Bioengineering

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

Bachelor of Science (BS)

Rated one of the top 10 Bioengineering undergraduate programs in the country, Bioengineering at Berkeley is a multidisciplinary major intended for academically strong students who excel in the physical sciences, mathematics, and biology. Coursework provides a strong foundation in engineering and the biological sciences, with the freedom to explore a variety of topics and specialize in advanced areas of research. All students benefit from intensive group design work, either through a senior capstone project or through independent research in faculty laboratories. The major features small, specialized upper division courses, and direct interaction with faculty. 

The stimulating environment of Berkeley offers a wealth of opportunity for learning, research, service, and community involvement, and provides dedicated students the knowledge and skills to become the next leaders in bioengineering.

Course of Study Overview

The department offers one Bioengineering major, with several concentrations. For detailed descriptions of these concentrations, please see the department's website.

  • Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Cell Tissue Engineering
  • Biomedical Devices
  • Computational Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Imaging
  • Premed
  • Synthetic Biology

Admission to the Major

Prospective undergraduates of the College of Engineering will apply for admission to a specific program in the college. For further information, please see the College of Engineering's website.

Admission to engineering via a Change of College application for current UC Berkeley students is not guaranteed. For further information regarding a Change of College to Engineering, please see the college's website.

Minor Program

The department offers a minor in Bioengineering that is open to all students who are not majoring in bioengineering and who have completed the necessary prerequisites for the minor. For further information regarding the prerequisites, please see the Minor Requirements tab on this page.

Joint Major

The Department of Bioengineering also offers a joint major with the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, for students who have an interest in the field of biomaterials. For further information regarding this program, please see the Bioengineering/Materials Science and Engineering joint major page in this Guide.

Visit Department Website

Major Requirements

In addition to the University, campus, and college requirements, students must fulfill the below requirements specific to their major program.

General Guidelines

  1. All technical courses (courses in engineering, mathematics, chemistry, physics, statistics, biological sciences, and computer science) must be taken for a letter grade.

  2. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student’s major and minor programs.

  3. A minimum overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required for all work undertaken at UC Berkeley.

  4. A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required for all technical courses taken in satisfaction of major requirements.

For information regarding residence requirements and unit requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.

For a detailed plan of study by year and semester, please see the Plan of Study tab.

Students are advised to consult the approved concentrations to identify an appropriate course sequence for bioengineering specialty areas and may also design their own program that meets with the below requirements with permission from their faculty adviser. Regular consultation with an adviser is strongly encouraged. Recommended courses for each concentration can be found on the department's website.

Summary of Major Requirements

A student's course of study must include:

  1. 42 units of upper division coursework in technical subjects such as engineering, chemistry, physics, integrative biology, molecular and cell biology, mathematics, or statistics. Of these units, at least 22 must be in bioengineering. The 42 units must be from the bioengineering core curriculum (excluding BIO ENG 100) or the curriculum electives lists below (excluding ethics).
  2. 45 units of engineering (upper or lower division). These units must be from courses that appear on the bioengineering topics or engineering topics lists.

Lower Division Requirements

MATH 1ACalculus4
MATH 1BCalculus4
MATH 53Multivariable Calculus4
MATH 54Linear Algebra and Differential Equations4
CHEM 1A
1AL
General Chemistry
and General Chemistry Laboratory 1
4
or CHEM 4A General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis
CHEM 3A
3AL
Chemical Structure and Reactivity
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory 1
5
or CHEM 112A Organic Chemistry
PHYSICS 7APhysics for Scientists and Engineers4
PHYSICS 7BPhysics for Scientists and Engineers4
BIOLOGY 1A
1AL
General Biology Lecture
and General Biology Laboratory
5
BIO ENG 10Introduction to Biomedicine for Engineers 24
BIO ENG 24Freshmen Seminar1
BIO ENG 25Careers in Biotechnology1
ENGIN 7Introduction to Computer Programming for Scientists and Engineers4
or COMPSCI 61A The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs
Engineering/Biology Preparation: Two courses chosen from list below.6-8
1

CHEM 4A and CHEM 112A are intended for students majoring in chemistry or a closely-related field. The prerequisites for CHEM 112A include CHEM 1B or CHEM 4B.

2

Junior transfer admits are exempt from completing BIO ENG 10.

Upper Division Requirements

Bioengineering Fundamentals: Choose two courses from list below.8
Engineering Topics: Choose two courses from list below.6-8
Bioengineering Lab Course: Choose one course from list below.3-4
Bioengineering Topics: Choose two courses from list below.6-8
Technical Topics: Choose three courses from list below.9-13
Upper Division Biology Elective: Choose one course from list below.3-4
Bioengineering Design Project or Research: Choose one course from list below.3-4
Ethics Requirement: Choose one course from list below.3-4

Engineering/Biology Preparation

Choose two courses from the following:

BIO ENG 11Engineering Molecules 13
CHEM C130/MCELLBI C100ABiophysical Chemistry: Physical Principles and the Molecules of Life4
CIV ENG C30/MEC ENG C85Introduction to Solid Mechanics3
COMPSCI 61BData Structures4
or COMPSCI 61BL Data Structures and Programming Methodology
ENGIN 45Properties of Materials3
EL ENG 16ADesigning Information Devices and Systems I (and EE 16B)4
EL ENG 16BDesigning Information Devices and Systems II (and EE 16A)4
MATH 55Discrete Mathematics4
or COMPSCI 70 Discrete Mathematics and Probability Theory
MEC ENG 40Thermodynamics3

Bioengineering Fundamentals

Choose two courses from the following:

BIO ENG 101Instrumentation in Biology and Medicine4
BIO ENG 102Biomechanics: Analysis and Design4
BIO ENG 104Biological Transport Phenomena4
BIO ENG 110Biomedical Physiology for Engineers4
BIO ENG 116Cell and Tissue Engineering4
BIO ENG 131Introduction to Computational Molecular and Cell Biology4
BIO ENG 150Introduction of Bionanoscience and Bionanotechnology4

Engineering Topics

Choose two courses from the following:

BIO ENG 192Senior Design Projects4
BIO ENG H194Honors Undergraduate Research3-4
BIO ENG 196Undergraduate Design Research4
CHM ENG 140Introduction to Chemical Process Analysis4
CHM ENG 141Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics4
CHM ENG 150ATransport Processes4
CHM ENG 150BTransport and Separation Processes4
CHM ENG 170ABiochemical Engineering3
CHM ENG 170BBiochemical Engineering3
CHM ENG C170LBiochemical Engineering Laboratory3
CHM ENG 171Transport Phenomena3
CHM ENG C178Polymer Science and Technology3
CIV ENG C30/MEC ENG C85Introduction to Solid Mechanics3
CIV ENG 130NMechanics of Structures3
COMPSCI 61AThe Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs4
COMPSCI 61BData Structures4
or COMPSCI 61BL Data Structures and Programming Methodology
COMPSCI 170Efficient Algorithms and Intractable Problems4
COMPSCI 186Introduction to Database Systems4
COMPSCI/PHYSICS C191Quantum Information Science and Technology3
ENGIN 7Introduction to Computer Programming for Scientists and Engineers4
ENGIN 26Three-Dimensional Modeling for Design2
ENGIN 45Properties of Materials3
ENGIN 115Engineering Thermodynamics4
EL ENG 16ADesigning Information Devices and Systems I4
EL ENG 16BDesigning Information Devices and Systems II4
EL ENG 105Microelectronic Devices and Circuits4
EL ENG 117Electromagnetic Fields and Waves4
EL ENG 120Signals and Systems4
EL ENG 126Probability and Random Processes4
EL ENG 142Integrated Circuits for Communications4
EL ENG 143Microfabrication Technology4
EL ENG 192Mechatronic Design Laboratory4
IND ENG 162Linear Programming and Network Flows3
MEC ENG C85/CIV ENG C30Introduction to Solid Mechanics3
MEC ENG 102BMechatronics Design4
MEC ENG 104Engineering Mechanics II3
MEC ENG 106Fluid Mechanics3
MEC ENG 109Heat Transfer3
MEC ENG 118Introduction to Nanotechnology and Nanoscience3
MEC ENG 119Introduction to MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems)3
MEC ENG 132Dynamic Systems and Feedback3
MEC ENG 133Mechanical Vibrations3
MEC ENG 167Microscale Fluid Mechanics3
MEC ENG 185Introduction to Continuum Mechanics3
MAT SCI 102Bonding, Crystallography, and Crystal Defects3
MAT SCI 103Phase Transformations and Kinetics3
MAT SCI 104Materials Characterization4
MAT SCI 111Properties of Electronic Materials4
MAT SCI 112Corrosion (Chemical Properties)3
MAT SCI 113Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials3
MAT SCI 130Experimental Materials Science and Design3
MAT SCI 151Polymeric Materials3
NUC ENG 101Nuclear Reactions and Radiation4
NUC ENG 107Introduction to Imaging3
PHYSICS/COMPSCI C191Quantum Information Science and Technology3
any Bioengineering Topics Course3-4

Bioengineering Lab

Choose one course from the following:

BIO ENG 101Instrumentation in Biology and Medicine4
BIO ENG 115Cell Biology for Engineers4
BIO ENG 121LBioMems and BioNanotechnology Laboratory4
BIO ENG C136LLaboratory in the Mechanics of Organisms3
BIO ENG 140LSynthetic Biology Laboratory4
BIO ENG 144LProtein Informatics Laboratory3
BIO ENG C145LIntroductory Electronic Transducers Laboratory3
BIO ENG C145MIntroductory Microcomputer Interfacing Laboratory3
BIO ENG 163LMolecular and Cellular Biophotonics Laboratory4
BIO ENG 168LPractical Light Microscopy3

Bioengineering Topics

Choose two courses from the following:

BIO ENG 101Instrumentation in Biology and Medicine4
BIO ENG 102Biomechanics: Analysis and Design4
BIO ENG 103Engineering Molecules 24
BIO ENG 104Biological Transport Phenomena4
BIO ENG 110Biomedical Physiology for Engineers4
BIO ENG 111Functional Biomaterials Development and Characterization4
BIO ENG C112Molecular Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of the Cell4
BIO ENG 113Stem Cells and Technologies4
BIO ENG 115Cell Biology for Engineers4
BIO ENG 116Cell and Tissue Engineering4
BIO ENG C117Structural Aspects of Biomaterials4
BIO ENG C118Biological Performance of Materials4
BIO ENG C119Orthopedic Biomechanics4
BIO ENG 121BioMEMS and Medical Devices4
BIO ENG 121LBioMems and BioNanotechnology Laboratory4
BIO ENG 124Basic Principles of Drug Delivery3
BIO ENG C125Introduction to Robotics4
BIO ENG 131Introduction to Computational Molecular and Cell Biology4
BIO ENG 132Genetic Devices4
BIO ENG 135Frontiers in Microbial Systems Biology4
BIO ENG C136LLaboratory in the Mechanics of Organisms3
BIO ENG 140LSynthetic Biology Laboratory4
BIO ENG 144Introduction to Protein Informatics4
BIO ENG 144LProtein Informatics Laboratory3
BIO ENG C145LIntroductory Electronic Transducers Laboratory3
BIO ENG C145MIntroductory Microcomputer Interfacing Laboratory3
BIO ENG 147Principles of Synthetic Biology4
BIO ENG 148Bioenergy and Sustainable Chemical Synthesis: Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology Approaches3
BIO ENG 150Introduction of Bionanoscience and Bionanotechnology4
BIO ENG 151Micro/Nanofluidics for Bioengineering and Lab-On-A-Chip4
BIO ENG 163Principles of Molecular and Cellular Biophotonics4
BIO ENG 163LMolecular and Cellular Biophotonics Laboratory4
BIO ENG 164Optics and Microscopy4
BIO ENG C165Medical Imaging Signals and Systems4
BIO ENG 168LPractical Light Microscopy3
BIO ENG C181The Berkeley Lectures on Energy: Energy from Biomass3
BIO ENG 190Special Topics in Bioengineering 13-4
BIO ENG 192Senior Design Projects4
1

BIO ENG 190 must be 3 units or more.

Technical Topics

Choose three courses from the following:

Premed students should take BIOLOGY 1B and CHEM 3B/CHEM 3BL.

BIOLOGY 1BGeneral Biology Lecture and Laboratory4
CHEM 3BChemical Structure and Reactivity3
CHEM 112BOrganic Chemistry5
CHEM 120APhysical Chemistry3
CHEM 120BPhysical Chemistry3
CHEM C130/MCELLBI C100ABiophysical Chemistry: Physical Principles and the Molecules of Life4
CHEM 130BBiophysical Chemistry3
COMPSCI 61BData Structures4
or COMPSCI 61BL Data Structures and Programming Methodology
COMPSCI 70Discrete Mathematics and Probability Theory4
or MATH 55 Discrete Mathematics
INTEGBI 32Course Not Available3
MATH 110Linear Algebra4
MATH 118Fourier Analysis, Wavelets, and Signal Processing4
MATH 127Mathematical and Computational Methods in Molecular Biology4
MATH 128ANumerical Analysis4
MATH 170Mathematical Methods for Optimization4
MCELLBI C100A/CHEM C130Biophysical Chemistry: Physical Principles and the Molecules of Life4
NUSCTX 121Computational Toxicology3
PHYSICS 7CPhysics for Scientists and Engineers4
PHYSICS 110AElectromagnetism and Optics4
PHYSICS 112Introduction to Statistical and Thermal Physics4
PHYSICS 137AQuantum Mechanics4
PHYSICS 177Principles of Molecular Biophysics3
PHYSICS C191Quantum Information Science and Technology3
STAT 133Concepts in Computing with Data3
STAT 134Concepts of Probability 13
or IND ENG 172 Probability and Risk Analysis for Engineers
STAT 135Concepts of Statistics4
STAT 150Stochastic Processes3
Any Bioengineering Topics class3-4
Any Engineering Topics class3-4
Any upper division Biology Elective3-4
1

IND ENG 172 does not count toward the 45 engineering units.

Upper Division Biology Elective

Choose one course from the following:

BIO ENG 103Engineering Molecules 24
CHEM C130/MCELLBI C100ABiophysical Chemistry: Physical Principles and the Molecules of Life4
CHEM 135Chemical Biology3
INTEGBI 115Introduction to Systems in Biology and Medicine4
INTEGBI 127LMotor Control with Laboratory3
INTEGBI 131General Human Anatomy3
INTEGBI 132Survey of Human Physiology4
INTEGBI 135The Mechanics of Organisms4
INTEGBI 148Comparative Animal Physiology3
INTEGBI 163Molecular and Genomic Evolution3
MCELLBI C100A/CHEM C130Biophysical Chemistry: Physical Principles and the Molecules of Life4
MCELLBI 100BBiochemistry: Pathways, Mechanisms, and Regulation4
MCELLBI 102Survey of the Principles of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology4
MCELLBI 110Molecular Biology: Macromolecular Synthesis and Cellular Function4
MCELLBI/PLANTBI C112General Microbiology4
MCELLBI 132Biology of Human Cancer4
MCELLBI 133LPhysiology and Cell Biology Laboratory4
MCELLBI 136Physiology4
MCELLBI 140General Genetics4
MCELLBI 140LGenetics Laboratory4
MCELLBI/PLANTBI C148Microbial Genomics and Genetics4
MCELLBI 150Molecular Immunology4
MCELLBI 160Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology4
MCELLBI 160LNeurobiology Laboratory4
MCELLBI 166Biophysical Neurobiology3
PLANTBI/MCELLBI C112General Microbiology4
PLANTBI/MCELLBI C148Microbial Genomics and Genetics4
PLANTBI 185Techniques in Light Microscopy3

Bioengineering Design Project or Research

Choose one course from the following:

BIO ENG 121LBioMems and BioNanotechnology Laboratory4
BIO ENG 140LSynthetic Biology Laboratory4
BIO ENG 168LPractical Light Microscopy3
BIO ENG 192Senior Design Projects4
BIO ENG H194Honors Undergraduate Research3-4
BIO ENG 196Undergraduate Design Research4

Ethics1

Choose one course from the following:

ANTHRO 156BCulture and Power4
BIO ENG 100Ethics in Science and Engineering3
ENGIN 125Ethics, Engineering, and Society3
ENGIN/IAS 157ACEngineering, The Environment, and Society4
ESPM 161Environmental Philosophy and Ethics4
ESPM 162Bioethics and Society4
IAS 157ACEngineering, The Environment, and Society4
L & S 160BEffective Personal Ethics for the Twenty-First Century3-4
PHILOS 2Individual Morality and Social Justice4
PHILOS 104Ethical Theories4
PHILOS 107Moral Psychology4
PB HLTH 116Seminar on Social, Political, and Ethical Issues in Health and Medicine3
1

The ethics course will also fulfill one Humanities/Social Sciences course requirement. See College Requirements tab.

Minor Requirements

Minor programs are areas of concentration requiring fewer courses than an undergraduate major. These programs are optional, but can provide depth and breadth to a UC Berkeley education. The College of Engineering does not offer additional time to complete a minor, but it is usually possible to finish within the allotted time with careful course planning. Students are encouraged to meet with their ESS adviser to discuss the feasibility of completing a minor program.

All the engineering departments offer minors. Students may also consider pursuing a minor in another school or college.

Applicants can apply after second semester sophomore year and up to first semester senior year. Applicants who have completed all of the courses prior to applying will not be accepted into the minor; students must apply first.

General Guidelines

  1. All courses taken to fulfill the minor requirements must be taken for graded credit.

  2. A minimum overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the prerequisite courses is required for acceptance into the minor program.

  3. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required for courses used to fulfill the minor requirements.

  4. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student’s major and minor programs.

  5. Completion of the minor program cannot delay a student’s graduation.

  6. Please see more details at the department website.

Procedure

  • Students should apply first, before taking courses. Applications are available in 306 Stanley Hall or on the department website. Completed applications should be returned to 306 Stanley Hall. Please include an unofficial copy of your transcript with the application.
  • The department will approve or deny the application. If approved, the department will contact the student via email advising of the decision.
  • Upon completion of the requirements for the minor, the student should complete the Confirmation of Completion form. Please submit the form along with an unofficial transcript to 306 Stanley Hall.
  • The department will verify the completion of the minor and send the original form to the Office of the Registrar. (Note: for graduating seniors, this must be done no later than two weeks after the end of the term.) If you are a College of Letters & Science student, this form is sent to Evans Hall.
  • A notation in the memorandum section of the student’s transcript will indicate completion of the minor.

Recommended Preparation

The upper division requirements for the BioE minor require competency in subject matters covered in the following recommended courses. 

CHEM 3AChemical Structure and Reactivity3
MATH 53Multivariable Calculus4
MATH 54Linear Algebra and Differential Equations4
PHYSICS 7APhysics for Scientists and Engineers 14
PHYSICS 7BPhysics for Scientists and Engineers 14
1

Students who have already taken PHYSICS 8A and PHYSICS 8B may substitute them for these courses.

Upper Division Minor Requirements

College Requirements

Students in the College of Engineering must complete no fewer than 120 semester units with the following provisions: 

  1. Completion of the requirements of one engineering major program of study. 
  2. A minimum overall grade point average of 2.00 (C average) and a minimum 2.00 grade point average in upper division technical coursework required of the major. 
  3. The final 30 units and two semesters must be completed in residence in the College of Engineering on the Berkeley campus. 
  4. All technical courses (math, science and engineering), required of the major or not, must be taken on a letter graded basis (unless they are only offered P/NP). 
  5. Entering freshmen are allowed a maximum of eight semesters to complete their degree requirements. Entering junior transfers are allowed a maximum of four semesters to complete their degree requirements. (Note: junior transfers admitted missing three or more courses from the lower division curriculum are allowed five semesters.) Summer terms are optional and do not count toward the maximum. Students are responsible for planning and satisfactorily completing all graduation requirements within the maximum allowable semesters. 
  6. Adhere to all college policies and procedures as they complete degree requirements.
  7. Complete the lower division program before enrolling in upper division engineering courses. 

Humanities and Social Science (H/SS) Requirement

To promote a rich and varied educational experience outside of the technical requirements for each major, the College of Engineering has a six-course Humanities and Social Sciences breadth requirement, which must be completed to graduate. This requirement, built into all the engineering programs of study, includes two reading and composition courses (R&C), and four additional courses within which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. Follow these guidelines to fulfill this requirement:

  1. Complete a minimum of six courses from the  approved Humanities/Social Sciences (H/SS) lists
  2. Courses must be a minimum of 3 semester units (or 4 quarter units).
  3. Two of the six courses must fulfill the college's Reading and Composition (R&C) requirement. These courses must be taken for a letter grade (C- or better required) and must be completed by no later than the end of the sophomore year (fourth semester of enrollment). The first half of R&C, the “A” course, must be completed by the end of the freshman year; the second half of R&C, the “B" course, must be completed by no later than the end of the sophomore year. View a detailed lists of courses that fulfill Reading and Composition requirements, or use the College of Letters and Sciences search engine to view R&C courses offered in a given semester. 
  4. The four additional courses must be chosen within College of Engineering guidelines from the H/SS lists (see below). These courses may be taken on a Pass/Not Passed basis (P/NP).
  5. Two of the six courses must be upper division (courses numbered 100-196).
  6. One of the six courses must satisfy the campus American Cultures requirement. For detailed lists of courses that fulfill American Cultures requirements, visit the American Cultures site. 
  7. A maximum of two exams (Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, or A-Level) may be used toward completion of the H/SS requirement. View the list of exams that can be applied toward H/SS requirements.
  8. Courses may fulfill multiple categories. For example, if you complete CY PLAN 118AC that would satisfy the American Cultures requirement and one upper division H/SS requirement.
  9. No courses offered by any engineering department other than BIO ENG 100, COMPSCI C79, ENGIN 125, ENGIN 157AC, MEC ENG 191K and MEC ENG 191AC may be used to complete H/SS requirements.
  10. Foreign language courses may be used to complete H/SS requirements. View the list of language options.
  11. Courses numbered 97, 98, 99, or above 196 may not be used to complete any H/SS requirement
  12. The College of Engineering uses modified versions of five of the College of Letters and Science (L&S) breadth requirements lists to provide options to our students for completing the H/SS requirement. No courses on the L&S Biological Sciences or Physical Sciences breadth lists may be used to complete H/SS requirements. Within the guidelines above, choose courses from any of the lists below.

Class Schedule Requirements

  • Minimum units per semester: 12.0.
  • Maximum units per semester:  20.5.
  • Minimum technical courses: College of Engineering undergraduates must enroll each semester in no fewer than two technical courses (of a minimum of 3 units each) required of the major program of study in which the student is officially declared.  (Note: for most majors, normal progress will require enrolling in 3-4 technical courses each semester).
  • All technical courses (math, science, engineering), required of the major or not, must be taken on a letter graded basis (unless only offered as P/NP).
  • A student's proposed schedule must be approved by a faculty adviser (or on approval from the dean or a designated staff adviser) each semester prior to enrolling in courses.

Minimum Academic (Grade) Requirements

  • A minimum overall and semester grade point average of 2.00 (C average) is required of engineering undergraduates. A student will be subject to dismissal from the University if during any fall or spring semester their overall UC GPA falls below a 2.00, or their semester GPA is less than 2.00. 
  • Students must achieve a minimum grade point average of 2.00 (C average) in upper division technical courses required of the major curriculum each semester. A student will be subject to dismissal from the University if their upper division technical grade point average falls below 2.00. 
  • A minimum overall grade point average of 2.00, and a minimum 2.00 grade point average in upper division technical course work required of the major is needed to earn a Bachelor of Science in Engineering.

Unit Requirements

To earn a Bachelor of Science in Engineering, students must complete at least 120 semester units of courses subject to certain guidelines:

  • Completion of the requirements of one engineering major program of study. 
  • A maximum of 16 units of special studies coursework (courses numbered 97, 98, 99, 197, 198, or 199) is allowed towards the 120 units; a maximum of four is allowed in a given semester.
  • A maximum of 4 units of physical education from any school attended will count towards the 120 units.
  • Students may receive unit credit for courses graded P (including P/NP units taken through EAP) up to a limit of one-third of the total units taken and passed on the Berkeley campus at the time of graduation.

Normal Progress

Students in the College of Engineering must enroll in a full-time program and make normal progress each semester toward the bachelor's degree. The continued enrollment of students who fail to achieve minimum academic progress shall be subject to the approval of the dean. (Note: students with official accommodations established by the Disabled Students' Program, with health or family issues, or with other reasons deemed appropriate by the dean may petition for an exception to normal progress rules.) 

Plan of Study

For more detailed information regarding the courses listed below (e.g., elective information, GPA requirements, etc.), please see the College Requirements and Major Requirements tabs.

Freshman
FallUnitsSpringUnits
CHEM 4A or 1A and 1AL14CHEM 112A or 3A and 3AL15
MATH 1A4MATH 1B4
BIO ENG 1024PHYSICS 7A4
BIO ENG 241ENGIN 7 or COMPSCI 61A4
Reading and Composition course from List A4BIO ENG 251
 17 18
Sophomore
FallUnitsSpringUnits
MATH 534MATH 544
PHYSICS 7B4BIOLOGY 1A
1AL
5
First Engineering/Biology Prep Course33-4Second Engineering/Biology Prep Course33-4
Reading and Composition course from List B4Free Elective3
 15-16 15-16
Junior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
First Bioengineering Fundamentals Course34Second Biongineering Fundamentals Course34
First Engineering Topics Course33-4Second Technical Topics Course33-5
First Technical Topics Course33-5Upper-division Biology Elective33-4
Humanities/Social Sciences course3-4BIO ENG 100 or Humanities/Social Sciences course with ethics content33-4
 13-17 13-17
Senior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
Bioengineering Lab Course33-4Second Bioengineering Topics Course33-4
First Bioengineering Topics Course33-4Second Engineering Topics Course33-4
Third Technical Topics Course33-5Bioengineering Design Project or Research33-4
Humanities/Social Sciences course3-4Humanities/Social Sciences course3-4
Free Elective2Free Electives3
 14-19 15-19
Total Units: 120-139
1

CHEM 4A and CHEM 112A are intended for students majoring in chemistry or a closely-related field. The prerequisites for CHEM 112A include CHEM 1B or CHEM 4B.

2

Junior transfer admits are exempt from completing BIO ENG 10.

3

See Major Requirements tab for lists of approved electives.

Student Learning Goals

Mission

Since our founding in 1998, the BioE faculty have been working to create an integrated, comprehensive program. Much thought has been put into the question, “What does every bioengineer need to know?” The faculty have been engaged in considerable dialogue over the years about what needs to be included, in what order, and how to do so in a reasonable time frame. Balancing depth with breadth has been the key challenge, and we have reached a point where the pieces have come together to form a coherent bioengineering discipline.

Learning Goals for the Major

  1. Describe the fundamental principles and methods of engineering.
  2. Understand the physical, chemical, and mathematical basis of biology.
  3. Appreciate the different scales of biological systems.
  4. Apply the physical sciences and mathematics in an engineering approach to biological systems.
  5. Effectively communicate scientific and engineering data and ideas, both orally and in writing.
  6. Demonstrate the values of cooperation, teamwork, social responsibility, and lifelong learning necessary for success in the field.
  7. Design a bioengineering solution to a problem of technical, scientific. or societal importance.
  8. Demonstrate advanced knowledge in a specialized field of bioengineering.

Advising

Bioengineering provides an array of programmatic and individual advising services. Each student is required to consult with a faculty adviser each semester. Our dedicated Bioengineering undergraduate affairs officer is available through appointments or drop-in times to consult on topics such as course selection, degree requirements, concentration selection, and achieving personal and academic goals. Further advising support is available from staff in the Engineering Student Services Office.

Please see more information on advising on the department website.

Advising Staff and Hours

Undergraduate Adviser:
Cindy Manly-Fields
Phone: 510-642-5860
cmanly@berkeley.edu
306C Stanley Hall
Monday: 9 to 11:45 a.m.
Tuesday through Friday: 9 to 11:45 a.m.; Drop-ins 1:15 to 4 p.m.

Academic Opportunities

Undergraduate Research

We believe it is essential for undergraduates to experience the hands-on application of skills to prepare them for a career in bioengineering. Every student is required to complete at least one semester of research or design before graduation, although most do more. This can be accomplished through our outstanding senior capstone design course, or through other independent study options and research in faculty laboratories. A recent survey shows that 94% of our senior students have undertaken extracurricular research, usually starting in their sophomore year. For research resources, please visit the department website.

Student Organizations

There are several active student organizations related to bioengineering, focusing on academics, research, global healthcare, local outreach, social life, career planning, and other worthy efforts. For further information, please see the Resources for Undergrads page on the department website.

Courses

Bioengineering

BIO ENG 10 Introduction to Biomedicine for Engineers 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course is intended for lower division students interested in acquiring a foundation in biomedicine with topics ranging from evolutionary biology to human physiology. The emphasis is on the integration of engineering applications to biology and health. The goal is for undergraduate engineering students to gain sufficient biology and human physiology fundamentals so that they are better prepared to study specialized topics, e.g., biomechanics
, imaging, computational biology, tissue engineering, biomonitoring, drug development, robotics, and other topics covered by upper division and graduate courses in UC Berkeley departments of Molecular and Cell Biology, Integrative Biology, Bioengineering, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Mechanical Engineering, and courses in the UC San Francisco Division of Bioengineering. The specific lecture topics and exercises will include the key aspects of genomics and proteomics as well as topics on plant and animal evolution, stem cell biomedicine, and tissue regeneration and replacement. Medical physiology topics include relevant engineering aspects of human brain, heart, musculoskeletal, and other systems.
Introduction to Biomedicine for Engineers: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 11 Engineering Molecules 1 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016
This course focuses on providing students with a foundation in organic chemistry and biochemistry needed to understand contemporary problems in synthetic biology, biomaterials and computational biology.

Engineering Molecules 1: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 24 Freshmen Seminar 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester.

Freshmen Seminar: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 25 Careers in Biotechnology 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This introductory seminar is designed to give freshmen and sophomores an opportunity to explore specialties related to engineering in the pharmaceutical/biotech field. A series of one-hour seminars will be presented by industry professionals, professors, and researchers. Topics may include biotechnology and pharmaceutical manufacturing; process and control engineering; drug inspection process; research and development; compliance and validation;
construction process for a GMP facility; project management; and engineered solutions to environmental challenges. This course is of interest to students in all areas of engineering and biology, including industrial engineering and manufacturing, chemical engineering, and bioengineering.
Careers in Biotechnology: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 26 Introduction to Bioengineering 1 Unit

Terms offered: Not yet offered
This introductory seminar is designed to give freshmen and sophomores a glimpse of a broad selection of bioengineering research that is currently underway at Berkeley and UCSF. Students will become familiar with bioengineering applications in the various concentration areas and see how engineering principles can be applied to biological and medical problems.

Introduction to Bioengineering: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 84 Sophomore Seminar 1 or 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2013, Spring 2005
Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses offered by faculty members in departments all across the campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for close, regular intellectual contact between faculty members and students in the crucial second year. The topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sophomores.

Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 98 Supervised Independent Group Studies 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Organized group study on various topics under the sponsorship of a member of the Bioengineering faculty.

Supervised Independent Group Studies: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 99 Supervised Independent Study and Research 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Supervised independent study for lower division students.

Supervised Independent Study and Research: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 100 Ethics in Science and Engineering 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
The goal of this semester course is to present the issues of professional conduct in the practice of engineering, research, publication, public and private disclosures, and in managing professional and financial conflicts. The method is through historical didactic presentations, case studies, presentations of methods for problem solving in ethical matters, and classroom debates on contemporary ethical issues. The faculty will be drawn from national
experts and faculty from religious studies, journalism, and law from the UC Berkeley campus.
Ethics in Science and Engineering: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 101 Instrumentation in Biology and Medicine 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course teaches the fundamental principles underlying modern sensing and control instrumentation used in biology and medicine. The course takes an integrative analytic and hands-on approach to measurement theory and practice by presenting and analyzing example instruments currently used for biology and medical research, including EEG, ECG, pulsed oximeters, Complete Blood Count (CBC), etc.

Instrumentation in Biology and Medicine: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 102 Biomechanics: Analysis and Design 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course introduces, develops and applies the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena abundant in biology and medicine. It is intended for upper level undergraduate students who have been exposed to vectors, differential equations, and undergraduate course(s) in physics and certain aspects of modern biology.

Biomechanics: Analysis and Design: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 103 Engineering Molecules 2 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016
Thermodynamic and kinetic concepts applied to understanding the chemistry and structure of biomolecules (proteins, membranes, DNA, and RNA) and their thermodynamic and kinetic features in the crowded cellular environment. Topics include entropy, bioenergetics, free energy, chemical potential, reaction kinetics, enzyme kinetics, diffusion and transport, non-equilibrium systems, and their connections to the cellular environment.

Engineering Molecules 2: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 104 Biological Transport Phenomena 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
The transport of mass, momentum, and energy are critical to the function of living systems and the design of medical devices. Biological transport phenomena are present at a wide range of length scales: molecular, cellular, organ (whole and by functional unit), and organism. This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biological transport phenomena over a range of length and time scales. The course
is intended for undergraduate students who have taken a course in differential equations and an introductory course in physics. Students should be familiar with basic biology; an understanding of physiology is useful, but not assumed.
Biological Transport Phenomena: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 110 Biomedical Physiology for Engineers 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course introduces students to the physiology of human organ systems, with an emphasis on quantitative problem solving, engineering-style modeling, and applications to clinical medicine.

Biomedical Physiology for Engineers: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 111 Functional Biomaterials Development and Characterization 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course is intended for upper level engineering undergraduate students interested in the development of novel functional proteins and peptide motifs and characterization of their physical and biological properties using various instrumentation tools in quantitative manners. The emphasis of the class is how to develop novel proteins and peptide motifs, and to characterize their physical and biological functions using various analytical
tools in quantitative manners.
Functional Biomaterials Development and Characterization: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C112 Molecular Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of the Cell 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
This course applies methods of statistical continuum mechanics to subcellar biomechanical phenomena ranging from nanoscale (molecular) to microscale (whole cell and cell population) biological processes at the interface of mechanics, biology, and chemistry.

Molecular Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of the Cell: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 113 Stem Cells and Technologies 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
This course will teach the main concepts and current views on key attributes of embryonic stem cells (ESC), will introduce theory of their function in embryonic development, methods of ESC derivation, propagation, and characterization, and will discuss currently developing stem cell technologies.

Stem Cells and Technologies: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 114 Cell Engineering 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016
This course will teach the main concepts and current views on key attributes of animal cells (somatic, embryonic, pluripotent, germ-line; with the focus on mammalian cells), will introduce theory of the regulation of cell function, methods for deliberate control of cell properties and resulting biomedical technologies. Techniques for primary cell-line derivation, propagation characterization and therapeutic use (transplantation and drug-screening) will be outlined.
Current bioengineering strategies will be discussed.
Cell Engineering: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 115 Cell Biology for Engineers 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
This course aims to provide a practical understanding of the nature of cell and tissue biology research. Students will be introduced to cell biology techniques as applied to cells and tissues including immunofluorescence, image analysis, protein quantification, protein expression, gene expression, and cell culture. The course culminates with a group project which synthesizes literature review, experimental design, implementation, troubleshooting
, and analysis of results.
Cell Biology for Engineers: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 116 Cell and Tissue Engineering 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
The goal of tissue engineering is to fabricate substitutes to restore tissue structure and functions. Understanding cell function in response to environmental cues will help us to establish design criteria and develop engineering tools for tissue fabrication. This course will introduce the basic concepts and approaches in the field, and train students to design and engineer biological substitutes.

Cell and Tissue Engineering: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C117 Structural Aspects of Biomaterials 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2013, Spring 2012
This course covers the structure and mechanical functions of load bearing tissues and their replacements. Natural and synthetic load-bearing biomaterials for clinical applications are reviewed. Biocompatibility of biomaterials and host response to structural implants are examined. Quantitative treatment of biomechanical issues and constitutive relationships of tissues are covered in order to design biomaterial replacements for structural function.
Material selection for load bearing applications including reconstructive surgery, orthopedics, dentistry, and cardiology are addressed. Mechanical design for longevity including topics of fatigue, wear, and fracture are reviewed. Case studies that examine failures of devices are presented.
Structural Aspects of Biomaterials: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C118 Biological Performance of Materials 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
This course is intended to give students the opportunity to expand their knowledge of topics related to biomedical materials selection and design. Structure-property relationships of biomedical materials and their interaction with biological systems will be addressed. Applications of the concepts developed include blood-materials compatibility, biomimetic materials, hard and soft tissue-materials interactions, drug delivery, tissue engineering
, and biotechnology.
Biological Performance of Materials: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C119 Orthopedic Biomechanics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Statics, dynamics, optimization theory, composite beam theory, beam-on-elastic foundation theory, Hertz contact theory, and materials behavior. Forces and moments acting on human joints; composition and mechanical behavior of orthopedic biomaterials; design/analysis of artificial joint, spine, and fracture fixation prostheses; musculoskeletal tissues including bone, cartilage, tendon, ligament, and muscle; osteoporosis and fracture-risk predication
of bones; and bone adaptation. MATLAB-based project to integrate the course material.
Orthopedic Biomechanics: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 121 BioMEMS and Medical Devices 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Biophysical and chemical principles of biomedical devices, bionanotechnology, bionanophotonics, and biomedical microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMS). Topics include basics of nano- and microfabrication, soft-lithography, DNA arrays, protein arrays, electrokinetics, electrochemical, transducers, microfluidic devices, biosensor, point of care diagnostics, lab-on-a-chip, drug delivery microsystems, clinical lab-on-a-chip, advanced biomolecular
probes, etc.
BioMEMS and Medical Devices: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 121L BioMems and BioNanotechnology Laboratory 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Students will become familiar with BioMEMS and Lab-on-a-Chip research. Students will design and fabricate their own novel micro- or nano-scale device to address a specific problem in biotechnology using the latest micro- and nano-technological tools and fabrication techniques. This will involve an intensive primary literature review, experimental design, and quantitative data analysis. Results will be presented during class presentations and
at a final poster symposium.
BioMems and BioNanotechnology Laboratory: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 124 Basic Principles of Drug Delivery 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course focuses on providing students with the foundations needed to understand contemporary literature in drug delivery. Concepts in organic chemistry, biochemistry, and physical chemistry needed to understand current problems in drug delivery are emphasized.

Basic Principles of Drug Delivery: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C125 Introduction to Robotics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
An introduction to the kinematics, dynamics, and control of robot manipulators, robotic vision, and sensing. The course covers forward and inverse kinematics of serial chain manipulators, the manipulator Jacobian, force relations, dynamics, and control. It presents elementary principles on proximity, tactile, and force sensing, vision sensors, camera calibration, stereo construction, and motion detection. The course concludes with current applications
of robotics in active perception, medical robotics, and other areas.
Introduction to Robotics: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C125B Robotic Manipulation and Interaction 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016
This course is a sequel to Electrical Engineering C106A/Bioengineering C125, which covers kinematics, dynamics and control of a single robot. This course will cover dynamics and control of groups of robotic manipulators coordinating with each other and interacting with the environment. Concepts will include an introduction to grasping and the constrained manipulation, contacts and force control for interaction with the environment. We will also cover
active perception guided manipulation, as well as the manipulation of non-rigid objects. Throughout, we will emphasize design and human-robot interactions, and applications to applications in manufacturing, service robotics, tele-surgery, and locomotion.
Robotic Manipulation and Interaction: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 131 Introduction to Computational Molecular and Cell Biology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Topics include computational approaches and techniques to gene structure and genome annotation, sequence alignment using dynamic programming, protein domain analysis, RNA folding and structure prediction, RNA sequence design for synthetic biology, genetic and biochemical pathways and networks, UNIX and scripting languages, basic probability and information theory. Various "case studies" in these areas are reviewed; web-based computational
biology tools will be used by students and programming projects will be given. Computational biology research connections to biotechnology will be explored.
Introduction to Computational Molecular and Cell Biology: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 132 Genetic Devices 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
This senior-level course is a comprehensive survey of genetic devices. These DNA-based constructs are comprised of multiple "parts" that together encode a higher-level biological behavior and perform useful human-defined functions. Such constructs are the engineering target for most projects in synthetic biology. Included within this class of constructs are genetic circuits, sensors, biosynthetic pathways, and microbiological functions.

Genetic Devices: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 133 Biomolecular Engineering 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This is an introductory course of biomolecular engineering and is required for all CBE graduate students. Undergraduates with knowledge of thermodynamics and transport are also welcome. The topics include structures, functions, and dynamics of biomolecules; molecular tools in biotechnology; metabolic and signaling networks in cellular engineering; and synthetic biology and biomedical engineering applications.

Biomolecular Engineering: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 135 Frontiers in Microbial Systems Biology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
This course is aimed at graduate and advanced undergraduate students from the (bio) engineering and chemo-physical sciences interested in a research-oriented introduction to current topics in systems biology. Focusing mainly on two well studied microbiological model systems--the chemotaxis network and Lambda bacteriophage infection--the class systematically introduces key concepts and techniques for biological network deduction, modelling, analysis
, evolution, and synthetic network design. Students analyze the impact of approaches from the quantitative sciences--such as deterministic modelling, stochastic processes, statistics, non-linear dynamics, control theory, information theory, graph theory, etc.--on understanding biological processes, including (stochastic) gene regulation, signalling, network evolution, and synthetic network design. The course aims to identify unsolved problems and discusses possible novel approaches while encouraging students to develop ideas to explore new directions in their own research.
Frontiers in Microbial Systems Biology: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C136L Laboratory in the Mechanics of Organisms 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
Introduction to laboratory and field study of the biomechanics of animals and plants using fundamental biomechanical techniques and equipment. Course has a series of rotations involving students in experiments demonstrating how solid and fluid mechanics can be used to discover the way in which diverse organisms move and interact with their physical environment. The laboratories emphasize sampling methodology, experimental design, and statistical
interpretation of results. Latter third of course devoted to independent research projects. Written reports and class presentation of project results are required.
Laboratory in the Mechanics of Organisms: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C137 Designing for the Human Body 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
The course provides project-based learning experience in understanding product design, with a focus on the human body as a mechanical machine. Students will learn the design of external devices used to aid or protect the body. Topics will include forces acting on internal materials (e.g., muscles and total replacement devices), forces acting on external materials (e.g., prothetics and crash pads), design/analysis of devices aimed to improve or fix the human body
, muscle adaptation, and soft tissue injury. Weekly laboratory projects will incorporate EMG sensing, force plate analysis, and interpretation of data collection (e.g., MATLAB analysis) to integrate course material to better understand contemporary design/analysis/problems.
Designing for the Human Body: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 140L Synthetic Biology Laboratory 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2014
This laboratory course is designed as an introduction to research in synthetic biology, a ground-up approach to genetic engineering with applications in bioenergy, heathcare, materials science, and chemical production. In this course, we will design and execute a real research project. Each student will be responsible for designing and constructing components for the group project and then performing experiments to analyze the system. In addition
to laboratory work, we will have lectures on methods and design concepts in synthetic biology including an introduction to Biobricks, gene synthesis, computer modeling, directed evolution, practical molecular biology, and biochemistry.
Synthetic Biology Laboratory: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 143 Computational Methods in Biology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
An introduction to biophysical simulation methods and algorithms, including molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo, mathematical optimization, and "non-algorithmic" computation such as neural networks. Various case studies in applying these areas in the areas of protein folding, protein structure prediction, drug docking, and enzymatics will be covered. Core Specialization: Core B (Informatics and Genomics); Core D (Computational Biology); BioE
Content: Biological.
Computational Methods in Biology: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 144 Introduction to Protein Informatics 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2008, Fall 2007
This course will introduce students to the bioinformatics algorithms used by biologists to identify homologs, construct multiple sequence alignments, predict protein structure, estimate phylogenetic trees, identify orthologs, predict protein-protein interaction, and build hidden Markov models. The focus is on the algorithms used, and on the sources of various types of errors in these methods.

Introduction to Protein Informatics: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 144L Protein Informatics Laboratory 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2008
This course is intended to provide hands-on experience with a variety of bioinformatics tools, web servers, and databases that are used to predict protein function and structure. This course will cover numerous bioinformatics tasks including: homolog detection using BLAST and PSI-BLAST, hidden Markov model construction and use, multiple sequence alignment, phylogenetic tree construction, ortholog identification, protein structure prediction, active site prediction,
cellular localization, protein-protein interaction and phylogenomic analysis. Some minimal programming/scripting skills (e.g., Perl or Python) are required to complete some of the labs.
Protein Informatics Laboratory: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C145L Introductory Electronic Transducers Laboratory 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
Laboratory exercises exploring a variety of electronic transducers for measuring physical quantities such as temperature, force, displacement, sound, light, ionic potential; the use of circuits for low-level differential amplification and analog signal processing; and the use of microcomputers for digital sampling and display. Lectures cover principles explored in the laboratory exercises; construction, response and signal to noise of electronic
transducers and actuators; and design of circuits for sensing and controlling physical quantities.
Introductory Electronic Transducers Laboratory: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C145M Introductory Microcomputer Interfacing Laboratory 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2012, Spring 2011
Laboratory exercises constructing basic interfacing circuits and writing 20-100 line C programs for data acquisition, storage, analysis, display, and control. Use of the IBM PC with microprogrammable digital counter/timer, parallel I/O port. Circuit components include anti-aliasing filters, the S/H amplifier, A/D and D/A converters. Exercises include effects of aliasing in periodic sampling, fast Fourier transforms of basic waveforms, the
use of the Hanning filter for leakage reduction, Fourier analysis of the human voice, digital filters, and control using Fourier deconvolution. Lectures cover principles explored in the lab exercises and design of microcomputer-based systems for data acquisitions, analysis and control.
Introductory Microcomputer Interfacing Laboratory: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 147 Principles of Synthetic Biology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
The field of synthetic biology is quickly emerging as potentially one of the most important and profound ways by which we can understand and manipulate our physical world for desired purposes. In this course, the field and its natural scientific and engineering basis are introduced. Relevant topics in cellular and molecular biology and biophysics, dynamical and engineering systems, and design and operation of natural and synthetic circuits are
covered in a concise manner that then allows the student to begin to design new biology-based systems.
Principles of Synthetic Biology: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 148 Bioenergy and Sustainable Chemical Synthesis: Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology Approaches 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
This course will cover metabolic engineering and the various synthetic biology approaches for optimizing pathway performance. Use of metabolic engineering to produce biofuels and general "green technology" will be emphasized since these aims are currently pushing these fields. The course is meant to be a practical guide for metabolic engineering and the related advances in synthetic biology as well the related industrial research and
opportunities.
Bioenergy and Sustainable Chemical Synthesis: Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology Approaches: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 150 Introduction of Bionanoscience and Bionanotechnology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course is intended for the bioengineering or engineering undergraduate students interested in acquiring a background in recent development of bio-nanomaterials and bio-nanotechnology. The emphasis of the class is to understand the properties of biological basis building blocks, their assembly principles in nature, and their application to build functional materials and devices.

Introduction of Bionanoscience and Bionanotechnology: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 151 Micro/Nanofluidics for Bioengineering and Lab-On-A-Chip 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
Introduction and in-depth treatment of theory relevant to fluid flow in microfluidic and nanofluidic systems supplemented by critical assessment of recent applications drawn from the literature. Topics include low Reynolds Number flow, mass transport including diffusion phenomena, and emphasis on electrokinetic systems and bioanalytical applications of said phenomena.

Micro/Nanofluidics for Bioengineering and Lab-On-A-Chip: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 163 Principles of Molecular and Cellular Biophotonics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course provides undergraduate and graduate bioengineering students with an opportunity to increase their knowledge of topics in the emerging field of biophotonics with an emphasis on fluorescence spectroscopy, biosensors and devices for optical imaging and detection of biomolecules. This course will cover the photophysics and photochemistry of organic molecules, the design and characterization of biosensors and their applications within diverse
environments.
Principles of Molecular and Cellular Biophotonics: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 163L Molecular and Cellular Biophotonics Laboratory 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Fall 2013
This course provides undergraduate and graduate bioengineering students with an opportunity to acquire essential experimental skills in fluorescence spectroscopy and the design, evaluation, and optimization of optical biosensors for quantitative measurements of proteins and their targets. Groups of students will be responsible for the research, design, and development of a biosensor or diagnostic device for the detection, diagnosis, and monitoring
of a specific biomarker(s).
Molecular and Cellular Biophotonics Laboratory: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 164 Optics and Microscopy 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2010, Fall 2009, Fall 2008
This course teaches fundamental principles of optics and examines contemporary methods of optical microscopy for cells and molecules. Students will learn how to design simple optical systems, calculate system performance, and apply imaging techniques including transmission, reflection, phase, and fluorescence microscopy to investigate biological samples. The capabilities of optical microscopy will be compared with complementary techniques including
electron microscopy, coherence tomography, and atomic force microscopy. Students will also be responsible for researching their final project outside of class and presenting a specific application of modern microscopy to biological research as part of an end-of-semester project.
Optics and Microscopy: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C165 Medical Imaging Signals and Systems 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Biomedical imaging is a clinically important application of engineering, applied mathematics, physics, and medicine. In this course, we apply linear systems theory and basic physics to analyze X-ray imaging, computerized tomography, nuclear medicine, and MRI. We cover the basic physics and instrumentation that characterizes medical image as an ideal perfect-resolution image blurred by an impulse response. This material could prepare the student
for a career in designing new medical imaging systems that reliably detect small tumors or infarcts.
Medical Imaging Signals and Systems: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 168L Practical Light Microscopy 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
This laboratory course is designed for students interested in obtaining practical hands-on training in optical imaging and instrumentation. Using a combination of lenses, cameras, and data acquisition equipment, students will construct simple light microscopes that introduce basic concepts and limitations important in biomedical optical imaging. Topics include compound microscopes, Kohler illumination, Rayleigh two-point resolution, image contrast
including dark-field and fluorescence microscopy, and specialized techniques such as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). Intended for students in both engineering and the sciences, this course will emphasize applied aspects of optical imaging and provide a base of practical skill and reference material that students can leverage in their own research or in industry.
Practical Light Microscopy: Read More [+]

BIO ENG C181 The Berkeley Lectures on Energy: Energy from Biomass 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
After an introduction to the different aspects of our global energy consumption, the course will focus on the role of biomass. The course will illustrate how the global scale of energy guides the biomass research. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of the biological aspects (crop selection, harvesting, storage and distribution, and chemical composition of biomass) with the chemical aspects to convert biomass to energy. The course aims to
engage students in state-of-the-art research.
The Berkeley Lectures on Energy: Energy from Biomass: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 190 Special Topics in Bioengineering 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016
This course covers current topics of research interest in bioengineering. The course content may vary from semester to semester.

Special Topics in Bioengineering: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 192 Senior Design Projects 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This semester-long course introduces students to bioengineering project-based learning in small teams, with a strong emphasis on need-based solutions for real medical and research problems through prototype solution selection, design, and testing. The course is designed to provide a "capstone" design experience for bioengineering seniors. The course is structured around didactic lectures, and a textbook, from which assigned readings will
be drawn, and supplemented by additional handouts, readings, and lecture material. Where appropriate, the syllabus includes guest lectures from clinicians and practicing engineers from academia and industry. The course includes active learning through organized activities, during which teams will participate in exercises meant to reinforce lecture material through direct application to the team design project.
Senior Design Projects: Read More [+]

BIO ENG H194 Honors Undergraduate Research 3 or 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Supervised research. Students who have completed 3 or more upper division courses may pursue original research under the direction of one of the members of the staff. May be taken a second time for credit only. A final report or presentation is required. A maximum of 4 units of this course may be used to fulfill the research or technical elective requirement or in the Bioengineering program.

Honors Undergraduate Research: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 196 Undergraduate Design Research 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Supervised research. This course will satisfy the Senior Bioengineering Design project requirement. Students with junior or senior status may pursue research under the direction of one of the members of the staff. May be taken a second time for credit only. A final report or presentation is required.

Undergraduate Design Research: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 198 Directed Group Study for Advanced Undergraduates 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Group study of a selected topic or topics in bioengineering, usually relating to new developments.

Directed Group Study for Advanced Undergraduates: Read More [+]

BIO ENG 199 Supervised Independent Study 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2017
Supervised independent study.

Supervised Independent Study: Read More [+]

Faculty and Instructors

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

John Anderson, Assistant Professor.

Martin S. Banks, Professor. Stereopsis, virtual reality, optometry, multisensory interactions, self-motion perception, vision, depth perception, displays, picture perception, visual ergonomics.
Research Profile

Steven Brenner, Professor. Molecular biology, computational biology, evolutionary biology, bioengineering, structural genomics, computational genomics, cellular activity, cellular functions, personal genomics.
Research Profile

John Canny, Professor. Computer science, activity-based computing, livenotes, mechatronic devices, flexonics.
Research Profile

Jose M. Carmena, Professor. Brain-machine interfaces, neural ensemble computation, neuroprosthetics, sensorimotor learning and control.
Research Profile

Michelle Chang, Associate Professor.

Irina M. Conboy, Associate Professor. Stem cell niche engineering, tissue repair, stem cell aging and rejuvenation.
Research Profile

Yang Dan, Professor. Neuronal circuits, mammalian visual system, electrophysiological, psychophysical and computational techniques, visual cortical circuits, visual neurons.
Research Profile

John Eugene Dueber, Assistant Professor. Synthetic biology, Metabolic Engineering.
Research Profile

+ Robert J. Full, Professor. Energetics, comparative biomechanics, arthropod, adhesion, comparative physiology, locomotion, neuromechanics, biomimicry, biological inspiration, reptile, gecko, amphibian, robots, artificial muscles.
Research Profile

Jack L. Gallant, Professor. Vision science, form vision, attention, fMRI, computational neuroscience, natural scene perception, brain encoding, brain decoding.
Research Profile

Xiaohua Gong, Professor. Optometry, vision science, eye development and diseases, lens development.
Research Profile

Amy Herr, Associate Professor. Microfluidics, bioanalytical separations, diagnostics, electrokinetic transport, engineering design.
Research Profile

Tony M. Keaveny, Professor. Biomechanics of bone, orthopaedic biomechanics, design of artificial joints, osteoporosis, finite element modeling, clinical biomechanics.
Research Profile

Stanley A. Klein, Professor. Optometry, vision science, spatial vision modeling, psychophysical methods and vision test design, corneal topography and contact lens design, source localization of evoked potentials, fMRI, amblyopia.
Research Profile

Luke Lee, Professor. Biophotonics, biophysics, bionanoscience, molecular imaging, single cell analysis, bio-nano interfaces, integrated microfluidic devices (iMD) for diagnostics and preventive personalized medicine.
Research Profile

Seung-Wuk Lee, Associate Professor. Nanotechnology, bio-inspired nanomaterials, synthetic viruses, regenerative tissue engineering materials, drug delivery vehicles.
Research Profile

Song Li, Professor. Bioengineering, vascular tissue engineering, stem cell engineering, mechano-chemical signal transduction, biomimetic matrix, molecules, bioinformatic applications in tissue engineering, molecular dynamics.
Research Profile

Michel Maharbiz, Associate Professor. Neural interfaces, bioMEMS, microsystems, MEMS, microsystems for the life sciences.
Research Profile

Gerard Marriott, Professor.

Richard Mathies, Professor. Genomics, biophysical, bioanalytical, physical chemistry; laser spectroscopy, resonance Raman, excited-state reaction dynamics photoactive proteins, rhodopsins, microfabricated chemical biochemical analysis devices, forensics, infectious disease detection.
Research Profile

Mohammad Mofrad, Professor. Nuclear pore complex and nucleocytoplasmic transport, mechanobiology of disease, cellular mechanotransduction, integrin-mediated focal adhesions.
Research Profile

Niren Murthy, Professor.

+ Alexander Pines, Professor. Theory and experiment in magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging, quantum coherence and decoherence, novel concepts and methods including molecular and biomolecular sensors and microfluidics, laser hyperpolarization and detection, laser and zero-field NMR, in areas from material science to biomedicine.
Research Profile

Austin John Roorda, Professor. Adaptive optics, eye, vision, ophthalmoscopy, scanning laser ophthalmoscope, ophthalmology.
Research Profile

Kimmen Sjolander, Professor. Computational biology, algorithms, phylogenetic tree reconstruction, protein structure prediction, multiple sequence alignment, evolution, bioinformatics, hidden Markov models, metagenomics, statistical modeling, phylogenomics, emerging and neglected diseases, machine-learning, genome annotation, metagenome annotation, systems biology, functional site prediction, ortholog identification.
Research Profile

Lydia Sohn, Associate Professor. Micro-nano engineering.
Research Profile

Danielle Tullman-Ercek, Assistant Professor. Bioenergy, synthetic biology, protein engineering, bionanotechnology.
Research Profile

Emeritus Faculty

Thomas F. Budinger, Professor Emeritus. Image processing, biomedical electronics, quantitative aging, cardiovascular physiology, bioastronautics, image reconstruction, nuclear magnetic resonance, positron emission, tomography, reconstruction tomography, inverse problem mathematics.
Research Profile

Contact Information

Department of Bionegineering

306 Stanley Hall

MC 1762

Phone: 510-642-5833

Fax: 510-642-5835

bioeng@berkeley.edu

Visit Department Website

Department Chair

Daniel Fletcher, PhD

Phone: 510-642-5833

bioe_chair@berkeley.edu

Academic Undergraduate Student Adviser

Cindy Manly-Fields

306C Stanley Hall

Phone: 510-642-5860

cmanly@berkeley.edu

College of Engineering Student Services

Advising

230 Bechtel Engineering Center

Phone: 510-642-7594

Fax: 510-643-8653

ess@berkeley.edu

Engineering Student Services Adviser

Genie Foon

eugenia@berkeley.edu

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