course gives attention to broad themes and problems in Japan's political, social, and cultural/intellectual history. Topics include the dialectic of national and local identities in shaping Japanese politics, Japan's interaction with the Asian continent and the Western world, and the relation of past to present in modern times.

Introduction to the History of Japan: Read More [+]

HISTORY 24 Freshman Seminar 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
The Freshman Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered in all campus departments and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to fifteen freshmen.

Freshman Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTORY 30 Science and Society 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Science as we know is the product of a historical process. In this course, we will explore the emergence of its concepts, practices, goals, and cognitive authority by surveying its roots in their social and cultural setting. We will trace the development of conceptions of the natural world from antiquity through the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment and up to the modern age. All the sciences fall within our purview, from their early forms
up to today.
Science and Society: Read More [+]

HISTORY 39C Freshman Sophomore Seminar 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2009, Spring 2003, Fall 1998
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTORY 39D Freshman Sophomore Seminar 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2009, Fall 2006, Spring 2004
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTORY 39E Freshman Sophomore Seminar 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2010, Spring 2009, Fall 2003
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTORY 39F Freshman Sophomore Seminar 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2010, Fall 2009, Fall 2005
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTORY 39G Freshman Sophomore Seminar 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2010, Spring 2010, Spring 2005
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTORY 39H Freshman Sophomore Seminar 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2010, Fall 2009, Fall 2008
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTORY 39I Freshman Sophomore Seminar 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Spring 2009
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTORY 39J Freshman Sophomore Seminar 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2012
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTORY 39K Freshman Sophomore Seminar 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2009
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTORY 39L Freshman Sophomore Seminar 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTORY 39M Freshman Sophomore Seminar 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTORY 39R Freshman Sophomore Seminar 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2006, Fall 2004
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTORY 84 Sophomore Seminar 1 or 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses offered by faculty members in departments all across the campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for close, regular intellectual contact between faculty members and students in the crucial second year. The topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sophomores.

Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTORY 88 How Does History Count? 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016
In this connector course, we will explore how historical data becomes historical evidence and how recent technological advances affect long-established practices, such as close attention to historical context and contingency. Will the advent of fast computing and big data make history “count” more or lead to unprecedented insights into the study of change over time? During our weekly discussions, we will apply what we learn in lectures and labs to the
analysis of selected historical sources and get an understanding of constructing historical datasets. We will also consider scholarly debates over quantitative evidence and historical argument.
How Does History Count?: Read More [+]

HISTORY 98 Directed Group Study for Lower Division Students 1 - 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Lectures and small group discussion focusing on topics of interest that vary from semester to semester. Grading based on discussion and written work.

Directed Group Study for Lower Division Students: Read More [+]

HISTORY 98BC Berkeley Connect for Lower Division Students 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. Over the course of a semester, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor (following a faculty-directed curriculum), meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising, attend lectures and panel discussions featuring department
faculty and alumni, and go on field trips to campus resources. Students are not required to be declared majors in order to participate.
Berkeley Connect for Lower Division Students: Read More [+]

HISTORY 100 Special Topics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Summer 2014 First 6 Week Session
Designed primarily to permit the instructors to deal with a topic with which they are especially concerned, usually more restricted than the subject matter of a regular lecture course. A combination of informal lectures and discussions, term papers, and examinations. Instructors and subject to vary. Consult department website during pre-enrollment week each semester.

Special Topics: Read More [+]

HISTORY 100AC Special Topics in the History of the United States 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Summer 2016 First 6 Week Session
Designed primarily to permit the instructors to deal with topics with which they are especially concerned, usually more restricted than the subject matter of a regular lecture course. A combination of informal lectures and discussions, term papers, and examinations, with all grading by the instructor. Instructors and subjects to vary.

Special Topics in the History of the United States: Read More [+]

HISTORY 100AP Special Topics in Ancient History 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Summer 2016 First 6 Week Session
Designed primarily to permit the instructors to deal with a topic with which they are especially concerned, usually more restricted than the subject matter of a regular lecture course. A combination of informal lectures and discussions, term papers, and examinations. Instructors and subject to vary. Consult department website during pre-enrollment week each semester. Satisfies the premodern requirement for the History major.

Special Topics in Ancient History: Read More [+]

HISTORY 100B Special Topics in European History 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Designed primarily to permit the instructors to deal with a topic with which they are especially concerned, usually more restricted than the subject matter of a regular lecture course. A combination of informal lectures and discussions, term papers, and examinations. Instructors and subject to vary. Consult department website during pre-enrollment week each semester for specific topic.

Special Topics in European History: Read More [+]

HISTORY 100BP Special Topics in Medieval History 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016
Designed primarily to permit the instructors to deal with a topic with which they are especially concerned, usually more restricted than the subject matter of a regular lecture course. A combination of informal lectures and discussions, term papers, and examinations. Instructors and subject to vary. Consult department website during pre-enrollment week each semester for topic. Satisfies the premodern requirement for the History major.

Special Topics in Medieval History: Read More [+]

HISTORY 100D Special Topics in the History of the United States 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Designed primarily to permit the instructors to deal with a topic with which they are especially concerned, usually more restricted than the subject matter of a regular lecture course. A combination of informal lectures and discussions, term papers, and examinations. Instructors and subject to vary. Consult department website during pre-enrollment week each semester for topics.

Special Topics in the History of the United States: Read More [+]

HISTORY 100E Special Topics in Latin American History 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Spring 2017
Designed primarily to permit the instructors to deal with a topic with which they are especially concerned, usually more restricted than the subject matter of a regular lecture course. A combination of informal lectures and discussions, term papers, and examinations. Instructors and subject to vary. Consult department website during pre-enrollment week each semester for specific topic.

Special Topics in Latin American History: Read More [+]

HISTORY 100F Special Topics in Asian History 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Designed primarily to permit the instructors to deal with a topic with which they are especially concerned, usually more restricted than the subject matter of a regular lecture course. A combination of informal lectures and discussions, term papers, and examinations. Instructors and subject to vary. Consult department website during pre-enrollment week each semester for topics.

Special Topics in Asian History: Read More [+]

HISTORY 100H Special Topics in African History 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Designed primarily to permit the instructors to deal with a topic with which they are especially concerned, usually more restricted than the subject matter of a regular lecture course. A combination of informal lectures and discussions, term papers, and examinations. Instructors and subject to vary. Consult department website during pre-enrollment week each semester for topic.

Special Topics in African History: Read More [+]

HISTORY 100L Special Topics in Legal History 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Designed primarily to permit the instructors to deal with a topic with which they are especially concerned, usually more restricted than the subject matter of a regular lecture course. A combination of informal lectures and discussions, term papers, and examinations. Instructors and subject to vary. Consult department website during pre-enrollment week each semester for topic.

Special Topics in Legal History: Read More [+]

HISTORY 100M Special Topics in the History of the Middle East 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Designed primarily to permit the instructors to deal with a topic with which they are especially concerned, usually more restricted than the subject matter of a regular lecture course. A combination of informal lectures and discussions, term papers, and examinations. Instructors and subject to vary. Consult department website during pre-enrollment week each semester for topics.

Special Topics in the History of the Middle East: Read More [+]

HISTORY 100S Special Topics in the History of Science 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
Designed primarily to permit the instructors to deal with a topic with which they are especially concerned, usually more restricted than the subject matter of a regular lecture course. A combination of informal lectures and discussions, term papers, and examinations. Instructors and subject to vary. Consult department website during pre-enrollment week each semester for topics.

Special Topics in the History of Science: Read More [+]

HISTORY 100U Special Topics in Comparative History 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Designed primarily to permit the instructors to deal with a topic with which they are especially concerned, usually more restricted than the subject matter of a regular lecture course. A combination of informal lectures and discussions, term papers, and examinations. Instructors and subject to vary. Consult department website during pre-enrollment week each semester for topic.

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HISTORY 100UP Special Topics in Comparative History 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Designed primarily to permit the instructors to deal with a topic with which they are especially concerned, usually more restricted than the subject matter of a regular lecture course. A combination of informal lectures and discussions, term papers, and examinations. Instructors and subject to vary. Consult department website during pre-enrollment week each semester for topic. Satisfies the premodern requirement for the History major.

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HISTORY N100 Special Topics in History: Short Course 2 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
Designed primarily to permit the instructors to deal with a topic with which they are especially concerned, more focused than the subject matter of a regular lecture course. See department website for topics. Does not count towards the requirements of the History major or minor, but may satisfy other campus requirements.

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HISTORY 101 Seminar in Historical Research and Writing for History Majors 5 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Individual research projects carried out in seminar sections in various historical fields resulting in a lengthy paper, with readings and discussions on general problems of historical inquiry. In addition to regular class meetings, individual consultations with the instructor, research, and preparation totaling ten to twelve hours per week are required.

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HISTORY 103A Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Ancient 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Designed primarily to give majors in history elementary training in historical criticism and research. Emphasis will be placed on writing and discussion. For precise schedule of offerings, see department catalog during pre-enrollment week each semester.

Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Ancient: Read More [+]

HISTORY 103B Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Europe 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Designed primarily to give majors in history elementary training in historical criticism and research. Emphasis will be placed on writing and discussion. For precise schedule of offerings, see department catalog during pre-enrollment week each semester.

Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Europe: Read More [+]

HISTORY 103C Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: England 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Designed primarily to give majors in history elementary training in historical criticism and research. Emphasis will be placed on writing and discussion. For precise schedule of offerings, see department catalog during pre-enrollment week each semester.

Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: England: Read More [+]

HISTORY 103D Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: United States 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Designed primarily to give majors in history elementary training in historical criticism and research. Emphasis will be placed on writing and discussion. For precise schedule of offerings, see department catalog during pre-enrollment week each semester.

Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: United States: Read More [+]

HISTORY 103E Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Latin America 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Designed primarily to give majors in history elementary training in historical criticism and research. Emphasis will be placed on writing and discussion. For precise schedule of offerings, see department catalog during pre-enrollment week each semester.

Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Latin America: Read More [+]

HISTORY 103F Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Asia 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Designed primarily to give majors in history elementary training in historical criticism and research. Emphasis will be placed on writing and discussion. For precise schedule of offerings, see department catalog during pre-enrollment week each semester.

Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Asia: Read More [+]

HISTORY 103H Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Africa 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Designed primarily to give majors in history elementary training in historical criticism and research. Emphasis will be placed on writing and discussion. For precise schedule of offerings, see department catalog during pre-enrollment week each semester.

Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Africa: Read More [+]

HISTORY 103M Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Middle East 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Designed primarily to give majors in history elementary training in historical criticism and research. Emphasis will be placed on writing and discussion. For precise schedule of offerings, consult departmental website for topic information which is viewable at http://history.berkeley.edu/courses

Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Middle East: Read More [+]

HISTORY 103S Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: History of Science 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Designed primarily to give majors in history elementary training in historical criticism and research. Emphasis will be placed on writing and discussion. For precise schedule of offerings, see department catalog during pre-enrollment week each semester.

Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: History of Science: Read More [+]

HISTORY 103U Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Studies in Comparative History 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Designed primarily to give majors in history elementary training in historical criticism and research. Emphasis will be placed on writing and discussion. For precise schedule of offerings, see department catalog during pre-enrollment week each semester.

Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Studies in Comparative History: Read More [+]

HISTORY 104 The Craft of History 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
The principal aim of this course it to prepare students to write a thesis in history (in the History 101 thesis seminar). To that end, its goals are (i) to introduce students to concrete elements of the craft of history; (ii) to provide ample opportunity in section to learn and practice these elements; and (iii) to introduce students in lecture to the enduring problems of the discipline. The course is offered in the spring semester, and is
designed to precede the required 103 and 101 seminars.
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HISTORY 105A Ancient Greece: Archaic and Classical Greek History 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
An overview of the history of the Greek world from the Bronze Age to 404 BC. Major themes will include: the ecology of the Mediterranean; development of the polis; colonization; tyranny and democracy; religion; warfare; agriculture and commerce; interstate relations; the Persian Wars; Sparta and the Peloponnesian League; Athens and the Athenian Empire. Most readings will be in (translated) primary sources, including Homer, Hesiod, Herodotus,
Thucydides, Aeschylus, Aristophanes, and documentary evidence such as laws, treaties, and decrees.
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HISTORY 105B Ancient Greece: The Greek World: 403-31 BCE 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Fall 2013
An overview of the history of the Greek World from the end of the Peloponnesian War to the Battle of Actium, the final stage in the Roman conquest of the Hellenistic World. Major topics will include: Greek-Persian relations in the fourth century; the rise of Macedon under Philip II; the conquests of Alexander the Great; the Hellenistic kingdoms; cultural interactions between Greeks and non-Greeks; Hellenistic economics; and the Roman conquest
of the Greek world. Most readings will be in translated primary sources.
Ancient Greece: The Greek World: 403-31 BCE: Read More [+]

HISTORY 106A Ancient Rome: The Roman Republic 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Fall 2015
A history of Rome from the foundation of the city to the dictatorship of Caesar. The course examines the evolution of Republican government, the growth of Roman imperialism, and the internal disruptions of the age of the Gracchi, Sulla, and Caesar.

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HISTORY 106B Ancient Rome: The Roman Empire 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Summer 2016 First 6 Week Session, Fall 2015
A history of Rome from Augustus to Constantine. The course surveys the struggles between the Roman emperors and the senatorial class, the relationship between civil and military government, the emergence of Christianity, and Roman literature as a reflection of social and intellectual life.

Ancient Rome: The Roman Empire: Read More [+]

HISTORY N106A The Roman Republic 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2013 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2012 10 Week Session, Summer 2012 Second 6 Week Session
A history of Rome from the foundation of the city to the dictatorship of Caesar. The course examines the evolution of Republican government, the growth of Roman imperialism, and the internal disruptions of the age of the Gracchi, Sulla, and Caesar.

The Roman Republic: Read More [+]

HISTORY N106B The Roman Empire 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2015 10 Week Session, Summer 2015 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2014 First 6 Week Session
A history of Rome from Augustus to Constantine. The course surveys the struggles between the Roman emperors and the senatorial class, the relationship between civil and military government, the emergence of Christianity, and Roman literature as a reflection of social and intellectual life.

The Roman Empire: Read More [+]

HISTORY 108 Byzantium 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
The social, cultural, and religious history of the Near East and eastern Mediterranean from late antiquity through the early middle ages. The survival of the Roman Empire in Byzantium, the Sassanian Empire in Iran, and the rise of Islam are the topics covered.

Byzantium: Read More [+]

HISTORY 109A The Rise of Islamic Civilization, 600-1200 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2011, Spring 2006, Spring 2004
A survey of Islamic civilization in the Middle East during the medieval period. Topics include the emergence of Islam in Arabia and the role of the prophet Muhammad; the rapid rise of an Islamic empire and its effects on the societies it governed; the creation of an Islamic civilization and the religious, political, and intellectual debates it engendered; contact with Europe and Asia through trade, the Crusades, and nomadic conquest; the contributions
of non-Muslims, women, slaves.
The Rise of Islamic Civilization, 600-1200: Read More [+]

HISTORY 109B The Middle East, 1000-1750 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
The establishment of Turkish power in the Middle East: Seljuks, Mongols, Ottomans, and Safavis.

The Middle East, 1000-1750: Read More [+]

HISTORY 109C The Middle East From the 18th Century to the Present 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2015
The breaking of pre-modern empires and the formation of national states in the Arab world, Turkey, and Iran; Islam and nationalism.

The Middle East From the 18th Century to the Present: Read More [+]

HISTORY N109C The Middle East From the 18th Century to the Present 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2015 Second 6 Week Session
The breaking of pre-modern empires and the formation of national states in the Arab world, Turkey, and Iran; Islam and nationalism.

The Middle East From the 18th Century to the Present: Read More [+]

HISTORY 111A Topics in the History of Southest Asia: Southeast Asia to the 18th Century 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012, Fall 2010, Fall 2003
The rise of the region's most important classical and early modern states; long-term economic, social, and religious trends.

Topics in the History of Southest Asia: Southeast Asia to the 18th Century: Read More [+]

HISTORY 111B Topics in the History of Southest Asia: Modern Southeast Asia 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Major themes in modern Southeast Asian history with an emphasis on cross-country comparisons involving the region's largest and most populous countries: Thailand, Burma, Vietnam, Indonesia, and the Philippines.

Topics in the History of Southest Asia: Modern Southeast Asia: Read More [+]

HISTORY 111C Topics in the History of Southest Asia: Political and Cultural History of Vietnam 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course provides an introduction to the main issues in Vietnamese history from the mythic and archaeological origins of the modern nation-state to the end of the Second Indochina War in 1975. Special emphasis will be placed on "modern" developments from the late 18th century. In addition to history texts, readings will be taken from novels, short stories, poetry, and memoirs.

Topics in the History of Southest Asia: Political and Cultural History of Vietnam: Read More [+]

HISTORY 111D Vietnam at War 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016
This course explores the history of the wars that engulfed Vietnam during the post-WWII era. While focusing on the Second Indochina War (1954-1975), it also examines the history of the First Indochina War (1946-1954) and the Third Indochina War (1978-1980). It will address military, political, and social dynamics of the conflict as well as representatives of the war in film, fiction, and memoirs.

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HISTORY 112B Africa: Modern South Africa, 1652-Present 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
This course will examine three centuries of South African history that account for the origin and development of the recently dismantled apartheid regime. Our aim is to understand the major historical forces that progressively shaped what became a turbulent socio-cultural, economic, political, and racial frontier.

Africa: Modern South Africa, 1652-Present: Read More [+]

HISTORY 112C Colonialism and Nationalism in Africa 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Fall 2011
This course examines the nature and effects of European colonization of Africa, and African responses to the colonial encounter. Broad themes include colonial conquest and practices of administration, African responses to the imposition of colonial rule, colonial economies, labor migration, introduction and impact of Christianity and Western education; women and the colonial state, urbanization, social change, the apartheid system, liberation
struggles, decolonization, and the colonial legacy.
Colonialism and Nationalism in Africa: Read More [+]

HISTORY N112B Modern South Africa, 1652-Present 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2011 First 6 Week Session
This course will examine three centuries of South African history that account for the origin and development of the recently dismantled apartheid regime. Our aim is to understand the major historical forces that progressively shaped what became a turbulent socio-cultural, economic, political, and racial frontier.

Modern South Africa, 1652-Present: Read More [+]

HISTORY 113A Traditional Korean History 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2010, Fall 2009, Fall 2008
This course surveys major issues in Korean history from the origins of the Korean people to the 19th century.

Traditional Korean History: Read More [+]

HISTORY 113B Modern Korean History 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Spring 2010, Spring 2009
This course will survey major social, economic, and political developments on the Korean peninsula from the middle of the 19th century.

Modern Korean History: Read More [+]

HISTORY 114A India: Medieval and Early Modern India to the Coming of the British 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
We will have two projects in this course. The first of these is to understand, in so far as the sources permit, the nature of state structure in the Indian area between 1000 and 1800 CE. The second of these is to look at the way in which historians have described the history and the society of this period to understand the way in which the Indian state and its society has been constructed. This will involve reading in both substantive texts and
theoretical works.
India: Medieval and Early Modern India to the Coming of the British: Read More [+]

HISTORY 114B India: Modern South Asia 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Here we will deal with the history of South Asia between the coming of the Europeans and the present. It will be organized around a series of contested formulations about the recent South Asian past. One of these problems is: how was India comprehended and manipulated by the Europeans? The second problem is: How was India conquered, by the sword or by the word? The third is: How did Indians resist the British? Finally, how was the voice of
women, lower classes, and others expressed and heard? We will read books about language, gender, the "subaltern" classes, and women in an attempt to understand these questions.
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HISTORY 116A China: Early China 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Fall 2010, Spring 2010

China: Early China: Read More [+]

HISTORY 116B China: Two Golden Ages: China During the Tang and Song Dynasties 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
This course explores Chinese history and culture in the period from the 7th to the 13th centuries, when China achieved unprecedented military, political, and cultural power in East Asia. It concentrates on the fundamental transformation of state and society that took place between the 8th and 12th centuries, and on the nature of the new "early modern" order that had come into existence by the end of the Southern Song. Topics of special
concern are economic and political power, technology, religion and philosophy, and poetry and painting.
China: Two Golden Ages: China During the Tang and Song Dynasties: Read More [+]

HISTORY 116C China: Modern China 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Fall 2010, Spring 2009

China: Modern China: Read More [+]

HISTORY 116D China: Twentieth-Century China 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Chinese history from the decline of the Qing empire to the reforms under the Chinese Communist Party in the late 20th century.

China: Twentieth-Century China: Read More [+]

HISTORY 116G Imperial China and the World 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
The history of China's relationship to the world from earliest times to the 20th c. Provides historical contextualization for China’s recent resurgence on the world stage. Topics will include early territorial expansion, the Silk Road, the Great Wall, the Chinese diaspora, Mongol and Manchu empire building, the impact of Europeans in the 19th c, the emergence of Chinese nationalism, and China's evolving role in the global economy.

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HISTORY 117A Topics in Chinese History: Chinese Popular Culture 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2011, Fall 2009
It is impossible to understand Chinese history and culture without knowing what ordinary people thought, felt, and believed. In this course, our primary concerns will be 1) the built environment -- village form, houses, temples; 2) village festivals and domestic rituals; 3) the rituals and scriptures of local cults; 4) operas, storytelling, and other forms of village entertainment; and 5) popular visual arts. These subjects will be studied
through both written and visual documentation.
Topics in Chinese History: Chinese Popular Culture: Read More [+]

HISTORY 117D Topics in Chinese History: The Chinese Body: Gender and Sex, Health, and Medicine 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2009
This course brings a thematic approach to the critical analysis of the "Chinese body," as constructed before the 20th century, from four main perspectives, those of (1) gender, (2) sexual activity, (3) health, and (4) medicine. A variety of sources, material and literary, attest to changing perceptions over time, through the continuing use of standard vocabulary for Yin/Yang and the Five Phases frequently masked innovations.

Topics in Chinese History: The Chinese Body: Gender and Sex, Health, and Medicine: Read More [+]

HISTORY 118A Japan: Japan, Archaeological Period to 1800 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Emphasis on political, cultural, and intellectual history of the Early Imperial State, Japan's first military governments, early modern, and Meiji Japan.

Japan: Japan, Archaeological Period to 1800: Read More [+]

HISTORY 118B Japan: Japan 1800-1900 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2010
Emphasis on the social and intellectual history of Japan's pre-war reconstruction.

Japan: Japan 1800-1900: Read More [+]

HISTORY 118C Japan: Empire and Alienation: The 20th Century in Japan 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Japan's experience of the 20th century, beginning with the development of capitalism and the acquisition of an empire, and tracing the achievements and tragedy that came with Japan's emergence as a world power. Emphasis on social and intellectual history and on how Japan has understood itself and the world in this century.

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HISTORY 119A Topics in Japanese History: Postwar Japan 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Summer 2010 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2009 First 6 Week Session
This course considers the history of Japan since the end of World War II, beginning with an exploration of the war itself and its complex legacy to the postwar era. Using the best recent scholarship and a selection of translated novels, essays, and poetry along with film and art, we look at the six postwar decades and the transformations of Japanese life that those years have brought. We try, finally
, to answer the question: has "postwar" itself come to an end?
Topics in Japanese History: Postwar Japan: Read More [+]

HISTORY N119A Postwar Japan 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2015 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2014 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2013 First 6 Week Session
This course considers the history of Japan since the end of World War II, beginning with an exploration of the war itself and its complex legacy to the postwar era. Using the best recent scholarship and a selection of translated novels, essays, and poetry along with film and art, we look at the six postwar decades and the transformations of Japanese life that those years have
brought. We try, finally, to answer the question: has "postwar" itself come to an end?
Postwar Japan: Read More [+]

HISTORY 120AC American Environmental and Cultural History 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
History of the American environment and the ways in which different cultural groups have perceived, used, managed, and conserved it from colonial times to the present. Cultures include American Indians and European and African Americans. Natural resources development includes gathering-hunting-fishing; farming, mining, ranching, forestry, and urbanization. Changes in attitudes and behaviors toward nature and past and present
conservation and environmental movements are also examined.
American Environmental and Cultural History: Read More [+]

HISTORY 121B The Colonial Period and American Revolution: The American Revolution 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2014, Spring 2013

The Colonial Period and American Revolution: The American Revolution: Read More [+]

HISTORY 122AC Antebellum America: The Advent of Mass Society 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2017, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
This course examines half a century of life in the United States (roughly from the War of 1812 until the secession of the Southern states), focusing on race relations, westward expansion, class formation, immigration, religion, sexuality, popular culture, and everyday life. Assigned readings will consist largely of first-person narratives in which women and men of a range of ethnic and cultural
backgrounds construct distinctive visions of life in the new nation.
Antebellum America: The Advent of Mass Society: Read More [+]

HISTORY 123 Civil War and Reconstruction 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2013, Fall 2010, Spring 2008
This lecture course will take a broad view of the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States in the mid-19th century in order to explore both the causes of the Civil War and its effects on American development. Major topics will include slavery and race relations (north and south), class relations and industrialization, the organization of party politics, and changing ideas about and uses of government power.

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HISTORY 124A The Recent United States: The United States from the Late 19th Century to the Eve of World War II 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
During the first half-century before World War II, the United States became an industrialized, urban society with national markets and communication media. This class will explore in depth some of the most important changes and how they were connected. We will also examine what did not change, and how state and local priorities persisted in many arenas. Among the topics addressed: population movements and efforts to control immigration; the growth
of corporations and trade unions; the campaign for women's suffrage; Prohibition; an end to child labor; the institution of the Jim Crow system; and the reshaping of higher education.
The Recent United States: The United States from the Late 19th Century to the Eve of World War II: Read More [+]

HISTORY 124B The Recent United States: The United States from World War II 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Immediately prior to World War II, the US military ranked 17th in the world, most African-Americans lived in the rural south and were barred from voting, culture and basic science in the United States enjoyed no world-wide recognition, most married women did not work for wages, and the census did not classify most Americans as middle-class or higher. By 1973, all this had changed. This course will explore these and other transformations, all
part of the making of modern America. We will take care to analyze the events, significance and cost of US ascendancy to world power in an international and domestic context.
The Recent United States: The United States from World War II: Read More [+]

HISTORY N124A The United States from the Late 19th Century to the Eve of the World War II 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2015 10 Week Session, Summer 2015 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2014 First 6 Week Session
During the first half-century before World War II, the United States became an industrialized, urban society with national markets and communication media. This class will explore in depth some of the most important changes and how they were connected. We will also examine what did not change, and how state and local priorities persisted in many arenas. Among the topics addressed:
population movements and efforts to control immigration; the growth of corporations and trade unions; the campaign for women's suffrage; Prohibition; an end to child labor; the institution of the Jim Crow system; and the reshaping of higher education.
The United States from the Late 19th Century to the Eve of the World War II: Read More [+]

HISTORY N124B The United States from World War II to the Vietnam Era 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
Immediately prior to World War II, the U.S. military ranked 17th in the world, most African-Americans lived in the rural south and were barred from voting, culture and basic science in the United States enjoyed no world-wide recognition, most married women did not work for wages, and the census did not classify most Americans as middle-class or higher. By 1973, all this had changed.
This course will explore these and other transformations, all part of the making of modern America. We will take care to analyze the events, significance and cost of U.S. ascendancy to world power in an international and domestic context.
The United States from World War II to the Vietnam Era: Read More [+]

HISTORY 125A History of African-Americans and Race Relations in the United States: The History of Black People and Race Relations, 1550-1861 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
The course will survey African American history from the African background to the outbreak of the Civil War. The origins and development of Afro-American society, culture and politics will be explored from the perspective of African-Americans themselves: slave and free, North and South. Throughout, the enduring dilemma of race relations functions as a central theme.

History of African-Americans and Race Relations in the United States: The History of Black People and Race Relations, 1550-1861: Read More [+]

HISTORY 125B History of African-Americans and Race Relations in the United States: Soul Power: African American History 1861-1980 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
This course will examine the history of African Americans and ethno-racial relations from the Civil War and Emancipation (1861-1865) to the modern African American Freedom Struggle (1954-1972). Social, cultural, economic, and political developments will be emphasized. Topics to be covered include: Black Reconstruction; black life and labor in the New South; leadership; class; gender; Jim Crow; migration; urbanization; war and social change;
the Harlem Renaissance; civil rights; and Black Power.
History of African-Americans and Race Relations in the United States: Soul Power: African American History 1861-1980: Read More [+]

HISTORY N125B Soul Power: African American History 1861-2008 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2013 First 6 Week Session
This course will examine the history of African Americans and ethno-racial relations from the Civil War and Emancipation (1861-1865) to the modern African American Freedom Struggle (1954-1972). Social, cultural, economic, and political developments will be emphasized. Topics to be covered include Black Reconstruction, black life and labor in the New South; leadership; class; gender; Jim Crow; migration; urbanization; war and social change; the
Harlem Renaissance; civil rights; and Black Power.
Soul Power: African American History 1861-2008: Read More [+]

HISTORY 126A The American West since 1850 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2010
This course surveys the history of the American West since 1845. We will pay particular heed to the history and historiography surrounding those aspects of the West that are typically associated with the region's distinctiveness as both a shifting region on the national map and a potent metaphor in the national imagination.

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HISTORY 126B The American West since 1850 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
This course surveys the history of the American West since 1845. We will pay particular heed to the history and historiography surrounding those aspects of the West that are typically associated with the region's distinctiveness as both a shifting region on the national map and a potent metaphor in the national imagination.

The American West since 1850: Read More [+]

HISTORY 127AC California 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
The history of California from pre-European contact to the present, with emphasis on the diversity of cultures and the interplay of social, economic, and political developments.

California: Read More [+]

HISTORY 130 American Foreign Policy 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015
This course will explore the history of American foreign policy since 1776, focusing on diplomatic and military interactions and the evolution of American strategic thought. Students will also traverse the broader history of international relations and will engage some of the basic vocabulary of IR theory. Topics will range from the territorial expansion of the United States to the making of Cold War strategy and beyond. Students will be asked to consider how historical
knowledge and reasoning might inform the making of foreign policy.
American Foreign Policy: Read More [+]

HISTORY 131B Social History of the United States: Creating Modern American Society: From the End of the Civil War to the Global Age 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course examines the transformation of American society since the Civil War. The lectures and readings give special attention to the emergence of city culture and its possibilities for a pluralistic society; the experience and effect of immigration in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the revolution in communications and industry; changes in family dynamics, the emergence of modern childhood, schooling, and youth
culture; changes in gender relations and sexuality; the problematics of race and the changing nature of class relationships in a consumer society; the triumph of psychological and therapeutic concepts of the self.
Social History of the United States: Creating Modern American Society: From the End of the Civil War to the Global Age: Read More [+]

HISTORY N131B Social History of the United States: 1914-Present 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 First 6 Week Session
The nature and development of social and economic institutions; class, family, and racial relationships; sex roles; and cultural norms in the United States.

Social History of the United States: 1914-Present: Read More [+]

HISTORY C132B Intellectual History of the United States since 1865 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Spring 2014
In this course we will be discussing key developments in U.S. thought since the middle of the nineteenth century, roughly beginning with the reception of Darwin. The broader story told in the class weaves together in the history of science and engineering, the arts and popular culture, philosophy, and education. Our goal is to trace how ideas, whether they are dominant, challenging, or look back, have affected the ways in which Americans live
together. We will look at how intellectual life has empowered and expanded the capacity of Americans to understand their world and achieve goals more effectively. We will also consider how intellectual theories have contributed to inequality and injustice.
Intellectual History of the United States since 1865: Read More [+]

HISTORY 134A The Age of the City: The Age of the City, 1825-1933 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
For most of human history, urban living has been the experience of a distinct minority. Only in the past two hundred years have the physicial spaces, social relations, and lifestyles associated with large cities entered the mainstream. This course examines the long century of urban growth between 1825 and 1933, when big cities came into being in the United States. Focusing on large metropolitian centers (especially on New York, Chicago, and
San Francisco), we will study the way urban spaces provided sites and sources of new modes of personal interaction, popular entertainment, social conflict, and political expression.
The Age of the City: The Age of the City, 1825-1933: Read More [+]

HISTORY 135 American Indian History: Precontact to the Present 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
This course will provide an introductory interpretation of the varied historical experiences of diverse nations native to North America from their origins through the present. We will assess both the impact of colonialism and its consequences upon Indian peoples as well as their responses, treating Native Americans as historical, political, economic, and cultural actors who resourcefully adjusted, resisted, and accommodated to the changing realities
of life in native North America.
American Indian History: Precontact to the Present: Read More [+]

HISTORY 136 Gender Matters in 20th Century America 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2009, Spring 2009, Spring 2008
This course explores the social, political, cultural, and economic history of women and men's lives, as well as changing sexual attitudes toward gender, the family and sexuality. Against the tapestry of twentieth American history, we will analyze how two dramatic changes--women's entry into the paid labor force and their control over their repoductive lives--gave rise to our contemporary cultural wars over the family, sexuality and reproduction.

Gender Matters in 20th Century America: Read More [+]

HISTORY 136A The History of Women in the United States before 1900 4 Units

Terms offered: Not yet offered
This course is a survey of the history of women in America from the pre-colonial period to the turn of the twentieth century. It examines the significant cultural, economic, and political developments that shaped the lives of American women, but places gender at the center of historical analysis. The course also stresses the variety of women’s experiences, acknowledging the importance of race, ethnicity, and class in shaping female lives.

The History of Women in the United States before 1900: Read More [+]

HISTORY 136AC Gender Matters in 20th Century America 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
This course explores the social, political, cultural, and economic history of women and men's lives, as well as changing sexual attitudes toward gender, the family and sexuality. Against the tapestry of twentieth century American history, we will analyze how two dramatic changes -- women's entry into the paid labor force and their control over their reproductive lives -- gave rise to our contemporary cultural wars over the family, sexuality,
and reproduction.
Gender Matters in 20th Century America: Read More [+]

HISTORY 136B Gender and Sexuality in Twentieth-Century US History 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017
This course introduces students to the history of gender and sexuality in twentieth-century United States. We will learn about the distinctive history of women and men from 1900 to the present, the transformation of gender relations and sex roles, and how gender and sexuality have shaped the lives of different groups of women and men in twentieth century America. While paying attention to broader historical trends, we will specifically focus on the intersection
of gender, race, sexuality, and class and its consequences for the experiences of women and men.
Gender and Sexuality in Twentieth-Century US History: Read More [+]

HISTORY 136C Defiant Women: Gender, Power and Violence in American History 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Spring 2017
Taking as its focus diverse groups of women who have shaped the course of North American history, this class will explore the relationship between gender, power and violence from the colonial period to the modern era. We will discuss how women have challenged conventional notions of “womanhood” through their words and their deeds, how their respective communities understood their behavior, and we will contemplate the ways in which
these women simultaneously constructed narratives of power that do not conform to contemporary conceptualizations of their lives.
Defiant Women: Gender, Power and Violence in American History: Read More [+]

HISTORY 137AC The Repeopling of America 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course examines the coming together of people from five continents to the United States and provides an historical overview of the shifting patterns of immigration. The course begins in the colonial era when servants and slaves typified the migrant to America. It then follows the migration of the pre-industrial immigrants, through migration streams during the industrial and "post-industrial" eras of the nation.

The Repeopling of America: Read More [+]

HISTORY 138 History of Science in the U.S. 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
History of science in the U.S. from the colonial period to the present, with a focus on the contentious debates over the place of science within cultural, religious, and social-intellectual life. Development of institutions for the pursuit of scientific knowledge, with special attention to the relationships between science and technology and between science and the state.

History of Science in the U.S.: Read More [+]

HISTORY 138T History of Science in the US CalTeach 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course is a parallel course to 138, intended for students interested in teaching elementary or secondary school science and math. Students in the "T" course will attend the regular 138 lectures and a special section; this section will focus on techniques, skills, and perspectives necessary to apply the history of science in the juvenile and adolescent science classroom, including pedagogy, devising lesson plans for their classrooms
, finding reliable historical information, and writing.
History of Science in the US CalTeach: Read More [+]

HISTORY C139B The American Immigrant Experience 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
The history of the United States is the history of migration. The course covers the evolution of the American population from about 20,000 BC with the goal of understanding the interdependent roles of history and demography. As an American cultures class, special attention is given to the experiences of 18th- and 19th-century African and European immigrants and 20th- and 21st-century Asian and Latin American immigrants. Two substantial laboratory
assignments; facility with a spreadsheet program is assumed.
The American Immigrant Experience: Read More [+]

HISTORY C139C Civil Rights and Social Movements in U.S. History 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Beginning with the onset of World War II, America experienced not a sigular,unitary Civil Rights Movement -- as is typically portrayed in standard textbood accounts and the collective memory -- but rather a variety of contemporaneous civil rights and their related social movements. This course explores the history, presenting a top-down (political and legal history), bottom-up (social and cultural history), and comparative (by race
and ethnicity as well as region) view of America's struggles for racial equality from roughly World War II until the present.
Civil Rights and Social Movements in U.S. History: Read More [+]

HISTORY C139D From Civil Rights Era to the New Gilded Age: Struggles for Racial Equality and Economic Equity from 'Double Victory' to 'Occupy' 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016
World War II lifted the U.S. from the Great Depression and launched a long economic boom that helped underwrite and propel efforts on behalf of greater racial equality and economic equity. As that boom began to fade in the late 1960s, America’s march toward greater racial equality foundered, while its march toward greater economic equity began to reverse course. The Civil Rights Era gave way to the New Gilded Age. This course will explore the political
, legal, and economic history of America’s struggles for racial equality and economic equity – and the relationship between them.
From Civil Rights Era to the New Gilded Age: Struggles for Racial Equality and Economic Equity from 'Double Victory' to 'Occupy': Read More [+]

HISTORY 140B Mexico: Modern Mexico 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
This course surveys Mexican history from the end of the colonial period to the present, with an eye to how the study of Mexican history can help us understand the Mexico of today. Topics include the historical origins of peasant rebellions and their influence on national politics; the tension between democratic pressures and elitist and exclusionary pressures on the political system; neo-liberal economic policies; the powerful influence of the
Catholic church; immigration to the U.S.; and the explosive 20th-century growth of Mexico City.
Mexico: Modern Mexico: Read More [+]

HISTORY 141B Social History of Latin America: Social History of Modern Latin America 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Affirmation of the central state. Social conflicts in the 20th century: industrialization and agrarian conflict.

Social History of Latin America: Social History of Modern Latin America: Read More [+]

HISTORY 143 Brazil 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
From 16th Century conquest and settlement to the emergence of an industrial economy during the post-1964 period of military rule. Emphasis on dependence of colony on empire, on plantation agriculture, slavery, export economy, and the transition from agrarian to industrial society.

Brazil: Read More [+]

HISTORY N143 Brazil 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2012 First 6 Week Session
From 16th Century conquest and settlement to the emergence of an industrial economy during the post - 1964 period of military rule. Emphasis on dependence of colony on empire, on plantation agriculture, slavery, export economy, and the transition from agrarian to industrial society.

Brazil: Read More [+]

HISTORY 145 Latin America in Film 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2004 10 Week Session, Summer 2003 10 Week Session
This class uses films as the basis of historical inquiry and analysis. Students will consider the content, form, and execution of a set of outstanding films from Latin America, primarily Mexico, Brazil, Cuba, and Argentina. Discussions and readings will focus on histories of the film industry and cultural policy as well as the political and social issues raised in the movies, such as the
portrayal of race and gender, depictions of poverty and inequality, and how films have contributed to the creation of national mythology and icons. All films have English subtitles.
Latin America in Film: Read More [+]

HISTORY 146 Latin American Women 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Spring 2012
This class surveys the experiences and impact of women in Latin America from the pre-conquest period to the present, as well as the ways that gender ideologies (like patriarchy, honor-shame, machismo) have influenced Latin American history.

Latin American Women: Read More [+]

HISTORY 149B Medieval Italy: Italy in the Age of Dante (1000-1350) 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
This course is a survey of the history of northern Italy during the central Middle Ages (ca. 1000-1350). It traces the emergence, flowering, and decline of the "communes," the independent city republics that made Italian political life distinctive during the Middle Ages. The course explores the culture of these dynamic urban communities, especially emphasizing the rich visual and material culture, as well as the particular relationship
between religion and society in Italy before the Renaissance.
Medieval Italy: Italy in the Age of Dante (1000-1350): Read More [+]

HISTORY 150B Medieval England: From the Conquest to 1290 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2010, Spring 2005, Fall 2002
Government, observation of government, community, religion, and social change.

Medieval England: From the Conquest to 1290: Read More [+]

HISTORY 151A Britain 1485-Present: Tudor Stuart Britain, 1485-1660 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
The history of Britain, albeit with primary emphasis on England, from the advent of the Tudors through the revolutions of the mid-17th century. Principal concentration on political, religious, and social developments. No prerequisites other than some sense of general European history in the age of the Reformation.

Britain 1485-Present: Tudor Stuart Britain, 1485-1660: Read More [+]

HISTORY 151B Britain 1485-Present: Britain, 1660-1851 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
This is a course about the history of Britain that asks why this small island nation was so central to how Europeans and others understood world history more generally. It looks at Britain as the paradigmatic venue of industrialization, class conflict or its absence, consumer culture, parliamentary democracy, religious tolerance, imperial expansion, and modernity generally. It begins with the aftermath of Europe's first revolution and ends with
the first world's fair, 1851's Great Exhibition.
Britain 1485-Present: Britain, 1660-1851: Read More [+]

HISTORY 151C Britain 1485-Present: The Peculiar Modernity of Britain, 1848-2000 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
For many years, Britain was seen as the crucible of the modern world.This small, cold, and wet island was thought to have been the first to develop representative democracy, an industrial economy,rapid transport, mass cities, mass communication and mass culture, and, of course, an empire upon which the sun famously never set.And yet, despite this precocious modernity, imperial Britain remained a deeply traditional society unable to rid itself
of ancient institutions like the monarchy, the aristocracy, and the established church. The focus of the course is on how this combination of the old and the new produced a broadly 'liberal' set of mentalities through which Britons came to understand and manage the great transformations of modern life.
Britain 1485-Present: The Peculiar Modernity of Britain, 1848-2000: Read More [+]

HISTORY N151C The Peculiar Modernity of Britain, 1848-2000 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2014 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2013 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2012 Second 6 Week Session
For many years, Britain was seen as the crucible of the modern world. This small, cold, and wet island was thought to have been the first to develop representative democracy, an industrial economy, rapid transport, mass cities, mass communication and mass culture, and, of course, an empire upon which the sun famously never set. And yet, despite this precocious modernity, imperial
Britain remained a deeply traditional society unable to rid itself of ancient institutions like the monarchy, the aristocracy, and the established church. The focus of the course is on how this combination of the old and the new produced a broadly 'liberal' set of mentalities through which Britons came to understand and manage the great transformations of modern life, both at home and across the empire.
The Peculiar Modernity of Britain, 1848-2000: Read More [+]

HISTORY 152A Topics in the History of the British Isles: Ireland Since the Union 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2011, Fall 2009, Spring 2008
Irish history from the completion of the English conquest (1691) to the present. Topics: the formation of the British colony; the French Revolution and the beginnings of the nationalist tradition; Catholic emancipation and the origins of Home Rule; the Great Famine and the struggle of rural Ireland to the Land League; the transformation of the Catholic unionism, and the Great War; the Irish Revolution; the two Irelands, 1921-1967; Northern Ireland
, troubles and terror; Ireland and Europe.
Topics in the History of the British Isles: Ireland Since the Union: Read More [+]

HISTORY 154 Canada 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2009, Fall 2005, Fall 2003
A survey of Canadian history from exploration and first settlement through colonial times to confederation and nationhood to the present.

Canada: Read More [+]

HISTORY 155A Medieval Europe: From the Late Empire to the Investiture Conflict 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2011, Fall 2008, Fall 2004
Formulation of a West European civilization; stress on tribal settlements, the Carolingian Empire, and Christian foundations.

Medieval Europe: From the Late Empire to the Investiture Conflict: Read More [+]

HISTORY 155B Medieval Europe: From the Investiture Conflict to the Fifteenth Century 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Summer 2011 Second 6 Week Session
Crusades; empire, papacy and the Western monarchies; social change, the rise of towns and heresy; culture and learning. Medieval civilization at its height.

Medieval Europe: From the Investiture Conflict to the Fifteenth Century: Read More [+]

HISTORY C157 The Renaissance and the Reformation 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2013, Spring 2012
European history from the fourteenth to the middle of the seventeenth century. Political, social, and economic developments during this transitional period will be examined, together with the rise of Renaissance culture, and the religious upheavals of the sixteenth century.

The Renaissance and the Reformation: Read More [+]

HISTORY 158A Modern Europe: Old Regime and Revolutionary Europe, 1715-1815 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2011, Fall 2005, Spring 2005
The eighteenth century in Europe witnessed a series of "revolutions"--intellectual, political, and to a lesser extent, social and economic--that together constitute the birth rites of modern European society and culture. Historians collectively agree that the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, and the European expansion of Napoleonic France were events of world-historical significance, yet the causes and precise meaning of these
events are the subjects of substantial disagreement. We will study the transformations of the eighteenth century that announced our modern world, and we will also try to make sense of the different ways that historians disagree about the meaning of what happened.
Modern Europe: Old Regime and Revolutionary Europe, 1715-1815: Read More [+]

HISTORY 158B Modern Europe: Europe in the 19th Century 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014

Modern Europe: Europe in the 19th Century: Read More [+]

HISTORY 158C Modern Europe: Old and New Europe, 1914-Present 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
A survey of the main trends and forces in the history of Europe from 1914 to the present. The course stresses the interaction of political, economic, and socio-cultural changes and explores the relationship between domestic and international politics. Topics discussed include the two world wars, the rise and fall of fascism and communism, imperialism, European integration, the cultural revolution of the 1960s.

Modern Europe: Old and New Europe, 1914-Present: Read More [+]

HISTORY N158C Old and New Europe, 1914-Present 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 8 Week Session
A survey of the main trends and forces in the history of Europe from 1914 to the present. The course stresses the interaction of political, economic, and socio-cultural changes and explores the relationship between domestic and international politics. Topics discussed include the two world wars, the rise and fall of fascism and communism, imperialism, European integration, the cultural revolution
of the 1960s.
Old and New Europe, 1914-Present: Read More [+]

HISTORY 159A European Economic History 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
Survey of the economic and social developments of Europe up to the eve of industrialization. Including the transformation of peasant-based, agrarian economies, capitalist organization, colonial expansion, and international trade. This course is equivalent to Economics 111A; students will not receive credit for both courses.

European Economic History: Read More [+]

HISTORY 159B European Economic History 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
The Industrial Revolution and the rise of the European economy to world dominance in the 19th century, emphasizing the diffusion of the industrial system and its consequences, the world trading system, and the rise of modern imperialism.

European Economic History: Read More [+]

HISTORY 160 The International Economy of the 20th Century 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Summer 2015 First 6 Week Session
Development and crises of the advanced economies, with particular emphasis on trade relations with third world countries. Economic impact of war, business cycles, and social movements. This course is equivalent to Economics 115; students will not receive credit for both courses.

The International Economy of the 20th Century: Read More [+]

HISTORY N160 The International Economy of the 20th Century 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
Development and crises of the advanced economies, with particular emphasis on trade relations with third world countries. Economic impact of war, business cycles, and social movements. This course is equivalent to Economics 115; students will not receive credit for both courses.

The International Economy of the 20th Century: Read More [+]

HISTORY 162A Europe and the World: Wars, Empires, Nations 1648-1914 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This upper division course looks at the rise and fall of the European great powers from the Peace of Westphalia, traditionally perceived as the beginning of the modern states system, to the coming of the First World War, an era of state and empire building. Economic and technological trends are naturally part of the story as well as cultural, social, and political forces. At the same time, the course highlights the decisive influence of the shakers
and movers--kings, emperors, and generals.
Europe and the World: Wars, Empires, Nations 1648-1914: Read More [+]

HISTORY 162B War and Peace: International Relations since 1914 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
This course analyzes the turbulent transitions from the classical European balance of power system to the global multipolar system of today. The course explores the political, economic, ideological, and technological roots of international affairs. Among topics discussed are the two world wars, inter-war collective security,the Cold War, European integration, imperialism and de-colonization, the collapse of Communism, the Middle East conflict
, the rise of China and Japan, and the post-1990 international order.
War and Peace: International Relations since 1914: Read More [+]

HISTORY N162A Europe and the World: Wars, Empires, Nations 1648-1914 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This upper division course looks at the rise and fall of the European great powers from the Peace of Westphalia, traditionally perceived as the beginning of the modern states system, to the coming of the First World War, an era of state and empire building. Economic and technological trends are naturally part of the story as well as cultural, social, and political forces. At the same time, the course highlights the decisive influence of the shakers and movers--kings
, emperors, and generals.
Europe and the World: Wars, Empires, Nations 1648-1914: Read More [+]

HISTORY 163A Modern European Intellectual History: European Intellectual History from the Enlightenment to 1870 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2008, Fall 2004, Fall 2002
Reading primary texts, we will examine the major figures and themes in the intellectual development of Europe from Rousseau to Wagner. Included in the topics of the course will be German Idealism, Romanticism, Utopian Socialism, Marxism, Realism, Feminism and Nationalism. We will read works by Kant, Hegel, Goethe, Marx, Flaubert, Wollstonecraft, Kierkegard, and others. We will also listen to Wagner's Tristan und Isolde. The intellectual and artistic
currents of the period will be set against the background of European history as a whole.
Modern European Intellectual History: European Intellectual History from the Enlightenment to 1870: Read More [+]

HISTORY 163B Modern European Intellectual History: European Intellectual History, 1870 to the Present 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2010, Fall 2009, Spring 2009
The focus of the course will be on the social and political thought, primarily in Germany and France, with peripheral attention paid to England and Italy. Related philosophical and cultural trends will also be discussed. The readings will consist largely of selected texts which are representative of the major currents of the period.

Modern European Intellectual History: European Intellectual History, 1870 to the Present: Read More [+]

HISTORY 164A The Birth of Modern Thought: European Intellectual History, 1500-1800 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Between 1500 and 1800, European thought built the foundations of modern culture, politics, economy, government, law, and religion. This course will introduce students to the period, from the Renaissance rediscovery of antiquity to the Scientific Revolution, from the theological innovation of the Reformation to the new forms of political theory that accompanied both French and American Revolutions.

The Birth of Modern Thought: European Intellectual History, 1500-1800: Read More [+]

HISTORY 164B Modern European Intellectual History: European Intellectual History from Enlightenment to 1870 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2011
Reading primary texts, we will examine the major figures and themes in the intellectual development of Europe from Rousseau to Wagner. Included in the topics of the course will be German Idealism, Romanticism, Utopian Socialism, Marxism, Realism, Feminism and Nationalism. We will read works by Kant, Hegel, Goethe, Marx, Flaubert, Wollstonecraft, Kierkegard, and others. We will also listen to Wagner's Tristan und Isolde. The intellectual and artistic currents
of the period will be set against the background of European history as a whole.
Modern European Intellectual History: European Intellectual History from Enlightenment to 1870: Read More [+]

HISTORY 164C Modern European Intellectual History: European Intellectual History 1870 to the Present 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
The focus of the coruse will be on the social and political thought, primarily in Germany and France, with the peripheral attention paid to England and Italy. Related philosophical and cultural trends will also be discussed. The readings will consist largely of selected texts which are representative of the major currents of the period.

Modern European Intellectual History: European Intellectual History 1870 to the Present: Read More [+]

HISTORY S164B Social History of Western Europe 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
European Society from 1750 to the Present.

Social History of Western Europe: Read More [+]

HISTORY 165A Topics in Modern European History: The Reformations of Christendom 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Spring 2014
This course examines not a period but a process: the reform and disruption of the civilization called "Christendom" during the 16th and 17th centuries and its transformation into the familiar Europe of the nation states.

Topics in Modern European History: The Reformations of Christendom: Read More [+]

HISTORY 165B Topics in Modern European History: The World, the Picture, and the Page: The Revolution in European Culture since the late 18th Century 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2007, Fall 2003, Spring 1997
Europe has experienced three revolutions in the past two centuries. The first was political, the second was economic, and the third was what Raymond Williams called the "cultural revolution" - the dramatic shift from a largely oral and iconographic world to one of universal literacy and the technology of modern communications. By means of readings, lectures, discussions, films and slides, the class will examine the meaning of the
revolutionary change for the lives of ordinary men and women, as well as the responses of selected writers, artists, and social theorists to the culture of democratization.
Topics in Modern European History: The World, the Picture, and the Page: The Revolution in European Culture since the late 18th Century: Read More [+]

HISTORY 165D The Social and Cultural History of Early Modern Europe 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course examines the lives of ordinary people in Europe from roughly 1300-1800. Its goal, in the words of the great social historian E.P. Thompson, is to rescue them from "the enormous condescension of posterity," exploring how the common people made their own history and used their ingenuity to shape not only their own lives but also, at key moments, the development of European modernity.

The Social and Cultural History of Early Modern Europe: Read More [+]

HISTORY 166A Modern France: Early Modern France to 1715 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2010

Modern France: Early Modern France to 1715: Read More [+]

HISTORY 166B Modern France: Old Regime and Revolutionary France 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
France from the rise of Louis XIV to the fall of Napoleon Bonaparte. The course will explore the socio-economic and political factors that allowed France to emerge as the most powerful nation in Europe under Louis XIV. We will assess the extent of the kingdom's cultural influence and the realities of everyday life under the "old regime." We will then examine the intellectual, social, political, and religious developments of the eighteenth
century--such as the Enlightenment, Jansenism, and colonialism--that ultimately led to a total assault against the monarchy in 1789, and finally, the outbreak, course, and consequences of the first great democratic revolution in modern Europe.
Modern France: Old Regime and Revolutionary France: Read More [+]

HISTORY 166C Modern France 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015

Modern France: Read More [+]

HISTORY 167A Modern Germany: Early Modern Germany 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
From the period of the Protestant Reformation to the era of enlightened despotism and the French Revolution, German history was characterized by severe conflicts and problems unresolved. Early Modern German history contains many lessons concerning the relationship of war and peace, of violence and toleration, of reform and renewal and the rejection of any change, of Baroque splendor and widespread misery, of some progress and much disappointment
, in short: of a most complicated legacy for future generations.
Modern Germany: Early Modern Germany: Read More [+]

HISTORY 167B Modern Germany: The Rise and Fall of the Second Reich: Germany 1770-1918 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
This course provides the essential foundation for understanding the catastrophic history of Germany in the 20th Century, as well as some of its successes. A central theme is the struggle to define and impose a single national identity on socially, culturally, and religiously diverse peoples in an age of Great Power conflict. Although the region now known as Germany will be the focus of our investigation, considerable attention will also be paid
to the Hapsburg Empire, for until 1866 Austria was officially a part of "Germany" and remained, for nearly a century thereafter, culturally and in popular consciousness a part of a "Greater Germany."
Modern Germany: The Rise and Fall of the Second Reich: Germany 1770-1918: Read More [+]

HISTORY 167C Modern Germany: Germany 1914 to the Present 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course will survey the political, economic, social, and cultural development of Germany since 1914. Special attention will be paid to the impact of World War I; problems of democratization under the impact of defeat, inflation, and depression; National Socialist racism and imperialism; the evolution of the German Federal Republic and the German Democratic Republic; unification and its problems; and modern Germany's role in Europe.

Modern Germany: Germany 1914 to the Present: Read More [+]

HISTORY 167D Berlin and the Twentieth Century 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017
This course provides an introduction to Germany’s experience of the twentieth century, analyzed through the social and cultural history of its modern metropolis. Pivotal site for the collapse of four different Germanies between 1918 and 1989, Berlin has been the capital of imperialism, war and revolution, democracy, social reform and cultural experimentation, Nazism, genocide and urban warfare, Cold War division, student radicalism in the West and Soviet-style Socialism
in the East, and finally re-united Germany, haunted by the presence of the past.
Berlin and the Twentieth Century: Read More [+]

HISTORY 168A Spain and Portugal: The Spanish and Portuguese Empires in the Golden Age: 1450-1700 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Spring 2010
This course will focus on the rise and development of early modern Europe's most powerful empires. Rising from the unlikely setting of a weak and fragmented Iberian peninsula in the 15th century, the Spanish and Portuguese Empires went on to become the world's first truly global powers. As such, they had a tremendous impact on the political, economic, cultural, and religious life of not only Iberia, but on significant parts of Europe and
the New World.
Spain and Portugal: The Spanish and Portuguese Empires in the Golden Age: 1450-1700: Read More [+]

HISTORY 169A Modern Italy: Renaissance and Baroque Italy 1350-1800 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Spring 2013
This course will focus on the history of Italy during a period when it was the leading center of European artistic and cultural production and the driving force in the revival of classical learning and literary ideals. This was the Italy of Raphael and Michelangelo, Ariosto and Alberti, Brunelleschi and Botticelli. At the same time, Italy was also a political battleground through most of this period, both in the realm of ideas and theory but
also in a literal sense. It was in Italy that "the art of war," as Machiavelli called it, took center stage as the peninsula became one of the major theaters of war between the great powers of the age, France and Spain. The course will combine a study of the artistic, intellectual, religious, and political history of Italy in this period both as it developed internally and as it was related to the rest of Europe and the Mediterranean world. Requirements will include a midterm, a final, and an optional final paper.
Modern Italy: Renaissance and Baroque Italy 1350-1800: Read More [+]

HISTORY 170 The Netherlands 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2010
The Lowlands from the earliest times to the present monarchy; emphasis on the Golden Age of the 17th and 18th Centuries.

The Netherlands: Read More [+]

HISTORY 171A Russia: Russia to 1700 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
This course examines the forces that molded Russian culture, society, and politics from earliest times to the 18th century. Lectures and readings touch upon multiple disciplines, including politics, society, economics, art, architecture, religion, and literature.

Russia: Russia to 1700: Read More [+]

HISTORY 171B Russia: Imperial Russia: From Peter the Great to the Russian Revolution 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
In 1721, Peter the Great chose the title of Emperor for himself, and declared that Russia would be an Empire. The empire lasted until the revolutions of 1917, but was never entirely stable. The Romanovs believed that autocracy was the key to good governance. Yet, the reigns of almost all the Romanov Emperors were marked by coups d'etat, peasant rebellions, and, later, assassination attempts. Russia's expanding boundaries and growing population
made it even more difficult to rule. This course will focus heavily on political history and political thought. Given the many factors that were tearing Peter's Empire apart, it will ask, what held it together for so many years?
Russia: Imperial Russia: From Peter the Great to the Russian Revolution: Read More [+]

HISTORY 171C Russia: The Soviet Union, 1917 to the Present 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
An introductory survey of Soviet history from the revolutions of 1917 to the present. Marxism-Leninism, War Communism, and Real Socialism; the Great Transformation and the Great Terror; family and nationality; state and society; Russia versus Soviet; Gorbachev versus the past.

Russia: The Soviet Union, 1917 to the Present: Read More [+]

HISTORY 172 Russian Intellectual History 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2011, Spring 2009
This course introduces students to Russian intellectual history from the end of the eighteenth century to the beginning of the twentieth century, covering aspects of political, social, and religious thought.We will observe Russian thinkers elaborate conceptions of nationalism in a multi-ethnic empire, trying to resolve the eternal question of Russia's national identity: whether it belongs to the East or West? Next, we will move on to social
thought, including debates on serfdom, populism, the "women question," the nature of progress, and the rise of Marxism. Finally, we will study debates on religion: the pertinence of Orthodox Christian faith in social and philosophical thought, including early twentieth century religious rebuttals to Marx
Russian Intellectual History: Read More [+]

HISTORY 173B History of Eastern Europe: The Habsburg Empire, 1740-1918 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2001, Spring 1999

History of Eastern Europe: The Habsburg Empire, 1740-1918: Read More [+]

HISTORY 173C History of Eastern Europe: History of Eastern Europe: From 1900 to the Present 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course will examine the history of 20th-century Eastern Europe, understood as the band of countries and peoples stretching from the Baltics to the Balkans. Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary, however, will receive special attention. Topics of study will include foundation of the national states, Eastern European fascism, Nazi occupation, contructing Stalinist socialism, the fate of reform communism, reconstitution of "civil society
," and the emergence of a new Eastern Europe. Given the paucity of historical writings on the region, the course will make extensive use of cinematic and literary portrayals of Eastern Europe.
History of Eastern Europe: History of Eastern Europe: From 1900 to the Present: Read More [+]

HISTORY 174A Topics in the History of Eastern Europe: A History of Poland-Lithuania 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2010
The course will focus on the development of identities within the constantly shifting borders of Polish-Lithuanian and Polish states. Among the topics: competing definitions--ethnic, confessional, linguistic, political--of Polishness; continuities and discontinuities in Polish history and historiography; Poland beween East and West; the development of Polish self-perceptions; Jewish, Lithuanian, and Ukrainian identities in the Polish context; the Polish
chapter in the events leading to the end of Communist hegemony in Eastern Europe.
Topics in the History of Eastern Europe: A History of Poland-Lithuania: Read More [+]

HISTORY 174B Topics in the History of Eastern Europe: Poles and Others: the Making of Modern Poland 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Fall 1999
This course uses the devices of historical and literary interpretation to expose and analyze some of the lines of political and cultural development that have led to the Poland we now know. Beginning with the awakening of modern Polish nationalism, it traces the emergence of this Poland through the rise of mass society; the horrifying and exhilarating spectacles of World War I and national and social revolutions; first experiments with modern
Polish statehood (especially policies toward ethnic minorities and socially marginalized groups); then the transformations wrought by a half century of totalitarian rule; ethnic cleansing, elite transfer, forces social stratification, and despite all of this, the defiant return of civil society. Students must attend lectures, complete required readings, take two examinations and write a semester paper.
Topics in the History of Eastern Europe: Poles and Others: the Making of Modern Poland: Read More [+]

HISTORY C175B Jewish Civilization: Modern Period 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2013
This is the fourth course in a four-course sequence in the history of Jewish culture and civilization. It explores the major themes in Jewish history from 1750 to the present, with special attention paid to the transformation of Jewish communal and individual identity in the modern world. Topics to be treated include the breakdown of traditional society, enlightenment and emancipation, assimilation, Hasidism, racial anti-Semitism
, colonialism, Zionism, and contemporary Jewish life in Europe, North America, and Israel. The multicultural nature of Jewish history will be highlighted throughout the course through the treatment of non-European Jewish narratives alongside the more familiar Ashkenazi perspective.
Jewish Civilization: Modern Period: Read More [+]

HISTORY 177A Armenia: Armenia from Ethnogenesis to the Dark Ages 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Spring 2014
This course will cover close to three millenia of Armenian history, from the process of ethnogenesis to the almost complete destruction of the Armenian "feudal" system by the end of the 15th century. This course is based on the broad framework of Armenian political history and institutions, but also emphasizes economic development, social change, and cultural transformations.

Armenia: Armenia from Ethnogenesis to the Dark Ages: Read More [+]

HISTORY 177B Armenia: From Pre-modern Empires to the Present 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
This survey course will cover the period from the incorporation of most of the Armenian plateau into the Ottoman Empire to the present day.

Armenia: From Pre-modern Empires to the Present: Read More [+]

HISTORY 178 History of the Holocaust 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
This course will survey the historical events and intellectual developments leading up to and surrounding the destruction of European Jewry during World War II. We will examine the Shoah (the Hebrew word for the Holocaust) against the backdrop of modern Jewish and modern German history. The course is divided into two main parts: (1) the historical background up to 1939; and (2) the destruction of European Jewry, 1939-1945.

History of the Holocaust: Read More [+]

HISTORY 180 The Life Sciences since 1750 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
This course will survey the development of the sciences of living nature from the mid-18th to the late-20th century. Topics include scientific and popular natural history, exploration and discovery, Darwin and evolution, cell theory, the organizational transformation of science, physiology and experimentalism, classical and molecular genetics, and the biomedical-industrial complex. Emphasis is on the formation of fundamental concepts and methods
, long-term trends toward specialization, institutionalization, professionalization, and industrialization, and the place of the life sciences in modern societies. Many lectures are illustrated by slides.
The Life Sciences since 1750: Read More [+]

HISTORY 180T History of the Life Sciences Since 1750 (Cal Teach) 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
This course is a parallel course to 180, intended for students interested in teaching elementary or secondary school science and math. Students in the "T" course will attend the regular 180 lectures and a special section; this section will focus on techniques, skills, and perspectives necessary to apply the history of science in the juvenile and adolescent science classroom, including pedagogy, devising lesson plans for their classrooms
, finding reliable historical information, and writing.
History of the Life Sciences Since 1750 (Cal Teach): Read More [+]

HISTORY 181B Topics in the History of the Physical Sciences: Modern Physics: From the Atom to Big Science 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2008, Fall 2007, Fall 2005
This course examines the establishment of the ideas and institutions of modern physics over the last century and a half. We begin with the nineteenth-century organization of the discipline and the debates over the classical world picture (mechanics, electromagnetism and optics, thermodynamics and statistical mechanics). We then follow the dramatic changes that undid the classical picture, from the discovery of radioactivity through Einstein's
theories of relativity on to the creation of quantum mechanics and the accompanying philosophical disputes. Alongside these conceptual upheavals we will look at the evolving structure of the discipline, its links with industry and government, and the massive transformations of the Second World War, culminating in the atomic bomb. In the postwar period we will deal with the conceptual consolidation of the modern physical worldview and the emergence of "big science" in alliance with the state.
Topics in the History of the Physical Sciences: Modern Physics: From the Atom to Big Science: Read More [+]

HISTORY 182A Science, Technology, and Society 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
Where do science and technology come from? How did they become the most authoritative kinds of knowledge in our society? How do technology, culture, and society interact? What drives technological change? The course examines these questions using case studies from different historical periods. We shall discuss the emergence of science as a dimension of our modernity, and its relations to other traditions such as magic, religion, and art.
The aim of the course is for students to learn about how science and technology shape the way we live and, especially, how technological change is invariably shaped by historical and social circumstances.
Science, Technology, and Society: Read More [+]

HISTORY 182AT Science, Technology, and Society (Cal Teach) 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2011
This course is a parallel course to 182A, intended for students interested in teaching elementary or secondary school science and math. Students in the "T" course will attend the regular 182A lectures and a special section; this section will focus on techniques, skills, and perspectives necessary to apply the history of science in the juvenile and adolescent science classroom, including pedagogy, devising lesson plans for their
classrooms, finding reliable historical information, and writing.
Science, Technology, and Society (Cal Teach): Read More [+]

HISTORY C182C Introduction to Science, Technology, and Society 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course provides an overview of the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) as a way to study how our knowledge and technology shape and are shaped by social, political, historical, economic, and other factors. We will learn key concepts of the field (e.g., how technologies are understood and used differently in different communities) and apply them to a wide range of topics, including geography, history, environmental and information science
, and others. Questions this course will address include: how are scientific facts constructed? How are values embedded in technical systems?

Introduction to Science, Technology, and Society: Read More [+]

HISTORY 183 Topics in the History of Medicine 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2010, Spring 1998

Topics in the History of Medicine: Read More [+]

HISTORY 183A Health and Disease 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
This course introduces major themes in the history of medicine through the lens of disease. It focuses on two questions: How have people defined well-being? How have they responded to illness? Themes considered include changing theories of disease causality, the development of international public health policy, social understandings of the body, and the growth of the pharmaceutical industry. Disease case studies will be analyzed through
readings and films.
Health and Disease: Read More [+]

HISTORY 185A History of Christianity: History of Christianity to 1250 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
The course deals with the origins of Christianity and the first eleven centuries of its expansion into a major institutional, social, and intellectual force shaping Western Europe. The central themes are the mechanisms and conditions shaping this expansion, rather than a chronological account in order to present this process as a model of institutionalization of religious movements. The emphasis will be on patterns of crisis and reform; i.e.
, on conflicts arising within the church itself and as a result of its dealings with the "outside" world, and how these crises were resolved. The course is based on the study of primary sources and will include problems of historical method.
History of Christianity: History of Christianity to 1250: Read More [+]

HISTORY 185B History of Christianity: History of Christianity from 1250 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2012
This course follows 185A as the second of two semesters on the History of Christianity. It treats the history of (principally Western) Christianity between the High Middle Ages and the present in Europe and in the rest of the world. The course's main theme is Christianity and the encounter of cultures. Its core readings range from Thomas a Kempis, Martin Luther, and St. Teresa of Avila to Simone Weil and Dietrich Bonhoeffer. The lectures will
treat social, cultural, and intellectual topics, such as ecclesiastical authority institutions, forms of piety, revivalism, evangelization, theological speculation, Biblical scholarship, and philosophical arguments for and against religion. This introductory course presupposes no previous study of the subject, though almost any previous study of history or religion should be helpful.
History of Christianity: History of Christianity from 1250: Read More [+]

HISTORY 186 International and Global History since 1945 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course explores great and complex global historical changes that have taken place since the end of the second World War. By situating the major postwar upheavals - from decolonization to the Cold War; from population growth to environmental degradation; from globalization to the endurance of economic inequalities - in comparative and international contexts, this course encourages students to see the origins of our own times and dilemmas
in their proper historical context and provides an introduction to recent international and gloal history.
International and Global History since 1945: Read More [+]

HISTORY C187 The History and Practice of Human Rights 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
A required class for students in the human rights minor (but open to others), this course examines the development of human rights. More than a history of origins, it explores the relationships between human rights and other crucial themes in the history of the modern era. As a history of international trends and an examination of specific practices, it will ask students to make comparisons across space and time and to reflect upon the
evolution of human rights in both thought and action.
The History and Practice of Human Rights: Read More [+]

HISTORY C188A Art and Science 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2013
This course explores the intersections of art and science in medieval, modern, and contemporary history. It focuses on the ways in which artistic and scientific practices have shaped and legitimated each other through the ages. The course takes the form of an overview that spans from the awakening of European culture through the reception of new knowledge from the Near East to the most recent encounters between art and technoscience in the 21st century.

Art and Science: Read More [+]

HISTORY C188B Art and Science 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014
In this course we explore the intersections of art and science in medieval, modern, and contemporary history. Our aim is twofold. First, to explore the close interaction between these two fields, and the way in which they have shaped each other through the ages. Second, to focus our attention on specific instances of art/science interaction, using them as prisms through which one can reach a fuller understanding of major historical transformations.

Art and Science: Read More [+]

HISTORY C188C Magic, Religion, and Science: The Ancient and Medieval Worlds 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016
This course will explore magic as an experimental science within the learned traditions of civilizations that we consider as fundamental for a modern Western identity: from ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Rome to the medieval and early modern Middle East, Byzantium, and Europe. The primary sources used for this exploration will be texts on demons, magic, divination, and the sophisticated philosophical background to such beliefs. In addition, archeological remains
pertinent to these practices such as talismans, amulets, and other magical objects will be discussed.
Magic, Religion, and Science: The Ancient and Medieval Worlds: Read More [+]

HISTORY 190 Soccer: A Global History 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2009, Fall 2002
Whether you call it soccer, football or futebol the beautiful game with the round ball is played and watched around the world. This class will explore how and why that came to happen. Along the way it will trace key developments in the game such as the formation of clubs, international tournaments, the development of stadiums, fan culture, media coverage, formations and styles of play, gambling and corruption, the working conditions and wages
of players. We will locate these changes in broader historical processes – political, economic, social and cultural - that have transformed the game and made it a global commodity. The class will teach you both about the game and about thinking historically and how the world changes over time.
Soccer: A Global History: Read More [+]

HISTORY C191 Death, Dying, and Modern Medicine: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
This course will study the end of life--dying and death--from the perspective of medicine and history. It seeks to confront the humanist with the quotidian dilemmas of modern clinical practice and medicine's deep engagement with death more generally. It invites pre-med, pre-law, and public policy students to understand these matters in light of the historical and, more broadly, literary and artistic perspectives of the
humanities.
Death, Dying, and Modern Medicine: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives: Read More [+]

HISTORY C194 Dutch Culture and Society: Amsterdam and Berkeley in the Sixties 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2008
This course will focus on the cultural aspects of protest- and youth cultures in two cities that were influential in the sixties: Amsterdam and Berkeley. Particular attention will be paid to how American popular culture was perceived in a European context. All readings and discussions in English.

Dutch Culture and Society: Amsterdam and Berkeley in the Sixties: Read More [+]

HISTORY H195 Senior Honors 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Limited to senior honors candidates. Directed study centering upon the preparation of an honors thesis. Supervisors will be assigned to each student after consultation with the honors committee.

Senior Honors: Read More [+]

HISTORY C196A UCDC Core Seminar 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
This course is the UCDC letter-graded core seminar for 4 units that complements the P/NP credited internship course UGIS C196B. Core seminars are designed to enhance the experience of and provide an intellectual framework for the student's internship. UCDC core seminars are taught in sections that cover various tracks such as the Congress, media, bureaucratic organizations and the Executive Branch, international relations, public policy and general
un-themed original research.
UCDC Core Seminar: Read More [+]

HISTORY C196B UCDC Internship 6.5 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
This course provides a credited internship for all students enrolled in the UCDC and Cal in the Capital Programs. It must be taken in conjunction with the required academic core course C196A. C196B requires that students work 3-4 days per week as interns in settings selected to provide them with exposure to and experienc in government, public policy, international affairs, media, the arts or other areas or relevance to their major fields of study.

UCDC Internship: Read More [+]

HISTORY C196W Special Field Research 10.5 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2014
Students work in selected internship programs approved in advance by the faculty coordinator and for which written contracts have been established between the sponsoring organization and the student. Students will be expected to produce two progress reports for their faculty coordinator during the course of the internship, as well as a final paper for the course consisting of at least 35 pages.
Other restrictions apply; see faculty adviser.
Special Field Research: Read More [+]

HISTORY 198 Directed Group Study for Upper Division Students 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Lectures and small group discussion focusing on topics of interest that vary from semester to semester. Grading based on discussion and written work.

Directed Group Study for Upper Division Students: Read More [+]

HISTORY 198BC Berkeley Connect for Upper Division Students 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. Over the course of a semester, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor (following a faculty-directed curriculum), meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising, attend lectures and panel discussions featuring department
faculty and alumni, and go on field trips to campus resources. Students are not required to be declared majors in order to participate.
Berkeley Connect for Upper Division Students: Read More [+]

HISTORY 199 Supervised Independent Study and Research 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Spring 2017

Supervised Independent Study and Research: Read More [+]

Faculty and Instructors

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

Stephan H. Astourian, Associate Adjunct Professor. Armenia, Caucasus, Azerbaijan, Modern Turkey, Diasporas.
Research Profile

Janaki Bakhle, Associate Professor.

Andrew E. Barshay, Professor. Social thought, modernism, social sciences in modern Japan, marxism, Japanese history, Japanese-Russian relations.
Research Profile

Mary Elizabeth Berry, Professor. Late medieval and early modern Japan.
Research Profile

Mark Brilliant, Associate Professor. 20th century US history, with a focus on political economy, civil rights, education, law, and the west.
Research Profile

Cathryn Carson, Associate Professor. History of physics, science and society, history of universities, German history, intellectual history, ethnography, data science, nuclear waste.
Research Profile

Margaret Chowning, Professor. Mexico, history, gender, women, Latin America.
Research Profile

John Connelly, Professor.

Alexander C. Cook, Assistant Professor. East Asia: China.
Research Profile

Thomas Dandelet, Professor. Renaissance Italy and Europe, Spanish Empire, early modern Mediterranean.
Research Profile

Brian Delay, Associate Professor. US, the Americas, International History, nineteenth century, Native American history, American West, Borderlands.
Research Profile

Nicholas Dirks, Professor. History and anthropology of South Asia, social and cultural theory, history of imperialism, historiography, cultural studies, globalization.
Research Profile

Sandra Eder, Assistant Professor. Gender, sexuality, medicine, science, US History 20th century, popular culture.
Research Profile

John M. Efron, Professor. Cultural and social history of German Jewry.
Research Profile

+ Robin L. Einhorn, Professor. Taxation, United States political history, urban history, nineteenth century.
Research Profile

Susanna Elm, Professor. History of the Later Roman Empire, pagan - Christian interactions, ancient medicine, slavery and the evolution of Christianity, leadership and empire, reception of antiquity.
Research Profile

Victoria Frede-Montemayor, Associate Professor. Enlightenment, Russian intellectual history, sentimentalism, eighteenth and nineteenth century, anti-religious thought, romanticism, history of friendship.
Research Profile

David Henkin, Professor. History, US History, urban history, cultural history, History of Time.
Research Profile

Rebecca Herman, Assistant Professor.

Carla Hesse, Professor. France, modern Europe, history of women.
Research Profile

Stefan-Ludwig Hoffmann, Associate Professor. Modern German and European History, Conceptual History, Transnational History, urban studies.
Research Profile

Martin E. Jay, Professor. Rhetoric, history, Marxist theory, European intellectual history, 19th 20th century, visual discourse and culture.
Research Profile

Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers, Assistant Professor.
Research Profile

Abhishek Kaicker, Assistant Professor. South Asia, Mughal, early modern, cities, history, Persian.
Research Profile

Tabitha Kanogo, Professor. Colonialism, nationalism, women and gender, childhood and youth.
Research Profile

Kerwin L. Klein, Professor.

Geoffrey Koziol, Professor. Medieval history, History of Medieval Christianity, Medieval Political Institutions.
Research Profile

Thomas W. Laqueur, Professor. Medicine, religion, body, human rights.
Research Profile

Emily Mackil, Associate Professor.
Research Profile

Waldo E. Martin, Professor. African American History ; Modern American Culture.
Research Profile

Maria Mavroudi, Professor. Byzantine studies.
Research Profile

Massimo Mazzotti, Associate Professor. History of science, History of Mathematics, social theory, science and society, STS.
Research Profile

Rebecca Mclennan, Associate Professor. North America: 1763-present, law & society, crime & punishment, prisons, society & culture, capitalism, global foodways.
Research Profile

Maureen Miller, Professor. Medieval history.
Research Profile

Carlos F. Norena, Associate Professor. Roman history.
Research Profile

Michael Nylan, Professor. Gender, history, East Asian studies, early China, the fifth century BC to the fifth century AD, with an emphasis on the sociopolitical context, aesthetic theories and material culture, belief.
Research Profile

Dylan Penningroth, Professor.

Mark A. Peterson, Professor. US/North America, Atlantic World, early modern history, religion, political economy.
Research Profile

Christine Philliou, Associate Professor.

Caitlin C. Rosenthal, Assistant Professor. American history, capitalism, economic history, slavery.
Research Profile

Peter Sahlins, Professor. Early modern France, animal-human relations, immigration, citizenship and nationality in pre-modern Europe.
Research Profile

Daniel Sargent, Associate Professor. American history, International History, Contemporary History.
Research Profile

Elena A. Schneider, Assistant Professor. Cuba and the Caribbean; colonial Latin America; The Atlantic World, 1400-1888.

Ethan H. Shagan, Professor. British history, early modern European history, history of religion.
Research Profile

Jonathan Sheehan, Professor. Religion, Christianity, Europe, secularism, Secularization.
Research Profile

Andrea A. Sinn, Assistant Adjunct Professor.

Yuri Slezkine, Professor. Russia, Late Modern Europe.
Research Profile

Nicolas Tackett, Associate Professor. Ethnicity, elites, China, cities, national identity, social networks, medieval history, death ritual, Tang Dynasty, Song Dynasty, Liao Dynasty.
Research Profile

James Vernon, Professor. Britain, its Empire and World, 1750 to present.
Research Profile

Wen-Hsin Yeh, Professor. History, East Asian studies, Qing and Modern China.
Research Profile

Peter B. Zinoman, Professor. Vietnam, Vietnam War, Vietnamese literature, Southeast Asian history, communism, nationalism, colonialism.
Research Profile

Lecturers

Rodolfo J. Alaniz, Lecturer.

David S. Boyk, Lecturer.

Robert N. Chester, Lecturer.

Michael Dean, Lecturer.

Nils Gilman, Lecturer.

Robert L. Harkins, Lecturer.

Tyler C. Lange, Lecturer.

Andrej Milivojevic, Lecturer.

Sarah Selvidge, Lecturer.

Christopher W. Shaw, Lecturer.

Lynsay Skiba, Lecturer.

Stacey Van Vleet, Lecturer.

David Wetzel, Lecturer.

Gene Zubovich, Lecturer.

Visiting Faculty

Yuval Ben-Bassat, Visiting Professor.

Emeritus Faculty

Richard M. Abrams, Professor Emeritus. Politics, recent US history: business foreign relations, etc.
Research Profile

Anthony Adamthwaite, Professor Emeritus.

Margaret Lavinia Anderson, Professor Emeritus. Germany 1860-1945, Kulturkampf, the Center Party (Zentrum), 19th century European Catholicism, the 19th century European Religious Revival, Democratisation more generally and comparatively, comparative elections and electoral politics, European (and esp. German) Relations with the late Ottoman Empire, Armenian Genocide.
Research Profile

Robert M. Berdahl, Professor Emeritus.

Thomas A. Brady, Professor Emeritus.

Gene A. Brucker, Professor Emeritus.

Richard Candida Smith, Professor Emeritus. Identity, memory, narrative, 19th and 20th century US cultural and intellectual history, cultural interaction and exchange with France and Latin America, oral history and personal testimony as historical sources.
Research Profile

Diane Shaver Clemens, Professor Emeritus.

Jan De Vries, Professor Emeritus. Economics, demography, history.
Research Profile

Paula S. Fass, Professor Emeritus. History of childhood, social and cultural history of the United States, immigration and ethnicity, history of education, child abduction.
Research Profile

+ Erich S. Gruen, Professor Emeritus. Classics, Greek and Roman history, Jews in the Greco-Roman world.
Research Profile

Samuel Haber, Professor Emeritus.

John L. Heilbron, Professor Emeritus. History of the physical sciences, biography.
Research Profile

Richard Herr, Professor Emeritus.

David Hollinger, Professor Emeritus. US history.
Research Profile

Eugene F. Irschick, Professor Emeritus.

David G. Johnson, Professor Emeritus. History, East Asian studies, city-god cults of T'ang and Sung China, ritual and sculpture in Chinese religion.
Research Profile

David N. Keightley, Professor Emeritus. History, East Asian studies, origins of Chinese civilization in the Neolithic and early Bronze Ages, the formation of political and religious culture especially ancestor worship and divination, and the development of bureauracy.
Research Profile

Raymond K. Kent, Professor Emeritus.

Ira M. Lapidus, Professor Emeritus.

John Lesch, Professor Emeritus.

Linda Lewin, Professor Emeritus. Race, social history of 19th & 20th century Brazil--family & kinship; illegitimacy & inheritance rights; banditry (emergence of cangaco); slavery, & color; oral poetic tradition in NE region (repentistas, desafio); cotton production in 19th-century NE Brazil.
Research Profile

+ Leon F. Litwack, Professor Emeritus.

Thomas R. Metcalf, Professor Emeritus.

+ Robert L. Middlekauff, Professor Emeritus.

Sheldon Rothblatt, Professor Emeritus.

Mary P. Ryan, Professor Emeritus.

Irwin Scheiner, Professor Emeritus.

Charles G. Sellers, Professor Emeritus.

John M. Smith, Professor Emeritus.

Randolph R. Starn, Professor Emeritus.

William B. Taylor, Professor Emeritus.

Contact Information

Department of History

3229 Dwinelle Hall

Phone: 510-642-1971

Fax: 510-643-5323

history@berkeley.edu

Visit Department Website

Department Chair

Mark Peterson, PhD

3303 Dwinelle Hall

Phone: 510-642-3402

mark-peterson@berkeley.edu

Undergraduate Major Adviser

Leah Flanagan

3327 Dwinelle Hall

Phone: 510-642-0356

leahf@berkeley.edu

Undergraduate Minor Adviser

Erin Leigh Inama

3312 Dwinelle Hall

Phone: 510-642-2378

history-recruitment@berkeley.edu

Student Services Coordinator

Anne Meyers

3313 Dwinelle Hall

Phone: 510-643-8995

history-ssc@berkeley.edu

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