History

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

The Department of History offers a program of instruction ranging widely over the historical record of human experience. The chronological, geographical, and topical range affords great flexibility to students working toward degrees in history and to those who wish to give a historical dimension to their studies in other disciplines. History at Berkeley is a highly flexible major that allows students to follow their interests. It is also a major that places strong value on original student research, with all students completing capstone projects on topics they choose in consultation with members of the faculty.

Declaring the Major

Students may declare the major after completing three letter-graded courses in the Department of History with a 2.0 grade-point average (GPA) or better. This must include at least two lower division courses.

Honors Program

To graduate with honors in History, a major must achieve a general GPA of 3.5, a departmental GPA of 3.7, and a minimum grade of "A-" in HISTORY 101. To be eligible for graduation with high or highest honors in History, a major must achieve a general GPA of 3.5, a departmental GPA of 3.7, and a grade of "A" in HISTORY 101. The student must also receive a nomination for high or highest honors from the 101 instructor. The decision to award high or highest honors rests with the Honors Committee.

A major who is eligible for honors after completing HISTORY 101 and is interested in continued research may pursue a second thesis project under the rubric HISTORY H195. The second project may substitute for the 101 thesis in determining eligibility for high or highest honors if the student meets the GPA standards and receives a nomination from the H195 instructor.

Minor Program

The Department of History offers a minor in History.

Students are encouraged to meet with the minor adviser to file a "History Minor Application" as soon as they have completed one course towards the minor. In addition to turning in the application, students who have taken their lower division minor course elsewhere should provide an unofficial copy of the transcript showing the course that satisfies the minor and the grade received.

All students must submit a completed “History Minor Application” and an L&S “Minor Completion” petition by the minor declaration deadline once they have enrolled in or completed the course that will complete the minor. The deadline is May first for the spring and November first for the fall. The application and completion forms may be submitted simultaneously. 

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Major Requirements

In addition to the University, campus, and college requirements, listed on the College Requirements tab, students must fulfill the following requirements specific to their major program.

General Guidelines

  1. All courses taken to fulfill the major requirements below must be taken for graded credit, other than courses listed which are offered on a Pass/No Pass basis only. Other exceptions to this requirement are noted as applicable.
  2. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student's major and minor programs.
  3. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 must be maintained in both upper and lower division courses used to fulfill the major requirements.

For information regarding residence requirements and unit requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.

Summary of Major Requirements

Lower division Requirements: Four courses
Upper division Requirements: Eight courses
Pre-modern History Requirement: One course, used in fulfillment of either lower or upper division requirements
Field of Concentration: At least four of the eight upper division courses must constitute a Field of Concentration (see below)
At least one section of HISTORY 103
One section of HISTORY 101

 Lower Division Requirements

Select one survey course in the history of the United States from the following: 1
Introduction to the History of the United States: The United States from Settlement to Civil War [4]
Introduction to the History of the United States: The United States from Civil War to Present [4]
Select one survey course in the history of Europe from the following: 1
Origins of Western Civilization: The Ancient Mediterranean World [4]
Origins of Western Civilization: Medieval Europe [4]
European Civilization from the Renaissance to the Present [4]
Select one survey course in the history of another world area from the following: 1
After the Roman Empire: the East [4]
History of China: Origins to the Mongol Conquest [4]
Introduction to Chinese History from the Mongols to Mao [4]
Latin American History: Becoming Latin America, 1492 to 1824 [4]
Latin American History: Modern Latin America [4]
African History [4]
India [4]
The Middle East [4]
Introduction to the History of Japan [4]
One elective: Select any additional course listed above or one of the following: 2
HISTORY 1Global History4
Comparative World History [4]
Science and Society [4]
HISTORY 39 A-Z Freshman Sophomore Seminar
1

 Students may substitute one upper division course for one of these requirements, in consultation with the Undergraduate Adviser. The substitute course will not then fulfill one of the eight upper division requirements.

2

 Please note that HISTORY R1BHISTORY 24HISTORY 84, and HISTORY 98 do not fulfill this requirement.

Upper Division Requirements

Select eight courses, including the following:

At least one section from the HISTORY 103 series
One section of HISTORY 101
HISTORY 100ACSpecial Topics in the History of the United States4
HISTORY 100APSpecial Topics in Ancient History (Premodern)4
HISTORY 100BSpecial Topics in European History4
HISTORY 100BPSpecial Topics in Medieval History (Premodern)4
HISTORY 100DSpecial Topics in the History of the United States4
HISTORY 100ESpecial Topics in Latin American History4
HISTORY 100FSpecial Topics in Asian History4
HISTORY 100HSpecial Topics in African History4
HISTORY 100LSpecial Topics in Legal History4
HISTORY 100MSpecial Topics in the History of the Middle East4
HISTORY 100SSpecial Topics in the History of Science4
HISTORY 100USpecial Topics in Comparative History4
HISTORY 100UPSpecial Topics in Comparative History (Premodern)4
HISTORY 101Seminar in Historical Research and Writing for History Majors5
HISTORY 103AProseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Ancient4
HISTORY 103BProseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Europe4
HISTORY 103CProseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: England4
HISTORY 103DProseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: United States4
HISTORY 103EProseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Latin America4
HISTORY 103FProseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Asia4
HISTORY 103HProseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Africa4
HISTORY 103SProseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: History of Science4
HISTORY 103UProseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Studies in Comparative History4
HISTORY 104The Craft of History4
HISTORY 105AAncient Greece: Archaic and Classical Greek History4
HISTORY 105BAncient Greece: The Greek World: 403-31 BCE4
HISTORY 106AAncient Rome: The Roman Republic4
HISTORY 106BAncient Rome: The Roman Empire4
HISTORY 108Byzantium4
HISTORY 109AThe Rise of Islamic Civilization, 600-12004
HISTORY 109BThe Middle East, 1000-17504
HISTORY 109CThe Middle East From the 18th Century to the Present4
HISTORY 111ATopics in the History of Southest Asia: Southeast Asia to the 18th Century4
HISTORY 111BTopics in the History of Southest Asia: Modern Southeast Asia4
HISTORY 111CTopics in the History of Southest Asia: Political and Cultural History of Vietnam4
HISTORY 111DVietnam at War4
HISTORY 112BAfrica: Modern South Africa, 1652-Present4
HISTORY 112CColonialism and Nationalism in Africa4
HISTORY 113ACourse Not Available
HISTORY 113BCourse Not Available4
HISTORY 114APolitics, Culture, and Philosophy in South Asia before Modernity4
HISTORY 114BIndia: Modern South Asia4
HISTORY 116ACourse Not Available4
HISTORY 116BChina: Two Golden Ages: China During the Tang and Song Dynasties4
HISTORY 116CChina: Modern China4
HISTORY 116DChina: Twentieth-Century China4
HISTORY 116GImperial China and the World4
HISTORY 117ATopics in Chinese History: Chinese Popular Culture4
HISTORY 117DTopics in Chinese History: The Chinese Body: Gender and Sex, Health, and Medicine4
HISTORY 118AJapan: Japan, Archaeological Period to 18004
HISTORY 118BJapan: Japan 1800-19004
HISTORY 118CJapan: Empire and Alienation: The 20th Century in Japan4
HISTORY 119ATopics in Japanese History: Postwar Japan4
HISTORY 120ACAmerican Environmental and Cultural History4
HISTORY 121BThe Colonial Period and American Revolution: The American Revolution4
HISTORY 122ACAntebellum America: The Advent of Mass Society4
HISTORY 123Civil War and Reconstruction4
HISTORY 124AThe Recent United States: The United States from the Late 19th Century to the Eve of World War II4
HISTORY 124BThe Recent United States: The United States from World War II4
HISTORY 125AHistory of African-Americans and Race Relations in the United States: The History of Black People and Race Relations, 1550-18614
HISTORY 125BHistory of African-Americans and Race Relations in the United States: Soul Power: African American History 1861-19804
HISTORY 126ACourse Not Available4
HISTORY 126BCourse Not Available4
HISTORY 127ACCourse Not Available4
HISTORY 128ACCalifornia, the West, and the World4
HISTORY 130American Foreign Policy4
HISTORY 131BSocial History of the United States: Creating Modern American Society: From the End of the Civil War to the Global Age4
HISTORY C132BIntellectual History of the United States since 18654
HISTORY 133AThe History of American Capitalism4
HISTORY 133BWall Street / Main Street4
HISTORY 134AThe Age of the City: The Age of the City, 1825-19334
HISTORY 135Course Not Available4
HISTORY 136AThe History of Women in the United States before 19004
HISTORY 136BGender and Sexuality in Twentieth-Century US History4
HISTORY 136CDefiant Women: Gender, Power and Violence in American History4
HISTORY 137ACThe Repeopling of America4
HISTORY 138History of Science in the U.S.4
HISTORY 138THistory of Science in the US CalTeach4
HISTORY C139BThe American Immigrant Experience4
HISTORY C139CCivil Rights and Social Movements in U.S. History4
HISTORY 140BMexico: Modern Mexico4
HISTORY 141BSocial History of Latin America: Social History of Modern Latin America4
HISTORY 142Cuba in World History4
HISTORY 143Brazil4
HISTORY 145Latin America in Film4
HISTORY 146Latin American Women4
HISTORY 149BMedieval Italy: Italy in the Age of Dante (1000-1350)4
HISTORY 150BMedieval England: From the Conquest to 12904
HISTORY 151ABritain 1485-Present: Tudor Stuart Britain, 1485-16604
HISTORY 151BBritain 1485-Present: Britain, 1660-18514
HISTORY 151CBritain 1485-Present: The Peculiar Modernity of Britain, 1848-20004
HISTORY 152ATopics in the History of the British Isles: Ireland Since the Union4
HISTORY 154Course Not Available4
HISTORY 155AMedieval Europe: From the Late Empire to the Investiture Conflict4
HISTORY 155BMedieval Europe: From the Investiture Conflict to the Fifteenth Century4
HISTORY C157The Renaissance and the Reformation4
HISTORY 158AModern Europe: Old Regime and Revolutionary Europe, 1715-18154
HISTORY 158BModern Europe: Europe in the 19th Century4
HISTORY 158CModern Europe: Old and New Europe, 1914-Present4
HISTORY 158DHistory of Fascism4
HISTORY 159AEuropean Economic History4
HISTORY 159BEuropean Economic History4
HISTORY 160The International Economy of the 20th Century4
HISTORY 162AEurope and the World: Wars, Empires, Nations 1648-19144
HISTORY 162BWar and Peace: International Relations since 19144
HISTORY 164AThe Birth of Modern Thought: European Intellectual History, 1500-18004
HISTORY 164BModern European Intellectual History: European Intellectual History from Enlightenment to 18704
HISTORY 164CModern European Intellectual History: European Intellectual History 1870 to the Present4
HISTORY 165ATopics in Modern European History: The Reformations of Christendom4
HISTORY 165BTopics in Modern European History: The World, the Picture, and the Page: The Revolution in European Culture since the late 18th Century4
HISTORY 165DThe Social and Cultural History of Early Modern Europe4
HISTORY 166ACourse Not Available4
HISTORY 166BModern France: Old Regime and Revolutionary France4
HISTORY 166CModern France4
HISTORY 167AModern Germany: Early Modern Germany4
HISTORY 167BModern Germany: The Rise and Fall of the Second Reich: Germany 1770-19184
HISTORY 167CModern Germany: Germany 1914 to the Present4
HISTORY 167DBerlin and the Twentieth Century4
HISTORY 168ASpain and Portugal: The Spanish and Portuguese Empires in the Golden Age: 1450-17004
HISTORY 169AModern Italy: Renaissance and Baroque Italy 1350-18004
HISTORY 170The Netherlands4
HISTORY 171ARussia: Russia to 17004
HISTORY 171BRussia: Imperial Russia: From Peter the Great to the Russian Revolution4
HISTORY 171CRussia: The Soviet Union, 1917 to the Present4
HISTORY 172Russian Intellectual History4
HISTORY 173BHistory of Eastern Europe: The Habsburg Empire, 1740-19184
HISTORY 173CHistory of Eastern Europe: History of Eastern Europe: From 1900 to the Present4
HISTORY 174ATopics in the History of Eastern Europe: A History of Poland-Lithuania4
HISTORY 174BTopics in the History of Eastern Europe: Poles and Others: the Making of Modern Poland4
HISTORY C175BJewish Civilization: Modern Period4
HISTORY C176Course Not Available4
HISTORY 177AArmenia: Armenia from Ethnogenesis to the Dark Ages4
HISTORY 177BArmenia: From Pre-modern Empires to the Present4
HISTORY 178History of the Holocaust4
HISTORY 180The Life Sciences since 17504
HISTORY 180THistory of the Life Sciences Since 1750 (Cal Teach)4
HISTORY 181BTopics in the History of the Physical Sciences: Modern Physics: From the Atom to Big Science4
HISTORY 182AScience, Technology, and Society4
HISTORY 182ATScience, Technology, and Society (Cal Teach)4
HISTORY C182CIntroduction to Science, Technology, and Society4
HISTORY 183AHealth and Disease4
HISTORY 185AHistory of Christianity: History of Christianity to 12504
HISTORY 185BHistory of Christianity: History of Christianity from 12504
HISTORY 186International and Global History since 19454
HISTORY C187The History and Practice of Human Rights4
HISTORY C188BArt and Science4
HISTORY 190Soccer: A Global History4
HISTORY C191Death, Dying, and Modern Medicine: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives4
HISTORY C192Course Not Available3
HISTORY C194Dutch Culture and Society: Amsterdam and Berkeley in the Sixties4
HISTORY 199Supervised Independent Study and Research (May count towards the eight upper division requirements if taken for four units, one time only. See advisor.)1-4

Field of Concentration Requirement

At least four of the eight upper-division courses must constitute a Field of Concentration, which shall be defined by one of the following rubrics:

  • a period (such as “The Ancient World,” “The Medieval World,” “The Twentieth Century,” or a similarly broad temporal span)
  • a geographical area (such as “Eastern Europe,” “China,” “The Mediterranean,” or a similarly broad spatial expanse)
  • a thematic approach (such as “Science and Medicine,” “Law,” “Popular Culture,” “Religion,” or a similarly broad subject matter)

The four courses constituting the Field of Concentration must include History 101.The three additional courses in the Field may include a course from the History 103 series. They may also include one appropriate upper-division course (of at least three units) from another department (in consultation with the Undergraduate Advisor.)

Pre-Modern Requirement

At least one course used to fulfill the major requirements must be devoted entirely to pre-modern history, to be selected from courses focused on one or more of the following eras: antiquity, the classical period, and the medieval period. Courses dealing solely with the early modern period do not satisfy this requirement.

HISTORY 2Comparative World History ("Ancient Empires")4
HISTORY 3After the Roman Empire: the East4
HISTORY 4AOrigins of Western Civilization: The Ancient Mediterranean World4
HISTORY 4BOrigins of Western Civilization: Medieval Europe4
HISTORY 6AHistory of China: Origins to the Mongol Conquest4
HISTORY 100APSpecial Topics in Ancient History4
HISTORY 100UPSpecial Topics in Comparative History ("Premodern")4
HISTORY 105AAncient Greece: Archaic and Classical Greek History4
HISTORY 105BAncient Greece: The Greek World: 403-31 BCE4
HISTORY 106AAncient Rome: The Roman Republic4
HISTORY 106BAncient Rome: The Roman Empire4
HISTORY 108Byzantium4
HISTORY 109AThe Rise of Islamic Civilization, 600-12004
HISTORY 109BThe Middle East, 1000-17504
HISTORY 111ATopics in the History of Southest Asia: Southeast Asia to the 18th Century4
HISTORY 114APolitics, Culture, and Philosophy in South Asia before Modernity4
HISTORY 116ACourse Not Available
HISTORY 116BChina: Two Golden Ages: China During the Tang and Song Dynasties4
HISTORY 117DTopics in Chinese History: The Chinese Body: Gender and Sex, Health, and Medicine4
HISTORY 118AJapan: Japan, Archaeological Period to 18004
HISTORY 149BMedieval Italy: Italy in the Age of Dante (1000-1350)4
HISTORY 150BMedieval England: From the Conquest to 12904
HISTORY 155AMedieval Europe: From the Late Empire to the Investiture Conflict4
HISTORY 155BMedieval Europe: From the Investiture Conflict to the Fifteenth Century4
HISTORY 171ARussia: Russia to 17004
HISTORY 177AArmenia: Armenia from Ethnogenesis to the Dark Ages4
HISTORY 185AHistory of Christianity: History of Christianity to 12504

Minor Requirements

Students who have a strong interest in an area of study outside their major often decide to complete a minor program. These programs have set requirements and are noted officially on the transcript in the memoranda section, but they are not noted on diplomas.

General Guidelines

  1. The History minor consists of six four-unit courses: one lower division and five upper division, from at least two of the seven historical fields below.
  2. All courses taken to fulfill the minor requirements must be taken for a letter grade.
  3. All of the upper division courses taken to fulfill the History minor requirements must be completed at UC Berkeley.
  4. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required for courses used to fulfill the minor requirements.
  5. Courses used to fulfill the minor requirements may be applied toward the Seven-Course Breadth requirement, for Letters & Science students.
  6. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student's major and minor programs.
  7. All minor requirements must be completed prior to the last day of finals during the semester in which you plan to graduate. If you cannot finish all courses required for the minor by that time, please see a College of Letters & Science adviser.
  8. All minor requirements must be completed within the unit ceiling. (For further information regarding the unit ceiling, please see the College Requirements website.)

Requirements

Lower Division
Select one of the following courses:
Comparative World History [4]
After the Roman Empire: the East [4]
Origins of Western Civilization: The Ancient Mediterranean World [4]
Origins of Western Civilization: Medieval Europe [4]
European Civilization from the Renaissance to the Present [4]
History of China: Origins to the Mongol Conquest [4]
Introduction to Chinese History from the Mongols to Mao [4]
Introduction to the History of the United States: The United States from Settlement to Civil War [4]
Introduction to the History of the United States: The United States from Civil War to Present [4]
Latin American History: Becoming Latin America, 1492 to 1824 [4]
Latin American History: Modern Latin America [4]
African History [4]
India [4]
The Middle East [4]
Introduction to the History of Japan [4]
Science and Society [4]
39 A-Z Freshman Sophomore Seminar
Upper Division
Select five courses from the following:
Africa
Special Topics in African History [4]
Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Africa [4]
Africa: Modern South Africa, 1652-Present [4]
HISTORY N112B
Course Not Available [4] (Summer Session)
Colonialism and Nationalism in Africa [4]
Asia
Special Topics in Asian History [4]
Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Asia [4]
Topics in the History of Southest Asia: Southeast Asia to the 18th Century [4]
Topics in the History of Southest Asia: Modern Southeast Asia [4]
HISTORY C111B
Course Not Available
Topics in the History of Southest Asia: Political and Cultural History of Vietnam [4]
HISTORY 113A
Course Not Available
HISTORY 113B
Course Not Available
Politics, Culture, and Philosophy in South Asia before Modernity [4]
India: Modern South Asia [4]
HISTORY 116A
Course Not Available
China: Two Golden Ages: China During the Tang and Song Dynasties [4]
China: Modern China [4]
China: Twentieth-Century China [4]
Imperial China and the World [4]
Topics in Chinese History: Chinese Popular Culture [4]
Topics in Chinese History: The Chinese Body: Gender and Sex, Health, and Medicine [4]
Japan: Japan, Archaeological Period to 1800 [4]
Japan: Japan 1800-1900 [4]
Japan: Empire and Alienation: The 20th Century in Japan [4]
Topics in Japanese History: Postwar Japan [4]
HISTORY N119A
Course Not Available [4] (Summer Session)
Europe
Special Topics in Ancient History [4]
Special Topics in Medieval History [4]
Special Topics in European History [4]
Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Ancient [4]
Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Europe [4]
Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: England [4]
Ancient Greece: Archaic and Classical Greek History [4]
Ancient Greece: The Greek World: 403-31 BCE [4]
Ancient Rome: The Roman Republic [4]
HISTORY N106A
Course Not Available [4] (Summer Session)
Ancient Rome: The Roman Empire [4]
HISTORY N106B
Course Not Available [4] (Summer Session)
Medieval Italy: Italy in the Age of Dante (1000-1350) [4]
Medieval England: From the Conquest to 1290 [4]
Britain 1485-Present: Tudor Stuart Britain, 1485-1660 [4]
Britain 1485-Present: Britain, 1660-1851 [4]
Britain 1485-Present: The Peculiar Modernity of Britain, 1848-2000 [4]
HISTORY N151C
Course Not Available [4] (Summer Session)
Topics in the History of the British Isles: Ireland Since the Union [4]
Medieval Europe: From the Investiture Conflict to the Fifteenth Century [4]
Medieval Europe: From the Late Empire to the Investiture Conflict [4]
The Renaissance and the Reformation [4]
Modern Europe: Old Regime and Revolutionary Europe, 1715-1815 [4]
Modern Europe: Europe in the 19th Century [4]
Modern Europe: Old and New Europe, 1914-Present [4]
HISTORY N158C
Course Not Available [4] (Summer Session)
European Economic History [4]
European Economic History [4]
HISTORY N160
Course Not Available [4] (Summer Session)
Europe and the World: Wars, Empires, Nations 1648-1914 [4]
HISTORY N162A
Course Not Available [4] (Summer Session)
The Birth of Modern Thought: European Intellectual History, 1500-1800 [4]
Modern European Intellectual History: European Intellectual History from Enlightenment to 1870 [4]
Modern European Intellectual History: European Intellectual History 1870 to the Present [4]
Topics in Modern European History: The Reformations of Christendom [4]
Topics in Modern European History: The World, the Picture, and the Page: The Revolution in European Culture since the late 18th Century [4]
The Social and Cultural History of Early Modern Europe [4]
HISTORY 166A
Course Not Available
Modern France: Old Regime and Revolutionary France [4]
Modern France [4]
Modern Germany: Early Modern Germany [4]
Modern Germany: The Rise and Fall of the Second Reich: Germany 1770-1918 [4]
Modern Germany: Germany 1914 to the Present [4]
Spain and Portugal: The Spanish and Portuguese Empires in the Golden Age: 1450-1700 [4]
Modern Italy: Renaissance and Baroque Italy 1350-1800 [4]
The Netherlands [4]
Russia: Russia to 1700 [4]
Russia: Imperial Russia: From Peter the Great to the Russian Revolution [4]
Russia: The Soviet Union, 1917 to the Present [4]
Russian Intellectual History [4]
History of Eastern Europe: The Habsburg Empire, 1740-1918 [4]
History of Eastern Europe: History of Eastern Europe: From 1900 to the Present [4]
Topics in the History of Eastern Europe: A History of Poland-Lithuania [4]
Topics in the History of Eastern Europe: Poles and Others: the Making of Modern Poland [4]
History of the Holocaust [4]
History of Christianity: History of Christianity to 1250 [4]
History of Christianity: History of Christianity from 1250 [4]
Dutch Culture and Society: Amsterdam and Berkeley in the Sixties [4]
Latin America
Special Topics in Latin American History [4]
Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Latin America [4]
Mexico: Modern Mexico [4]
Social History of Latin America: Social History of Modern Latin America [4]
Brazil [4]
HISTORY N143
Course Not Available [4] (Summer Session)
Latin American Women [4]
Near and Middle East
Special Topics in the History of the Middle East [4]
Byzantium [4]
The Rise of Islamic Civilization, 600-1200 [4]
The Middle East, 1000-1750 [4]
The Middle East From the 18th Century to the Present [4]
HISTORY N109C
Course Not Available [4] (Summer Session)
Armenia: Armenia from Ethnogenesis to the Dark Ages [4]
Armenia: From Pre-modern Empires to the Present [4]
United States
Special Topics in the History of the United States [4]
Special Topics in the History of the United States [4]
Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: United States [4]
American Environmental and Cultural History [4]
The Colonial Period and American Revolution: The American Revolution [4]
Antebellum America: The Advent of Mass Society [4]
Civil War and Reconstruction [4]
The Recent United States: The United States from the Late 19th Century to the Eve of World War II [4]
HISTORY N124A
Course Not Available [4] (Summer Session)
The Recent United States: The United States from World War II [4]
HISTORY N124B
Course Not Available [4] (Summer Session)
History of African-Americans and Race Relations in the United States: The History of Black People and Race Relations, 1550-1861 [4]
History of African-Americans and Race Relations in the United States: Soul Power: African American History 1861-1980 [4]
HISTORY N125B
Course Not Available [4] (Summer Session)
HISTORY 126A
Course Not Available
HISTORY 126B
Course Not Available
HISTORY 127AC
Course Not Available
American Foreign Policy [4]
Social History of the United States: Creating Modern American Society: From the End of the Civil War to the Global Age [4]
HISTORY N131B
Course Not Available [4] (Summer Session)
Intellectual History of the United States since 1865 [4]
The Age of the City: The Age of the City, 1825-1933 [4]
HISTORY 135
Course Not Available
HISTORY 136AC
Course Not Available [4]
The Repeopling of America [4]
History of Science in the U.S. [4]
History of Science in the US CalTeach [4]
The American Immigrant Experience [4]
Civil Rights and Social Movements in U.S. History [4]
HISTORY 154
Course Not Available
Comparative
Special Topics in Legal History [4]
Special Topics in the History of Science [4]
Special Topics in Comparative History [4]
Special Topics in Comparative History [4]
Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: History of Science [4]
Proseminar: Problems in Interpretation in the Several Fields of History: Studies in Comparative History [4]
The Craft of History [4]
The International Economy of the 20th Century [4]
War and Peace: International Relations since 1914 [4]
Jewish Civilization: Modern Period [4]
The Life Sciences since 1750 [4]
History of the Life Sciences Since 1750 (Cal Teach) [4]
Topics in the History of the Physical Sciences: Modern Physics: From the Atom to Big Science [4]
Science, Technology, and Society [4]
Science, Technology, and Society (Cal Teach) [4]
Health and Disease [4]
International and Global History since 1945 [4]
The History and Practice of Human Rights [4]
Death, Dying, and Modern Medicine: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives [4]
HISTORY C192
Course Not Available

College Requirements

Undergraduate students must fulfill the following requirements in addition to those required by their major program.

For detailed lists of courses that fulfill college requirements, please review the College of Letters & Sciences page in this Guide. For College advising appointments, please visit the L&S Advising Pages. 

University of California Requirements

Entry Level Writing

All students who will enter the University of California as freshmen must demonstrate their command of the English language by fulfilling the Entry Level Writing requirement. Fulfillment of this requirement is also a prerequisite to enrollment in all reading and composition courses at UC Berkeley. 

American History and American Institutions

The American History and Institutions requirements are based on the principle that a US resident graduated from an American university, should have an understanding of the history and governmental institutions of the United States.

Berkeley Campus Requirement

American Cultures

All undergraduate students at Cal need to take and pass this course in order to graduate. The requirement offers an exciting intellectual environment centered on the study of race, ethnicity and culture of the United States. AC courses offer students opportunities to be part of research-led, highly accomplished teaching environments, grappling with the complexity of American Culture.

College of Letters & Science Essential Skills Requirements

Quantitative Reasoning

The Quantitative Reasoning requirement is designed to ensure that students graduate with basic understanding and competency in math, statistics, or computer science. The requirement may be satisfied by exam or by taking an approved course.

Foreign Language

The Foreign Language requirement may be satisfied by demonstrating proficiency in reading comprehension, writing, and conversation in a foreign language equivalent to the second semester college level, either by passing an exam or by completing approved course work.

Reading and Composition

In order to provide a solid foundation in reading, writing, and critical thinking the College requires two semesters of lower division work in composition in sequence. Students must complete parts A & B reading and composition courses by the end of their second semester and a second-level course by the end of their fourth semester.

College of Letters & Science 7 Course Breadth Requirements

Breadth Requirements

The undergraduate breadth requirements provide Berkeley students with a rich and varied educational experience outside of their major program. As the foundation of a liberal arts education, breadth courses give students a view into the intellectual life of the University while introducing them to a multitude of perspectives and approaches to research and scholarship. Engaging students in new disciplines and with peers from other majors, the breadth experience strengthens interdisciplinary connections and context that prepares Berkeley graduates to understand and solve the complex issues of their day.

Unit Requirements

  • 120 total units

  • Of the 120 units, 36 must be upper division units

  • Of the 36 upper division units, 6 must be taken in courses offered outside your major department
Residence Requirements

For units to be considered in "residence," you must be registered in courses on the Berkeley campus as a student in the College of Letters & Science. Most students automatically fulfill the residence requirement by attending classes here for four years. In general, there is no need to be concerned about this requirement, unless you go abroad for a semester or year or want to take courses at another institution or through UC Extension during your senior year. In these cases, you should make an appointment to meet an adviser to determine how you can meet the Senior Residence Requirement.

Note: Courses taken through UC Extension do not count toward residence.

Senior Residence Requirement

After you become a senior (with 90 semester units earned toward your BA degree), you must complete at least 24 of the remaining 30 units in residence in at least two semesters. To count as residence, a semester must consist of at least 6 passed units. Intercampus Visitor, EAP, and UC Berkeley-Washington Program (UCDC) units are excluded.

You may use a Berkeley Summer Session to satisfy one semester of the Senior Residence requirement, provided that you successfully complete 6 units of course work in the Summer Session and that you have been enrolled previously in the college.

Modified Senior Residence Requirement

Participants in the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP), Berkeley Summer Abroad, or the UC Berkeley Washington Program (UCDC) may meet a Modified Senior Residence requirement by completing 24 (excluding EAP) of their final 60 semester units in residence. At least 12 of these 24 units must be completed after you have completed 90 units.

Upper Division Residence Requirement

You must complete in residence a minimum of 18 units of upper division courses (excluding UCEAP units), 12 of which must satisfy the requirements for your major.

Plan of Study

Students are encouraged to familiarize themselves with the History major requirements before making a program plan. For more detailed information regarding the courses listed below (e.g., elective information, GPA requirements, etc.), see the College Requirements and Major Requirements tabs.

Freshman
FallUnitsSpringUnits
Lower Division US History (Historical Studies Breadth)4Lower Division European History (Social and Behavioral Sciences) Breadth)4
Reading and Composition A4Reading and Composition B4
American Cultures Requirement4L&S Breadth4
L&S Breadth3Lower Division Elective3
 15 15
Sophomore
FallUnitsSpringUnits
Lower Division Other World Area History4Lower Division History Elective4
L&S Breadth4American Cultures Requirement4
Lower Division Elective4L&S Breadth3
Lower Division Elective3L&S Breadth4
 15 15
Junior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
Upper Division History (1 of 6)4Upper Division History (3 of 6)4
Upper Division History (2 of 6)4Upper Division History (4 of 6)4
Lower or Upper Division Elective4Lower or Upper Division Elective4
Lower or Upper Division Elective3Upper Division L&S Non-Major Department Elective3
 15 15
Senior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
Upper Division History (5 of 6)4Upper Division History (6 of 6)4
One of the following proseminars:4HISTORY 1015
 Lower or Upper Division Elective3
 Lower or Upper Division Elective3
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Upper Division L&S Non-Major Department Elective4 
Lower or Upper Division Elective3 
 15 15
Total Units: 120
1

 This is a sample program plan. This plan assumes that the student has completed the Entry Level Writing, American History and Institutions, Quantitative Reasoning, and Foreign Language requirements prior to admission.

2

 Students are strongly advised to work with an academic adviser to determine a personal program plan. Your program plan will differ depending on previous credit received, your course schedule, and available offerings.

3

 At least one of the 12 courses required for the major must be devoted entirely to premodern history.

4

 Field of Concentration requirement: HISTORY 101 plus at least 3 other upper division History courses. Students must submit the Field of Concentration form (online) two semesters prior to graduation. For a 4-year plan, submit form the spring term of the third year.

Accelerated Program Plans

For students considering graduating in less than four years, it's important to acknowledge the reasons to undertake such a plan of study. While there are advantages to pursuing a three-year degree plan such as reducing financial burdens, they are not for everyone and do involve sacrifices; especially with respect to participating in co-curricular activities, depth of study,  and summer internships, which typically lead to jobs upon graduation. All things considered, please see the tables for three and three and a half year degree options.

3.5 and 3 Year Plans

Student Learning Goals

Mission

The History major helps students learn to think critically and deeply about the historical processes that have shaped the world we live in. History majors are exposed to a temporally and geographically broad range of historical experience, but they are also required to concentrate on a world region or theme or a period in history, both in order to develop depth of understanding and in order to prepare for the capstone of the History Major: an article-length, primary-source based, original research project. The major is designed to develop critical reading, thinking, and writing skills that will be needed to succeed in this capstone course.

Learning Goals for the Major

  1. Distinguish and characterize significant periods of historical experience in multiple societies from different parts of the globe.
  2. Describe events and developments in the history of multiple societies in terms of continuity, change, and causation.
  3. Understand interpretive debates about the past.
  4. Appreciate the complexities involved in interpreting societies and social change: for example, the local and the global, particular and general, contingent and structural.
  5. Identify different kinds of historical evidence and understand their role in the production of historical knowledge.

Skills

  1. Recall factual claims about the past and synthesize them into coherent interpretive arguments.
  2. Read documents closely and critically.
  3. Formulate a well-organized, well-supported argument.
  4. Demonstrate clear writing in the form of essays of varying lengths.
  5. Make cogent oral arguments about reading assignments in the context of a seminar discussion.
  6. Conduct original research with primary sources.
  7. Locate good, relevant secondary scholarship, and distinguish good from poor scholarship.
  8. Observe ethical practices of citation and intellectual self-presentation.

Career & Internship Information

Career Services Overview

The UC Berkeley Career Center prepares undergraduates, graduate students, and alumni to make informed decisions about their futures by providing comprehensive resources, programs, and counseling on career development, internships, employment, and graduate school.  Whether it be through a resume critique, an alumni networking event, or an interviewing skills workshop, the Career Center is committed to helping all students achieve:

  • Career Clarity: Providing students the opportunity to identify their career direction
  • Career Competitiveness: Providing students the opportunities to enhance their marketability via real world experiences
  • Career Connections: Providing students opportunities to engage with alumni and employers

Common Career Paths for History Majors

Career Destinations Survey

Every year the Career Center surveys graduating seniors about their post-graduation plans to better understand the career outcomes of our alumni including: career fields, job titles, specific employers, entry-level salaries, and graduate/professional school destinations. The data profiles by major provide an impressive overview of the diverse interests and achievements of recent graduates from UC Berkeley, including specific data for the History Department. Each survey year includes the August, December, and May graduating cohorts for that survey year. This data is designed to provide students, alumni, and employers with critical information about where Cal students go after graduation. As expected, college major does not restrict the employment or graduate school options that Cal students pursue. With careful planning, you can develop career-related skills and experiences that can prepare you for almost any job or graduate school field.

Sample Career Pathways

History majors go on to pursue a wide variety of career options including, but not limited to:

  • Local, state and federal government: Public policy, city and regional planning, judicial services, program administration, social services, intelligence, law enforcement, foreign service, research.
  • Politics: Elected or appointed leadership, campaign management, staff administration, special interest advocacy, lobbying.
  • Law: Prosecution, defense, corporate, public interest, mediation.
  • Nonprofit: Administration, management, public relations, fundraising/development, program coordination, grant writing, volunteer management.
  • Museums, curatorial and archival management: Acquisition, preservation, exhibition, research.
  • Education:
    • Primary and post-secondary: teaching, administration, library services.
    • Higher education: teaching, research, administration, student affairs, admissions, advising, community relations.
  • Business:  Sales, management, office administration, human resources, training, public relations, writing/editing.
  • Media: Editing, publishing, writing, sales, digital media, public relations, broadcasting.

Visit our Connecting Majors to Careers resource to explore additional career paths most commonly associated with over 80 majors, including History.

Career Services Overview

The UC Berkeley Career Center prepares undergraduates, graduate students, and alumni to make informed decisions about their futures by providing comprehensive resources, programs, and counseling on career development, internships, employment, and graduate school.  Whether it be through a resume critique, an alumni networking event, or an interviewing skills workshop, the Career Center is committed to helping all students achieve:

  • Career Clarity: providing students the opportunity to identify their career direction;

  • Career Competitiveness: providing students the opportunity to enhance their marketability via real-world experiences;

  • Career Connections: providing students opportunities to engage with alumni and employers.

Career and Internship Resources

The UC Berkeley Career Center offers a wide variety of programs and resources to support students of all majors and class levels.

  • Job Search Tools: Resume and cover letter writing, job search strategies, networking tools, interviewing skills, and more.
  • Career Counseling: A wide variety of scheduled and drop-in appointment options based on major and topic.
  • Internships: Internship listings, search strategies, FAQs, and more.
  • Career Exploration: Resources to explore career options, identify career goals, and develop effective career plans.
  • Events and Workshops: Over 70 events each semester including workshops, alumni networking events, career panels, conferences, and on-campus Career Chats.
  • Career Fairs and Employer Information Sessions: We offer 14 career fairs each year across a variety of career fields and partner with numerous employers for on-campus information sessions.
  • Graduate and Professional School: Counseling and resources to help students research and apply for graduate and professional school including medical school and law school.

*The above services are available to all currently enrolled UC Berkeley students and members of the Career Center’s Alumni Advantage program.

Courses

Faculty and Instructors

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

Stephan H. Astourian, Associate Adjunct Professor. Armenia, Caucasus, Azerbaijan, Modern Turkey, Diasporas.
Research Profile

Janaki Bakhle, Associate Professor.

Andrew E. Barshay, Professor. Social thought, modernism, social sciences in modern Japan, marxism, Japanese history, Japanese-Russian relations.
Research Profile

Mark Brilliant, Associate Professor. 20th century US history, with a focus on political economy, civil rights, education, law, and the west.
Research Profile

Cathryn Carson, Professor. History of physics, science and society, history of universities, German history, intellectual history, ethnography, data science, nuclear waste.
Research Profile

Margaret Chowning, Professor. Mexico, history, gender, women, Latin America.
Research Profile

John Connelly, Professor.

Thomas Dandelet, Professor. Renaissance Italy and Europe, Spanish Empire, early modern Mediterranean.
Research Profile

Brian Delay, Associate Professor. US, the Americas, International History, nineteenth century, Native American history, American West, Borderlands.
Research Profile

Nicholas Dirks, Professor. History and anthropology of South Asia, social and cultural theory, history of imperialism, historiography, cultural studies, globalization.
Research Profile

Sandra Eder, Assistant Professor. Gender, sexuality, medicine, science, US History 20th century, popular culture.
Research Profile

John M. Efron, Professor. Cultural and social history of German Jewry.
Research Profile

+ Robin L. Einhorn, Professor. Taxation, United States political history, urban history, nineteenth century.
Research Profile

Susanna Elm, Professor. History of the Later Roman Empire, pagan - Christian interactions, ancient medicine, slavery and the evolution of Christianity, leadership and empire, reception of antiquity.
Research Profile

Victoria Frede-Montemayor, Associate Professor. Enlightenment, Russian intellectual history, sentimentalism, eighteenth and nineteenth century, anti-religious thought, romanticism, history of friendship.
Research Profile

Bruce Hall, Associate Professor.

David Henkin, Professor. History, US History, urban history, cultural history, History of Time.
Research Profile

Rebecca Herman, Assistant Professor.

Carla Hesse, Professor. France, modern Europe, history of women.
Research Profile

Stefan-Ludwig Hoffmann, Associate Professor. Modern German and European History, Conceptual History, Transnational History, urban studies.
Research Profile

Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers, Assistant Professor.
Research Profile

Abhishek Kaicker, Assistant Professor. South Asia, Mughal, early modern, cities, history, Persian.
Research Profile

Tabitha Kanogo, Professor. Colonialism, nationalism, women and gender, childhood and youth.
Research Profile

Geoffrey Koziol, Professor. Medieval history, History of Medieval Christianity, Medieval Political Institutions.
Research Profile

Thomas W. Laqueur, Professor. Medicine, religion, body, human rights.
Research Profile

Emily Mackil, Associate Professor.
Research Profile

Waldo E. Martin, Professor. African American History ; Modern American Culture.
Research Profile

Maria Mavroudi, Professor. Byzantine studies.
Research Profile

Massimo Mazzotti, Professor. History of science, History of Mathematics, social theory, science and society, STS.
Research Profile

Rebecca McLennan, Associate Professor. North America: 1763-present, law and society, crime and punishment, prisons, society and culture, capitalism, global foodways.
Research Profile

Maureen Miller, Professor. Medieval history.
Research Profile

+ Carlos F. Norena, Associate Professor. Roman history.
Research Profile

Michael Nylan, Professor. Gender, history, East Asian studies, early China, the fifth century BC to the fifth century AD, with an emphasis on the sociopolitical context, aesthetic theories and material culture, belief.
Research Profile

Vanessa Ogle, Associate Professor.

Dylan Penningroth, Professor.

Mark A. Peterson, Professor. US/North America, Atlantic World, early modern history, religion, political economy.
Research Profile

Christine Philliou, Associate Professor.

Isabel Richter, Assistant Adjunct Professor.

Caitlin C. Rosenthal, Assistant Professor. American history, capitalism, economic history, slavery.
Research Profile

Peter Sahlins, Professor. Early modern France, animal-human relations, immigration, citizenship and nationality in pre-modern Europe.
Research Profile

Daniel Sargent, Associate Professor. American history, International History, Contemporary History.
Research Profile

Elena A. Schneider, Assistant Professor. Cuba and the Caribbean; colonial Latin America; The Atlantic World, 1400-1888.

Ethan H. Shagan, Professor. British history, early modern European history, history of religion.
Research Profile

Jonathan Sheehan, Professor. Religion, Christianity, Europe, secularism, Secularization.
Research Profile

Yuri Slezkine, Professor. Russia, Late Modern Europe.
Research Profile

Nicolas Tackett, Associate Professor. Ethnicity, elites, China, cities, national identity, social networks, medieval history, death ritual, Tang Dynasty, Song Dynasty, Liao Dynasty.
Research Profile

James Vernon, Professor. Britain, its Empire and World, 1750 to present.
Research Profile

Wen-Hsin Yeh, Professor. History, East Asian studies, Qing and Modern China.
Research Profile

Peter B. Zinoman, Professor. Vietnam, Vietnam War, Vietnamese literature, Southeast Asian history, communism, nationalism, colonialism.
Research Profile

Diliana Angelova, Associate Professor. Gender, early Christian art, Byzantine art, late antique art, the Virgin Mary, early Christian empresses, imperial iconography, power and material culture, the empress Helena, the relic of the True Cross, urban development of Constantinople, textiles, ivories, mythology in Byzantine art, myth and genre in Archaic and Classical Greek art, romantic love in ancient and medieval art.
Research Profile

Lecturers

Rodolfo J. Alaniz, Lecturer.

David S. Boyk, Lecturer.

Robert N. Chester, Lecturer.

Michael Dean, Lecturer.

Nils Gilman, Lecturer.

Robert L. Harkins, Lecturer.

Tyler C. Lange, Lecturer.

Andrej Milivojevic, Lecturer.

Sarah Selvidge, Lecturer.

Christopher W. Shaw, Lecturer.

Lynsay Skiba, Lecturer.

Stacey Van Vleet, Lecturer.

David Wetzel, Lecturer.

Gene Zubovich, Lecturer.

Emeritus Faculty

Richard M. Abrams, Professor Emeritus. Politics, recent US history: business foreign relations, etc.
Research Profile

Anthony Adamthwaite, Professor Emeritus.

Margaret Lavinia Anderson, Professor Emeritus. Germany 1860-1945, Kulturkampf, the Center Party (Zentrum), 19th century European Catholicism, the 19th century European Religious Revival, Democratisation more generally and comparatively, comparative elections and electoral politics, European (and esp. German) Relations with the late Ottoman Empire, Armenian Genocide.
Research Profile

Robert M. Berdahl, Professor Emeritus.

Mary Elizabeth Berry, Professor Emeritus. Late medieval and early modern Japan.
Research Profile

Thomas A. Brady, Professor Emeritus.

Richard Candida Smith, Professor Emeritus. Identity, memory, narrative, 19th and 20th century US cultural and intellectual history, cultural interaction and exchange with France and Latin America, oral history and personal testimony as historical sources.
Research Profile

Jan De Vries, Professor Emeritus. Economics, demography, history.
Research Profile

Paula S. Fass, Professor Emeritus. History of childhood, social and cultural history of the United States, immigration and ethnicity, history of education, child abduction.
Research Profile

+ Erich S. Gruen, Professor Emeritus. Classics, Greek and Roman history, Jews in the Greco-Roman world.
Research Profile

Samuel Haber, Professor Emeritus.

John L. Heilbron, Professor Emeritus. History of the physical sciences, biography.
Research Profile

Richard Herr, Professor Emeritus.

David Hollinger, Professor Emeritus. US history.
Research Profile

Eugene F. Irschick, Professor Emeritus.

Martin E. Jay, Professor Emeritus. Rhetoric, history, Marxist theory, European intellectual history, 19th 20th century, visual discourse and culture.
Research Profile

David G. Johnson, Professor Emeritus. History, East Asian studies, city-god cults of T'ang and Sung China, ritual and sculpture in Chinese religion.
Research Profile

Kerwin L. Klein, Professor Emeritus.

Ira M. Lapidus, Professor Emeritus.

John Lesch, Professor Emeritus.

Linda Lewin, Professor Emeritus. Race, social history of 19th andamp;amp; 20th century Brazil--family andamp;amp; kinship; illegitimacy andamp;amp; inheritance rights; banditry (emergence of cangaco); slavery, andamp;amp; color; oral poetic tradition in NE region (repentistas, desafio); cotton production in 19th-century NE Brazil.
Research Profile

+ Leon F. Litwack, Professor Emeritus.

Thomas R. Metcalf, Professor Emeritus.

+ Robert L. Middlekauff, Professor Emeritus.

Sheldon Rothblatt, Professor Emeritus.

Mary P. Ryan, Professor Emeritus.

Irwin Scheiner, Professor Emeritus.

Charles G. Sellers, Professor Emeritus.

John M. Smith, Professor Emeritus.

Randolph R. Starn, Professor Emeritus.

William B. Taylor, Professor Emeritus.

Contact Information

Department of History

3229 Dwinelle Hall

Phone: 510-642-1971

Fax: 510-643-5323

history@berkeley.edu

Visit Department Website

Department Chair

Peter Zinoman, PhD

3303 Dwinelle Hall

Phone: 510-642-3402

pzinoman@berkeley.edu

Undergraduate Major Adviser

Leah Flanagan

3226 Dwinelle Hall

Phone: 510-642-0356

leahf@berkeley.edu

Undergraduate Minor Adviser

Erin Leigh Inama

3312 Dwinelle Hall

Phone: 510-642-2378

history-recruitment@berkeley.edu

Student Services Coordinator

Anne Meyers

3313 Dwinelle Hall

Phone: 510-643-8995

history-ssc@berkeley.edu

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