Chinese Language

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

The Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures offers an undergraduate major in Chinese Language. The course of study is designed to train students in the humanistic investigation of major East Asian traditions, through a curriculum that centers on the acquisition of the modern and classical forms of the language, the informed and engaged reading of a wide variety of East Asian texts in their historical and cultural contexts, and the development of effective writing skills and critical thinking. Students are introduced to the vast and variegated literary, artistic, philosophical, and cultural traditions of East Asia and their transformations in modernity. Course offerings situate the study of East Asia in a global context and expose students to a variety of disciplinary and comparative approaches.

The major provides training in speaking, reading, and writing the relevant modern languages, as well as a basic familiarity with one or more of the language's earlier forms. Students complete the major by selecting from a broad range of courses in literature, popular cultures, philosophy, and linguistics, both in translation and in the original languages.

Students who major in the program have a variety of backgrounds. Many students are double majors in a broad spectrum of other departments and programs, including anthropology, applied mathematics, architecture, art history, art practice, Asian studies, business, comparative literature, computer science, economics, English, linguistics, mass communications, molecular and cell biology, political economy, political science, psychology, rhetoric, and theater arts.

Declaring the Major

Students interested in majoring in the program should consult with the staff undergraduate adviser regarding major requirements, transfer credits, and other academic concerns. Students are admitted to the major only after successful completion (with a grade of C or higher) of the prerequisites to the major; for information regarding the prerequisites, please see the Major Requirements tab on this page. Students are advised to begin preparation for the major as soon as possible in order to satisfy University, college, and department requirements. All students should be familiar with the college requirements for graduation with a Bachelor of Arts degree, as explained in the "Earning Your Degree," a bulletin available from the College of Letters & Science, 206 Evans Hall.

Honors Program

A senior undergraduate student who has completed 12 units of upper division language courses in the department, and who has a GPA of 3.5 in those courses and an overall average of 3.0 may apply for admission to the honors program. If accepted, the student will enroll in an honors course (any H195 course) for two consecutive semesters leading to the completion of an honors thesis, which must be submitted at least two weeks before the end of the semester in which the student expects to graduate. While enrolled in the honors program, the student will undertake independent advanced study under the guidance of the student's honors thesis adviser. Upon completion of the program, a faculty committee will determine the degree of honors to be awarded (honors, high honors, highest honors), taking into consideration both the quality of the thesis and overall performance in the department. Honors will not be granted to a student who does not achieve a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.3 in all undergraduate work in the University by the time of graduation.

Minor

The Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures offers an undergraduate minor in Chinese Language. To declare the minor, please visit 3414 Dwinelle Hall.

Other Majors and Minors Offered by the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures

East Asian Religion, Thought, and Culture (Major only)
Japanese Language (Major and Minor)
Korean Language (Minor only)
Tibetan (Minor only)

Visit Department Website

Major Requirements

In addition to the University, campus, and college requirements, listed on the College Requirements tab, students must fulfill the below requirements specific to their major program.

General Guidelines

  1. All courses taken to fulfill the major requirements below must be taken for graded credit, other than courses listed which are offered on a Pass/No Pass basis only. Other exceptions to this requirement are noted as applicable.
  2. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student's major and minor programs, with the exception of minors offered outside of the College of Letters & Science.
  3. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 must be maintained in both upper and lower division courses used to fulfill the major requirements.

For information regarding residence requirements and unit requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.

Please note that students with previous language experience will be required to take the online placement exam.

Lower Division Prerequisites

CHINESE 1AElementary Chinese (or equivalent) 15
CHINESE 1BElementary Chinese (or equivalent) 15
CHINESE 7AIntroduction to Premodern Chinese Literature and Culture 24
or CHINESE 7B Introduction to Modern Chinese Literature and Culture

Lower Division Major Requirements

Minimum three courses, 12 units.

CHINESE 10AIntermediate Chinese (or equivalent) 15
CHINESE 10BIntermediate Chinese (or equivalent) 15
Select one of the following (whichever one not selected as a prerequisite):
Introduction to Premodern Chinese Literature and Culture
Introduction to Modern Chinese Literature and Culture

Upper Division Major Requirements

Minimum eight courses, 32 units.

CHINESE 100AAdvanced Chinese (or equivalent) 15
CHINESE 100BAdvanced Chinese (or equivalent) 15
CHINESE 110AIntroduction to Literary Chinese4
CHINESE 110BIntroduction to Literary Chinese4
Select one modern Chinese literature course from courses numbered CHINESE 150-159:4
Reading Taiwan
Readings in Vernacular Chinese Literature
Modern Chinese Literature
Contemporary Chinese Literature
Reading Chinese Cities
Cities and the Country
Select one EA LANG upper division course, from courses numbered EALANG 100-1894
Select two additional upper division EALC electives (Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Mongolian, Tibetan, or East Asian Languages and Cultures), in consultation with the adviser8
1

Please note that students with previous language experience will be required to take a placement exam. Students who place out of language courses or into the heritage track will be required to take additional adviser-approved literature or culture courses offered by the department in order to meet the above unit requirements.

2

Introduction to Chinese Literature must be taken at UC Berkeley.

Minor Requirements

Students who have a strong interest in an area of study outside their major often decide to complete a minor program. These programs have set requirements and are noted officially on the transcript in the memoranda section but are not noted on diplomas.

General Guidelines

  1. All courses taken to fulfill the minor requirements below must be taken for graded credit.
  2. A minimum of three of the upper division courses taken to fulfill the minor requirements must be completed at UC Berkeley.
  3. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required for courses used to fulfill the minor requirements.
  4. Courses used to fulfill the minor requirements may be applied toward the Seven-Course Breadth requirement, for Letters & Science students.
  5. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student's major and minor programs.
  6. All minor requirements must be completed prior to the last day of finals during the semester in which you plan to graduate. If you cannot finish all courses required for the minor by that time, please see a College of Letters & Science adviser.
  7. All minor requirements must be completed within the unit ceiling. (For further information regarding the unit ceiling, please see the College Requirements tab.)

Requirements

Language Training 1
CHINESE 1AElementary Chinese (or equivalent)5
CHINESE 1BElementary Chinese (or equivalent)5
CHINESE 10AIntermediate Chinese (or equivalent)5
CHINESE 10BIntermediate Chinese (or equivalent)5
Upper Division Requirements (five courses, minimum 20 units) 2,3
Select three upper division Chinese courses
Advanced Chinese
Advanced Chinese
Advanced Chinese for Mandarin Speakers
Advanced Chinese for Mandarin Speakers
Advanced Chinese for Dialect Speakers
Advanced Chinese for Dialect Speakers
Fourth-Year Chinese Readings: Literature
Fourth-Year Chinese Readings: Social Sciences and History
Business Chinese
Introduction to Literary Chinese
Introduction to Literary Chinese
Fifth-Year Readings: Reading and Analysis of Advanced Chinese Texts
Fifth-Year Readings: Chinese for Research and Professional Use
Buddhism in China
Ancient Chinese Prose
Ancient Chinese Poetry
Topics in Daoism
Readings in Classical Chinese Poetry
Readings in Medieval Prose
Readings in Chinese Buddhist Texts
Reading Taiwan
Readings in Vernacular Chinese Literature
Modern Chinese Literature
Contemporary Chinese Literature
Reading Chinese Cities
Cities and the Country
Structure of the Chinese Language
History of the Chinese Language
Contemporary Chinese Language Cinema
Bad Emperors: Fantasies of Sovereignty and Transgression in the Chinese Tradition
Traditional Chinese Drama
Exploring Premodern Chinese Novels
The Story of the Stone
Sonic Culture in China
Confucius and His Interpreters
Literature and Media Culture in Taiwan
Popular Media in Modern China
Chinese Landscapes: Space, Place, and Travel
Select two additional upper division electives from Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Mongolian, Tibetan, and East Asian Languages and Cultures courses 48
1

Students with previous language experience will be required to take a placement exam.

2

All courses require adviser approval.

3

One 7A or 7B course from the EALC department listings may be substituted for one of the five upper division courses.

4

EAP course(s) may be used to satisfy one of the electives; however, not all EAP courses will be approved for the minor. Please check with the adviser in advance.

College Requirements

Undergraduate students in the College of Letters & Science must fulfill the following requirements in addition to those required by their major program.

For detailed lists of courses that fulfill college requirements, please review the College of Letters & Sciences page in this Guide.

Entry Level Writing

All students who will enter the University of California as freshmen must demonstrate their command of the English language by fulfilling the Entry Level Writing requirement. Fulfillment of this requirement is also a prerequisite to enrollment in all reading and composition courses at UC Berkeley. 

American History and American Institutions

The American History and Institutions requirements are based on the principle that a US resident graduated from an American university should have an understanding of the history and governmental institutions of the United States.

American Cultures

American Cultures is the one requirement that all undergraduate students at Cal need to take and pass in order to graduate. The requirement offers an exciting intellectual environment centered on the study of race, ethnicity and culture of the United States. AC courses offer students opportunities to be part of research-led, highly accomplished teaching environments, grappling with the complexity of American Culture.

Quantitative Reasoning

The Quantitative Reasoning requirement is designed to ensure that students graduate with basic understanding and competency in math, statistics, or computer science. The requirement may be satisfied by exam or by taking an approved course.

Foreign Language

The Foreign Language requirement may be satisfied by demonstrating proficiency in reading comprehension, writing, and conversation in a foreign language equivalent to the second semester college level, either by passing an exam or by completing approved course work.

Reading and Composition

In order to provide a solid foundation in reading, writing and critical thinking the College requires two semesters of lower division work in composition in sequence. Students must complete a first-level reading and composition course by the end of their second semester and a second-level course by the end of their fourth semester.

Breadth Requirements

The undergraduate breadth requirements provide Berkeley students with a rich and varied educational experience outside of their major program. As the foundation of a liberal arts education, breadth courses give students a view into the intellectual life of the University while introducing them to a multitude of perspectives and approaches to research and scholarship. Engaging students in new disciplines and with peers from other majors, the breadth experience strengthens interdisciplinary connections and context that prepares Berkeley graduates to understand and solve the complex issues of their day.

Unit Requirements

  • 120 total units, including at least 60 L&S units

  • Of the 120 units, 36 must be upper division units

  • Of the 36 upper division units, 6 must be taken in courses offered outside your major department

Residence Requirements

For units to be considered in "residence," you must be registered in courses on the Berkeley campus as a student in the College of Letters & Science. Most students automatically fulfill the residence requirement by attending classes here for four years. In general, there is no need to be concerned about this requirement, unless you go abroad for a semester or year or want to take courses at another institution or through UC Extension during your senior year. In these cases, you should make an appointment to meet an adviser to determine how you can meet the Senior Residence Requirement.

Note: Courses taken through UC Extension do not count toward residence.

Senior Residence Requirement

After you become a senior (with 90 semester units earned toward your BA degree), you must complete at least 24 of the remaining 30 units in residence in at least two semesters. To count as residence, a semester must consist of at least 6 passed units. Intercampus Visitor, EAP, and UC Berkeley-Washington Program (UCDC) units are excluded.

You may use a Berkeley Summer Session to satisfy one semester of the Senior Residence requirement, provided that you successfully complete 6 units of course work in the Summer Session and that you have been enrolled previously in the college.

Modified Senior Residence Requirement

Participants in the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP) or the UC Berkeley Washington Program (UCDC) may meet a Modified Senior Residence requirement by completing 24 (excluding EAP) of their final 60 semester units in residence. At least 12 of these 24 units must be completed after you have completed 90 units.

Upper Division Residence Requirement

You must complete in residence a minimum of 18 units of upper division courses (excluding EAP units), 12 of which must satisfy the requirements for your major.

Courses

Chinese Language

CHINESE 1 Intensive Elementary Chinese 10 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2015 10 Week Session
This course is the equivalent of Chinese 1A and Chinese 1B offered in the regular academic year.

Intensive Elementary Chinese: Read More [+]

CHINESE 1A Elementary Chinese 5 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
The course is designed for students who are of non-Chinese origin and were not raised in a Chinese-speaking environment; or who are of Chinese origin but do not speak Chinese and whose parents do not speak Chinese. The course develops beginning learners’ functional language ability—the ability to use Mandarin Chinese in linguistically and culturally appropriate ways at the beginning level.
It helps students acquire communicative competence in Chinese while sensitizing them to the links between language and culture.
Elementary Chinese: Read More [+]

CHINESE 1B Elementary Chinese 5 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
The course is designed for students who are of non-Chinese origin and were not raised in a Chinese-speaking environment, or who are of Chinese origin but do not speak Chinese and whose parents do not speak Chinese. The course continues to focus on training students in the four language skills--speaking, listening, reading, and writing with a gradually increasing emphasis on basic cultural
readings and developing intercultural competence.
Elementary Chinese: Read More [+]

CHINESE 1X Elementary Chinese for Mandarin Speakers 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course is designed specifically for Mandarin heritage students who possess speaking skill but little or no reading and writing skills in Chinese. The course utilizes students’ prior knowledge of listening and speaking skills to advance them to the intermediate Chinese proficiency level in one semester. Close attention is paid to meeting Mandarin heritage students’ literacy needs in meaningful
contexts while introducing a functional vocabulary and a systematic review of structures through culturally related topics. The Hanyu Pinyin (a Chinese Romanization system) and traditional/simplified characters are introduced.
Elementary Chinese for Mandarin Speakers: Read More [+]

CHINESE 1Y Elementary Chinese for Dialect Speakers 5 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The course is designed for students who have had exposure to a non-Mandarin Chinese dialect but cannot speak Mandarin and possess little or no reading and writing skills in Chinese. The course helps students gain a fundamental knowledge about Mandarin Chinese and explore their Chinese heritage culture through language. Students learn ways and discourse strategies to express themselves and
develop their linguistic and cultural awareness in order to function appropriately in Mandarin-speaking environments.
Elementary Chinese for Dialect Speakers: Read More [+]

CHINESE 7A Introduction to Premodern Chinese Literature and Culture 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Fall 2016
The first in a two-semester sequence, introducing students to Chinese literature in translation. In addition to literary sources, a wide range of philosophical and historical texts will be covered, as well as aspects of visual and material culture. 7A covers early China through late medieval China, up to and including the Yuan Dynasty (14th century); the course will
also focus on the development of sound writing.
Introduction to Premodern Chinese Literature and Culture: Read More [+]

CHINESE 7B Introduction to Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2017, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
The second of a two-semester sequence introducing students to Chinese literature in translation. In addition to literary sources, a wide range of philosophical and historical texts will be covered, as well as aspects of visual and material culture. 7B focuses on late imperial, modern, and contemporary China. The course will focus on the development
of sound writing skills.
Introduction to Modern Chinese Literature and Culture: Read More [+]

CHINESE 10 Intensive Intermediate Chinese 10 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2015 10 Week Session
This course is equivalent to Chinese 10A and Chinese 10B offered in the regular academic year.

Intensive Intermediate Chinese: Read More [+]

CHINESE 10A Intermediate Chinese 5 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The course is designed for students who are of non-Chinese origin and were not raised in a Chinese-speaking environment, or who are of Chinese origin but do not speak Chinese and whose parents do not speak Chinese. The course deals with lengthy conversations as well as narrative and descriptive texts in both simplified and traditional characters. It helps students to express themselves in
speaking and writing on a range of topics and raises their awareness of the connection between language and culture to foster the development of communicative competence.
Intermediate Chinese: Read More [+]

CHINESE 10B Intermediate Chinese 5 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
The course further develops students’ linguistic and cultural competence. In dealing with texts, students are guided to interpret, narrate, describe, and discuss topics ranging from real-life experience and personal memoire to historic events. Intercultural competence is promoted through linguistic and cultural awareness and language use in culturally appropriate contexts.

Intermediate Chinese: Read More [+]

CHINESE 10X Intermediate Chinese for Mandarin Speakers 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
The course continues to develop students’ literacy and communicative competence through vocabulary and structure expansion dealing with topics related to Chinese heritage students’ personal experiences. Students are guided to express themselves on complex issues and to connect their language knowledge with real world experiences.

Intermediate Chinese for Mandarin Speakers: Read More [+]

CHINESE 10Y Intermediate Chinese for Dialect Speakers 5 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
The course helps students further develop their linguistic and cultural competence in Mandarin Chinese. It trains students to use Mandarin more appropriately and confidently in speaking, reading, and writing. With the expanded repertoire of Chinese language use and the increased awareness of the differences between cultures and subcultures, students are equipped to negotiate their way
in an intercultural environment.
Intermediate Chinese for Dialect Speakers: Read More [+]

CHINESE 51 Chinese Thought in the Han Dynasty 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2017
This course examines the complex worldviews of China’s Han period, the centuries that follow its unification and the establishment of its empire. The momentous changes of this period shaped traditional and contemporary views of history and society, philosophy, and religion, and as a result are still relevant today. This course will look at Han “thought,” a word chosen for its range, including religion, state ritual
, social conventions, moral philosophy, and thinking about the natural world. It covers both elite and popular culture, and pays particular attention to two works of the second century B.C.E.: the Shiji (i.e., Records of the Historian) or the Huainanzi.
Chinese Thought in the Han Dynasty: Read More [+]

CHINESE 98 Directed Group Study for Lower Division Students 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2009, Spring 2009, Fall 2008
Small group instruction in topics not covered by regularly scheduled courses.

Directed Group Study for Lower Division Students: Read More [+]

CHINESE 99 Independent Study for Lower Division Students 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Spring 2006, Spring 2004
Independent study in topics not covered by regularly scheduled courses.

Independent Study for Lower Division Students: Read More [+]

CHINESE 100A Advanced Chinese 5 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The course takes students to a higher level of competence in Chinese language and culture and develops students’ critical linguistic and cultural awareness. It surveys social issues and values on more abstract topics in a changing China. Through the development of discourse and cultural knowledge in spoken and written Chinese, students learn to interpret subtle textual meanings in texts and
contexts as well as reflect on the world and themselves and express themselves using a variety of genres.
Advanced Chinese: Read More [+]

CHINESE 100B Advanced Chinese 5 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
The course continues the development of critical awareness by emphasizing the link between socio-cultural literacy and a higher level of language competence. While continuing to expand their critical literacy skills, students interpret texts related to Chinese popular culture, social change, cultural traditions, politics and history. Through linguistic and cultural comparisons, students
understand more about people in the target society and themselves as well as about the power of language in language use to enhance their competence in operating between languages and associated cultures.
Advanced Chinese: Read More [+]

CHINESE 100XA Advanced Chinese for Mandarin Speakers 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course advances students’ linguistic and cultural competence through the development of critical literacy skills. It guides students to become more sophisticated language users equipped with linguistic, pragmatic, and textual knowledge in discussions, reading, writing, and translation. Students reflect on the world and themselves through the lens of the target language and culture and
become more competent in operating between English and Chinese and between American culture and Chinese culture. Students learn to recognize a second version of Chinese characters.
Advanced Chinese for Mandarin Speakers: Read More [+]

CHINESE 100XB Advanced Chinese for Mandarin Speakers 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
The course continues to develop students’ critical literacy skills in interpreting texts and writing in different genres and styles. It engages students to use their linguistic knowledge and skills to survey portions of Chinese history and society and comprehend Chinese cultural heritage in contemporary and historic economic, social, and political contexts. Students are guided to explore
how language constructs subjective realities and contrast their own meanings in language production. The development of critical literacy and an understanding of the power of language in language use enables students to enhance their competence in operating between languages and associated cultures.
Advanced Chinese for Mandarin Speakers: Read More [+]

CHINESE 100YA Advanced Chinese for Dialect Speakers 5 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course helps Chinese heritage language learners with a dialect background to further develop their Chinese language competence. More sophisticated linguistic forms are used with various socio-cultural topics. Close reading knowledge and skills, formal and informal registers, discourses in speaking and writing, and different genres of Chinese reading and writing are introduced and practiced.
Students learn to recognize a second version of Chinese characters.
Advanced Chinese for Dialect Speakers: Read More [+]

CHINESE 100YB Advanced Chinese for Dialect Speakers 5 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016
This course is for students who have taken Chinese 100YA or an equivalent course. It further develops their Chinese language competence. It guides students to investigate, explain, and reflect on the nature of language used in the texts and on the cultural perspective embedded in the language. Close reading knowledge and skills, formal and informal registers, discourses in speaking and writing, and
different genres of Chinese reading and writing are practiced and used by students. They also are required to read texts in two versions of Chinese characters.
Advanced Chinese for Dialect Speakers: Read More [+]

CHINESE 101 Fourth-Year Chinese Readings: Literature 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
The course is designed to assist students to reach the advanced-mid level on language skills and to enhance their intercultural competence. Students read the works of famous Chinese writers. Movie adaptations of these writings are also used. In addition to reading and seeking out information, students experience readings by interpreting and constructing meanings and evaluate the effect
of the language form choice.
Fourth-Year Chinese Readings: Literature: Read More [+]

CHINESE 102 Fourth-Year Chinese Readings: Social Sciences and History 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The course is designed to further develop students’ advanced-mid level language proficiency and intercultural competence. It uses authentic readings on Chinese social, political, and journalistic issues, supplemented by newspaper articles. To develop students’ self-learning abilities and help them to link the target language to their real world experience, students’ agency in learning is promoted
through critical reading and rewriting and through comparing linguistic and cultural differences.
Fourth-Year Chinese Readings: Social Sciences and History: Read More [+]

CHINESE 105 Business Chinese 6 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2014 10 Week Session, Summer 2012 10 Week Session
Daily topics of instruction include media Chinese, reading business Chinese, and oral training. This course covers intensive instruction in third-year Chinese with an emphasis on business terminology and introduction to cultural knowledge specific to conducting business in the Chinese environment. Two afternoons per week are devoted
to field trips related to the topics of study including visits to banks and businesses, government units, museums, and guided tours of the city.
Business Chinese: Read More [+]

CHINESE 110 Introduction to Literary Chinese 8 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Summer 2010 10 Week Session
This ten-week course is an introduction to the core vocabulary and basic grammar of literary Chinese and is designed to provide students with the skills necessary for advanced reading in the various genres of literary Chinese. We will focus on reading skills through the introduction of basic grammatical features of the language and through the intensive study of actual texts. This course is the
equivalent of Chinese 110A-110B offered in the regular academic year.
Introduction to Literary Chinese: Read More [+]

CHINESE 110A Introduction to Literary Chinese 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The first half of a one-year introductory course in literary Chinese, introducing key features of grammar, syntax, and usage, along with the intensive study of a set of readings in the language. Readings are drawn from a variety of pre-Han and Han-Dynasty sources.

Introduction to Literary Chinese: Read More [+]

CHINESE 110B Introduction to Literary Chinese 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
The second half of a one-year introductory course in literary Chinese, continuing the topics from the first semester, and giving basic coverage of relevant issues in the history of the language and writing system. The use of basic reference sources is introduced.

Introduction to Literary Chinese: Read More [+]

CHINESE 111 Fifth-Year Readings: Reading and Analysis of Advanced Chinese Texts 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This fast-paced course improves students’ abilities to use advanced language forms to read and discuss a wide range of abstract subjects and issues. This includes literature, philosophy, law, economics, history, cross-Strait relations, geography, and movie criticism. The course also develops students’ ability to read articles that contain both formal and informal and modern and classic Chinese
usages. Students learn to identify and explain the classical Chinese allusions used in the articles and compare them to their modern counterparts. Students use the Chinese language in their fields of study and are directed to write a professional paper in their academic field.
Fifth-Year Readings: Reading and Analysis of Advanced Chinese Texts: Read More [+]

CHINESE 112 Fifth-Year Readings: Chinese for Research and Professional Use 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This fast-paced course is designed to help the student reach an advanced-high competence level in all aspects of modern Chinese. It prepares students for research or employment in a variety of China-related fields. Materials are drawn from native-speaker target publications, including modern Chinese literature, film, intellectual history, and readings on contemporary issues. Texts are
selected according to the students’ interests. Under the instructor’s guidance, students conduct their own research projects based on specialized readings in their own fields of study. Research projects are presented both orally and in written form.
Fifth-Year Readings: Chinese for Research and Professional Use: Read More [+]

CHINESE C116 Buddhism in China 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Spring 2015
This course is an introduction to the history of Buddhism in China from its beginnings in the early centuries CE to the present day. Through engagement with historical scholarship, primary sources in translation, and Chinese Buddhist art, we will explore the intellectual history and cultural impact of Buddhism in China. Students will also be introduced to major issues in the institutional history of Buddhism
, the interactions between Buddhism and indigenous Chinese religions, and the relationship between Buddhism and the state. Previous study of Buddhism is helpful but not required.
Buddhism in China: Read More [+]

CHINESE 120 Ancient Chinese Prose 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2012, Fall 2006, Fall 2004
Readings in historical, religious, and philosophical texts of the Zhou, Han, and later periods from both printed and manuscript sources.

Ancient Chinese Prose: Read More [+]

CHINESE 122 Ancient Chinese Poetry 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Fall 2007
Readings from the Shijing (book of Odes), the Chuci (song of Chu), and selections from other early compilations of poetry.

Ancient Chinese Poetry: Read More [+]

CHINESE 130 Topics in Daoism 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
Readings in printed and manuscript sources that relate to early Chinese popular religion, the Celestial Masters tradition, medieval Daoist revelations (e.g., Shangqing and Lingbao texts), Daoism and the state, interactions with other traditions, liturgy, alchemy, drama, and modern Daoist practices in China and the diaspora.

Topics in Daoism: Read More [+]

CHINESE 134 Readings in Classical Chinese Poetry 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session, Fall 2014
Introduction to the forms and subtypes of classical poetry, focusing on both learning to read poems in the original as well as developing the critical and analytical tools to discuss and respond to them in an informed way.

Readings in Classical Chinese Poetry: Read More [+]

CHINESE 136 Readings in Medieval Prose 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2013, Spring 2013
Thematic focus and range of readings will vary. The course will deal with readings from one or more genres of classical Chinese prose, such as essays, epigraphical materials, historical works, classical tales, administrative documents, scholars' notes, geographical treatises, or travel diaries.

Readings in Medieval Prose: Read More [+]

CHINESE C140 Readings in Chinese Buddhist Texts 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Fall 2009
This course is an introduction to the study of medieval Buddhist literature written in classical Chinese. We will read samples from a variety of genres, including early Chinese translations of Sanskrit and Central Asian Buddhist scriptures, indigenous Chinese commentaries, philosophical treatises, and sectarian works, including Chan (Zen koans). The course will also serve as an introduction
to resource materials used in the study of Chinese Buddhist texts, and students will be expected to make use of a variety of reference tools in preparation for class. Readings in Chinese will be supplemented by a range of secondary readings in English on Mahayana doctrine and Chinese Buddhist history.
Readings in Chinese Buddhist Texts: Read More [+]

CHINESE 153 Reading Taiwan 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Spring 2013
This course is an intensive introduction to Taiwanese literature and media culture.

Reading Taiwan: Read More [+]

CHINESE 155 Readings in Vernacular Chinese Literature 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
A critical study of pre-modern Chinese fiction.

Readings in Vernacular Chinese Literature: Read More [+]

CHINESE 156 Modern Chinese Literature 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2012, Spring 2010
This course will introduce students to selected works of modern Chinese literature produced in the first half of the 20th century, as well as their cultural and historical context. How did writers such as Lu Xun, Shen Congwen, Eileen Chang, and others attempt to make themselves "at home" in a world profoundly dislocated by the forces of colonialism, war, and revolution? We will
examine the politics of literary style, questions of nationalism, representations of gender, and the problem of colonial modernity in these texts. All primary texts are presented in the original Chinese, supplemented by critical and biographical articles in English.
Modern Chinese Literature: Read More [+]

CHINESE 157 Contemporary Chinese Literature 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2014, Spring 2008, Spring 2006
This course explores popular, realist, and avant-garde literature from mainland China and Taiwan since 1949. We will consider how writers have engaged with the cultural dislocations of modernity by exploring questions such as the presentation of cultural and gender identities and the politics of memory and place. Central to our discussion will be the problem of how literature not only
reflects but also critically engages with historical and cultural experience through a variety of genres. A crucial aspect of this course will be the development of skills in close, critical, and historically contextualized reading.
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CHINESE 158 Reading Chinese Cities 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Spring 2014
Chinese cities are the sites of complicated global/local interconnections as the nation is increasingly incorporated into the world system. Understanding Chinese cities is the key to analyzing the dramatic transformation of Chinese society and culture. This course is designed to teach students to think about Chinese cities in more textured ways. How are urban forms and urban spaces produced
through processes of social, political, and ideological conflict? How are cities represented in literary, cinematic, and various popular cultures? How has our imagination of the city been shaped and how are these spatial discourses influencing the making of the cities of tomorrow?
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CHINESE 159 Cities and the Country 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2009, Fall 2005
This course explores one of the most central and potent areas of cultural politics in modern China: the city and its relations to the countryside. We will explore how urban space and native soil became central places of imagination and desire in modernity; how Beijing and Shanghai become mediums of imagining differing meanings of "modernity" and "tradition," "Chinese" and
"Western," and cultural authenticity; the repeated reformist and revolutionary desire to return from the city back to the countryside; as well as more recent mass migrations from the countryside during a time of (and as part of) drastic urban destruction and "renewal."
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CHINESE 161 Structure of the Chinese Language 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2011, Spring 2010, Spring 2007
Chinese dialects, Mandarin phonology, and Mandarin grammar.

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CHINESE 165 History of the Chinese Language 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Spring 2009, Spring 2008, Spring 2001
Writing system, early dictionaries, historical phonology, and classical grammar.

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CHINESE 172 Contemporary Chinese Language Cinema 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course introduces Chinese language cinema since the late 1970s. Depending on the semester, the class will either focus on the distinct new waves in the three regions of Mainland, Taiwan, or Hong Kong, or cover all three regions to examine to what extent these “New Cinemas” share similar concerns on questions of gender, politics, remembrance, and urbanization.

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CHINESE 176 Bad Emperors: Fantasies of Sovereignty and Transgression in the Chinese Tradition 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Spring 2014
Ideals of good governance are a core concern of many brands of traditional Chinese thought. The image of the ruler whose authority is exercised in harmony with the desires and interests of the society at large plays a key role not only in theories of governance but also in thought about ethics and psychology. There is also a fascination with the bad ruler. In addition to serving as negative examples just as good
rulers serve as positive examples, bad rulers also provide an imaginative space for thinking about extremes of human will, offering an outlet for fantasy and vicarious gratification of desires that normally remain taboo.
Bad Emperors: Fantasies of Sovereignty and Transgression in the Chinese Tradition: Read More [+]

CHINESE 178 Traditional Chinese Drama 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015
This course introduces the history of traditional Chinese drama from the thirteenth to seventeenth centuries, covering important works from a wide range of genres (farcical, religious, detective, martial arts, historical, and romantic). We study Chinese theater in the context of pleasure precincts, ad hoc markets, ritual parades, and printed matter. The underlying questions we ask are: how did different
kinds of spatial structure historically define performance? And how did these varied spatial configurations orient the relationship of the audience to the performance differently? And what general implications did the theatrical space have for the constitution of the self and for social formation in medieval and early modern China?
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CHINESE 179 Exploring Premodern Chinese Novels 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2013
Vernacular fiction in late imperial China emerged at the margins of official historiography, traveled through oral storytelling, and reached sophistication in the hands of literati. Covering the major genres and masterpieces of traditional Chinese novels including military, martial arts, libertine, and romantic stories, this course investigates how shifting boundaries brought about significant transformations
of Chinese narrative at the levels of both form and content.
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CHINESE 180 The Story of the Stone 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Spring 2015
This course centers around intensive reading and analysis of Cao Xueqin’s 18th-century masterpiece of Chinese fiction (also known as the Dream of the Red Chamber). Students will be introduced to the literary, cultural, philosophical, and material world from which this work emerged, as well as various approaches to the world within the text.

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CHINESE C184 Sonic Culture in China 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Spring 2014, Fall 2004
This course explores the aesthetics and politics of sound - both musical and otherwise - in Chinese cultures. Through musical discourse and literary discourses on music, we trace the ways in which sound has been produced, heard, understood, and debated in both pre-modern and modern China. Topics include Confucian musical theory, Daoist hermeneutics, music, and poetry; the impact of recording technology
and Western music; urban popular musics, sound and cinema, and contemporary soundscapes.
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CHINESE 186 Confucius and His Interpreters 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
This course examines the development of Confucianism in pre-modern China using a dialogical model that emphasizes its interactions with competing viewpoints. Particular attention will be paid to ritual, conceptions of human nature, ethics, and to the way that varieties of Confucianism were rooted in more general theories of value.

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CHINESE 187 Literature and Media Culture in Taiwan 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This course is an intensive introduction in English translation to the history, literature, and media culture of Taiwan.

Literature and Media Culture in Taiwan: Read More [+]

CHINESE 188 Popular Media in Modern China 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2011, Spring 2011
This course is an introduction to media culture in 20th-century China, with an emphasis on photography, cinema, and popular music. The course places these productions in historical and cultural context, examining the complex intertwinement of culture, technology, and politics in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan from the turn of the last century to the beginning of the 21st. Students will also
be introduced to a number of approaches to thinking about and analyzing popular cultural phenomena.
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CHINESE 189 Chinese Landscapes: Space, Place, and Travel 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Spring 2010, Fall 2008, Fall 2005
What do landscapes "do"? How do landscape images and travel narratives mediate experiences of land, nature, and other peoples? How do landscapes map one's place in the world, shaping both cultural identities and real geographic spaces? Can landscapes travel? This course explores such questions by examining one of the world's longest-running traditions of landscape representation.
We will consider such landscape genres as poetry, prose description, fiction, travel narrative, maps, painting, and photography, and consider their work across China's long history of imperial expansion, colonization, and globalization. We will also consider China's places in thinking about landscape and travel in the West.
Chinese Landscapes: Space, Place, and Travel: Read More [+]

CHINESE H195A Honors Course 2 - 5 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Directed independent study and preparation of senior honors thesis. Limited to senior honors candidates in East Asian Languages (for description of Honors Program, see Index).

Honors Course: Read More [+]

CHINESE H195B Honors Course 2 - 5 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
Directed independent study and preparation of senior honors thesis. Limited to senior honors candidates in East Asian Languages (for description of Honors Program, see Index).

Honors Course: Read More [+]

CHINESE 198 Directed Group Study 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
Small group instruction in topics not covered by regularly scheduled courses.

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CHINESE 199 Independent Study 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: East Asian Languages and Cultures
Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
Independent study in topics not covered by regularly scheduled courses.

Independent Study: Read More [+]

Faculty and Instructors

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

Jinsoo An, Assistant Professor.

Robert Ashmore, Associate Professor. China, lyric poetry, Chinese literature, Chinese culture, poetic theory.
Research Profile

Weihong Bao, Assistant Professor. Film theory and history, media archaeology, critical theory, visual and performance culture, Chinese language cinema, transnational genre cinema, comparative media history and theory.

Mark L. Blum, Professor. Buddhism, Japan, culture and society, modernization.
Research Profile

Mark Csikszentmihalyi, Professor. Early China, Confucianism, Taoism, Daoism, Comparative Religion.
Research Profile

Jacob Dalton, Associate Professor. Religion, ritual, Tibet, Buddhism, Tantra, Dunhuang.
Research Profile

Yoko Hasegawa, Professor. Pragmatics, syntax, east asian languages and cultures, acoustic phonetics, semantics, sociolinguistics of Japanese, cognitive linguistics.
Research Profile

+ H. Mack Horton, Professor. Performativity, east asian languages and cultures, classical poetry, diary literature, cultural context, anthology of vernacular poetry, Man'yoshu, poetry and poetics.
Research Profile

Andrew Jones, Professor. East asian languages and cultures, Chinese popular music, sonic culture, media technology, modern Chinese fiction, children's literature, literary translation.
Research Profile

Youngmin Kwon, Adjunct Professor. Korean literature.
Research Profile

Ling Hon Lam, Assistant Professor.

Daniel C. O'Neill, Associate Professor. Modern Japanese Literature, East Asian Cinema, Global Modernism, visual studies.
Research Profile

Lanchih Po, Associate Adjunct Professor.

Robert Sharf, Professor. East asian languages and cultures, medieval Chinese buddhism, Chan buddhism, Japanese buddhism, Zen buddhism, Tantric buddhism, buddhist art, ritual studies, methodological issues in the study of religion.
Research Profile

Alan Tansman, Professor. Modern Japanese Literature, literary and cultural theory, aesthetics and politics, Comparative Responses to Violence, literary history.
Research Profile

Paula Varsano, Associate Professor. Phenomenology, translation, comparative literature, aesthetics, epistemology, classical Chinese poetry and poetics (3rd-11th centuries), traditional Chinese literary theory.
Research Profile

Sophie Volpp, Associate Professor. East asian languages and cultures, history of performance, gender theory, the history of sexuality, material culture, material objects in late-imperial literature.
Research Profile

Lecturers

Yasuko Konno Baker, Lecturer. Japanese language.
Research Profile

Brian Baumann, Lecturer. Mongolian language.
Research Profile

Weisi Cai, Lecturer. Chinese language.
Research Profile

Yuriko Caltabiano, Lecturer. Japanese language.
Research Profile

Seung-Eun Chang, Lecturer. Korean language.
Research Profile

Damien Donnelly, Lecturer. Chinese language.
Research Profile

Kayoko Imagawa, Lecturer. Japanese language.
Research Profile

Wakae Kambara, Lecturer. Japanese language.
Research Profile

Jiyoung Kim, Lecturer. Korean language.
Research Profile

Kyung-Ah Kim, Lecturer. Korean language.
Research Profile

Minsook Kim, Lecturer. Korean language.
Research Profile

Kijoo Ko, Lecturer. Korean language.
Research Profile

Yumi Konishi, Lecturer. Japanese language.
Research Profile

Meehyei Lee, Lecturer. Korean language.
Research Profile

Soojin C. Lee, Lecturer. Korean language.
Research Profile

I-Hao Li, Lecturer. Chinese language.
Research Profile

Hsin-yu Lin, Lecturer. Chinese language.
Research Profile

Pei-Ying Lin, Lecturer.
Research Profile

Li Liu, Lecturer. Chinese language.
Research Profile

Sanjyot Mehendale, Lecturer. Near Eastern studies, Central Asia, Central Asian studies, archaeology and art history.
Research Profile

Noriko Knickerbocker, Lecturer. Japanese language.
Research Profile

Junghee Park, Lecturer. Korean language.
Research Profile

Jann M. Ronis, Lecturer. Buddhist studies.
Research Profile

Chika Shibahara, Lecturer. Japanese language.
Research Profile

Maki Takata, Lecturer. Japanese language.
Research Profile

Chen-Hui Tsai, Lecturer. Chinese language.
Research Profile

John R. Wallace, Lecturer. Japanese language.
Research Profile

Noriko Komatsu Wallace, Lecturer. Japanese language.
Research Profile

Xianghua Wu, Lecturer. Chinese language.
Research Profile

Chunhong Xie, Lecturer. Chinese language.
Research Profile

Lihua Zhang, Lecturer. Chinese language.
Research Profile

Emeritus Faculty

Haruo Aoki, Professor Emeritus.

Cyril Birch, Professor Emeritus.

James E. Bosson, Professor Emeritus.

Kun Chang, Professor Emeritus.

Hung-Nin Samuel Cheung, Professor Emeritus. East asian languages and cultures, East Asian studies, vernacular Chinese literature and linguistics.
Research Profile

John C. Jamieson, Professor Emeritus.

Lewis Lancaster, Professor Emeritus. East asian languages and cultures, East Asian studies, east asian buddhism.
Research Profile

Susan Matisoff, Professor Emeritus. Japanese literature, performing arts and folklore.
Research Profile

Jeffrey Riegel, Professor Emeritus. East asian languages and cultures, ancient Chinese poetry and prose, early Chinese thought, Confucian classics, paleography, recently-excavated manuscripts.
Research Profile

Pang-Hsin Ting, Professor Emeritus.

Stephen H. West, Professor Emeritus.

Contact Information

Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures

3413 Dwinelle Hall

Phone: 510-642-3480

Fax: 510-642-6031

ealang@berkeley.edu

Visit Department Website

Department Chair

H. Mack Horton, PhD

3407 Dwinelle Hall

hmhorton@berkeley.edu

Student Services Adviser

Grant Tompkins

3414 Dwinelle Hall

Phone: 510-642-4497

Fax: 510-642-6031

ealc-advising@berkeley.edu

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