Art Practice

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

Bachelor of Arts

The UC Berkeley Department of Art Practice offers an undergraduate major program in studio art which provides a firm grounding in basic techniques and principles while encouraging guided experimentation. Our curriculum is designed to teach students to think visually and to help students develop a creative intelligence through the disciplined practice of a visual art. We provide technical and conceptual training in most traditional and new media: painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture (wood, metal, ceramic, and mixed media), photography, installation, performance art, video, animation, sound, and in the emerging fields of programming, interactivity, and game design. Art majors are expected to round out the required studio courses with art history and theory classes.

Art Practice seeks to graduate students who demonstrate an original vision in their approach to practice, form, and content and who have the potential for significant artistic and cultural impact. Successful Art Practice graduates understand the professional art world and are articulate about their work. They are deeply engaged with their art forms, rigorously committed to their crafts, and capable of transcending boundaries of mind, media or method through creative research. Students graduating with a major in art pursue careers as professional artists and teachers or in arts-related activities with museums, galleries, arts management, publishing, and artists’ organizations.

Course of Study Overview

While the undergraduate major is made up largely of studio courses, it also requires at least three courses in art history. Our students are required to be broadly familiar with the aesthetic strategies that artists have devised to understand and invent their worlds, not just in the 20th and 21st centuries, but throughout the millennia of human culture. Field trips to area museums, galleries, and artists’ studios provide an important onsite learning tool, one which emphasizes the pedagogical primacy of direct contact with works of art.

Small studio classes with frequent critiques are designed to foster a supportive community, productive debate, and collaborative thinking. Students are encouraged to be both open-minded and tough-minded, to look closely, think critically, and challenge assumptions. Most upper division studio courses involve an exhibition requirement when students are asked to consider questions of audience, context, site, and timing. Several gallery spaces, among them the Worth Ryder Art Gallery, offer exhibition venues. The department also maintains web space for online exhibitions and video streaming.

Declaring the Major

In order to declare the major, you must:

  1. Have an overall GPA of 3.3.
  2. Complete the R&C requirements.
  3. Complete two required studio classes: ART 8 and ART 12 and 1 lower division History of Art course (any).
  4. Submit a portfolio of 12 images (include work from all UC Berkeley studio classes).
  5. Submit one letter of recommendation from an art faculty, art lecturer, or art GSI.

Honors Program

Students with an overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.3 or higher who are in their senior year may, with the permission of a regular faculty member, enroll in the honors program. This is an independent study course, taken for a minimum of one semester and a maximum of two semesters and comprising a minimum of 4 units and a maximum of 8 units. A final grade is given at the completion of the program. Honors courses count toward the art major as they are taken for a letter grade.

Minor Program

For information regarding declaring the minor, please contact the department.

Visit Department Website

Major Requirements

In addition to the University, campus, and college requirements, listed on the College Requirements tab, students must fulfill the below requirements specific to their major program.

General Guidelines

  1. All courses taken to fulfill the major requirements below must be taken for a letter grade. An exception is made for courses that are offered on a Pass/No Pass basis only. Other exceptions to this requirement are noted as applicable.
  2. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student's major and minor programs, with the exception of minors offered outside of the College of Letters & Science.
  3. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.3 must be maintained in both upper and lower division courses used to fulfill the major requirements.

For information regarding residence requirements and unit requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.

Lower Division Prerequisites

The following two studio courses and one history of art class must be completed before declaring the Art Practice major:

ART 8Introduction to Visual Thinking4
ART 12The Language of Drawing4
Select one lower division history of art class

Lower Division Courses

Select two studio courses from the following:
Language of Painting
The Language of Sculpture
Introduction to Printmaking
Digital Photography: The Image and the Hive Mind
Foundations of American Cyber-Culture
Moving Image Media Production

Upper Division Courses

The following two courses are required for the upper division group
ART 119Global Perspectives in Contemporary Art4
( an art history course for majors)
ART 185Senior Projects/Professional Practices4
(a studio class)
Select five studio courses from the following: 120
Approaches to Painting
Research, Methods and Materials of Drawing
Contemporary Perspectives of Figure Drawing
Approaches to Printmaking: Intaglio
Approaches to Printmaking: Lithography
The Language of Printmaking-Screenprinting
Advanced Projects in Printmaking
Approaches to Sculpture: Concept and Construction
Approaches to Sculpture: Ceramics
Approaches to Sculpture: Meaning in Material
Approaches to Sculpture: Installations
Temporal Structures: Video and Performance Art
New Genres
Special Topics in Visual Studies
Social Practice: Critical Site and Context
Art and Meditation
Art, Medicine, and Disabilities
Digital Video: The Architecture of Time
Sound Art: Sound, Image, Projection, Process
Advanced Digital Video
Game Design Methods
Advanced Digital Photography
Junior Seminar: Meaning and Making
Senior Projects/Professional Practices
Bridging the Arts Seminar
Select one history of art class which focuses on 20th century topics
Theories and Methods of Art History
Art in the Early 20th Century
Art in the Later 20th Century
1

Two studio classes from the following list may be substituted: FILM 180, FILM C181, FILM 185 , THEATER 173A/THEATER 173B, THEATER 174A/THEATER 174B, THEATER 175A/THEATER 175B, NWMEDIA 190, VIS STD 180A, VIS STD 180B, VIS STD 181, VIS STD C185AVIS STD 185X, VIS STD 187A.

Minor Requirements

Students who have a strong interest in an area of study outside their major often decide to complete a minor program. These programs have set requirements and are noted officially on the transcript in the memoranda section, but are not noted on diplomas.

General Guidelines

  1. All courses taken to fulfill the minor requirements below must be taken for graded credit.
  2. A minimum of three of the upper division courses taken to fulfill the minor requirements must be completed at UC Berkeley.
  3. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 is required for courses used to fulfill the minor requirements.
  4. Courses used to fulfill the minor requirements may be applied toward the Seven-Course Breadth requirement, for Letters & Science students.
  5. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student's major and minor programs.
  6. All minor requirements must be completed prior to the last day of finals during the semester in which you plan to graduate. If you cannot finish all courses required for the minor by that time, please see a College of Letters & Science adviser.
  7. All minor requirements must be completed within the unit ceiling. (For further information regarding the unit ceiling, please see the College Requirements tab.)

Minor Requirements

Lower Division
ART 8Introduction to Visual Thinking 14
ART 12The Language of Drawing4
Select two studio courses from the following:8
Language of Painting
The Language of Sculpture
Introduction to Printmaking
Digital Photography: The Image and the Hive Mind
Foundations of American Cyber-Culture
Data Arts
Moving Image Media Production
Upper Division
Select four studio courses, from advanced-level, upper division art studio courses 2
ART 102Approaches to Painting4
ART 117Research, Methods and Materials of Drawing4
ART 118Contemporary Perspectives of Figure Drawing4
ART 120Approaches to Printmaking: Intaglio4
ART 123The Language of Printmaking-Screenprinting4
ART 130Approaches to Sculpture: Concept and Construction4
ART 133Approaches to Sculpture: Meaning in Material4
ART 138Approaches to Sculpture: Installations4
ART 141Temporal Structures: Video and Performance Art4
ART 142New Genres4
ART 160Special Topics in Visual Studies4
ART 163Social Practice: Critical Site and Context4
ART 164Art and Meditation4
ART 165Art, Medicine, and Disabilities4
ART 171Digital Video: The Architecture of Time4
ART 172CGI Animation Studies4
ART 173Sound Art: Sound, Image, Projection, Process4
ART 174Advanced Digital Video4
ART 178Game Design Methods4
ART 180Advanced Digital Photography4
Select one Art History course from the following: 1
Theories and Methods of Art History
HISTART 180B
Course Not Available
Nineteenth-Century Europe: The Invention of Avant-Gardes
American Art (1800-Present)
Art in the Early 20th Century
HISTART 186B
Course Not Available
Art in the Later 20th Century
Special Topics in Fields of Art History: 19th-20th Century
1

Must be taken at UC Berkeley

2

Two studio classes from the following list may be substituted: FILM 180, FILM C181, FILM 185, , THEATER 173A/THEATER 173B, THEATER 174A/THEATER 174B, THEATER 175A/THEATER 175B, NWMEDIA 190, VIS STD 180A, VIS STD 180B, VIS STD 181, VIS STD 185X, VIS STD C185A, VIS STD 187A.

College Requirements

Undergraduate students in the College of Letters & Science must fulfill the following requirements in addition to those required by their major program.

For detailed lists of courses that fulfill college requirements, please review the College of Letters & Sciences page in this Guide.

Entry Level Writing

All students who will enter the University of California as freshmen must demonstrate their command of the English language by fulfilling the Entry Level Writing requirement. Fulfillment of this requirement is also a prerequisite to enrollment in all reading and composition courses at UC Berkeley. 

American History and American Institutions

The American History and Institutions requirements are based on the principle that a US resident graduated from an American university should have an understanding of the history and governmental institutions of the United States.

American Cultures

American Cultures is the one requirement that all undergraduate students at Cal need to take and pass in order to graduate. The requirement offers an exciting intellectual environment centered on the study of race, ethnicity and culture of the United States. AC courses offer students opportunities to be part of research-led, highly accomplished teaching environments, grappling with the complexity of American Culture.

Quantitative Reasoning

The Quantitative Reasoning requirement is designed to ensure that students graduate with basic understanding and competency in math, statistics, or computer science. The requirement may be satisfied by exam or by taking an approved course.

Foreign Language

The Foreign Language requirement may be satisfied by demonstrating proficiency in reading comprehension, writing, and conversation in a foreign language equivalent to the second semester college level, either by passing an exam or by completing approved course work.

Reading and Composition

In order to provide a solid foundation in reading, writing and critical thinking the College requires two semesters of lower division work in composition in sequence. Students must complete a first-level reading and composition course by the end of their second semester and a second-level course by the end of their fourth semester.

Breadth Requirements

The undergraduate breadth requirements provide Berkeley students with a rich and varied educational experience outside of their major program. As the foundation of a liberal arts education, breadth courses give students a view into the intellectual life of the University while introducing them to a multitude of perspectives and approaches to research and scholarship. Engaging students in new disciplines and with peers from other majors, the breadth experience strengthens interdisciplinary connections and context that prepares Berkeley graduates to understand and solve the complex issues of their day.

Unit Requirements

  • 120 total units, including at least 60 L&S units

  • Of the 120 units, 36 must be upper division units

  • Of the 36 upper division units, 6 must be taken in courses offered outside your major department

Residence Requirements

For units to be considered in "residence," you must be registered in courses on the Berkeley campus as a student in the College of Letters & Science. Most students automatically fulfill the residence requirement by attending classes here for four years. In general, there is no need to be concerned about this requirement, unless you go abroad for a semester or year or want to take courses at another institution or through UC Extension during your senior year. In these cases, you should make an appointment to meet an adviser to determine how you can meet the Senior Residence Requirement.

Note: Courses taken through UC Extension do not count toward residence.

Senior Residence Requirement

After you become a senior (with 90 semester units earned toward your BA degree), you must complete at least 24 of the remaining 30 units in residence in at least two semesters. To count as residence, a semester must consist of at least 6 passed units. Intercampus Visitor, EAP, and UC Berkeley-Washington Program (UCDC) units are excluded.

You may use a Berkeley Summer Session to satisfy one semester of the Senior Residence requirement, provided that you successfully complete 6 units of course work in the Summer Session and that you have been enrolled previously in the college.

Modified Senior Residence Requirement

Participants in the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP) or the UC Berkeley Washington Program (UCDC) may meet a Modified Senior Residence requirement by completing 24 (excluding EAP) of their final 60 semester units in residence. At least 12 of these 24 units must be completed after you have completed 90 units.

Upper Division Residence Requirement

You must complete in residence a minimum of 18 units of upper division courses (excluding EAP units), 12 of which must satisfy the requirements for your major.

Courses

Practice of Art

ART 8 Introduction to Visual Thinking 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2017
A first course in the language, processes, and media of visual art. Course work will be organized around weekly lectures and studio problems that will introduce students to the nature of art making and visual thinking.

Introduction to Visual Thinking: Read More [+]

ART 12 The Language of Drawing 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2017
A study of drawing as a tool for articulating what the eyes, hand, and mind discover and investigate when coordinated. Some sessions will be devoted to drawing the human figure. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.

The Language of Drawing: Read More [+]

ART N12 The Language of Drawing 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2004 10 Week Session
A study of drawing as a tool for articulating what the eyes, hand, and mind discover and investigate when coordinated. Some sessions will be devoted to drawing the human figure.

The Language of Drawing: Read More [+]

ART 13 Language of Painting 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
A concentrated investigation of what painting on a two-dimensional surface can elicit from what is both observed and felt. Illustrated talks will help familiarize you with issues that have concerned painters in the 20th century. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.

Language of Painting: Read More [+]

ART N13 Language of Painting 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2004 10 Week Session
A concentrated investigation of what painting on a two-dimensional surface can elicit from what is both observed and felt. Illustrated talks will help familiarize you with issues that have concerned painters in the 20th century.

Language of Painting: Read More [+]

ART 14 The Language of Sculpture 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
This course is the study of the interaction between physical form and space. We will focus on building a strong conceptual foundation while developing the practical studio skills needed to translate your ideas into three dimensions. Shop practices will include hand, machine, and computer-aided fabrications. Field trips and illustrated talks will help acquaint students with the ideas sculptors have explored through history and in contemporary
sculptural practices.
The Language of Sculpture: Read More [+]

ART 15 The Language of Sculpture: Ceramics 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
This course will challenge students to use ceramics as a way to explore and understand three-dimensional space, and use a contemporary art framework for critiquing and discussing the work produced. We will develop a practical understanding of how clay and glaze behave, while building a conceptual framework through which to apply this knowledge. Studio practice includes hand building, modeling, carving, and glazing as possibilities for turning
ideas into three dimensional propositions. Illustrated talks will help acquaint students with the ideas artists have explored through history and in contemporary sculptural practices.
The Language of Sculpture: Ceramics: Read More [+]

ART 16 Introduction to Printmaking 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course examines and explores various print disciplines. Students study and create traditional forms of fine art printmaking including woodcut, lithography, intaglio, and screenprinting as well as newer approaches which include transfer and digital printmaking. This course is a prerequisite for upper division print courses. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.

Introduction to Printmaking: Read More [+]

ART 21 Digital Photography: The Image and the Hive Mind 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Fall 2016
This class provides a basic foundation for digital photography with hands-on instruction in the use of digital cameras and online image dissemination. Topics include image capture, composition, image syntax, image analysis, image manipulation, metatext production, and image sequencing for visual narratives. We also study image dissemination through online networks including social networks, blogs,
news, storage, search, and print services. Rather than limiting the discussion of photography to the production of the photographic image itself, we explore in written assignments how the reception of images can change based on context, usage, and network dynamics. While we rely on required DSLR digital cameras to produce images for weekly photographic assignments, we also experiment with alternate digital image generation techniques from telescopes to microscopes. All coursework will be posted and discussed online as well as in weekly lectures, workshops, and critiques. Course readings cover the history of photography, the theory of photographic reproduction and the theory of networked and memetic dissemination.
Digital Photography: The Image and the Hive Mind: Read More [+]

ART 23AC Foundations of American Cyber-Culture 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Summer 2012 Second 6 Week Session
This new course will enable students to think critically about, and engage in practical experiments in, the complex interactions between new media and perceptions and performances of embodiment, agency, citizenship, collective action, individual identity, time and spatiality. We will pay particular attention to the categories of personhood that make up the UC Berkeley American Cultures rubric (race and ethnicity), as well
as to gender, nation, and disability. The argument threading through the course will be the ways in which new media both reinforce pre-existing social hierarchies, and yet offer possibilities for the transcendence of those very categories. The new media -- and we will leave the precise definition of the new media as something to be argued about over the course of the semester -- can be yet another means for dividing and disenfranchising, and can be the conduit of violence and transnational dominance.
Foundations of American Cyber-Culture: Read More [+]

ART N23 Digital Media Foundation 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2004 10 Week Session, Summer 2003 10 Week Session
Server-based art course introduces principles of digital media creation from program to poetry through a combination of lectures, creative projects, and studio seminars. Topics: basic units of digital media, video, audio, and interactivity authoring, digital cinema, scripting, interactive art, web cam and net art. Final project is a web-based ambient/dramatic performance. All course resources, projects, and reviews are
web-based. Students must own networked computer.
Digital Media Foundation: Read More [+]

ART W23AC Data Arts 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Can we measure everything? What is the role of privacy? Can we count beauty? Is data always fair? This course explores participation as the foundation of online citizenship. Participation is based on data literacy and community awareness. Through online assignments, peer reviews and video chats, students form communities of explorers and innovators who challenge data culture through creative interventions including surveys, visualization
, animation, video, interaction design, music and other forms of digital expression. Assignments are based on readings about media theory, abstraction, interactivity, design theory, archives, performance, identity, privacy, automation, aggregation, networking, diffusion, diffraction and subversion.
Data Arts: Read More [+]

ART 26 Moving Image Media Production 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 First 6 Week Session
This course provides students with the technological and conceptual groundwork for advanced courses in video art and filmmaking including the use of digital cameras, sound recording, basic lighting techniques, digital editing, compression, and online dissemination. We will focus on what makes compelling moving images that elicit powerful intellectual and emotional responses. The course
also explores the range of techniques and languages of creative video making from traditional story genres to more contemporary experimental forms.
The course consists of weekly lectures, screenings, discussions and a lab section. The lab is a production workshop in which students will produce a series of short exercises and a final project.

Moving Image Media Production: Read More [+]

ART 98 Directed Group Study 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
This is a student-initiated course to be offered for academic credit. The subject matter will vary from semester to semester and will be taught by the student facilitator under the supervision of the faculty sponsor. Topics to be related to art practice.

Directed Group Study: Read More [+]

ART 99 Supervised Independent Study 1 - 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
This course will be a rubric for all one and two credit Independent Study courses in Art Practice that concentrate on the practical aspects of art production. Some students will study gallery work by participating in every phase of producing art exhibitions--from selecting works to hanging and insuring them. Other students will learn concepts, skills and information they can use in their major courses. All students gaining credit from these
courses will have to produce at least three short term papers analyzing their experiences and reflecting on the principles involved in their work.
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ART 100 Collaborative Innovation 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 1998
In this hands-on, project-based class, students will experience group creativity and team-based design by using techniques from across the disciplines of business, theatre, design, and art practice. They will leverage problem framing and solving techniques derived from critical thinking, systems thinking, and creative problem solving (popularly known today as design thinking). The course is grounded in a brief weekly lecture that sets out
the theoretical, historical, and cultural contexts for particular innovation practices, but the majority of the class involves hands-on studio-based learning guided by an interdisciplinary team of teachers leading small group collaborative projects.
Collaborative Innovation: Read More [+]

ART 102 Approaches to Painting 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2017
Inquiry into concepts of order, process, and content as related to human experience. While faculty contact with students is highly individualized, the course involves group critiques and lectures as well as assigned field trips. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.

Approaches to Painting: Read More [+]

ART N102 Approaches to Painting 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2004 10 Week Session
Inquiry into concepts of order, process, and content as related to human experience. While faculty contact with students is highly individualized, the course involves group critiques and lectures as well as assigned field trips.

Approaches to Painting: Read More [+]

ART 117 Research, Methods and Materials of Drawing 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Advanced drawing and composition, color and black-and-white, primarily on paper. 117 or 118 is required of all art majors. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.

Research, Methods and Materials of Drawing: Read More [+]

ART N117 Drawing and Composition 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2004 10 Week Session
Advanced drawing and composition, color and black-and-white, primarily on paper. Art 117 or 118 is required of all art majors.

Drawing and Composition: Read More [+]

ART 118 Contemporary Perspectives of Figure Drawing 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Emphasis on the human figure seen in the context of pictorial space, dark and light and color. Various media. 118 or 117 is required of all art majors. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.

Contemporary Perspectives of Figure Drawing: Read More [+]

ART 119 Global Perspectives in Contemporary Art 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2017
This course is designed to explore a range of contemporary art movements around the globe, through a closer look at their central ideas, artists, and artworks, as well as the preconditions and broader social context in which the work is being produced. Topics covered will range from the emergence of localized avant-garde movements in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America to the implicit globalism
of the international biennial circuit.
Global Perspectives in Contemporary Art: Read More [+]

ART 120 Approaches to Printmaking: Intaglio 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
An opportunity to discover what an artist can do with an etching press and a familiarity with such processes as etching, drypoint, aquatint, color, and monotype printing. The difference in the ways that these mediums enhance and condition your ideas will be made clear through individual and group critiques. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.

Approaches to Printmaking: Intaglio: Read More [+]

ART 122 Approaches to Printmaking: Lithography 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2013, Fall 2012, Fall 2010
In the course of making lithographs, you will be encouraged to find an aesthetic direction of your own. Your instructor will also help you develop skill in using both stone and metal plates. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.

Approaches to Printmaking: Lithography: Read More [+]

ART 123 The Language of Printmaking-Screenprinting 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
The process of screenprinting images onto paper and other surfaces will be explored in a variety of image producing techniques. Hand drawn, photographic, and digitally manipulated images are combined to produce multiple works of limited edition fine art prints. Image content and development is examined through drawings, studies, slide lectures, group critiques, and direct assistance. Each student is required to attend all class periods and
participate in group discussions and critique. It is the responsibility of the student to maintain a portfolio of all works executed during the semester and to turn in all assignments on time. The grade is determined by attendance, completion of projects and participation in critiques. Personal improvement will also be taken into account.
The Language of Printmaking-Screenprinting: Read More [+]

ART 124 Advanced Projects in Printmaking 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2012, Spring 2011
Non-traditional projects in printmaking. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.

Advanced Projects in Printmaking: Read More [+]

ART 130 Approaches to Sculpture: Concept and Construction 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
Course is geared toward constructing objects, forms, and particular structures to reveal concept. This class will have more advanced instruction in fabrications, emphasizing the use of wood and metal shops. Architectural considerations, physical experience of space, and innovative sculptural practices will be explored. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.

Approaches to Sculpture: Concept and Construction: Read More [+]

ART 132 Approaches to Sculpture: Ceramics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
An opportunity to learn the many ways of shaping and giving form to wet clay, then making it permanent by firing it. Illustrated talks will examine the ideas that have engaged ceramic sculptors in many traditions and the processes that they have used to expand them. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.

Approaches to Sculpture: Ceramics: Read More [+]

ART 133 Approaches to Sculpture: Meaning in Material 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This class will investigate the possibilities and potentials of sculptural material, both physically and conceptually. We will focus on a deeper exploration of the current state of art practice while questioning what methods and materials are considered non-traditional. We will discuss multiple applications as a means of mediating ideas in space, including sculpture, installation, video, photography and public exchanges. This class will have more
advanced instruction in fabrications, including the wood and metal shops. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.
Approaches to Sculpture: Meaning in Material: Read More [+]

ART 137 Advanced Projects in Ceramic Sculpture 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
Students who are experienced in clay may enroll in this course to continue developing their ideas and their technical command of ceramic materials and processes. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.

Advanced Projects in Ceramic Sculpture: Read More [+]

ART 138 Approaches to Sculpture: Installations 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
In this class we will consider sculptural issues of (and beyond) the object itself, notions of "site specific," and of whether an object is distinct from its environment or is part of it. We will also question issues of space, placement, installation, context, and public interaction. Students will engage with a variety of sites, both on and off campus, with drawings and written proposals being an intergral part of all projects.
Lectures and demonstrations will introduce students to techniques and varied applications.
Approaches to Sculpture: Installations: Read More [+]

ART 141 Temporal Structures: Video and Performance Art 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Fall 2014
Projects are aimed at understanding and inventing ways in which time and change can become key elements in an artwork. Regular screenings of professional tapes will illustrate uses of the mediums and provide a historical context. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.

Temporal Structures: Video and Performance Art: Read More [+]

ART 142 New Genres 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012, Spring 2010, Spring 2009
A survey intended to expose you to the nature and potential of such non-traditional tools for artmaking as performance, video, and audiotape. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.

New Genres: Read More [+]

ART 160 Special Topics in Visual Studies 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2017
Topics of concern to the instructor, usually related to current research, which may fall outside of the normal curriculum or be of more restricted content than regular studio courses. An opportunity to investigate topics and mediums on an ad hoc basis when there is a compelling reason to do so, providing there is no other course that deals with these concerns. Primarily intended for advanced undergraduates
and graduates in Art Practice but open to others. For special topics and enrollment see listings outside of 345 Kroeber.
Special Topics in Visual Studies: Read More [+]

ART N160 Foundations of Digital Photography 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2013 10 Week Session, Summer 2013 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2013 Second 6 Week Session
While digital photography has simplified the process of taking and sharing pictures, the challenges of image composition, visual storytelling, and image sequencing remain at the center serious photography. In this course, students who have a working knowledge of photography and who have access to a digital camera learn to compose and sequence images beyond the stereotypes of popular
photography. The course covers essential topics such as lighting, timing, composition, image sequencing, history of photography, potential and limitations of mechanical reproduction, photography and fine art, alternative tradition and digital image processes. All student work will be shared and reviewed online; classes are 33% lecture, 33% studio work, and 33% group critique.
Foundations of Digital Photography: Read More [+]

ART 162 Issues in Cultural Display: Studio and Post-Studio Art Practices 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2010 First 6 Week Session
This is a seminar class designed to engage in "close readings" of contemporary art-making and curatorial practices. Through weekly studio visits with artists and/or curators, the course examines the practical methods, historical origins, philosophical roots, and political and aesthetic implications of each maker's practice. Readings and discussions will focus on (though not be limited to) issues concerning the interaction of aesthetics
and ethics; culture and capital; copyright law; art and craft; singular vs. collective authorship.
Issues in Cultural Display: Studio and Post-Studio Art Practices: Read More [+]

ART 163 Social Practice: Critical Site and Context 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Social Practice broadly refers to work produced through various forms of direct engagement with a site, social system or collaborator. Interdisciplinary in nature, such work often takes the form of guerilla interventions, performance, institutional critique, community based public art and political activity, all sharing the premise that art created in the public sphere can help alter public perception and work toward social transformation.

Social Practice: Critical Site and Context: Read More [+]

ART N163 Social Practice: Critical Site and Context--ESCUELA de ARTE UTIL 6 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session
Social Practice broadly refers to work produced through various forms of direct engagement with a site, social system or collaborator.
Arte Útil, which translates into English as “useful art,” will consider the practice of Arte Útil as institutional self-criticism, active hyperrealism, a-legality,reforming capital,sustainability, and modes of creative collaboration.
Enrollment in the class requires familiarization with the Arte Útil archive
(http://www.arte-util.org/projects/) and lexicon (http://www.arte-util.org/tools/lexicon/), as well as the submission of a written statement of 250-400 words explaining how you think aesthetics can disrupt institutional structures and what social issues interest you. Send to school@arte-util.org.
Social Practice: Critical Site and Context--ESCUELA de ARTE UTIL: Read More [+]

ART 164 Art and Meditation 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
Meditation is arguably the most ancient, powerful, and yet simple spiritual practice in the world. It is known in various forms in nearly all times and cultures, and plays a part in every religious tradition. We will examine how meditation can affect your art both in terms of practice and content. The class will be structured with slide presentations, museum visits, discussion of reading, and reviews of art work. Art from various contemplative
traditions will be examined.
Art and Meditation: Read More [+]

ART 165 Art, Medicine, and Disabilities 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
This course will examine how visual artists have responded to illness and disability. We will consider visual representations of disability and healing, as well as the expressive work of visual artists working from within the personal experience of disability; in other words, we will look at disability as both a subject and a source of artistic creation. Several topics, historical and contemporary, will be explored. Students will complete
either a semester-long internship with an arts and disability organization, a research paper, or a creative project.
Art, Medicine, and Disabilities: Read More [+]

ART 171 Digital Video: The Architecture of Time 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
This hands-on studio course is designed to present students with a foundation-level introduction to the skills, theories and concepts used in digital video production. Non-linear and non-destructive editing methods used in digital video are defining new "architectures of time" for cinematic creation and experience, and offer new and innovative possibilities for authoring new forms of the moving image. This course will expose students
to a broad range of industry standard equipment, film and video history, theory, terminology, field and post-production skills. Students will be required to techinically master the digital media tools introduced in the course. Each week will include relevant readings, class discussions, guest speakers, demonstration of examples, and studio time for training and working on student assignments.
Digital Video: The Architecture of Time: Read More [+]

ART N171 Digital Video: The Architecture of Time 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2006 10 Week Session, Summer 2005 10 Week Session, Summer 2004 10 Week Session
This hands-on studio course is designed to present students with a foundation-level introduction to the skills, theories, and concepts used in digital video production. Non linear and non destructive editing methods used in digital video are defining new "architectures of time" for cinematic creation and experience and offer new and innovative possibilities for authoring new forms
of the moving image. This course will expose students to a broad range of industry-standard equipment, film and video history, theory, terminology, field, and post production skills. Students will be required to gain techinical mastery of the digital media tools introduced in the course.
Digital Video: The Architecture of Time: Read More [+]

ART 172 CGI Animation Studies 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2011 First 6 Week Session, Spring 2011, Summer 2010 First 6 Week Session
Motion is a ubiquitous element of human experience, yet attempts to explain it remain incomplete. The representation of motion with technical means is in continuous development, starting perhaps with sculptural representations of celestial movements in antiquity and leading to dynamic computer graphics simulations of molecular processes today. In this production-intensive studio course, we will study
computer graphics for motion simulations, or animations. We will also probe these tools for their use in creative expression and analyze their impact on our own perception of motion. Software used: Maya. Each week will include relevant readings, class discussions, guest speakers, demonstration of examples, and studio time for training and working on student assignments .
CGI Animation Studies: Read More [+]

ART 173 Sound Art: Sound, Image, Projection, Process 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This is a studio class designed to introduce artists to the medium of sound. Students will learn the basic skills necessary to work with audio, including microphones, digital recording, editing and processing, speaker and installation design, and circuit-bending. In addition, students will learn about the history of sound art and the ways in which visual art and experimental sound practice inform and expand upon each other.

Sound Art: Sound, Image, Projection, Process: Read More [+]

ART 174 Advanced Digital Video 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
This advanced studio course is designed for students who have mastered basic skills and concepts involved in digital video production, and are interested in further investigating critical, theoretical, and creative research topics in digital video production. Each week will include relevant readings, class discussions, guest speakers, demonstrat ion of examples, and studio time for training and working on student assignments .

Advanced Digital Video: Read More [+]

ART 178 Game Design Methods 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
This course offers an introduction to game design and game studies. Game studies has five core elements: the study of games as transmitters of culture, the study of play and interactivity, the study of games as symbolic systems; the study of games as artifacts; and methods for creating games. We will study these core elements through play, play tests, play analysis, and comparative studies. Our reading list includes classic game studies theory
and texts which support game design methods. After weekly writing and design exercises, our coursework will culminate in the design and evaluation of an original code-based game with a tangible interface.
Game Design Methods: Read More [+]

ART 180 Advanced Digital Photography 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2017, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
This course will cover a range of digital media and practices, with a view towards exploring current and future possibilities for photography. Inclusive of multiple approaches to scale, execution, and technique, the course enables students to examine and push the limits of photographic practices. This course will help students advance their digital shooting and Photoshop skills from a beginning
to a more advanced level, and will cover the workflow of digital photography: camera usage, scanning, image editing, management, and printing.
Advanced Digital Photography: Read More [+]

ART 184 Junior Seminar: Meaning and Making 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
This immersive studio/seminar class focuses on contemporary models of art making, exposing students to current issues in the art world, and fostering interdisciplinary models of thinking and making. Through field trips to museums, galleries, and alternative art spaces, as well as studio visits with local contemporary artists, students will be able to situate their own projects within the larger sphere of contemporary art. Language and writing
skills around artist statements, critical readings, and the critique process will be emphasized to understand how research methods give meaning in a studio practice. Presentation of a final studio project asks students to examine their place within a contemporary art dialogue.
Junior Seminar: Meaning and Making: Read More [+]

ART 185 Senior Projects/Professional Practices 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
This course provides students with a foundation for understanding their work within a cross-disciplinary critical context. Through class and individual critique, readings, guest artists, and field trips, students will explore the practical and conceptual components of their own media and practice within a broader discussion of artistic production. In addition to this focused attention on the critique process, the class with address the ongoing
needs of supporting one's work within a community of artists, arts professionals, and arts organizations. Each student will work towards developing the most effective tools for communicating their work to these broader audiences using strategies that are appropriate/effective for their ideas, media, and audience.
Senior Projects/Professional Practices: Read More [+]

ART H195A Special Study for Honors Candidates in the Practice of Art 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Summer 2016 First 6 Week Session
Honors students are required to take three units of H195A. They may elect to take an additional three units (H195B) the following semester.

Special Study for Honors Candidates in the Practice of Art: Read More [+]

ART H195B Special Study for Honors Candidates in the Practice of Art 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Honors students are required to take three units of H195A. They may elect to take an additional three units (H195B) the following semester.

Special Study for Honors Candidates in the Practice of Art: Read More [+]

ART 196 Bridging the Arts Seminar 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Bridging the Arts is open to artists from a variety of disciplines including dance, spoken word, theater, performance, creative writing, social practice, music, and visual arts. Through readings, written reflection, guest speakers, group discussion, and teaching in the field, Bridging the Arts (BtheArts) Student Instructors explore the arts in the public education system. Student Instructors develop and implement arts curricula that is both
age appropriate and culturally relevant to their students in underserved Bay Area Schools.


Bridging the Arts Seminar: Read More [+]

ART 198 Directed Group Study 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
This is a student-initiated course to be offered for academic credit. The subject matter will vary from semester to semester and will be taught by the student facilitator under the supervision of the faculty sponsor. Topics to be related to art practice.

Directed Group Study: Read More [+]

ART 199 Supervised Independent Study for Advanced Undergraduates 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016

Supervised Independent Study for Advanced Undergraduates: Read More [+]

ART N199 Supervised Independent Study for Advanced Undergraduates 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2004 10 Week Session
This course is for students wishing to pursue an interest not represented in the curriculum by developing an individual program of study supervised by a faculty member. Study may involve creative projects, research.

Supervised Independent Study for Advanced Undergraduates: Read More [+]

Faculty and Instructors

Faculty

Allan Desouza, Associate Professor.

Greg Niemeyer, Associate Professor. Art, film studies, digital media installations, photography.
Research Profile

Brody Reiman, Associate Professor.

Katherine D. Sherwood, Professor. Art & Disability.
Research Profile

Stephanie Syjuco, Assistant Professor. Art, sculpture, ceramics, social practice, craft, activism, public art, feminism, capitalism, communes, material culture, informal economies, black markets, hacker culture, detournement, digital culture, the industrial revolution, Russian Constructivism, Arts & Crafts Movement, The Bauhaus, The Berlin Wall, design culture, architecture, brutalist architecture, urbanism, survivalism, archives, libraries, museums, museum display, modernity, postcolonial studies, labor history, American history, globalization, revolutions, cargo cults, the Philippines, Asian American studies, empire, textiles, fashion, ethnography, trade routes, science fiction, afrofuturism, camouflage, surveillance technologies, DIY culture, zines, punk rock, maker culture, kittens.
Research Profile

Anne Walsh, Associate Professor.

Lecturers

Nathan Kwame Braun, Lecturer.

Aida Gamez, Lecturer.

Michael Hall, Lecturer.

Jamil Hellu, Lecturer.

Randy M. Hussong, Lecturer.

Sahar Khoury, Lecturer.

Christopher S. Kubick, Lecturer.

Carmen Lang Merino, Lecturer.

Stephanie F. Lie, Lecturer.

John S. Mcnamara, Lecturer.

Masako Miki, Lecturer.

Jill S. Miller, Lecturer.

Indira M. Morre, Lecturer.

Craig K. Nagasawa, Lecturer.

James S. Pitt, Lecturer.

Elise A. Putnam, Lecturer.

Erik Scollon, Lecturer.

Stacy Jo Scott, Lecturer.

Azin Seraj, Lecturer.

Jenifer K. Wofford, Lecturer.

Emeritus Faculty

Jerrold Ballaine, Professor Emeritus.

Squeak Carnwath, Professor Emeritus. Art, painting, printmaking.
Research Profile

Robert L. Hartman, Professor Emeritus.

Anne Healy, Professor Emeritus.

James Melchert, Professor Emeritus.

Mary Lovelace O'Neal, Professor Emeritus.

Richard Shaw, Professor Emeritus.

David Simpson, Professor Emeritus.

Brian Wall, Professor Emeritus.

Contact Information

Art Practice

345 Kroeber Hall

Phone: 510-642-2582

Fax: 510-643-0884

Visit Department Website

Chair/Associate Professor

Allan deSouza

337 Kroeber Hall

adesouza13@berkeley.edu

Undergraduate Adviser

Dee Levister

341 Kroeber Hall

Phone: 510-643-9107

dplev@berkeley.edu

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