Psychology

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Psychology as a scientific discipline aims to describe, understand, and predict the behavior of living organisms. In doing so, psychology embraces the many factors that influence behavior—from sensory experience to complex cognition, from the role of genetics to that of social and cultural environments, from the processes that explain behavior in early childhood to those that operate in older ages, and from normal development to pathological conditions. The Psychology Department at UC Berkeley reflects the diversity of our discipline's mission covering six key areas of research: Behavioral and Systems Neuroscience; Clinical Science; Cognition; Cognitive Neuroscience; Developmental, and Social-Personality Psychology. Despite the existence of these specialization areas, the program learning goals focus on fostering methodological, statistical, and critical thinking skills that are not tied to any one particular content area in psychology but are relevant for all of them.

The major serves three purposes:

  1. For the liberal arts student, the study of psychology provides an avenue for increased self-understanding and insight into the behavior of others. The objective study of behavior is one of the major themes of intellectual history in the last hundred-plus years.
  2. For students preparing for training in such professions as medicine, law, education and business, psychology provides important basic knowledge and principles.
  3. For students who plan on pursuing graduate work in psychology, the undergraduate major seeks to establish a sound foundation of research principles and knowledge of a variety of content areas.

Declaring the Major

Psychology is a capped (impacted) major at UC Berkeley. This means that due to high demand, the program unfortunately cannot accommodate every student who wishes to major in Psychology. As part of the terms of being a capped major, all students who apply to the major and meet the following criteria are guaranteed admission:

  1. Have a 3.2 grade point average (GPA) in the seven/eight prerequisite courses. (Note: GPA is not rounded up.)
  2. Students who entered UC Berkeley as a freshman must declare the major by their 5th semester OR prior to the accumulation of 80 semester units including work in progress (AP or college credit obtained in high school do not count towards the 80 units). Those who entered Berkeley as a junior level transfer must declare the major no later than their first semester at UC Berkeley.
  3. Submit the application to the major by the posted deadline. Please refer to the department website for exact deadlines. 

If any of the above criteria are not met, students may still be admitted to the major. However, there is no guarantee. Please understand that applications will not be processed until all prerequisite courses are complete and final grades have been posted. This may mean that students will not technically be admitted to the major until the beginning of the following semester.

Honors Program

Students with a 3.5 GPA in their major and 3.3 GPA overall may apply for admission to the honors program. For students interested in the honors program, it is recommended to participate in the Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program (URAP) or departmental research during their junior year. This will prepare them for experimental research and design necessary for completing their own project.

Students are required to complete the following courses, none of which count toward major requirements:

  •  PSYCH 102 Statistics for Psychological Research is a 3 unit upper division course that is designed to introduce students to the data analysis techniques researchers using the field of psychology. This course is only offered in fall and may be taken as early as the junior year. This course must be taken for a letter grade (P/NP grading not accepted). Completion of PSYCH 10/PSYCH 101 is a required prerequisite to this course. 
  • UGIS 192B  or PSYCH 199  Students applying to the honors program are required to be a research apprentice in the laboratory of their intended faculty sponsor. Students must begin their research project in the spring of their junior year. The URAP office will provide the students enrollment information for UGIS 192 (course control number and class entry code) to register via Tele-BEARS and the Psychology Student Services Office will provide enrollment information for Psych 199. A minimum of 2 units of UGIS 192 or Psych 199 is required.
  •  PSYCH H194A / PSYCH H194B Honors students are required to concurrently enroll in Psychology H194A-B (2 units per semester), the honors seminar, in their senior year. This course provides excellent supplemental background for preparing the thesis. 
  •  PSYCH H195A / PSYCH H195B Psychology H195A-B is offered for 1-3 units per semester and is mandatory in order to receive honors in the major. The course is sequential with a grade of In Progress or “IP” for the "A" portion and the final grade assigned for both semesters at the end of the "B" portion. 

Minor Program

There is no minor program in Psychology.

Visit Department Website

Major Requirements

In addition to the University, campus, and college requirements, listed on the College Requirements tab, students must fulfill the below requirements specific to their major program.

General Guidelines

  1. All courses taken to fulfill the major requirements below must be taken for graded credit, other than courses listed which are offered on a Pass/No Pass basis only. Other exceptions to this requirement are noted as applicable.
  2. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student's major and minor programs, with the exception of minors offered outside of the College of Letters & Science.
  3. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 must be maintained in both upper and lower division courses used to fulfill the major requirements.

For information regarding residence requirements and unit requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.

**Please contact the students services offices or make an appointment with your student services adviser for any questions related to these requirements.** 

Lower Division Prerequisites: Plan I

Applicable to freshman admitted to UC Berkeley fall 2016 or later and transfers admitted spring 2017 or later.

Psychology 1
General Psychology
Biological Science 2
Select two of the following:
Introduction to Biological Anthropology
General Biology Lecture
The Ecology and Evolution of Animal Behavior
Introduction to Human Physiology
Brain, Mind, and Behavior (cross-listed as MCELLBI C61)
Exploring the Brain: Introduction to Neuroscience (cross-listed as MCELLBI C64)
Social Science
Select two of the following, from two different departments:
Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
Introduction to Social/Cultural Anthropology (American Cultures)
Language and Linguistics
The Nature of Mind
Knowledge and Its Limits
Science and Human Understanding
Introduction to Logic
Modern Philosophy
Introduction to American Politics
Introduction to Comparative Politics
Introduction to Political Theory
Introduction to Sociology
Introduction to Sociology for Pre-Health Majors
Principles of Sociology: American Cultures
Quantitative
A total of 3 courses is required. You must take:
Research and Data Analysis in Psychology
Plus two of the following:
Methods of Mathematics: Calculus, Statistics, and Combinatorics (highly recommended)
Methods of Mathematics: Calculus, Statistics, and Combinatorics (highly recommended)
Calculus
Calculus
Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Discrete Mathematics
Introduction to Statistics
Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Introductory Probability and Statistics for Business
Foundations of Data Science
1

 AP Psychology with a score of 4 or 5 will satisfy this prerequisite.

2

 AP Biology with a score of 4 or 5 will satisfy one biological science prerequisite from the first section only (PSYCH C61 or PSYCH C64 will not be satisfied).

Lower Division Prerequisites: Plan II

Applicable to freshman admitted to UC Berkeley fall 2014 or later and transfers admitted fall 2015 or later.

Psychology 1
General Psychology
Biological Science 2
Select one of the following:
Introduction to Biological Anthropology
General Biology Lecture
The Ecology and Evolution of Animal Behavior
Introduction to Human Physiology
Select one of the following:
Brain, Mind, and Behavior (cross-listed as MCELLBI C61)
Exploring the Brain: Introduction to Neuroscience (cross-listed as MCELLBI C64)
Social Science
Select two of the following, from two different departments:
Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
Introduction to Social/Cultural Anthropology (American Cultures)
Language and Linguistics
The Nature of Mind
Knowledge and Its Limits
Introduction to Logic
Modern Philosophy
Introduction to Sociology
Principles of Sociology: American Cultures
SOCIOL 3
Course Not Available
Quantitative
A total of 3 courses is required. You must take:
Research and Data Analysis in Psychology
Plus two of the following:
Methods of Mathematics: Calculus, Statistics, and Combinatorics (highly recommended)
Methods of Mathematics: Calculus, Statistics, and Combinatorics (highly recommended)
Calculus
Calculus
Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Discrete Mathematics
Introduction to Statistics
Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Introductory Probability and Statistics for Business
1

 AP Psychology with a score of 4 or 5 will satisfy this prerequisite.

2

 AP Biology with a score of 4 or 5 will satisfy one biological science prerequisite from the first section only (PSYCH C61 or PSYCH C64 will not be satisfied).

Lower Division Prerequisites: Plan III

Applicable to freshman admitted spring 2014 or earlier and transfers admitted spring 2015 or earlier.

Psychology 1
General Psychology
Evolution
Select one of the following:
Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Human Biological Variation
Genetics and Society
Biological Sciences 2
Select two of the following:
General Biology Lecture
General Biology Lecture and Laboratory
BIOLOGY 11
Course Not Available
The Ecology and Evolution of Animal Behavior
Introduction to Human Physiology
The Immune System and Disease
Introduction to Functional Neuroanatomy
Drugs and the Brain (cross-listed with MCELLBI C62 / L & S C30T)
Brain, Mind, and Behavior (cross-listed with MCELLBI C61)
Exploring the Brain: Introduction to Neuroscience (cross-listed with MCELLBI C64)
Social Science 3
Select two of the following, from two different departments:
Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
Introduction to Social/Cultural Anthropology (American Cultures)
Language and Linguistics
The Nature of Mind
Knowledge and Its Limits
Introduction to Logic
Modern Philosophy
Introduction to American Politics
Introduction to Comparative Politics
Introduction to Political Theory
Principles of Sociology: American Cultures
Quantitative
Select one of the following:
Methods of Mathematics: Calculus, Statistics, and Combinatorics (highly recommended)
Methods of Mathematics: Calculus, Statistics, and Combinatorics (highly recommended)
Calculus
Calculus
Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Discrete Mathematics
Introduction to Statistics
Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Introductory Probability and Statistics for Business
1

AP Psychology with a score of 4 or 5 will satisfy this prerequisite.

2

AP Biology with a score of 4 or 5 will satisfy one biological science prerequisite.

3

AP US Government or AP Comparative Government with a score of 4 or 5 will satisfy one of the social science requirements; the second social science course may not be in political science.

Upper Division Requirements: Plan I

Applicable to freshman admitted to UC Berkeley fall 2016 or later and transfers admitted spring 2017 or later.

Tier II Requirements:
A minimum of five courses from the following, with at least one in each area:
Biological
Introduction to Biological Psychology 1
Human Neuropsychology
Cognitive Neuroscience (cross-listed with COG SCI C127)
Cognitive & Developmental
Basic Issues in Cognition (cross-listed with COG SCI C100)
Perception (cross-listed with COG SCI C126)
Developmental Psychology
Language Acquisition (cross-listed with LINGUIS C146)
Social/Personality
Psychology of Personality
Human Emotion
Social Psychology
Cultural Psychology
Industrial-Organizational Psychology
Clinical
Clinical Psychology
Developmental Psychopathology
Health Psychology
Treating Mental Illness: Development, Evaluation, and Dissemination
Tier III Requirements:
Select three additional upper division psychology courses, numbered between PSYCH 104-PSYCH 182, of at least 3 units each. Any excess survey courses will count toward Tier III. The course number 192 is used to designate a new class and may apply toward one of the electives. 2, 3
1

Effective fall 2016: students will not receive credit for PSYCH 110 if MCELLBI C61 Brain, Mind, and Behavior is taken prior. Students must take another course to meet biological sciences requirement.

2

Only one of these courses may be a seminar (courses ending in "8").

3

PSYCH 102PSYCH H194A / PSYCH H194BPSYCH H195A / PSYCH H195BPSYCH 197PSYCH 198 & PSYCH 199 do not count toward coursework requirements.

Upper Division Requirements: Plan II

Applicable to freshman admitted fall 2014 or later and transfers admitted fall 2015 or later.

Tier II Requirements:
A minimum of five courses from the following, with at least one in each area:
Biological
Introduction to Biological Psychology
The Developing Brain
Cognitive Neuroscience (cross-listed with COG SCI C127)
Cognitive & Developmental
Basic Issues in Cognition (cross-listed with COG SCI C100)
Perception (cross-listed with COG SCI C126)
Developmental Psychology
Language Acquisition (cross-listed with LINGUIS C146)
Social/Personality
Psychology of Personality
Human Emotion
Social Psychology
Cultural Psychology
Industrial-Organizational Psychology
Clinical
Clinical Psychology
Developmental Psychopathology
Health Psychology
Treating Mental Illness: Development, Evaluation, and Dissemination
Tier III Requirements:
Select three additional upper division psychology courses, numbered between PSYCH 104-PSYCH 182, of at least 3 units each. 1, 2
1

Only one of these courses may be a seminar (courses ending in "8").

2

PSYCH 102, PSYCH H194A / PSYCH H194B, PSYCH H195A / PSYCH H195B, PSYCH 197, PSYCH 198PSYCH 199 do not count toward coursework requirements.

Upper Division Requirements: Plan III

Applicable to freshman admitted fall 2013/spring 2014 and transfers admitted fall 2013–spring 2015.

Tier II Requirements
Research and Data Analysis in Psychology 1
A minimum of five courses from the following, with at least one in each area:
Biological
Introduction to Biological Psychology
The Developing Brain
Cognitive Neuroscience (cross-listed with COG SCI C127)
Cognitive & Developmental
Basic Issues in Cognition (cross-listed with COG SCI C100)
Perception (cross-listed with COG SCI C126)
Developmental Psychology
Language Acquisition (cross-listed with LINGUIS C146)
Social/Personality
Psychology of Personality
Human Emotion
Social Psychology
Cultural Psychology
Industrial-Organizational Psychology
Clinical
Clinical Psychology
Developmental Psychopathology
Health Psychology
Tier III Requirements:
Select three additional upper division psychology courses, numbered between PSYCH 104-PSYCH 182, of at least 3 units each. 2, 3
1

Also listed as PSYCH 10.

2

Only one of these courses may be a seminar (courses ending in "8").

3

PSYCH 102, PSYCH H194A / PSYCH H194B, PSYCH H195A / PSYCH H195B, PSYCH 197, PSYCH 198 & PSYCH 199 do not count toward coursework requirements.

Upper Division Requirements: Plan IV

Applicable to all students admitted prior to fall 2013.

Required Courses
Research and Data Analysis in Psychology 1
Three of the Following Decade Courses
Introduction to Biological Psychology
Basic Issues in Cognition (cross-listed as COG SCI C100)
Clinical Psychology
Developmental Psychology
Psychology of Personality
Social Psychology
Industrial-Organizational Psychology
Elective Courses
Four courses with a value of at least 3 units from courses numbered PSYCH 104-182.
Only ONE of these courses can be seminar (ending ins "8").
PSYCH H194A/PSYCH H194B, PSYCH H195A/PSYCH H195B, PSYCH 197, PSYCH 198, & PSYCH 199 do not count towards coursework requirements.
The course number 192 used to designate a new class and may apply toward one of the electives.
Breadth Courses
Above courses must include at least 1 course from each of the 4 subareas:
Cognition, Brain & Behavior (110-129)
Clinical Science (130-139)
Developmental (140-149)
Social/Personality (150-169, 180)
1

Also listed as PSYCH 10.

College Requirements

Undergraduate students in the College of Letters & Science must fulfill the following requirements in addition to those required by their major program.

For detailed lists of courses that fulfill college requirements, please review the College of Letters & Sciences page in this Guide.

Entry Level Writing

All students who will enter the University of California as freshmen must demonstrate their command of the English language by fulfilling the Entry Level Writing requirement. Fulfillment of this requirement is also a prerequisite to enrollment in all reading and composition courses at UC Berkeley. 

American History and American Institutions

The American History and Institutions requirements are based on the principle that a US resident graduated from an American university should have an understanding of the history and governmental institutions of the United States.

American Cultures

American Cultures is the one requirement that all undergraduate students at Cal need to take and pass in order to graduate. The requirement offers an exciting intellectual environment centered on the study of race, ethnicity and culture of the United States. AC courses offer students opportunities to be part of research-led, highly accomplished teaching environments, grappling with the complexity of American Culture.

Quantitative Reasoning

The Quantitative Reasoning requirement is designed to ensure that students graduate with basic understanding and competency in math, statistics, or computer science. The requirement may be satisfied by exam or by taking an approved course.

Foreign Language

The Foreign Language requirement may be satisfied by demonstrating proficiency in reading comprehension, writing, and conversation in a foreign language equivalent to the second semester college level, either by passing an exam or by completing approved course work.

Reading and Composition

In order to provide a solid foundation in reading, writing and critical thinking the College requires two semesters of lower division work in composition in sequence. Students must complete a first-level reading and composition course by the end of their second semester and a second-level course by the end of their fourth semester.

Breadth Requirements

The undergraduate breadth requirements provide Berkeley students with a rich and varied educational experience outside of their major program. As the foundation of a liberal arts education, breadth courses give students a view into the intellectual life of the University while introducing them to a multitude of perspectives and approaches to research and scholarship. Engaging students in new disciplines and with peers from other majors, the breadth experience strengthens interdisciplinary connections and context that prepares Berkeley graduates to understand and solve the complex issues of their day.

Unit Requirements

  • 120 total units, including at least 60 L&S units

  • Of the 120 units, 36 must be upper division units

  • Of the 36 upper division units, 6 must be taken in courses offered outside your major department

Residence Requirements

For units to be considered in "residence," you must be registered in courses on the Berkeley campus as a student in the College of Letters & Science. Most students automatically fulfill the residence requirement by attending classes here for four years. In general, there is no need to be concerned about this requirement, unless you go abroad for a semester or year or want to take courses at another institution or through UC Extension during your senior year. In these cases, you should make an appointment to meet an adviser to determine how you can meet the Senior Residence Requirement.

Note: Courses taken through UC Extension do not count toward residence.

Senior Residence Requirement

After you become a senior (with 90 semester units earned toward your BA degree), you must complete at least 24 of the remaining 30 units in residence in at least two semesters. To count as residence, a semester must consist of at least 6 passed units. Intercampus Visitor, EAP, and UC Berkeley-Washington Program (UCDC) units are excluded.

You may use a Berkeley Summer Session to satisfy one semester of the Senior Residence requirement, provided that you successfully complete 6 units of course work in the Summer Session and that you have been enrolled previously in the college.

Modified Senior Residence Requirement

Participants in the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP) or the UC Berkeley Washington Program (UCDC) may meet a Modified Senior Residence requirement by completing 24 (excluding EAP) of their final 60 semester units in residence. At least 12 of these 24 units must be completed after you have completed 90 units.

Upper Division Residence Requirement

You must complete in residence a minimum of 18 units of upper division courses (excluding EAP units), 12 of which must satisfy the requirements for your major.

Plan of Study

Students are encouraged to familiarize themselves with the Psychology major requirements before making a program plan. For more detailed information regarding the courses listed below (e.g., elective information, GPA requirements, etc.,), see the College Requirements and Major Requirements tabs.

Freshman
FallUnitsSpringUnits 
PSYCH 1 (Social and Behavioral Sciences Breadth)3PSYCH C61 (Biological Science Breadth)3 
Reading and Composition A4
OR
  
MATH 10A4  
L&S Breadth3Reading and Composition B4 
Freshman Seminar1MATH 10B4 
 
OR
  
   
 L&S Breadth3 
 Freshman Seminar1 
 15 15
Sophomore
FallUnitsSpringUnitsSummerUnits
PSYCH 104SOCIOL 3AC (American Cultures Requirement)4Internship 
MCELLBI 323Language Course5OR 
Language Course5L&S Breadth3Study Abroad 
PHILOS 3 (Philosophy and Values Breadth)4L&S Breadth3 
 16 15 0
Junior
FallUnitsSpringUnitsSummerUnits
Upper Division Psychology Tier 2 (1 of 5)3Upper Division Psychology Tier 2 (3 of 5)3Internship 
Upper Division Psychology Tier 2 (2 of 5)3Upper Division Psychology Tier 2 (4 of 5)3OR 
Lower or Upper Division Elective3Lower or Upper Division Elective4Study Abroad 
Lower or Upper Division Elective4Upper Division Elective Outside Major Department3 
Research (1-3)2Research (1-3)2 
 15 15 0
Senior
FallUnitsSpringUnits 
Upper Division Psychology Tier 2 (5 of 5)3Upper Division Psychology Tier 3 (2 of 3)3 
Upper Division Psychology Tier 3 (1 of 3)3Upper Division Psychology Tier 3 (3 of 3)3 
Upper Division Elective Outside Major Department3Lower or Upper Division Elective4 
Upper Division Elective4Upper Division Elective3 
Research (1-3)2Research (1-3)2 
 15 15
Total Units: 121
1

This is a sample program plan. This plan assumes that the student has completed the Entry Level Writing and American History and Institutions requirements prior to admission requirements prior to admission.

2

Students are strongly advised to work with an academic adviser to determine a personal program plan. Your program plan will differ depending on previous credit received, your course schedule, and available offerings.

3

Declare major the spring term of second year.

4

Students should also understand that while L&S Breadth requirements can be shuffled around within the plan, that is not the case for the lower-division prerequisites for the major. For majors with additional requirements for declaration, there is a limited window of eligibility for guaranteed admission.

5

All courses are subject to change every semester. Students must check the Online Schedule of Classes for the most up-to-date course offerings.

Accelerated Program Plans

For students considering graduating in less than four years, it's important to acknowledge the reasons to undertake such a plan of study. While there are advantages to pursuing a three-year degree plan such as reducing financial burdens, they are not for everyone and do involve sacrifices; especially with respect to participating in co-curricular activities, depth of study,  and summer internships, which typically lead to jobs upon graduation. All things considered, please see the tables for three and three and a half year degree options.

3.5 Year Plan

3 Year Plan

Student Learning Goals

Mission

The Psychology Department at Berkeley reflects the diversity of the discipline's mission covering six key areas of research: Behavioral and Systems Neuroscience; Clinical Science; Cognition; Cognitive Neuroscience; Developmental, and Social-Personality Psychology. Despite the existence of these specialization areas, the program learning goals focus on fostering methodological, statistical, and critical thinking skills that are not tied to any one particular content area in psychology but are relevant for all of them.

Most of the program level goals are introduced in PSYCH 1 (General Psychology). These goals are extended and reinforced in a majority of the core courses. These include PSYCH 101, Research Methods, required of all majors, and the upper division decade courses that survey the major fields of psychology: PSYCH 110: Biological Psychology; PSYCH C120: Cognitive Psychology, PSYCH 130: Clinical Psychology, PSYCH 140: Developmental Psychology, PSYCH 150: Personality Psychology, PSYCH 160: Social Psychology. The program is designed to ensure that all students gain broad exposure to the field of psychology. In addition, students are encouraged to develop a deeper understanding of at least one major content area in psychology.

Learning Goals for the Major

  1. Define basic concepts that characterize psychology as a field of scientific inquiry and appreciate the various subfields that form the discipline as well as things that differentiate it from other related disciplines. Develop an understanding of the central questions and issues in contemporary psychology.
  2. Be familiar with the range of methods used to investigate psychological questions.
  3. Develop skills to critically evaluate the presentation of scientific ideas and research in the popular media.
  4. Develop competence in reading and evaluating original scientific papers.
  5. Become familiar with the basic concepts of statistics and develop skills in evaluating information from a statistical perspective.
  6. Develop and articulate, both orally and in written form, a testable hypothesis or an argument drawing from an existing body of literature.
  7. Develop competence in interpreting graphical data to understand what is being compared/manipulated (independent variables) and what is being measured (dependent variables).
  8. Be familiar with the history of psychology as a field and different theoretical and empirical frameworks that have defined and shaped the field.
  9. Apply a psychological principle to an everyday problem or take an everyday problem and identify the relevant psychological mechanisms/issues.
  10. Develop a deeper understanding of one of the major content areas of psychology (i.e., social/personality, developmental, clinical, cognitive, biological).
  11. Develop an understanding and an appreciation of how social (e.g., environmental/cultural) and biological (e.g., genes, hormones) factors jointly shape human behavior.
  12. Develop an awareness of the importance of science to humanity while recognizing its limits (i.e., some scientific knowledge is culture specific and may not applicable to the human condition universally).

Courses

Psychology

PSYCH 1 General Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Introduction to the principal areas, problems, and concepts of psychology. This course is required for the major; students not considering a psychology major are directed to 2.

General Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH N1 General Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
Introduction to the principal areas, problems, and concepts of psychology. This course is required for the major; students not considering a psychology major are directed to 2.

General Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH W1 General Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Spring 2017
Introduction to the principal areas, problems, and concepts of psychology.

General Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH 2 Principles of Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
An overview of psychology for students who will not major in the field. This course satisfies the prerequisite for upper division decade courses.

Principles of Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH 3 Introduction to How the Brain Works 1 Unit

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
This course will give a rigorous yet accessible overview of our current understanding of how the brain works and how it is altered by experience. Specifically, the class provides: an introduction to the structure and function of the sensory and motor systems; discussions of disorders and phenomena such as blindsight, synaesthesia, color blindness, and phantom limbs; and a lecture
with presentation of classical experiments on the capacity of the young and adult brain for plasticity and learning.
Introduction to How the Brain Works: Read More [+]

PSYCH 5 Technology vs. Psychology: The Internet Revolution and the Rise of the Virtual Self 2 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Fall 1995
Most people have an online alter ego that is stronger and sexier but also angrier, more impulsive, and less ethical. These traits can become incorporated into offline personality, turning us into our avatar. Other psychological damage comes from the lack of online privacy and our new relationship with information. But the “Net” effect is not all bad; technology can also contribute to psychological wellbeing and make possible new treatments
, including computerized therapy and virtual reality exposure therapy.
Technology vs. Psychology: The Internet Revolution and the Rise of the Virtual Self: Read More [+]

PSYCH 6 Stress and Coping 2 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth analysis of the various areas within the field of psychology that address topics related to stress and coping. In particular, we will cover the biological, social, personality, cognitive, and clinical factors that play a role in the development of stress and subsequent coping techniques that can be used to deal with stress.
The class will have a strong focus on the empirical findings relating to the subject.
Stress and Coping: Read More [+]

PSYCH 7 The Person in Big Data 2 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
This course will introduce students to the basic principles and methods of personality and social psychology as applied to a rapidly growing topic of modern society--the collection and analysis of online social “big data.” Students will learn about the ways in which big data has historically been defined, collected, and utilized, as well as fundamental concepts in person perception
and social behavior that are relevant to topics of big data collection, analysis, and interpretation.
The Person in Big Data: Read More [+]

PSYCH 8 Music and the Brain 2 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2015 10 Week Session, Summer 2015 Second 6 Week Session
This course will explore mental processes that allow listeners to perceive music and performers to produce it. We will compare music from various traditions to examine shared cognitive principles and emotional responses; comparisons to language will highlight neural specializations for music. Developmental psychology will inform discussion of learned vs. innate components of musical behavior. Students will design
experiments to test hypotheses relating to music cognition.
Music and the Brain: Read More [+]

PSYCH 9 Changing Behavior: Lessons from a Dog Trainer 1 Unit

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session
In this course, we will examine behavior change – in you, and in those others you wish you could change -- by looking at basic principles that apply across species: operant conditioning, classical conditioning, motivation, stress and development. Animal trainers rely on very specific principles when modifying behavior, and those principles apply to every animal, human and non-human animals alike. Come learn what training animals can tell you
about your own life, learning, motivation and habits!
Changing Behavior: Lessons from a Dog Trainer: Read More [+]

PSYCH 10 Research and Data Analysis in Psychology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Spring 2017
The class covers research design, statistical reasoning, and statistical methods appropriate for psychological research. Topics covered in research design include the scientific method, experimental versus correlational designs, controls and placebos, within and between subject designs and temporal or sequence effects. Topics covered in statistics include descriptive versus inferential statistics, linear regression and correlation
and univariate statistical tests: t-test, one way and two-way ANOVA, chi-square test. The class also introduces non-parametric tests and modeling. Prospective Psychology majors need to take this course to be admitted to the major.
Research and Data Analysis in Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH 14 Psychology of Gender 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2014 10 Week Session, Summer 2014 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2013 First 6 Week Session
Examination of various factors in the development of feminine and masculine roles, including personality, social processes, biology, and culture.

Psychology of Gender: Read More [+]

PSYCH C19 Drugs and the Brain 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
The history, chemical nature, botanical origins, and effects on the human brain and behavior of drugs such as stimulants, depressants, psychedelics, analgesics, antidepressants, antipsychotics, steroids, and other psychoactive substances of both natural and synthetic origin. The necessary biological, chemical, and psychological background material for understanding the content of this course will be contained within the course itself.

Drugs and the Brain: Read More [+]

PSYCH 24 Freshman Seminars 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester.

Freshman Seminars: Read More [+]

PSYCH 39E Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 2 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

PSYCH 39I Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 2 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2009
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

PSYCH 39J Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 2 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2010
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

PSYCH 39K Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 2 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2010, Spring 2010
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

PSYCH 39L Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 2 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2010
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

PSYCH 39M Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 2 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2013, Spring 2013, Spring 2011
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

PSYCH 48 Brain Development and Aging 1 Unit

Terms offered: Summer 2013 10 Week Session, Summer 2013 First 6 Week Session
This is an introductory survey course on brain and cognitive development. It gives an overview of brain structure and function and how it changes throughout life. Topics include: effect of pre-natal maternal and paternal behavior in brain development; critical periods; experience-dependent changes in the brain; the adolescent brain; and the aging brain. We will also discuss developmental disorders such as Down syndrome
and the putative benefits of exercise and diet to brain health.
Brain Development and Aging: Read More [+]

PSYCH C61 Brain, Mind, and Behavior 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Introduction to human brain mechanisms of sensation, movement, perception, thinking, learning, memory, and emotion in terms of anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system in health and disease. Intended for students in the humanities and social sciences and others not majoring in the biological sciences.

Brain, Mind, and Behavior: Read More [+]

PSYCH C64 Exploring the Brain: Introduction to Neuroscience 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 8 Week Session, Fall 2015
This course will introduce lower division undergraduates to the fundamentals of neuroscience. The first part of the course covers basic membrane properties, synapses, action potentials, chemical and electrical synaptic interactions, receptor potentials, and receptor proteins. The second part of the course covers networks in invertebrates, memory and learning behavior, modulation, vertebrate
brain and spinal cord, retina, visual cortex architecture, hierarchy, development, and higher cortical centers.
Exploring the Brain: Introduction to Neuroscience: Read More [+]

PSYCH 98 Supervised Group Study 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Group study of selected topics. Enrollment restricted. See Introduction to Courses and Curriculum section of this catalog.

Supervised Group Study: Read More [+]

PSYCH 99 Supervised Independent Study and Research 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2013, Fall 2012, Spring 2012
Intended for freshmen and sophomores who wish to undertake a program of individual inquiry on a topic in psychology.

Supervised Independent Study and Research: Read More [+]

PSYCH 101 Research and Data Analysis in Psychology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Spring 2017
The course will concentrate on hypothesis formulation and testing, tests of significance, analysis of variance (one-way analysis), simple correlation, simple regression, and nonparametric statistics such as chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests. Majors intending to be in the honors program must complete 101 by the end of their junior year.

Research and Data Analysis in Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH 102 Methods for Research in Psychological Sciences 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Lecture and computer lab course on advanced data analysis techniques used by researchers in psychology. The course will cover programming techniques in R and data analysis methods that include modeling, multivariate statistics, and data reduction and visualization techniques. The following topics will be covered: generalized linear model (includes logistic regression), discriminant analysis (includes multivariate ANOVA), principal component analysis
, and factor analysis.
Methods for Research in Psychological Sciences: Read More [+]

PSYCH 106 Psychology of Dreams 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2009, Fall 2006, Fall 2002
Dreaming is a necessary, universal nightly activity of the human mind and brain. This class will cover some of the major psychological theories, interpretations, and uses that have been made of dreams. Students will be encouraged to keep dream diaries to provide an experiential component to the class and so that they may apply the class topics and do research using the material they generate themselves.

Psychology of Dreams: Read More [+]

PSYCH 107 Buddhist Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2013 10 Week Session, Summer 2013 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2012 First 6 Week Session
Based on tradition of direct observation of working of ordinary mind in everyday life situations. Provides contrasting perspective to present theories of cognition, perception, motivation, emotion, social interaction, and neurosis.

Buddhist Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH N107 Buddhist Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2014 10 Week Session, Summer 2014 Second 6 Week Session
Based on tradition of direct observation of working of ordinary mind in everyday life situations. Provides contrasting perspective to present theories of cognition, perception, motivation, emotion, social interaction, and neurosis.

Buddhist Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH N108 Clinical Applications of East Asian Meditation Practices 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2015 10 Week Session, Summer 2015 Second 6 Week Session
This course applies views and practices of Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian schools of meditation. The emphasis in the course will be on practical and clinical applications of meditation such as working with emotions and the quest for psychological well-being. The basic laboratory technique will be various types of meditation.

Clinical Applications of East Asian Meditation Practices: Read More [+]

PSYCH 109 History of Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2007
Development of scientific study of human and animal behavior. Consideration of history of particular subject areas--such as biological, comparative, developmental, personality, and social psychology--as well as general trends.

History of Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH 110 Introduction to Biological Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2015
Survey of relations between behavioral and biological processes. Topics include sensory and perceptual processes, neural maturation, natural bases of motivation, and learning.

Introduction to Biological Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH N110 Introduction to Biological Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 First 6 Week Session
Survey of relations between behavioral and biological processes. Topics include sensory and perceptual processes, neural maturation, natural bases of motivation, and learning.

Introduction to Biological Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH C113 Biological Clocks: Physiology and Behavior 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2012, Fall 2010
A consideration of the biological clocks that generate daily, lunar, seasonal and annual rhythms in various animals including people. Emphasis on neuroendocrine substrates, development and adaptive significance of estrous cycles, feeding rhythms, sleep-wakefulness cycles, reproductive and hibernation cycles, body weight and migratory cycles.

Biological Clocks: Physiology and Behavior: Read More [+]

PSYCH 114 Biology of Learning 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2014
A study of theoretical and experimental investigations of the biological substrates of learning, memory and forms of neural plasticity related to the growth and maturation of the nervous system.

Biology of Learning: Read More [+]

PSYCH C116 Hormones and Behavior 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course provides a comprehensive overview of behavorial endocrinology beginning with hormone production and actions on target issues and continuing with an exploration of a variety of behaviors and their hormonal regulation/consequences. The course uses a comparative approach to examine the reciprocal interactions between the neuroendocrine system and behavior, considering the effects of hormone on development and adult behavior in addition
to how behavior regulates endocrine physiology. While much of the course focuses on non-human vertebrate species, the relevance to humans is explored where appropriate. Topics include sexual differentiation and sex differences in behavior, reproductive, parental, and aggressive behaviors, and hormonal and behavioral homeostatic regulation.
Hormones and Behavior: Read More [+]

PSYCH 117 Human Neuropsychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Fall 2014
This course covers the neural substrates of human behavior including: neuroanatomy, major methods in human brain research (EEG, MEG, PET, MRI, fMRI, TMS, Optical Imaging), neurological disorders resulting in neurobehavioral disorders (i.e. stroke, brain tumor, epilepsy, dementia) and classic neuropsychological syndromes (i.e. amnesia, aphasia, agnosia, executive control, emotional control).

Human Neuropsychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH N117 Human Neuropsychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session
This course covers the neural substrates of human behavior including: neuroanatomy, major methods in human brain research (EEG, MEG, PET, MRI, fMRI, TMS, Optical Imaging), neurological disorders resulting in neurobehavioral disorders (i.e. stroke, brain tumor, epilepsy, dementia) and classic neuropsychological syndromes (i.e. amnesia, aphasia, agnosia, executive control, emotional control).

Human Neuropsychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH 118 Topical Seminar in Biological Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Fall 2003, Fall 2002
For a precise schedule of courses, check with the Student Services Office each semester.

Topical Seminar in Biological Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH C120 Basic Issues in Cognition 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Theoretical foundations and current controversies in cognitive science will be discussed. Basic issues in cognition--including perception, imagery, memory, categorization, thinking, judgment, and development--will be considered from the perspectives of philosophy, psychology, computer science, and physiology. Particular emphasis will be placed on the nature, implications, and limitations of the computational model of mind.

Basic Issues in Cognition: Read More [+]

PSYCH N120 Basic Issues in Cognition 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session
Theoretical foundations and current controversies in cognitive science will be discussed. Basic issues in cognition--including perception, imagery, memory, categorization, thinking, judgment, and development--will be considered from the perspectives of philosophy, psychology, computer science, and physiology. Particular emphasis will be placed on the nature, implications, and limitations of the computational model of mind.

Basic Issues in Cognition: Read More [+]

PSYCH 121 Animal Cognition 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Spring 2014
This course focuses on how animals process, organize, and retain information. Specific topics include learning and memory, sensory processes, navigation and migration, communication, and cross-species comparisons of behavior. Material will be drawn from the ethological, behavioral/experimental, and, to a lesser extent, the neurosciences literature.

Animal Cognition: Read More [+]

PSYCH 122 Introduction to Human Learning and Memory 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
Theoretical and experimental analysis of human learning and memory; short-term and long-term memory; coding and retrieval processes; transfer and interference; mechanisms of forgetting.

Introduction to Human Learning and Memory: Read More [+]

PSYCH N122 Introduction to Human Learning and Memory 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2015 10 Week Session, Summer 2015 Second 6 Week Session
Theoretical and experimental analysis of human learning and memory; short-term and long-term memory; coding and retrieval processes; transfer and interference; mechanisms of forgetting.

Introduction to Human Learning and Memory: Read More [+]

PSYCH 125 The Developing Brain 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2012
What are the changes in brain structure and function that underlie improvements in cognitive abilities over childhood and adolescence? Or, coming from a different perspective, what insights can we gain regarding the neural basis of cognition by examining how the brain develops? And how are such findings relevant for medicine, education, and the law? The cutting-edge new field of developmental cognitive neuroscience is beginning to address these
and other questions. This course will consititute an overview of current research and methods in this field, focusing on both typically and atypically developing children and adolescents.
The Developing Brain: Read More [+]

PSYCH C126 Perception 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
An introduction to principal theoretical constructs and experimental procedures in visual and auditory perception. Topics will include psychophysics; perception of color, space, shape, and motion; pattern recognition and perceptual attention.

Perception: Read More [+]

PSYCH C127 Cognitive Neuroscience 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
This course will examine research investigating the neurological basis of cognition. Material covered will include the study of brain-injured patients, neurophysiological research in animals, and the study of normal cognitive processes in humans with non-invasive behavioral and physiological techniques such as functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), electroencephalography (EEG), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Topics to be
covered include perception, attention, memory, language, motor control, executive control, and emotion.
Cognitive Neuroscience: Read More [+]

PSYCH 128 Topical Seminars in Cognitive Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2015
For a precise schedule of offerings check with the Student Services Office each semester.

Topical Seminars in Cognitive Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH C129 Scientific Approaches to Consciousness 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2011
This course will examine the nature of human consciousness from the interdisciplinary perspective of cognitive science. It will cover topics from the philosophy of mind, cognitive linguistics, neuroscience, psychology, and computational models.
Recommended Courses: Psych C120/CogSci C100 OR Psych/CogSci C127

Scientific Approaches to Consciousness: Read More [+]

PSYCH 130 Clinical Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Theoretical and empirical approaches to the explanation of psychological dysfunction. The relation between theories of psychopathology and theories of intervention. A critical evaluation of the effects of individual, family, and community approaches to therapeutic and preventive intervention. Thematic focus of the course may change from year to year. See department notices for details.

Clinical Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH N130 Clinical Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2016 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2014 10 Week Session, Summer 2014 First 6 Week Session
Theoretical and empirical approaches to the explanation of psychological dysfunction. The relation between theories of psychopathology and theories of intervention. A critical evaluation of the effects of individual, family, and community approaches to therapeutic and preventive intervention. Thematic focus of the course may change from year to year. See department notices for details.

Clinical Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH 131 Developmental Psychopathology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
This course will discuss linkages between developmental processes and child psychopathology. Included will be discussion of cognitive impairments in children, including learning disabilities and mental retardation; internalizing disorders, such as anxiety, withdrawal, and depression; externalizing disorders, such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder; and child abuse and neglect. Psychobiological, familial, legal, and
societal factors will be emphasized.
Developmental Psychopathology: Read More [+]

PSYCH 133 Psychology of Sleep 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2013
This course has two primary goals: (1) to provide a basic introduction to the study of sleep and an overview of sleep measurement, regulation, ontogeny, phylogeny, physiology, and psychology; and (2) to provide a basic introduction to sleep disorders including their classification, cause, and treatment.

Psychology of Sleep: Read More [+]

PSYCH N133 Psychology of Sleep 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2015 10 Week Session, Summer 2015 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2014 Second 6 Week Session
This course has two primary goals: (1) to provide a basic introduction to the study of sleep and an overview of sleep measurement, regulation, ontogeny, phylogeny, physiology, and psychology; and (2) to provide a basic introduction to sleep disorders including their classification, cause, and treatment.

Psychology of Sleep: Read More [+]

PSYCH 134 Health Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course will provide students with an introduction to Health Psychology. Students will learn about measurement of psychological, behavioral, and biological constructs; incidence and prevalence of psychological and medical disorders; introductions to endocrinology, immunology, and psychophysiology and how these systems are thought to relate psychology to health; as well as introductions to how science is working to understand psychology and
health in the laboratory and across the population.
Health Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH N134 Health Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
This course will provide students with an introduction to Health Psychology. Students will learn about measurement of psychological, behavioral, and biological constructs; incidence and prevalence of psychological and medical disorders; introductions to endocrinology, immunology, and psychophysiology and how these systems are thought to relate psychology to health; as well as introductions
to how science is working to understand psychology and health in the laboratory and across the population.
Health Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH 135 Treating Mental Illness: Development, Evaluation, and Dissemination 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Although progress has been made in developing and disseminating evidence-based treatments for most forms of mental illness, there are still huge gaps in our knowledge base. Coverage of serious mental illness with adequate and disseminable intervention strategies is all too limited. Hence, there is a great need for the next generation of clinical scientists to contribute to the mission of treatment development for mental illness. In this course we will learn
about, and critique, treatment development models. We will review the steps in treatment development spanning from the study of mechanisms on to proof of concept and to establishing the feasibility of novel treatment ideas.
Treating Mental Illness: Development, Evaluation, and Dissemination: Read More [+]

PSYCH N135 Treating Mental Illness: Development, Evaluation, and Dissemination 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
Although progress has been made in developing and disseminating evidence-based treatments for most forms of mental illness, there are still huge gaps in our knowledge base. Coverage of serious mental illness with adequate and disseminable intervention strategies is all too limited. Hence, there is a great need for the next generation of clinical scientists to contribute to the mission of treatment development for
mental illness. In this course we will learn about, and critique, models of psychotherapy. We will review the steps in treatment development spanning from the study of mechanisms on to proof of concept and to establishing the feasibility of novel treatment ideas.
Treating Mental Illness: Development, Evaluation, and Dissemination: Read More [+]

PSYCH 136 Human Sexuality 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2015 First 6 Week Session
Biological, social, and clinical issues in sexuality. Topics include psychology and physiology of sexual response, new developments in contraception, homosexuality and lesbianism, variations in sexual behavior, gender identity and role, definition and treatment of sexual dysfunction. Approved for state psychology licensing requirement.

Human Sexuality: Read More [+]

PSYCH 139 Case Studies in Clinical Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
This course is for students who are curious about clinical psychology and who seek to explore real world cases and examples of mental health diagnoses. Through the use of clinical cases and first-person accounts, this course will give an overview of the diagnostic criteria mental health providers use to make diagnoses, and analyze environmental and other causal factors, with a view
to possible treatment options for various mental disorders.
Case Studies in Clinical Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH 140 Developmental Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
This course explores the development of children from birth to adolescence, in a wide range of areas including biological, cognitive, linguistic, social, and personality development. It also covers the effects of genes, experience, and social context on children's development.

Developmental Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH N140 Developmental Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
This course explores the development of children from birth to adolescence, in a wide range of areas including biological, cognitive, linguistic, social, and personality development. It also covers the effects of genes, experience, and social context on children's development.

Developmental Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH 141 Development During Infancy 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
Cognitive, perceptual, and social development during the first two years of life with emphasis upon methods of observation and experimentation.

Development During Infancy: Read More [+]

PSYCH C143 Language Acquisition 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
An overview of topics and theories in language acquisition: early development of speech perception and production, word learning, generalizing linguistic structure, and differences between first language acquisition, second language acquisition, and bilingualism. We will also compare different theoretical approaches, and address the classic "nature vs. nurture" question by examining both traditional generativist approaches and more
recent usage based models.
Language Acquisition: Read More [+]

PSYCH 144 Emerging Adulthood 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016
This course will explore the unique biological, cognitive, social, personality and identity development of individuals aged 18 to 29. As this is an experiential course, students are expected to apply their learning through active engagement in the course material.

Emerging Adulthood: Read More [+]

PSYCH 145 Relationships: Development and Clinical Implications of Intimate Ties 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2002 10 Week Session, Summer 2001 10 Week Session, Summer 2000 10 Week Session
This lecture course focuses on the close relationships that most individuals – usually, beginning in infancy -- will have formed during their lifetime, as well as the way such relationships can favorably or unfavorably influence an individual’s emotions and affect those of others. From infancy through young adulthood and old age, secure vs. insecure (e.g., ambivalent, avoidant, or unpredictable/frightening)
relationships affect not only an individual’s happiness and general well-being, but also the eventual presence or absence of clinical symptomatology. Favorable vs. unfavorable relationships with parents, peers, close friends and romantic partners will be discussed, together with their consequences for psychological health and overall
Relationships: Development and Clinical Implications of Intimate Ties: Read More [+]

PSYCH 146 Developmental and Biological Processes in Attachment 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2014
This course on attachment theory provides an integrative (evolutionary/genetic/experiential) approach to studying secure vs. insecure parent-child relationships; their precursors in parental rearing patterns; and favorable vs. unfavorable sequelae. Adult life-history narratives indicative of secure vs. insecure adult attachment have been found associated with care-giving of offspring.

Developmental and Biological Processes in Attachment: Read More [+]

PSYCH 148 Topical Seminars in Developmental Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
For a precise schedule of offerings, check with the Student Services Office each semester.

Topical Seminars in Developmental Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH 149A Early Learning: Engaging Interactions and Environments 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
A new lecture and practice course designed to increase participants’ knowledge and skills in providing preschool children with high quality early learning experiences. Using the research-based CLASS© tool as a framework, students learn how to engage in more effective teacher-child interactions and create environments that promote young children’s social-emotional and cognitive development. Observation and analysis of classroom practices, through video recording
, enable each student to receive individualized feedback from the instructor, as well as from peers. The focus is on professional growth, including developing abilities to support children’s cultural and linguistic diversity.
Early Learning: Engaging Interactions and Environments: Read More [+]

PSYCH 150 Psychology of Personality 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
A consideration of general and systematic issues in the study of personality and an evaluation of major theories and points of view.

Psychology of Personality: Read More [+]

PSYCH N150 Psychology of Personality 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 First 6 Week Session
A consideration of general and systematic issues in the study of personality and an evaluation of major theories and points of view.

Psychology of Personality: Read More [+]

PSYCH 156 Human Emotion 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2013, Summer 2013 First 6 Week Session
This course will examine two different theoretical perspectives on emotion: (1) the differential emotions approach with its strong evolutionary grounding, and (2) the social constructionist approach. Next, the course will investigate empirical research on many facets of emotion including facial expression, physiology, appraisal, and the lexicon of emotion. Finally, we will consider more specific topics including social
interaction, culture, gender, personality, and psychopathology.
Human Emotion: Read More [+]

PSYCH 160 Social Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Survey of social psychology including interaction processes, small groups, attitudes and attitude change, and social problems.

Social Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH N160 Social Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
Survey of social psychology including interaction processes, small groups, attitudes and attitude change, and social problems.

Social Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH 162 Human Happiness 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2011 10 Week Session, Summer 2011 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2009 Second 6 Week Session
This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to an understanding of happiness. The first part of the course will be devoted to the different treatments of happiness in the world's philosophical traditions, focusing up close on conceptions or the good life in classical Greek and Judeo-Christian thought, the great traditions in East Asian thought (Taoism, Buddhism, Confucianism)
, and ideas about happiness that emerged more recently in the age of Enlightenment. With these different perspectives as a framework, the course will then turn to treatments of happiness in the behavioral sciences, evolutionary scholarship, and neuroscience. Special emphasis will be given to understanding how happiness arises in experiences of the moral emotions, including gratitude, compassion, reverence and awe, as well as aesthetic emotions like humor and beauty.
Human Happiness: Read More [+]

PSYCH C162 Human Happiness 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to an understanding of happiness. The first part of the course will be devoted to the different treatments of happiness in the world's philosophical traditions, focusing up close on conceptions or the good life in classical Greek and Judeo-Christian thought, the great traditions in East Asian thought (Taoism, Buddhism, Confucianism), and ideas about happiness that emerged more recently in
the age of Enlightenment. With these different perspectives as a framework, the course will then turn to treatments of happiness in the behavioral sciences, evolutionary scholarship, and neuroscience. Special emphasis will be given to understanding how happiness arises in experiences of the moral emotions, including gratitude, compassion, reverence and awe, as well as aesthetic emotions like humor and beauty.
Human Happiness: Read More [+]

PSYCH N162 Human Happiness 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2014 10 Week Session, Summer 2014 First 6 Week Session
This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to an understanding of happiness. We will first review the different treatments of happiness in the world’s philosophical traditions: conceptions of the good life in classical Greek and Judeo-Christian thought, the great East Asian philosophies, and ideas about happiness that emerged in the age of Enlightenment. With these different perspectives as a framework, the
course will turn to treatments of happiness in the behavioral sciences, evolutionary scholarship, and neuroscience. Special Emphasis will be given to understanding how happiness arises in experiences of the moral emotions, including gratitude, compassion, reverence and awe, and aesthetic emotions like humor and beauty.
Human Happiness: Read More [+]

PSYCH 164 Social Cognition 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2010
Surveys empirical and theoretical approaches to our understanding of perception, memory, thought, and language concerning ourselves, other people, interpersonal behavior, and the situations in which social interaction takes place. Emphasis is placed on the integration of problems in social, personality, and clinical psychology with the concepts and principles employed in the study of nonsocial cognition.

Social Cognition: Read More [+]

PSYCH 165 Psychology of Creativity 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012, Fall 2010
This is a course on creativity, both at the individual and the group level. We will consider traits of highly creative individuals (vs. less creative individuals) and the ways in which they think. We will also investigate the ways in which influence processes affect individual creativity and will then focus on group creativity, including techniques by which creativity is hindered or stimulated. Finally, we will consider applications from organizations as
we consider cultures in which creativity thrives. Throughout the course, discussion will be encouraged and we will also do some experiential exercises. The course will be a combination of lecture, discussion, and experiential learning.
Psychology of Creativity: Read More [+]

PSYCH 166AC Cultural Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2017, Spring 2015
The course will review research on culture, race, and ethnicity and will consider the implications of these findings for our understanding of race, culture, and ethnicity in American society. Mounting evidence suggests that psychological processes are culture-specific, theory-driven, and context-dependent. This course will focus on the effects that theories of mind, person, self, and social institutions have on human
cognition, motivation, emotion, and social interactions in American society. Students will gain a better appreciation of the ways that cultural traditions and social practices regulate and transform psychological functioning. Simply, the course is about how culture affects psyche and how psyche affects culture.
Cultural Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH 167AC Stigma and Prejudice 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Traditionally, research on prejudice and stereotyping has focused on the psychological mechanisms that lead people to be biased against others. Recent research has begun to shed light on the psychological legacy of prejudice and stereotyping for their targets. This course will review the major contributions of each of these literatures, providing students with a broad understanding of both classic and current issues in the field. The course will
be divided into three sections: bias (i.e., the perpetrator's perspective), stigma (i.e., the target's perspective), and intergroup relations.
Stigma and Prejudice: Read More [+]

PSYCH 168 Topical Seminars in Social Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
For a precise schedule of offerings check with Student Services Office each semester.

Topical Seminars in Social Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH 169 Love & Close Relationships 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017
This course will explore the social, biological and neurological attributes of love and close relationships. As this is an experiential course, students are expected to apply their learning through active engagement in the course material.

Love & Close Relationships: Read More [+]

PSYCH 180 Industrial-Organizational Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2013 10 Week Session, Summer 2013 First 6 Week Session, Fall 2005
Primarily for majors. Introduction to the field of industrial psychology, covering fundamental theory and concepts in personnel and social aspects in the field. Concerned with the processes involved in developing and maintaining organizations.

Industrial-Organizational Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH N180 Industrial-Organizational Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
Primarily for majors. Introduction to the field of industrial psychology, covering fundamental theory and concepts in personnel and social aspects in the field. Concerned with the processes involved in developing and maintaining organizations.

Industrial-Organizational Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH 190A Early Learning: Engaging Interactions and Environments 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015
A new lecture and practice course designed to increase participants’ knowledge and skills in providing preschool children with high quality early learning experiences. Using the research-based CLASS© tool as a framework, students learn how to engage in more effective teacher-child interactions and create environments that promote young children’s social-emotional and cognitive development. Observation and analysis of classroom practices, through video recording, enable
each student to receive individualized feedback from the instructor, as well as from peers. The focus is on professional growth, including developing abilities to support children’s cultural and linguistic diversity.
Early Learning: Engaging Interactions and Environments: Read More [+]

PSYCH 192 Special Topics in Psychology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Course examines current problems and issues in psychology.

Special Topics in Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH 192AC Child Development in Different Cultures 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2012 10 Week Session, Summer 2012 Second 6 Week Session
This course explores "culture" as a context for development from both global and American sub-group perspectives, through developmental stages from early childhood to adolescence, across physical, social and cognitive domains. It will examine traditional theories and modern systems theories with respect to individual and social contexts, discuss the experience of sub-groups of American children and conclude
with a comprehensive analysis of the development of an individual.
Child Development in Different Cultures: Read More [+]

PSYCH 192P Psychology Post Baccalaureate Capstone 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
The Psychology Post Baccalaureate Program at UC Berkeley is intended to serve as a training program for students who have interest in pursuing graduate degrees in Psychology but who are lacking necessary academic training and research experience. In addition to the required course and lab work, Post Baccalaureate students are required to complete a two-part research learning project, called The Capstone Experience. The Capstone Experience consists
of two components: an applied written submission and a formal research presentation.
Psychology Post Baccalaureate Capstone: Read More [+]

PSYCH H194A Honors Seminar 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
In the fall semester the seminar will concentrate on issues of research design, ethics, and data analysis using statistical packages. The spring semester will focus on oral and written presentations of the thesis projects and feedback on thesis drafts.

Honors Seminar: Read More [+]

PSYCH H194B Honors Seminar 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
In the fall semester the seminar will concentrate on issues of research design, ethics, and data analysis using statistical packages. The spring semester will focus on oral and written presentations of the thesis projects and feedback on thesis drafts.

Honors Seminar: Read More [+]

PSYCH H195A Special Study for Honors Candidates 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2013
Independent study and preparation of an honors thesis under the supervision of a faculty member.

Special Study for Honors Candidates: Read More [+]

PSYCH H195B Special Study for Honors Candidates 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2015
Independent study and preparation of an honors thesis under the supervision of a faculty member.

Special Study for Honors Candidates: Read More [+]

PSYCH 197 Field Study in Psychology 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Supervised experience relevant to specific aspects of psychology in off-campus settings. Individual and/or group meetings with faculty. Enrollment is restricted by regulations of the Berkeley Division listed elsewhere in this catalog.

Field Study in Psychology: Read More [+]

PSYCH 198 Directed Group Study 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Group study of a selected topic or topics in psychology. Enrollment is restricted by regulations of the Berkeley Division listed elsewhere in this catalog.

Directed Group Study: Read More [+]

PSYCH 199 Supervised Independent Study and Research 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Summer 2016 10 Week Session
Enrollment is restricted by regulations of the Berkeley Division listed elsewhere in this catalog.

Supervised Independent Study and Research: Read More [+]

Faculty and Instructors

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

Ozlem Ayduk, Professor. Violence, developmental psychology, psychology, depression, self-control, emotion regulation, social-cognition in interpersonal relationships.
Research Profile

Sonia Bishop, Assistant Professor.

Silvia Bunge, Professor. Cognition, human brain function, development.
Research Profile

Joseph J. Campos, Professor. Social-emotional development in infancy, emotional communication, perception of emotion, relation of motor development to cognitive and social and emotional development.
Research Profile

Serena Chen, Professor. Close relationships, social cognition, social psychology, Self and identity, relational self, collective self, social power.
Research Profile

Michael Cole, Associate Adjunct Professor.

Anne Collins, Assistant Professor. Human learning, decision-making and executive functions; Computational modeling at multiple levels (cognitive and neuroscience); Behavioral, EEG, drug and genes studies in healthy or patient populations.Human learning, decision-making and executive functions; Computational modeling at multiple levels (cognitive and neuroscience); Behavioral, EEG, drug and genes studies in healthy or patient populations.
Research Profile

Mark T. D'Esposito, Professor. Cognitive neuroscience, psychology, working memory, frontal lobe function, functional MRI, neurology, brain imaging, dopamine.
Research Profile

Aaron Fisher, Assistant Professor. Anxiety, depression, personalized medicine, psychotherapy, psychophysiology.
Research Profile

Jack L. Gallant, Professor. Vision science, form vision, attention, fMRI, computational neuroscience, natural scene perception, brain encoding, brain decoding.
Research Profile

Alison Gopnik, Professor. Learning, philosophy, psychology, cognitive development, theory of mind, young children, children's causal knowledge, Bayes Net formalism.
Research Profile

Tom Griffiths, Professor. Machine learning, computational models of human cognition, Bayesian statistics, cultural evolution.
Research Profile

Allison Harvey, Professor. Sleep, insomnia, comorbidity, bipolar disorder, cognition and emotion.
Research Profile

Erik David Hesse, Associate Adjunct Professor.

Stephen Hinshaw, Professor. Psychology, child clinical, developmental psychopathology, risk factors for attentional, conduct disorders, child psychopharmacology, multimodality interventions, diagnostic validity of disorders, peer relationships, stigma of mental illness.
Research Profile

Rich Ivry, Professor. Cognitive neuroscience, behavior, cognition, brain, attention, coordination, psychology, motor and perceptual processes in normal and neurologically impaired populations, temporal processing, executive control.
Research Profile

Lucia F. Jacobs, Professor. Cognitive and brain evolution, adaptive patterns in spatial memory, spatial navigation, cognitive sex differences and decision making.
Research Profile

Oliver P. John, Professor. Research methods, personality, measurement, emotion regulation, personality structure, personality development, traits, Big Five model, individual differences, emotion expression, self-concept, accuracy, bias, self-knowledge, personality assessment.
Research Profile

Sheri Johnson, Professor. Bipolar disorder, social dominance.
Research Profile

Dacher Keltner, Professor. Culture, conflict, behavior, love, psychology, emotion, social interaction, individual differences in emotion, negotiation, embarrassment, desire, juvenile delinquency, laughter, anger, social perception, negotiating morality.
Research Profile

John F. Kihlstrom, Professor. Personality, behavior, memory, psychology, cognition in personal, social contexts, unconscious mental processes, hypnosis, social cognition, experimental psychopathology, health cognition, unconscious mental life.
Research Profile

Robert Thomas Knight, Professor. Cognitive neuroscience, language, physiology, memory, attention, psychology, working memory, neuropsychology, human prefrontal cortex, neural mechanisms of cognitive processing, sensory gating, sustained attention, ad novelty detection.
Research Profile

Lance Kriegsfeld, Associate Professor. NeuroendocrinologyCircadian Biology, Neuroimmunology, cancer biology, animal behavior.
Research Profile

Ann M. Kring, Professor. Schizophrenia, emotion, gender, mental illness, psychology, psychopathology, emotion in social interaction, emotion and cognition, facial expression.
Research Profile

Robert W. Levenson, Professor. Aging, gender, culture, brain, psychology, emotion, psychophysiology, marriage, clinical science, interpersonal interactions, dementia, relationships, neurodegenerative disease.
Research Profile

Tania Lombrozo, Associate Professor.

Mary Main, Professor.

Iris Mauss, Associate Professor. Social psychology, personality psychology, affective science, psychophysiology, individual differences, emotion, emotion regulation, health psychology, happiness, well-being, psychological health.
Research Profile

Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton, Professor. Diversity, intergroup relations, education, prejudice, stigma.
Research Profile

Jason Okonofua, Assistant Professor. Applied social psychology, mindsets, relationships, stereotypes, stigma, implicit bias, empathy, recursive cycles, scalable intervention, interpersonal justice, organizational justice, education, juvenile justice, school-to-prison pipeline, respect, school suspensions, hierarchal relationships, intergroup relations, health.

William Prinzmetal, Adjunct Professor. Behavior, cognition, brain, attention, psychology, visual perception.
Research Profile

Mahesh Srinivasan, Assistant Professor.

Claude Steele, Professor.

Frank J. Sulloway, Adjunct Professor.

Frederic Theunissen, Professor. Behavior, cognition, brain, psychology, birdsong, vocal learning, audition, neurophysiology, speech perception, computational neuroscience, theoretical neuroscience.
Research Profile

Matthew P. Walker, Professor. Plasticity, learning, memory, fMRI, emotion, sleep, EEG.
Research Profile

Jonathan David Wallis, Professor. Prefrontal cortex, neurophysiology, executive control, decision making.
Research Profile

David Whitney, Professor. Cognitive neuroscience, cognition, attention, visual perception, vision, visually guided action.
Research Profile

Linda Wilbrecht, Associate Professor. Neuroscience, addiction, early life adversity, adolescence.
Research Profile

Fei Xu, Professor. Conceptual development, developmental psychology, cognitive development, language development, social cognition in infants and children, learning in infants and young children, statistical learning and statistical inference, psychology and philosophy, computational models of cognitive development.
Research Profile

Qing Zhou, Associate Professor. Culture, family, child development, developmental psychopathology, immigrants.
Research Profile

Emeritus Faculty

+ Martin V. Covington, Professor Emeritus.

Carolyn Pape Cowan, Professor Emeritus. Child development, psychology, couple relationships, parenting styles, family transitions, preventive intervention.
Research Profile

+ Philip Cowan, Professor Emeritus. Couple relationships, family factors in children's development, parenting, fatherhood, preventive intervention with families.
Research Profile

Karen K. De Valois, Professor Emeritus. Psychophysics and electrophysiology of color vision, spatial vision and visual motion.
Research Profile

Susan M. Ervin-Tripp, Professor Emeritus. Sociolinguistics, psychologist, pragmatics, child language, bilingualism.
Research Profile

+ Stephen E. Glickman, Professor Emeritus. Animal behavior, physiological substrates of behavior, hormonal substrates, spotted hyenas, sexual differentiation, vertebrate behavior.
Research Profile

Ervin R. Hafter, Professor Emeritus.

Ravenna M. Helson, Professor Emeritus. Personality, psychology, adult development, psychology of women, creativity, enduring affective-cognitive styles, life choices, roles, retirement, changes in the self, the development of wisdom, gender issues.
Research Profile

Daniel Kahneman, Professor Emeritus.

Jonas Langer, Professor Emeritus.

+ Christina Maslach, Professor Emeritus. Health psychology, individuation, burnout and job stress.
Research Profile

+ Gerald A. Mendelsohn, Professor Emeritus.

Charlan Jeanne Nemeth, Professor Emeritus. Decision making, jury decision making, influence and persuasion, creativity in small groups, managing innovation in organizations, psychology of creative scientists and entrepreneurs, corporate cultures, diversity of team members, brainstorming, psychology and law.
Research Profile

Stephen E. Palmer, Professor Emeritus. Psychology, visual perception, visual processing.
Research Profile

Kaiping Peng, Professor Emeritus. Psychology, East Asian studies, social cultural sychology, reasoning and judgment across cultures and domains, inter-ethnic, racial relations, cross-cultural communication and understanding.
Research Profile

Donald A. Riley, Professor Emeritus. Behavior, learning, memory, cognition, brain, psychology.
Research Profile

Lynn C. Robertson, Professor Emeritus. Cognitive neuroscience, attention, psychology, representations of objects and space, visual search, binding mechanisms, perceptual organization in normal and neurological populations, functional hemisphere asymmetries, spatial deficits.
Research Profile

Eleanor Rosch, Professor Emeritus. Cognition, psychology, concepts, Eastern psychologies, psychologies of religion, cross cultural, causality.
Research Profile

Arthur P. Shimamura, Professor Emeritus. Cognitive neuroscience, behavior, cognition, brain, psychology, frontal lobe function, basic memory research.
Research Profile

Dan I. Slobin, Professor Emeritus. Sociolinguistics, behavior, cognition, brain, psycholinguistics, psychology, language and cognitive development, sign language, cross-cultural.
Research Profile

Anne Treisman, Professor Emeritus.

John S. Watson, Professor Emeritus. Psychology, development in infancy, evolution of psychological processes in artificial life.
Research Profile

+ Rhona Weinstein, Professor Emeritus. Community psychology, educational inequality and the achievement gap, teacher expectations and self-fulfilling prophecies, classroom and school reform.
Research Profile

Sheldon Zedeck, Professor Emeritus. Statistics, organization, psychology, research methodology, industrial, social psychology, personnel, cross-cultural work values, decision-making research, work and family issues, the work values of Chinese employees.
Research Profile

Irving Zucker, Professor Emeritus. Biological rhythms, seasonality, behavioral endocrinology, melatonin, suprachiasmatic nucleus, reproductive physiology, behavior, ultradian rhythms, sex differences.
Research Profile

Contact Information

Department of Psychology

3210 Tolman Hall

Phone: 510-642-5292

Fax: 510-642-5293

Visit Department Website

Department Chair

Ann Kring, PhD

3210 Tolman Hall

kring@berkeley.edu

Department Vice Chair

Serena Chen, PhD

3419 Tolman Hall

serchen@berkeley.edu

Department Vice Chair

Lance Kriegsfeld, PhD

3139 Tolman Hall

kriegsfeld@berkeley.edu

Student Services Director

Harumi Quinones

3313 Tolman Hall

Phone: 510-642-7097

harumi@berkeley.edu

Undergraduate Student Services Adviser

Emilie Dandan

3305 Tolman Hall

Phone: 510-643-8114

ebdandan@berkeley.edu

Undergraduate Student Services Adviser

Erin Ptaschinski

3305 Tolman Hall

Phone: 510-643-8114

erinp@berkeley.edu

Back to Top