Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

Bachelor of Science (BS)

The Berkeley electrical engineering and computer sciences major (EECS), offered through the College of Engineering, combines fundamentals of computer science and electrical engineering in one major.

The EECS department offers two undergraduate programs: electrical and computer engineering (ECE) and computer science and engineering (CSE). The ECE program (electrical engineering) is best suited for students interested in focusing on electrical engineering upper division classes after completing the lower division requirements. The transcripts of ECE students indicate that their degree is from the electrical and computer engineering program. There are no specific requirements for the ECE program beyond those of the EECS major. The CSE program (computer science) is best suited for students interested in focusing on computer science upper division classes after completing the lower division requirements. The transcripts of students in CSE indicate that their degree is from the computer science and engineering program.

Note that there are two different major programs for computer science at UC Berkeley. One major leads to the Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree from the College of Letters & Science, and the other, the CSE option within the EECS major, leads to the Bachelor of Science (BS). An essential difference between the two majors is that the EECS program requires a greater number of math and science courses than the CS program, which requires a greater number of non-technical, or breadth, courses. The computer science major under L&S is not ABET accredited. For further information on the BA program, please see the Computer Science program page in this Guide

Accreditation

Both of the EECS programs in the College of Engineering are accredited by ABET through September 2018.

Honors Program

The EECS honors degree program is designed to provide very talented undergraduate students with more flexibility at the undergraduate level. Honors students select an academic concentration outside of EECS. In addition, students receive a special faculty adviser, engage in research, receive official notation of the honors degree on their Berkeley transcript, and are invited to special events with faculty and EECS honors alumni.

For more information regarding this program, please click here.

Admission to the Major

Prospective undergraduates to the College of Engineering apply for admission to a specific program in the college. For further information, please see the College of Engineering's website.

Admission to engineering, and in particular the EECS major, via a Change of College application is highly unlikely and very competitive as there are few, if any, spaces that open in the college each year to students admitted to other colleges at UC Berkeley. Prospective undergraduates interested in an EECS major should apply for admission to the College of Engineering.  For further information regarding a Change of College to Engineering, please see the College's website.

Five-Year BS/MS Program

The Five-Year Bachelor/Master Program, called the 5th Year MS Program for short, offers qualified EECS and L&S computer science undergraduate students a unique opportunity to begin graduate study during their undergraduate years, thereby accelerating the master's degree by requiring only one additional year beyond the bachelor's degree. This is not a concurrent degree program. Students earn their bachelor's degree first and then the master's. However, careful planning during the undergraduate program allows motivated students to begin a research project and complete some master's course requirements while still in undergraduate standing. Depending on how quickly a student progresses through the undergraduate program, the additional graduate year may come sooner than the fifth year at Berkeley. The Five-Year Program is not intended for those who wish to pursue a PhD. For further information regarding this program, please see the Five-Year BS/MS tab on this page, or the Department's website.

Minor Program

The EECS minor, offered through the College of Engineering, is an optional program for students interested in coherent EECS study outside of their major. It is open to any undergraduate who has declared a major other than EECS on the UC Berkeley campus, and has completed two of the four lower division course requirements. For further information regarding the prerequisites and other requirements, please see the Minor Requirements tab on this page.

The EECS Department also offers a minor in computer science. For information regarding this program, please see the computer science program page in this Guide.

Joint Majors

The EECS department also offers two joint majors, with other departments in the College of Engineering. For further information on these programs, please click the links below:
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences/Materials Science and Engineering (Department of Materials Science and Engineering)
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences/Nuclear Engineering (Department of Nuclear Engineering)

Visit Department Website

Major Requirements (BS)

In addition to the University, campus, and college requirements, students must fulfill the below requirements specific to their major program.

General Guidelines

  1. All technical courses taken in satisfaction of major requirements must be taken for a letter grade.

  2. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student’s major and minor programs.

  3. A minimum overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required for all work undertaken at UC Berkeley.

  4. A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required for all technical courses taken in satisfaction of major requirements.

For information regarding residence requirements and unit requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.

For a detailed plan of study by year and semester, please see the Plan of Study tab.

Summary of Major Requirements

For more detailed curriculum options for the EECS major, please see the EECS Undergraduate Handbook, available here.

Natural sciences: three courses
Mathematics: four courses
EECS lower division core: five courses
Upper division EECS electives: 20 units minimum
Technical Elective: 4 units minimum 1
Technical engineering courses: 45 units minimum 2
Courses taken to satisfy the EECS lower division core and EECS upper division electives count toward this 45 units.
If courses in these two categories do not total at least 45 units, additional technical, letter-graded courses must be taken to fulfill this requirement. 2
Ethics requirement: one course

Natural Sciences

PHYSICS 7APhysics for Scientists and Engineers4
PHYSICS 7BPhysics for Scientists and Engineers4
Select one course from the following:3-5
Introduction to Astrophysics
Introduction to Astrophysics
General Biology Lecture
and General Biology Laboratory
General Biology Lecture and Laboratory
General Chemistry
and General Chemistry Laboratory
General Chemistry
Chemical Structure and Reactivity
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Chemical Structure and Reactivity
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis 3
General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis 3
Introduction to Human Physiology
and Introduction to Human Physiology Laboratory
Physics for Scientists and Engineers
Any upper division letter graded course of 3 units or more in astronomy, chemistry, earth and planetary science (other than 170AC), integrative biology, molecular & cell biology, physics, or plant & microbial biology

Mathematics

MATH 1ACalculus4
MATH 1BCalculus4
MATH 53Multivariable Calculus4
COMPSCI 70Discrete Mathematics and Probability Theory4

EECS Lower Division Core

EL ENG 16ADesigning Information Devices and Systems I4
EL ENG 16BDesigning Information Devices and Systems II4
COMPSCI 61AThe Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs4
COMPSCI 61BData Structures4
or COMPSCI 61BL Data Structures and Programming Methodology
COMPSCI 61CGreat Ideas of Computer Architecture (Machine Structures)4
or COMPSCI 61CL Machine Structures (Lab-Centric)

Upper Division EECS Electives

Select a minimum of 20 units of upper division EECS courses.20
At least one of the courses must be a design elective. Select from the following design courses:
Introduction to Embedded Systems
Introduction to Robotics
Robotic Manipulation and Interaction
Feedback Control Systems
Integrated-Circuit Devices
Linear Integrated Circuits
Microfabrication Technology
EL ENG C149
Course Not Available
Mechatronic Design Laboratory
COMPSCI C149
Course Not Available
User Interface Design and Development
Operating Systems and System Programming
Programming Languages and Compilers
Software Engineering
Foundations of Computer Graphics
Introduction to Database Systems
Introduction to Digital Design and Integrated Circuits
and Application Specific Integrated Circuits Laboratory
Introduction to Digital Design and Integrated Circuits
and Field-Programmable Gate Array Laboratory

Technical Elective: 4 units1

Ethics Requirement

Select one course from the following:1-4
Ethics in Science and Engineering 4
Social Implications of Computer Technology
Honors Social Implications of Computer Technology
Energy and Society 4
Ethics, Engineering, and Society 4
Engineering, The Environment, and Society 4
Engineering, The Environment, and Society 4
Introduction to Technology, Society, and Culture 4
Introduction to Science, Society, and Ethics 4
Data and Ethics
1
Students must complete 4 units of Technical Elective(s) chosen from any lower or upper division course in the following departments: astronomy, chemistry, data science, earth and planetary science, integrative biology, mathematics, molecular cell biology, physics, plant & microbial biology, statistics or any engineering department (including EECS). The 4 units of technical elective(s) must be in addition to the natural science elective and the 20 units of required EECS upper division technical electives. If the 4 units of technical elective(s) are from an engineering department, the units can count toward the required 45 units of engineering coursework (see footnote 2). See footnote 2 for the list of excluded courses.
2

Technical engineering courses cannot include:

3

CHEM 4A and CHEM 4B are intended for students majoring in chemistry or a closely-related field.

4

These courses also satisfy one upper division humanities/social sciences course.

Five-Year BS/MS

The Five-Year Bachelor/Master Program, called the 5th Year MS Program for short, offers qualified EECS and L&S Computer Science undergraduate students a unique opportunity to begin graduate study during their undergraduate years, thereby accelerating the master's degree by requiring only one additional year beyond the bachelor's degree. This is not a concurrent degree program. Students earn their bachelor's degree first and then the master's. However, careful planning during the undergraduate program allows motivated students to begin a research project and complete some master's course requirements while still in undergraduate standing. Depending on how quickly a student progresses through the undergraduate program, the additional graduate year may come sooner than the fifth year at Berkeley. The five-year program is not intended for those who wish to pursue a PhD. For further information regarding this program, please see the Department's website.

This program is geared toward students who would like to pursue an education beyond the BS/BA, allowing them to achieve greater breadth and/or depth of knowledge, and who would like to try their hand at research as well. It is not intended for students who have definitely decided to pursue a PhD immediately following graduation. Those students are advised to apply for a PhD program at Berkeley or elsewhere during their senior year. Students who have been accepted into the five-year BA/MS or BS/MS are free to change their minds later and apply to enter the PhD program or apply to a PhD program at another university. Note that admission is competitive with all our PhD applicants.

The program is focused on interdisciplinary training at a graduate level; with at least 8 units of course work outside EECS required. Students will emerge as leaders in their technical and professional fields.

  • Focused on interdisciplinary study and more experience in aligned technical fields such as physics, materials science, statistics, biology, etc., and/or professional disciplines such as management of technology, business, law and public policy.
  • If admitted to the program, students must begin the graduate portion in the semester immediately following the conferral of the bachelor's degree.
  • Only one additional year (two semesters) is permitted beyond the bachelor's degree.
  • Only available to Berkeley EECS and L&S CS undergraduates.
  • Participants in program may serve as graduate student instructors with approval from their faculty research adviser and the 5th Year MS Committee.
  • Participants in program are self-funded.

Minor Requirements

Minor programs are areas of concentration requiring fewer courses than an undergraduate major. These programs are optional but can provide depth and breadth to a UC Berkeley education. The College of Engineering does not offer additional time to complete a minor, but it is usually possible to finish within the allotted time with careful course planning. Students are encouraged to meet with their ESS adviser to discuss the feasibility of completing a minor program.

All the engineering departments offer minors. Students may also consider pursuing a minor in another school or college.

General Guidelines

  1. All courses taken to fulfill the minor requirements must be taken for graded credit.

  2. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required for courses used to fulfill the minor requirements.

  3. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student’s major and minor programs.

  4. Completion of the minor program cannot delay a student’s graduation.

  5. L&S Computer Science majors are discouraged from pursuing the EECS minor. They may only use EE upper division courses towards the minor and may not overlap any upper division courses between their major and the EECS minor.

  6. All students must complete the EECS Minor Completion Form during their final semester.

Requirements

Lower division
Designing Information Devices and Systems I
Designing Information Devices and Systems II
Select one from the following:
The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs 2
Introduction to Computer Programming for Scientists and Engineers
Select one from the following:
Data Structures
Data Structures and Programming Methodology
Great Ideas of Computer Architecture (Machine Structures)
Machine Structures (Lab-Centric)
Upper division
Select three upper division EECS courses, for a total of 9 units minimum 1
1

EL ENG 100​, 195, H196, 197, 198, of 199, and COMPSCI 195, H196, 197, 198, or 199 may not be used to fulfill this requirement. If you are unsure, please check with the EECS Minor Advisor.

College Requirements

Students in the College of Engineering must complete no fewer than 120 semester units with the following provisions: 

  1. Completion of the requirements of one engineering major program study. 
  2. A minimum overall grade point average of 2.00 (C average) and a minimum 2.00 grade point average in upper division technical coursework required of the major. 
  3. The final 30 units and two semesters must be completed in residence in the College of Engineering on the Berkeley campus. 
  4. All technical courses (math, science and engineering), required of the major or not, must be taken on a letter graded basis (unless they are only offered P/NP). 
  5. Entering freshmen are allowed a maximum of eight semesters to complete their degree requirements. Entering junior transfers are allowed a maximum of four semesters to complete their degree requirements. (Note: junior transfers admitted missing three or more courses from the lower division curriculum are allowed five semesters.) Summer terms are optional and do not count toward the maximum. Students are responsible for planning and satisfactorily completing all graduation requirements within the maximum allowable semesters. 
  6. Adhere to all college policies and procedures as they complete degree requirements.
  7. Complete the lower division program before enrolling in upper division engineering courses. 

Humanities and Social Science (H/SS) Requirement

To promote a rich and varied educational experience outside of the technical requirements for each major, the College of Engineering has a six-course Humanities and Social Sciences breadth requirement, which must be completed to graduate. This requirement, built into all the engineering programs of study, includes two reading and composition courses (R&C), and four additional courses within which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. Follow these guidelines to fulfill this requirement:

  1. Complete a minimum of six courses from the  approved Humanities/Social Sciences (H/SS) lists
  2. Courses must be a minimum of 3 semester units (or 4 quarter units).
  3. Two of the six courses must fulfill the college's Reading and Composition (R&C) requirement. These courses must be taken for a letter grade (C- or better required) and must be completed by no later than the end of the sophomore year (fourth semester of enrollment). The first half of R&C, the “A” course, must be completed by the end of the freshman year; the second half of R&C, the “B" course, must be completed by no later than the end of the sophomore year. View a detailed list of courses that fulfill Reading and Composition requirements, or use the College of Letters and Sciences search engine to view R&C courses offered in a given semester. 
  4. The four additional courses must be chosen within College of Engineering guidelines from the H/SS lists (see below). These courses may be taken on a Pass/Not Passed basis (P/NP).
  5. Two of the six courses must be upper division (courses numbered 100-196).
  6. One of the six courses must satisfy the campus American Cultures requirement. For detailed lists of courses that fulfill American Cultures requirements, visit the American Cultures site. 
  7. A maximum of two exams (Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, or A-Level) may be used toward completion of the H/SS requirement. View the list of exams that can be applied toward H/SS requirements.
  8. Courses may fulfill multiple categories. For example, if you complete CY PLAN 118AC that would satisfy the American Cultures requirement and one upper division H/SS requirement.
  9. No courses offered by any engineering department other than BIO ENG 100, COMPSCI C79, ENGIN 125, ENGIN 157AC, MEC ENG 191K and MEC ENG 191AC may be used to complete H/SS requirements.
  10. Foreign language courses may be used to complete H/SS requirements. View the list of language options.
  11. Courses numbered 97, 98, 99, or above 196 may not be used to complete any H/SS requirement
  12. The College of Engineering uses modified versions of five of the College of Letters and Science (L&S) breadth requirements lists to provide options to our students for completing the H/SS requirement. No courses on the L&S Biological Sciences or Physical Sciences breadth lists may be used to complete H/SS requirements. Within the guidelines above, choose courses from any of the lists below.

Class Schedule Requirements

  • Minimum units per semester: 12.0.
  • Maximum units per semester:  20.5.
  • Minimum technical courses: College of Engineering undergraduates must enroll each semester in no fewer than two technical courses (of a minimum of 3 units each) required of the major program of study in which the student is officially declared.  (Note: for most majors, normal progress will require enrolling in 3-4 technical courses each semester).
  • All technical courses (math, science, engineering), required of the major or not, must be taken on a letter-graded basis (unless only offered as P/NP).
  • A student's proposed schedule must be approved by a faculty adviser (or on approval from the dean or a designated staff adviser) each semester prior to enrolling in courses.

Minimum Academic (Grade) Requirements

  • A minimum overall and semester grade point average of 2.00 (C average) is required of engineering undergraduates. A student will be subject to dismissal from the University if during any fall or spring semester their overall UC GPA falls below a 2.00, or their semester GPA is less than 2.00. 
  • Students must achieve a minimum grade point average of 2.00 (C average) in upper division technical courses required for the major curriculum each semester. A student will be subject to dismissal from the University if their upper division technical grade point average falls below 2.00. 
  • A minimum overall grade point average of 2.00, and a minimum 2.00 grade point average in upper division technical course work required for the major is needed to earn a Bachelor of Science in Engineering.

Unit Requirements

To earn a Bachelor of Science in Engineering, students must complete at least 120 semester units of courses subject to certain guidelines:

  • Completion of the requirements of one engineering major program of study. 
  • A maximum of 16 units of special studies coursework (courses numbered 97, 98, 99, 197, 198, or 199) is allowed towards the 120 units; a maximum of four is allowed in a given semester.
  • A maximum of 4 units of physical education from any school attended will count towards the 120 units.
  • Students may receive unit credit for courses graded P (including P/NP units taken through EAP) up to a limit of one-third of the total units taken and passed on the Berkeley campus at the time of graduation.

Normal Progress

Students in the College of Engineering must enroll in a full-time program and make normal progress each semester toward the bachelor's degree. The continued enrollment of students who fail to achieve minimum academic progress shall be subject to the approval of the dean. (Note: students with official accommodations established by the Disabled Students' Program, with health or family issues, or with other reasons deemed appropriate by the dean may petition for an exception to normal progress rules.) 

UC and Campus Requirements

University of California Requirements

Entry Level Writing

All students who will enter the University of California as freshmen must demonstrate their command of the English language by fulfilling the Entry Level Writing Requirement. Fulfillment of this requirement is also a prerequisite to enrollment in all reading and composition courses at UC Berkeley. 

American History and American Institutions

The American History and Institutions requirements are based on the principle that a U.S. resident graduated from an American university should have an understanding of the history and governmental institutions of the United States.

Campus Requirement

American Cultures

American Cultures (AC) is the one requirement that all undergraduate students at UC Berkeley need to take and pass in order to graduate. The requirement offers an exciting intellectual environment centered on the study of race, ethnicity and culture in the United States. AC courses offer students opportunities to be part of research-led, highly accomplished teaching environments, grappling with the complexity of American Culture.

Plan of Study

For more detailed information regarding the courses listed below (e.g., elective information, GPA requirements, etc.), please see the Major Requirements tab.

Freshman
FallUnitsSpringUnits
MATH 1A4MATH 1B4
COMPSCI 61A4COMPSCI 61B or 61BL4
Natural Science Elective13-5EL ENG 16A4
Reading and Composition course from List A4Reading and Composition course from List B4
 15-17 16
Sophomore
FallUnitsSpringUnits
MATH 534PHYSICS 7B4
PHYSICS 7A4COMPSCI 61C or 61CL4
EL ENG 16B4COMPSCI 704
Humanities/Social Sciences course3-4Humanities/Social Sciences course3-4
 15-16 15-16
Junior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
EECS Upper Division Electives28EECS Upper Division Electives28
Technical Elective34Humanities/Social Sciences course3-4
Humanities/Social Sciences course3-4Ethics/Social Implications of Technology41-4
 Free Elective2
 15-16 14-18
Senior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
EECS Upper Division Elective24Engineering Elective53
Engineering Elective53Free Electives12
Free Electives8 
 15 15
Total Units: 120-129
1

Students must complete one course from the following list: ASTRON 7AASTRON 7B, BIOLOGY 1A and BIOLOGY 1AL (must take both), BIOLOGY 1BCHEM 1A and CHEM 1AL (must take both), CHEM 1B, CHEM 3A and CHEM 3AL (must take both), CHEM 3B and CHEM 3BL (must take both), CHEM 4ACHEM 4B, MCELLBI 32 and MCELLBI 32L (must take both), PHYSICS 7C, or an upper-division course of 3 units or more in astronomy, biology, chemistry, earth and planetary science, integrative biology, molecular cell biology, physics, or plant & microbial biology. This requirement is listed in the freshman year curriculum, but many of the options would not be appropriate for a first year student. Complete this requirement in the semester when it is most appropriate to do so (i.e., take PHYSICS 7C after completing PHYSICS 7B). Your ESS or faculty adviser can help guide your selection on this requirement.

2

Students must complete a minimum of 20 units of upper division EECS courses. One course must provide a major design experience, and be selected from the following list: EECS 149, EL ENG C106A, EL ENG C106BEL ENG C128, EL ENG 130, EL ENG 140, EL ENG 143, EL ENG C149, EL ENG 192, COMPSCI C149COMPSCI 160, COMPSCI 162, COMPSCI 164, COMPSCI 169, COMPSCI 184, COMPSCI 186, EECS 151 and EECS 151LA (must take both), EECS 151 and EECS 151LB (must take both).

3

Students must complete 4 units of Technical Elective(s) chosen from any lower or upper division course in the following departments: astronomy, chemistry, data science, earth and planetary science, integrative biology, mathematics, molecular cell biology, physics, plant & microbial biology, statistics or any engineering department (including EECS). The 4 units of technical elective(s) must be in addition to the natural science elective and the 20 units of required EECS upper division technical electives. If the 4 units of technical elective(s) are from an engineering department, the units can count toward the required 45 units of engineering coursework (see footnote 5). See footnote 5 for the list of excluded courses.

4

Students must complete one course about engineering ethics or social implications of technology. This may be fulfilled by completing one of the following courses: BIO ENG 100*, COMPSCI 195COMPSCI H195, ENE,RES C100*, ENGIN 125*, ENGIN 157AC*, IAS 157AC*, INFO 88A, ISF 100D*, ISF 100G*. Courses marked with an asterisk fulfill both a humanities/social science requirement and the EECS ethics/social implication of technology requirement.

5

Students must complete a minimum of 45 units of engineering coursework. The 45 units of engineering courses cannot include:

Accelerated Program Plans

For students considering graduating in less than four years, it's important to acknowledge the reasons to undertake such a plan of study. While there are advantages to pursuing a three-year degree plan such as reducing financial burdens, they are not for everyone and do involve sacrifices; especially with respect to participating in co-curricular activities, depth of study,  and summer internships, which typically lead to jobs upon graduation. All things considered, please see the tables for three and three and a half year degree options.

3.5 Year Plan

3 Year Plan

3 Year Plan with Exam Credit

Student Learning Goals

Mission

  1. Preparing graduates to pursue postgraduate education in electrical engineering, computer science, or related fields.
  2. Preparing graduates for success in technical careers related to electrical and computer engineering, or computer science and engineering.
  3. Preparing graduates to become leaders in fields related to electrical and computer engineering or computer science and engineering.

Learning Goals for the Major 

ECE

  1. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.
  2. An ability to configure, apply test conditions, and evaluate outcomes of experimental systems.
  3. An ability to design systems, components, or processes that conform to given specifications and cost constraints.
  4. An ability to work cooperatively, respectfully, creatively, and responsibly as a member of a team.
  5. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  6. An understanding of the norms of expected behavior in engineering practice and their underlying ethical foundations.
  7. An ability to communicate effectively by oral, written, and graphical means.
  8. An awareness of global and societal concerns and their importance in developing engineering solutions.
  9. An ability to independently acquire and apply required information, and an appreciation of the associated process of life-long learning.
  10. A knowledge of contemporary issues.
  11. An in-depth ability to use a combination of software, instrumentation, and experimental techniques practiced in circuits, physical electronics, communication, networks and systems, hardware, programming, and computer science theory.

CSE

  1. An ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the program’s student outcomes and to the discipline.
  2. An ability to analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution.
  3. An ability to design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component, or program to meet desired needs.
  4. An ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal.
  5. An understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security and social issues and responsibilities.
  6. An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences.
  7. An ability to analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations, and society.
  8. Recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in continuing professional development.
  9.  An ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practice.

Courses

Select a subject to view courses

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

EECS 47D Completion of work in Electrical Engineering 16A 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Not yet offered
This course allows students who have had a linear algebra and/or basic circuit theory course to complete the work in EE16A and be ready for EE16B or EE47E. The course focuses on the fundamentals of designing modern information devices and systems that interface with the real world and provides a comprehensive foundation for core EECS topics in signal processing, learning, control, and circuit design. Modeling is emphasized in a way that deepens mathematical maturity
, and in both labs and homework, students will engage computationally, physically, and visually with the concepts being introduced in addition to traditional paper/pencil exercises.
Completion of work in Electrical Engineering 16A: Read More [+]

EECS 47E Completion of work in Electrical Engineering 16B 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Not yet offered
This course allows students who have had a linear algebra and/or basic circuit theory course to complete the work in EE16B. The course focuses on the fundamentals of designing modern information devices and systems that interface with the real world and provides a comprehensive foundation for core EECS topics in signal processing (DFT), learning (SVD/PCA), feedback control, and circuit design. Modeling is emphasized in a way that deepens mathematical maturity
, and in both labs and homework, students will engage computationally, physically, and visually with the concepts being introduced in addition to traditional paper/pencil exercises.
Completion of work in Electrical Engineering 16B: Read More [+]

EECS 47F Completion of work in Computer Science 70 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Not yet offered
This course allows students who have had a discrete math and/or probability course to complete the work in CS70. Logic, infinity, and induction; applications include undecidability and stable marriage problem. Modular arithmetic and GCDs; applications include primality testing and cryptography. Polynomials; examples include error correcting codes and interpolation. Probability including sample spaces, independence, random variables, law of large numbers; examples
include load balancing, existence arguments, Bayesian inference.
Completion of work in Computer Science 70: Read More [+]

EECS C106A Introduction to Robotics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017
An introduction to the kinematics, dynamics, and control of robot manipulators, robotic vision, and sensing. The course covers forward and inverse kinematics of serial chain manipulators, the manipulator Jacobian, force relations, dynamics, and control. It presents elementary principles on proximity, tactile, and force sensing, vision sensors, camera calibration, stereo construction, and motion detection. The course concludes with current applications of robotics in
active perception, medical robotics, and other areas.
Introduction to Robotics: Read More [+]

EECS C106B Robotic Manipulation and Interaction 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018
This course is a sequel to EECS C106A/Bioengineering C106A, which covers kinematics, dynamics and control of a single robot. This course will cover dynamics and control of groups of robotic manipulators coordinating with each other and interacting with the environment. Concepts will include an introduction to grasping and the constrained manipulation, contacts and force control for interaction with the environment. We will also cover active perception guided manipulation
, as well as the manipulation of non-rigid objects. Throughout, we will emphasize design and human-robot interactions, and applications to applications in manufacturing, service robotics, tele-surgery, and locomotion.
Robotic Manipulation and Interaction: Read More [+]

EECS 126 Probability and Random Processes 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017
This course covers the fundamentals of probability and random processes useful in fields such as networks, communication, signal processing, and control. Sample space, events, probability law. Conditional probability. Independence. Random variables. Distribution, density functions. Random vectors. Law of large numbers. Central limit theorem. Estimation and detection. Markov chains.

Probability and Random Processes: Read More [+]

EECS 127 Optimization Models in Engineering 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017
This course offers an introduction to optimization models and their applications, ranging from machine learning and statistics to decision-making and control, with emphasis on numerically tractable problems, such as linear or constrained least-squares optimization.

Optimization Models in Engineering: Read More [+]

EECS 149 Introduction to Embedded Systems 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course introduces students to the basics of modeling, analysis, and design of embedded, cyber-physical systems. Students learn how to integrate computation with physical processes to meet a desired specification. Topics include models of computation, control, analysis and verification, interfacing with the physical world, real-time behaviors, mapping to platforms, and distributed embedded systems. The course has a strong laboratory component
, with emphasis on a semester-long sequence of projects.
Introduction to Embedded Systems: Read More [+]

EECS 151 Introduction to Digital Design and Integrated Circuits 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
An introduction to digital and system design. The material provides a top-down view of the principles, components, and methodologies for large scale digital system design. The underlying CMOS devices and manufacturing technologies are introduced, but quickly abstracted to higher-levels to focus the class on design of larger digital modules for both FPGAs (field programmable gate arrays) and ASICs (application specific integrated circuits).
The class includes extensive use of industrial grade design automation and verification tools for assignments, labs and projects.
The class has two lab options: ASIC Lab (EECS 151LA) and FPGA Lab (EECS 151LB). Students must enroll in at least one of the labs concurrently with the class.

Introduction to Digital Design and Integrated Circuits: Read More [+]

EECS 151LA Application Specific Integrated Circuits Laboratory 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
This lab lays the foundation of modern digital design by first presenting the scripting and hardware description language base for specification of digital systems and interactions with tool flows. The labs are centered on a large design with the focus on rapid design space exploration. The lab exercises culminate with a project design, e.g., implementation of a three-stage RISC-V processor with a register file and caches. The design is mapped
to simulation and layout specification.
Application Specific Integrated Circuits Laboratory: Read More [+]

EECS 151LB Field-Programmable Gate Array Laboratory 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
This lab covers the design of modern digital systems with Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platforms. A series of lab exercises provide the background and practice of digital design using a modern FPGA design tool flow. Digital synthesis, partitioning, placement, routing, and simulation tools for FPGAs are covered in detail. The labs exercises culminate with a large design project, e.g., an implementation of a full three-stage RISC-V processor
system, with caches, graphics acceleration, and external peripheral components. The design is mapped and demonstrated on an FPGA hardware platform.
Field-Programmable Gate Array Laboratory: Read More [+]

Computer Science

COMPSCI C8 Foundations of Data Science 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Summer 2017 8 Week Session
Foundations of data science from three perspectives: inferential thinking, computational thinking, and real-world relevance. Given data arising from some real-world phenomenon, how does one analyze that data so as to understand that phenomenon? The course teaches critical concepts and skills in computer programming and statistical inference, in conjunction with hands-on
analysis of real-world datasets, including economic data, document collections, geographical data, and social networks. It delves into social and legal issues surrounding data analysis, including issues of privacy and data ownership.
Foundations of Data Science: Read More [+]

COMPSCI C8R Introduction to Computational Thinking with Data 3 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Not yet offered
An introduction to computational thinking and quantitative reasoning, preparing students for further coursework, especially Foundations of Data Science (CS/Info/Stat C8). Emphasizes the use of computation to gain insight about quantitative problems with real data. Expressions, data types, collections, and tables in Python. Programming practices, abstraction, and iteration. Visualizing univariate and bivariate
data with bar charts, histograms, plots, and maps. Introduction to statistical concepts including averages and distributions, predicting one variable from another, association and causality, probability and probabilistic simulation. Relationship between numerical functions and graphs. Sampling and introduction to inference.
Introduction to Computational Thinking with Data: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 9A Matlab for Programmers 2 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Introduction to the constructs in the Matlab programming language, aimed at students who already know how to program. Array and matrix operations, functions and function handles, control flow, plotting and image manipulation, cell arrays and structures, and the Symbolic Mathematics toolbox.

Matlab for Programmers: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 9C C for Programmers 2 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Self-paced course in the C programming language for students who already know how to program. Computation, input and output, flow of control, functions, arrays, and pointers, linked structures, use of dynamic storage, and implementation of abstract data types.

C for Programmers: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 9D Scheme and Functional Programming for Programmers 2 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Self-paced course in functional programming, using the Scheme programming language, for students who already know how to program. Recursion; higher-order functions; list processing; implementation of rule-based querying.

Scheme and Functional Programming for Programmers: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 9E Productive Use of the UNIX Environment 2 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Use of UNIX utilities and scripting facilities for customizing the programming environment, organizing files (possibly in more than one computer account), implementing a personal database, reformatting text, and searching for online resources.

Productive Use of the UNIX Environment: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 9F C++ for Programmers 2 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Self-paced introduction to the constructs provided in the C++ programming language for procedural and object-oriented programming, aimed at students who already know how to program.

C++ for Programmers: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 9G JAVA for Programmers 2 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Self-paced course in Java for students who already know how to program. Applets; variables and computation; events and flow of control; classes and objects; inheritance; GUI elements; applications; arrays, strings, files, and linked structures; exceptions; threads.

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COMPSCI 9H Python for Programmers 2 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Introduction to the constructs provided in the Python programming language, aimed at students who already know how to program. Flow of control; strings, tuples, lists, and dictionaries; CGI programming; file input and output; object-oriented programming; GUI elements.

Python for Programmers: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 10 The Beauty and Joy of Computing 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Summer 2017 8 Week Session
An introduction to the beauty and joy of computing. The history, social implications, great principles, and future of computing. Beautiful applications that have changed the world. How computing empowers discovery and progress in other fields. Relevance of computing to the student and society will be emphasized. Students will learn the joy of programming a computer using
a friendly, graphical language, and will complete a substantial team programming project related to their interests.
The Beauty and Joy of Computing: Read More [+]

COMPSCI W10 The Beauty and Joy of Computing 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2012
This course meets the programming prerequisite for 61A. An introduction to the beauty and joy of computing. The history, social implications, great principles, and future of computing. Beautiful applications that have changed the world. How computing empowers discovery and progress in other fields. Relevance of computing to the student and society will be emphasized. Students will learn the joy of programming a
computer using a friendly, graphical language, and will complete a substantial team programming project related to their interests.
The Beauty and Joy of Computing: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 36 CS Scholars Seminar: The Educational Climate in CS & CS61A technical discussions 2 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018
Computer Science 36 is a seminar for CS Scholars who are concurrently taking CS61A: The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs. CS Scholars is a cohort-model program to provide support in exploring and potentially declaring a CS major for students with little to no computational background prior to coming to the university. CS 36 provides an introduction to the CS curriculum at UC Berkeley, and the
overall CS landscape in both industry and academia—through the lens of accessibility and its relevance to diversity. Additionally, CS36 provides technical instruction to review concepts in CS61A, in order to support CS Scholars’ individual learning and success in the CS61A course.
CS Scholars Seminar: The Educational Climate in CS & CS61A technical discussions: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 39 Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 2 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by the faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 39J Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2010, Spring 2010, Fall 2009
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by the faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 39K Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by the faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 39M Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2008
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by the faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 39N Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2010, Fall 2009
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by the faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 39P Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2012
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by the faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 39Q Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2011
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by the faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 39R Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 1.5 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2013
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by the faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 47A Completion of Work in Computer Science 61A 1 Unit

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Implementation of generic operations. Streams and iterators. Implementation techniques for supporting functional, object-oriented, and constraint-based programming in the Scheme programming language. Together with 9D, 47A constitutes an abbreviated, self-paced version of 61A for students who have already taken a course equivalent to 61B.

Completion of Work in Computer Science 61A: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 47B Completion of Work in Computer Science 61B 1 Unit

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Iterators. Hashing, applied to strings and multi-dimensional structures. Heaps. Storage management. Design and implementation of a program containing hundreds of lines of code. Students with sufficient partial credit in 61B may, with consent of instructor, complete the credit in this self-paced course.

Completion of Work in Computer Science 61B: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 47C Completion of Work in Computer Science 61C 1 Unit

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
MIPS instruction set simulation. The assembly and linking process. Caches and virtual memory. Pipelined computer organization. Students with sufficient partial credit in 61C may, with consent of instructor, complete the credit in this self-paced course.

Completion of Work in Computer Science 61C: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 61A The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Summer 2017 8 Week Session
An introduction to programming and computer science focused on abstraction techniques as means to manage program complexity. Techniques include procedural abstraction; control abstraction using recursion, higher-order functions, generators, and streams; data abstraction using interfaces, objects, classes, and generic operators; and language abstraction using interpreters
and macros. The course exposes students to programming paradigms, including functional, object-oriented, and declarative approaches. It includes an introduction to asymptotic analysis of algorithms. There are several significant programming projects.
The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 61AS The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (Self-Paced) 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Summer 2015 8 Week Session
Introductory programming and computer science. Abstraction as means to control program complexity. Programming paradigms: functional, object-oriented, client/server, and declarative (logic). Control abstraction: recursion and higher order functions. Introduction to asymptotic analysis of algorithms. Data abstraction: abstract data types, type-tagged data, first class data
types, sequences implemented as lists and as arrays, generic operators implemented with data-directed programming and with message passing. Implementation of object-oriented programming with closures over dispatch procedures. Introduction to interpreters and compilers. There are several significant programming projects. Course may be completed in one or two semesters. Students must complete a mimimum of two units during their first semester of 61AS.
The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (Self-Paced): Read More [+]

COMPSCI 61B Data Structures 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Fundamental dynamic data structures, including linear lists, queues, trees, and other linked structures; arrays strings, and hash tables. Storage management. Elementary principles of software engineering. Abstract data types. Algorithms for sorting and searching. Introduction to the Java programming language.

Data Structures: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 61BL Data Structures and Programming Methodology 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 8 Week Session
The same material as in 61B, but in a laboratory-based format.

Data Structures and Programming Methodology: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 61C Great Ideas of Computer Architecture (Machine Structures) 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Summer 2017 8 Week Session
The internal organization and operation of digital computers. Machine architecture, support for high-level languages (logic, arithmetic, instruction sequencing) and operating systems (I/O, interrupts, memory management, process switching). Elements of computer logic design. Tradeoffs involved in fundamental architectural design decisions.

Great Ideas of Computer Architecture (Machine Structures): Read More [+]

COMPSCI 61CL Machine Structures (Lab-Centric) 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2009, Spring 2009, Fall 2008
The same material as in 61C but in a lab-centric format.

Machine Structures (Lab-Centric): Read More [+]

COMPSCI W61A The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (Online) 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Not yet offered
An introduction to programming and computer science focused on abstraction techniques as means to manage program complexity. Techniques include procedural abstraction; control abstraction using recursion, higher-order functions, generators, and streams; data abstraction using interfaces, objects, classes, and generic operators; and language abstraction using interpreters and macros. The course exposes students
to programming paradigms, including functional, object-oriented, and declarative approaches. It includes an introduction to asymptotic analysis of algorithms. There are several significant programming projects.
The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (Online): Read More [+]

COMPSCI 70 Discrete Mathematics and Probability Theory 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Summer 2017 8 Week Session
Logic, infinity, and induction; applications include undecidability and stable marriage problem. Modular arithmetic and GCDs; applications include primality testing and cryptography. Polynomials; examples include error correcting codes and interpolation. Probability including sample spaces, independence, random variables, law of large numbers; examples include load balancing
, existence arguments, Bayesian inference.
Discrete Mathematics and Probability Theory: Read More [+]

COMPSCI C79 Societal Risks and the Law 3 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2013
Defining, perceiving, quantifying and measuring risk; identifying risks and estimating their importance; determining whether laws and regulations can protect us from these risks; examining how well existing laws work and how they could be improved; evaluting costs and benefits. Applications may vary by term. This course cannot be used to complete engineering unit or technical elective requirements for students
in the College of Engineering.
Societal Risks and the Law: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 88 Computational Structures in Data Science 2 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Development of Computer Science topics appearing in Foundations of Data Science (C8); expands computational concepts and techniques of abstraction. Understanding the structures that underlie the programs, algorithms, and languages used in data science and elsewhere. Mastery of a particular programming language while studying general techniques for managing program complexity, e.g., functional
, object-oriented, and declarative programming. Provides practical experience with composing larger systems through several significant programming projects.
Computational Structures in Data Science: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 94 Special Topics 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2015
Topics will vary semester to semester. See the Computer Science Division announcements.

Special Topics: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 97 Field Study 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2014
Students take part in organized individual field sponsored programs with off-campus companies or tutoring/mentoring relevant to specific aspects and applications of computer science on or off campus. Note Summer CPT or OPT students: written report required. Course does not count toward major requirements, but will be counted in the cumulative units toward graduation.

Field Study: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 98 Directed Group Study 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Seminars for group study of selected topics, which will vary from year to year. Intended for students in the lower division.

Directed Group Study: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 99 Individual Study and Research for Undergraduates 1 - 2 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Spring 2014
A course for lower division students in good standing who wish to undertake a program of individual inquiry initiated jointly by the student and a professor. There are no other formal prerequisites, but the supervising professor must be convinced that the student is able to profit by the program.

Individual Study and Research for Undergraduates: Read More [+]

COMPSCI C100 Principles & Techniques of Data Science 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
In this course, students will explore the data science lifecycle, including question formulation, data collection and cleaning, exploratory data analysis and visualization, statistical inference and prediction​, and decision-making.​ This class will focus on quantitative critical thinking​ and key principles and techniques needed to carry out this cycle. These include languages for transforming
, querying and analyzing data; algorithms for machine learning methods including regression, classification and clustering; principles behind creating informative data visualizations; statistical concepts of measurement error and prediction; and techniques for scalable data processing.
Principles & Techniques of Data Science: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 146L Programmable Digital Systems Laboratory 2 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2015
Hardware description languages for digital system design and interactions with tool flows. Design, implementation, and verification of digital designs. Digital synthesis, partitioning, placement, routing, and simulation for Field-Programmable Gate Arrays. Large digital-system design concepts. Project design component – example, a full processor implementation with peripherals.

Programmable Digital Systems Laboratory: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 152 Computer Architecture and Engineering 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Instruction set architecture, microcoding, pipelining (simple and complex). Memory hierarchies and virtual memory. Processor parallelism: VLIW, vectors, multithreading. Multiprocessors.

Computer Architecture and Engineering: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 160 User Interface Design and Development 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Summer 2017 8 Week Session
The design, implementation, and evaluation of user interfaces. User-centered design and task analysis. Conceptual models and interface metaphors. Usability inspection and evaluation methods. Analysis of user study data. Input methods (keyboard, pointing, touch, tangible) and input models. Visual design principles. Interface prototyping and implementation methodologies and
tools. Students will develop a user interface for a specific task and target user group in teams.
User Interface Design and Development: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 161 Computer Security 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Introduction to computer security. Cryptography, including encryption, authentication, hash functions, cryptographic protocols, and applications. Operating system security, access control. Network security, firewalls, viruses, and worms. Software security, defensive programming, and language-based security. Case studies from real-world systems.

Computer Security: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 162 Operating Systems and System Programming 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Basic concepts of operating systems and system programming. Utility programs, subsystems, multiple-program systems. Processes, interprocess communication, and synchronization. Memory allocation, segmentation, paging. Loading and linking, libraries. Resource allocation, scheduling, performance evaluation. File systems, storage devices, I/O systems. Protection, security, and privacy.

Operating Systems and System Programming: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 164 Programming Languages and Compilers 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Survey of programming languages. The design of modern programming languages. Principles and techniques of scanning, parsing, semantic analysis, and code generation. Implementation of compilers, interpreters, and assemblers. Overview of run-time organization and error handling.

Programming Languages and Compilers: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 168 Introduction to the Internet: Architecture and Protocols 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course is an introduction to the Internet architecture. We will focus on the concepts and fundamental design principles that have contributed to the Internet's scalability and robustness and survey the various protocols and algorithms used within this architecture. Topics include layering, addressing, intradomain routing, interdomain routing, reliable delivery, congestion control, and
the core protocols (e.g., TCP, UDP, IP, DNS, and HTTP) and network technologies (e.g., Ethernet, wireless).
Introduction to the Internet: Architecture and Protocols: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 169 Software Engineering 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Fall 2016
Ideas and techniques for designing, developing, and modifying large software systems. Function-oriented and object-oriented modular design techniques, designing for re-use and maintainability. Specification and documentation. Verification and validation. Cost and quality metrics and estimation. Project team organization and management. Students will work in teams on a substantial
programming project.
Software Engineering: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 170 Efficient Algorithms and Intractable Problems 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Concept and basic techniques in the design and analysis of algorithms; models of computation; lower bounds; algorithms for optimum search trees, balanced trees and UNION-FIND algorithms; numerical and algebraic algorithms; combinatorial algorithms. Turing machines, how to count steps, deterministic and nondeterministic Turing machines, NP-completeness. Unsolvable and intractable probl
ems.
Efficient Algorithms and Intractable Problems: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 172 Computability and Complexity 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Finite automata, Turing machines and RAMs. Undecidable, exponential, and polynomial-time problems. Polynomial-time equivalence of all reasonable models of computation. Nondeterministic Turing machines. Theory of NP-completeness: Cook's theorem, NP-completeness of basic problems. Selected topics in language theory, complexity and randomness.

Computability and Complexity: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 174 Combinatorics and Discrete Probability 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Permutations, combinations, principle of inclusion and exclusion, generating functions, Ramsey theory. Expectation and variance, Chebychev's inequality, Chernov bounds. Birthday paradox, coupon collector's problem, Markov chains and entropy computations, universal hashing, random number generation, random graphs and probabilistic existence bounds.

Combinatorics and Discrete Probability: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 176 Algorithms for Computational Biology 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Algorithms and probabilistic models that arise in various computational biology applications: suffix trees, suffix arrays, pattern matching, repeat finding, sequence alignment, phylogenetics, genome rearrangements, hidden Markov models, gene finding, motif finding, stochastic context free grammars, RNA secondary structure. There are no biology prerequisites for this course, but a strong quantitative
background will be essential.
Algorithms for Computational Biology: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 184 Foundations of Computer Graphics 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Techniques of modeling objects for the purpose of computer rendering: boundary representations, constructive solids geometry, hierarchical scene descriptions. Mathematical techniques for curve and surface representation. Basic elements of a computer graphics rendering pipeline; architecture of modern graphics display devices. Geometrical transformations such as rotation, scaling, translation
, and their matrix representations. Homogeneous coordinates, projective and perspective transformations. Algorithms for clipping, hidden surface removal, rasterization, and anti-aliasing. Scan-line based and ray-based rendering algorithms. Lighting models for reflection, refraction, transparency.
Foundations of Computer Graphics: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 186 Introduction to Database Systems 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Access methods and file systems to facilitate data access. Hierarchical, network, relational, and object-oriented data models. Query languages for models. Embedding query languages in programming languages. Database services including protection, integrity control, and alternative views of data. High-level interfaces including application generators, browsers, and report writers. Introduction
to transaction processing. Database system implementation to be done as term project.
Introduction to Database Systems: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 188 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Ideas and techniques underlying the design of intelligent computer systems. Topics include search, game playing, knowledge representation, inference, planning, reasoning under uncertainty, machine learning, robotics, perception, and language understanding.

Introduction to Artificial Intelligence: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 189 Introduction to Machine Learning 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Theoretical foundations, algorithms, methodologies, and applications for machine learning. Topics may include supervised methods for regression and classication (linear models, trees, neural networks, ensemble methods, instance-based methods); generative and discriminative probabilistic models; Bayesian parametric learning; density estimation and clustering; Bayesian networks; time series
models; dimensionality reduction; programming projects covering a variety of real-world applications.
Introduction to Machine Learning: Read More [+]

COMPSCI C191 Quantum Information Science and Technology 3 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2014, Spring 2012
This multidisciplinary course provides an introduction to fundamental conceptual aspects of quantum mechanics from a computational and informational theoretic perspective, as well as physical implementations and technological applications of quantum information science. Basic sections of quantum algorithms, complexity, and cryptography, will be touched upon, as well as pertinent physical
realizations from nanoscale science and engineering.
Quantum Information Science and Technology: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 194 Special Topics 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Topics will vary semester to semester. See the Computer Science Division announcements.

Special Topics: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 195 Social Implications of Computer Technology 1 Unit

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Topics include electronic community; the changing nature of work; technological risks; the information economy; intellectual property; privacy; artificial intelligence and the sense of self; pornography and censorship; professional ethics. Students will lead discussions on additional topics.

Social Implications of Computer Technology: Read More [+]

COMPSCI H195 Honors Social Implications of Computer Technology 3 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2014, Fall 2013, Spring 2013
Topics include electronic community; the changing nature of work; technological risks; the information economy; intellectual property; privacy; artificial intelligence and the sense of self; pornography and censorship; professional ethics. Students may lead discussions on additional topics.

Honors Social Implications of Computer Technology: Read More [+]

COMPSCI H196A Senior Honors Thesis Research 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2010, Spring 2010
Thesis work under the supervision of a faculty member. To obtain credit the student must, at the end of two semesters, submit a satisfactory thesis to the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department archive. A total of four units must be taken. The units many be distributed between one or two semesters in any way. H196A-H196B count as graded technical elective units, but may not
be used to satisfy the requirement for 27 upper division technical units in the College of Letters and Science with a major in Computer Science.
Senior Honors Thesis Research: Read More [+]

COMPSCI H196B Senior Honors Thesis Research 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2010, Spring 2009, Fall 2008
Thesis work under the supervision of a faculty member. To obtain credit the student must, at the end of two semesters, submit a satisfactory thesis to the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department archive. A total of four units must be taken. The units many be distributed between one or two semesters in any way. H196A-H196B count as graded technical elective units, but may
not be used to satisfy the requirement for 27 upper division technical units in the College of Letters and Science with a major in Computer Science.
Senior Honors Thesis Research: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 197 Field Study 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2016, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Fall 2015
Students take part in organized individual field sponsored programs with off-campus companies or tutoring/mentoring relevant to specific aspects and applications of computer science on or off campus. Note Summer CPT or OPT students: written report required. Course does not count toward major requirements, but will be counted in the cumulative units toward graduation.

Field Study: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 198 Directed Group Studies for Advanced Undergraduates 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Group study of selected topics in Computer Sciences, usually relating to new developments.

Directed Group Studies for Advanced Undergraduates: Read More [+]

COMPSCI 199 Supervised Independent Study 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Supervised independent study. Enrollment restrictions apply.

Supervised Independent Study: Read More [+]

Electrical Engineering

EL ENG 16A Designing Information Devices and Systems I 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Summer 2017 8 Week Session
This course and its follow-on course EE16B focus on the fundamentals of designing modern information devices and systems that interface with the real world. Together, this course sequence provides a comprehensive foundation for core EECS topics in signal processing, learning, control, and circuit design while introducing key linear-algebraic concepts motivated by application
contexts. Modeling is emphasized in a way that deepens mathematical maturity, and in both labs and homework, students will engage computationally, physically, and visually with the concepts being introduced in addition to traditional paper/pencil exercises. The courses are aimed at entering students as well as non-majors seeking a broad foundation for the field.
Designing Information Devices and Systems I: Read More [+]

EL ENG 16B Designing Information Devices and Systems II 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
This course is a follow-on to Electrical Engineering 16A, and focuses on the fundamentals of designing and building modern information devices and systems that interface with the real world. The course sequence provides a comprehensive introduction to core EECS topics in circuit design, signals, and systems in an application-driven context. The courses are delivered assuming mathematical
maturity and aptitude at roughly the level of having completed Math 1A-1B, and are aimed at entering students as well as non-majors seeking a broad introduction to the field.
Designing Information Devices and Systems II: Read More [+]

EL ENG 24 Freshman Seminar 1 Unit

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
The Freshman Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics may vary from department to department and semester to semester.

Freshman Seminar: Read More [+]

EL ENG 25 What Electrical Engineers Do--Feedback from Recent Graduates 1 Unit

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2011
A Berkeley Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences degree opens the door to many opportunities, but what exactly are they? Graduation is only a few years away and it's not too early to find out. In this seminar students will hear from practicing engineers who recently graduated. What are they working on? Are they working in a team? What do they wish they had learned better? How did they find their jobs?

What Electrical Engineers Do--Feedback from Recent Graduates: Read More [+]

EL ENG 39 Freshman/Sophomore Seminar 2 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by the faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

EL ENG 42 Introduction to Digital Electronics 3 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2013, Summer 2013 8 Week Session, Spring 2013
This course serves as an introduction to the principles of electrical engineering, starting from the basic concepts of voltage and current and circuit elements of resistors, capacitors, and inductors. Circuit analysis is taught using Kirchhoff's voltage and current laws with Thevenin and Norton equivalents. Operational amplifiers with feedback are introduced as basic building
blocks for amplication and filtering. Semiconductor devices including diodes and MOSFETS and their IV characteristics are covered. Applications of diodes for rectification, and design of MOSFETs in common source amplifiers are taught. Digital logic gates and design using CMOS as well as simple flip-flops are introduced. Speed and scaling issues for CMOS are considered. The course includes as motivating examples designs of high level applications including logic circuits, amplifiers, power supplies, and communication links.
Introduction to Digital Electronics: Read More [+]

EL ENG 43 Introductory Electronics Laboratory 1 Unit

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2013, Summer 2013 8 Week Session, Spring 2013
Using and understanding electronics laboratory equipment such as oscilloscope, power supplies, function generator, multimeter, curve-tracer, and RLC-meter. Includes a term project of constructing and testing a robot or other appropriate electromechanical device.

Introductory Electronics Laboratory: Read More [+]

EL ENG 49 Electronics for the Internet of Things 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018
Electronics has become pervasive in our lives as a powerful technology with applications in a wide range of fields including healthcare, environmental monitoring, robotics, or entertainment. This course teaches how to build electronic circuits that interact with the environment through sensors and actuators and how to communicate wirelessly with the internet to cooperate with other devices and with humans. In
the laboratory students design and build representative samples such as solar harvesters, robots, that exchange information with or are controlled from the cloud.
Electronics for the Internet of Things: Read More [+]

EL ENG 84 Sophomore Seminar 1 or 2 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses offered by faculty members in departments all across the campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for close, regular intellectual contact between faculty members and students in the crucial second year. The topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sophomores.

Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

EL ENG 97 Field Study 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Students take part in organized individual field sponsored programs with off-campus companies or tutoring/mentoring relevant to specific aspects and applications of computer science on or off campus. Note Summer CPT or OPT students: written report required. Course does not count toward major requirements, but will be counted in the cumulative units toward graduation.

Field Study: Read More [+]

EL ENG 98 Directed Group Study for Undergraduates 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Group study of selected topics in electrical engineering, usually relating to new developments.

Directed Group Study for Undergraduates: Read More [+]

EL ENG 99 Individual Study and Research for Undergraduates 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Supervised independent study and research for students with fewer than 60 units completed.

Individual Study and Research for Undergraduates: Read More [+]

EL ENG 105 Microelectronic Devices and Circuits 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
This course covers the fundamental circuit and device concepts needed to understand analog integrated circuits. After an overview of the basic properties of semiconductors, the p-n junction and MOS capacitors are described and the MOSFET is modeled as a large-signal device. Two port small-signal amplifiers and their realization using single stage and multistage CMOS building blocks are
discussed. Sinusoidal steady-state signals are introduced and the techniques of phasor analysis are developed, including impedance and the magnitude and phase response of linear circuits. The frequency responses of single and multi-stage amplifiers are analyzed. Differential amplifiers are introduced.
Microelectronic Devices and Circuits: Read More [+]

EL ENG C106A Introduction to Robotics 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
An introduction to the kinematics, dynamics, and control of robot manipulators, robotic vision, and sensing. The course covers forward and inverse kinematics of serial chain manipulators, the manipulator Jacobian, force relations, dynamics, and control. It presents elementary principles on proximity, tactile, and force sensing, vision sensors, camera calibration, stereo construction, and motion
detection. The course concludes with current applications of robotics in active perception, medical robotics, and other areas.
Introduction to Robotics: Read More [+]

EL ENG C106B Robotic Manipulation and Interaction 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016
This course is a sequel to Electrical Engineering C106A/Bioengineering C125, which covers kinematics, dynamics and control of a single robot. This course will cover dynamics and control of groups of robotic manipulators coordinating with each other and interacting with the environment. Concepts will include an introduction to grasping and the constrained manipulation, contacts and force control for
interaction with the environment. We will also cover active perception guided manipulation, as well as the manipulation of non-rigid objects. Throughout, we will emphasize design and human-robot interactions, and applications to applications in manufacturing, service robotics, tele-surgery, and locomotion.
Robotic Manipulation and Interaction: Read More [+]

EL ENG 113 Power Electronics 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Power conversion circuits and techniques. Characterization and design of magnetic devices including transformers, reactors, and electromagnetic machinery. Characteristics of bipolar and MOS power semiconductor devices. Applications to motor control, switching power supplies, lighting, power systems, and other areas as appropriate.

Power Electronics: Read More [+]

EL ENG 117 Electromagnetic Fields and Waves 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Review of static electric and magnetic fields and applications; Maxwell's equations; transmission lines; propagation and reflection of plane waves; introduction to guided waves, microwave networks, and radiation and antennas. Minilabs on statics, transmission lines, and waves.

Electromagnetic Fields and Waves: Read More [+]

EL ENG 118 Introduction to Optical Engineering 3 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Fundamental principles of optical systems. Geometrical optics and aberration theory. Stops and apertures, prisms, and mirrors. Diffraction and interference. Optical materials and coatings. Radiometry and photometry. Basic optical devices and the human eye. The design of optical systems. Lasers, fiber optics, and holography.

Introduction to Optical Engineering: Read More [+]

EL ENG 120 Signals and Systems 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Continuous and discrete-time transform analysis techniques with illustrative applications. Linear and time-invariant systems, transfer functions. Fourier series, Fourier transform, Laplace and Z-transforms. Sampling and reconstruction. Solution of differential and difference equations using transforms. Frequency response, Bode plots, stability analysis. Illustrated by analysis of communication
systems and feedback control systems.
Signals and Systems: Read More [+]

EL ENG 121 Introduction to Digital Communication Systems 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
Introduction to the basic principles of the design and analysis of modern digital communication systems. Topics include source coding, channel coding, baseband and passband modulation techniques, receiver design, and channel equalization. Applications to design of digital telephone modems, compact disks, and digital wireless communication systems. Concepts illustrated by a sequence of MATLAB
exercises.
Introduction to Digital Communication Systems: Read More [+]

EL ENG 122 Introduction to Communication Networks 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
This course focuses on the fundamentals of the wired and wireless communication networks. The course covers both the architectural principles for making these networks scalable and robust, as well as the key techniques essential for analyzing and designing them. The topics include graph theory, Markov chains, queuing, optimization techniques, the physical and link layers, switching,
transport, cellular networks and Wi-Fi.
Introduction to Communication Networks: Read More [+]

EL ENG 123 Digital Signal Processing 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Discrete time signals and systems: Fourier and Z transforms, DFT, 2-dimensional versions. Digital signal processing topics: flow graphs, realizations, FFT, chirp-Z algorithms, Hilbert transform relations, quantization effects, linear prediction. Digital filter design methods: windowing, frequency sampling, S-to-Z methods, frequency-transformation methods, optimization methods, 2-dimensional
filter design.
Digital Signal Processing: Read More [+]

EL ENG 126 Probability and Random Processes 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
This course covers the fundamentals of probability and random processes useful in fields such as networks, communication, signal processing, and control. Sample space, events, probability law. Conditional probability. Independence. Random variables. Distribution, density functions. Random vectors. Law of large numbers. Central limit theorem. Estimation and detection. Markov chains.

Probability and Random Processes: Read More [+]

EL ENG C128 Feedback Control Systems 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Analysis and synthesis of linear feedback control systems in transform and time domains. Control system design by root locus, frequency response, and state space methods. Applications to electro-mechanical and mechatronics systems.

Feedback Control Systems: Read More [+]

EL ENG 129 Neural and Nonlinear Information Processing 3 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2010, Fall 2009, Spring 2009
Principles of massively parallel real-time computation, optimization, and information processing via nonlinear dynamics and analog VLSI neural networks, applications selected from image processing, pattern recognition, feature extraction, motion detection, data compression, secure communication, bionic eye, auto waves, and Turing patterns.

Neural and Nonlinear Information Processing: Read More [+]

EL ENG 130 Integrated-Circuit Devices 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Overview of electronic properties of semiconductor. Metal-semiconductor contacts, pn junctions, bipolar transistors, and MOS field-effect transistors. Properties that are significant to device operation for integrated circuits. Silicon device fabrication technology.

Integrated-Circuit Devices: Read More [+]

EL ENG 134 Fundamentals of Photovoltaic Devices 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
This course is designed to give an introduction to, and overview of, the fundamentals of photovoltaic devices. Students will learn how solar cells work, understand the concepts and models of solar cell device physics, and formulate and solve relevant physical problems related to photovoltaic devices. Monocrystalline, thin film and third generation solar cells will be discussed and analyzed.
Light management and economic considerations in a solar cell system will also be covered.
Fundamentals of Photovoltaic Devices: Read More [+]

EL ENG 137A Introduction to Electric Power Systems 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Overview of conventional electric power conversion and delivery, emphasizing a systemic understanding of the electric grid with primary focus at the transmission level, aimed toward recognizing needs and opportunities for technological innovation. Topics include aspects of a.c. system design, electric generators, components of transmission and distribution systems, power flow analysis, system
planning and operation, performance measures, and limitations of legacy technologies.
Introduction to Electric Power Systems: Read More [+]

EL ENG 137B Introduction to Electric Power Systems 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Overview of recent and potential future evolution of electric power systems with focus on new and emerging technologies for power conversion and delivery, primarily at the distribution level. Topics include power electronics applications, solar and wind generation, distribution system design and operation, electric energy storage, information management and communications, demand response
, and microgrids.
Introduction to Electric Power Systems: Read More [+]

EL ENG 140 Linear Integrated Circuits 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Single and multiple stage transistor amplifiers. Operational amplifiers. Feedback amplifiers, 2-port formulation, source, load, and feedback network loading. Frequency response of cascaded amplifiers, gain-bandwidth exchange, compensation, dominant pole techniques, root locus. Supply and temperature independent biasing and references. Selected applications of analog circuits such as analog-to-digital
converters, switched capacitor filters, and comparators. Hardware laboratory and design project.
Linear Integrated Circuits: Read More [+]

EL ENG 142 Integrated Circuits for Communications 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Analysis and design of electronic circuits for communication systems, with an emphasis on integrated circuits for wireless communication systems. Analysis of noise and distortion in amplifiers with application to radio receiver design. Power amplifier design with application to wireless radio transmitters. Radio-frequency mixers, oscillators, phase-locked loops, modulators, and demodu
lators.
Integrated Circuits for Communications: Read More [+]

EL ENG 143 Microfabrication Technology 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
Integrated circuit device fabrication and surface micromachining technology. Thermal oxidation, ion implantation, impurity diffusion, film deposition, expitaxy, lithography, etching, contacts and interconnections, and process integration issues. Device design and mask layout, relation between physical structure and electrical/mechanical performance. MOS transistors and poly-Si surface
microstructures will be fabricated in the laboratory and evaluated.
Microfabrication Technology: Read More [+]

EL ENG 144 Fundamental Algorithms for Systems Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
The modeling, analysis, and optimization of complex systems requires a range of algorithms and design software. This course reviews the fundamental techniques underlying the design methodology for complex systems, using integrated circuit design as example. Topics include design flows, discrete and continuous models and algorithms, and strategies for implementing algorithms efficiently and
correctly in software. Laboratory assignments and a class project will expose students to state-of-the-art tools.
Fundamental Algorithms for Systems Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization: Read More [+]

EL ENG C145B Medical Imaging Signals and Systems 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Biomedical imaging is a clinically important application of engineering, applied mathematics, physics, and medicine. In this course, we apply linear systems theory and basic physics to analyze X-ray imaging, computerized tomography, nuclear medicine, and MRI. We cover the basic physics and instrumentation that characterizes medical image as an ideal perfect-resolution image blurred by an impulse
response. This material could prepare the student for a career in designing new medical imaging systems that reliably detect small tumors or infarcts.
Medical Imaging Signals and Systems: Read More [+]

EL ENG C145L Introductory Electronic Transducers Laboratory 3 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
Laboratory exercises exploring a variety of electronic transducers for measuring physical quantities such as temperature, force, displacement, sound, light, ionic potential; the use of circuits for low-level differential amplification and analog signal processing; and the use of microcomputers for digital sampling and display. Lectures cover principles explored in the laboratory exercises;
construction, response and signal to noise of electronic transducers and actuators; and design of circuits for sensing and controlling physical quantities.
Introductory Electronic Transducers Laboratory: Read More [+]

EL ENG C145M Introductory Microcomputer Interfacing Laboratory 3 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2012, Spring 2011
Laboratory exercises constructing basic interfacing circuits and writing 20-100 line C programs for data acquisition, storage, analysis, display, and control. Use of the IBM PC with microprogrammable digital counter/timer, parallel I/O port. Circuit components include anti-aliasing filters, the S/H amplifier, A/D and D/A converters. Exercises include effects of aliasing in periodic sampling
, fast Fourier transforms of basic waveforms, the use of the Hanning filter for leakage reduction, Fourier analysis of the human voice, digital filters, and control using Fourier deconvolution. Lectures cover principles explored in the lab exercises and design of microcomputer-based systems for data acquisitions, analysis and control.
Introductory Microcomputer Interfacing Laboratory: Read More [+]

EL ENG C145O Laboratory in the Mechanics of Organisms 3 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
Introduction to laboratory and field study of the biomechanics of animals and plants using fundamental biomechanical techniques and equipment. Course has a series of rotations involving students in experiments demonstrating how solid and fluid mechanics can be used to discover the way in which diverse organisms move and interact with their physical environment. The laboratories
emphasize sampling methodology, experimental design, and statistical interpretation of results. Latter third of course devoted to independent research projects. Written reports and class presentation of project results are required.
Laboratory in the Mechanics of Organisms: Read More [+]

EL ENG 146L Application Specific Integrated Circuits Laboratory 2 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2015
This is a lab course that covers the design of modern Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs). The labs lay the foundation of modern digital design by first setting-up the scripting and hardware description language base for specification of digital systems and interactions with tool flows. Software testing of digital designs is covered leading into a set of labs that cover the design flow. Digital synthesis
, floorplanning, placement and routing are covered, as well as tools to evaluate design timing and power. Chip-level assembly is covered, instantiation of custom IP blocks: I/O pads, memories, PLLs, etc. The labs culminate with a project design – implementation of a 3-stage RISC-V processor with register file and caches.
Application Specific Integrated Circuits Laboratory: Read More [+]

EL ENG 147 Introduction to Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) 3 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course will teach fundamentals of micromachining and microfabrication techniques, including planar thin-film process technologies, photolithographic techniques, deposition and etching techniques, and the other technologies that are central to MEMS fabrication. It will pay special attention to teaching of fundamentals necessary for the design and analysis of devices and systems in mechanical
, electrical, fluidic, and thermal energy/signal domains, and will teach basic techniques for multi-domain analysis. Fundamentals of sensing and transduction mechanisms including capacitive and piezoresistive techniques, and design and analysis of micmicromachined miniature sensors and actuators using these techniques will be covered.
Introduction to Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS): Read More [+]

EL ENG 192 Mechatronic Design Laboratory 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Design project course, focusing on application of theoretical principles in electrical engineering to control of a small-scale system, such as a mobile robot. Small teams of students will design and construct a mechatronic system incorporating sensors, actuators, and intelligence.

Mechatronic Design Laboratory: Read More [+]

EL ENG 194 Special Topics 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Fall 2015
Topics will vary semester to semester. See the Electrical Engineering announcements.

Special Topics: Read More [+]

EL ENG H196A Senior Honors Thesis Research 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Thesis work under the supervision of a faculty member. A minimum of four units must be taken; the units may be distributed between one and two semesters in any way. To obtain credit a satisfactory thesis must be submitted at the end of the two semesters to the Electrical and Engineering and Computer Science Department archive. Students who complete four units and a thesis in one semester
receive a letter grade at the end of H196A. Students who do not, receive an IP in H196A and must enroll in H196B.
Senior Honors Thesis Research: Read More [+]

EL ENG H196B Senior Honors Thesis Research 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Thesis work under the supervision of a faculty member. A minimum of four units must be taken; the units may be distributed between one and two semesters in any way. To obtain credit a satisfactory thesis must be submitted at the end of the two semesters to the Electrical and Engineering and Computer Science Department archive. Students who complete four units and a thesis in one semester
receive a letter grade at the end of H196A. Students who do not, receive an IP in H196A and must enroll in H196B.
Senior Honors Thesis Research: Read More [+]

EL ENG 197 Field Study 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Students take part in organized individual field sponsored programs with off-campus companies or tutoring/mentoring relevant to specific aspects and applications of computer science on or off campus. Note Summer CPT or OPT students: written report required. Course does not count toward major requirements, but will be counted in the cumulative units toward graduation.

Field Study: Read More [+]

EL ENG 198 Directed Group Study for Advanced Undergraduates 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Group study of selected topics in electrical engineering, usually relating to new developments.

Directed Group Study for Advanced Undergraduates: Read More [+]

EL ENG 199 Supervised Independent Study 1 - 4 Units

Offered through: Electrical Engin and Computer Sci
Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Summer 2016 8 Week Session
Supervised independent study. Enrollment restrictions apply.

Supervised Independent Study: Read More [+]

Faculty and Instructors

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

Pieter Abbeel, Associate Professor. Artificial Intelligence (AI); Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR); Machine Learning.
Research Profile

Elad Alon, Professor. Integrated Circuits (INC); Micro/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS); Communications & Networking (COMNET); Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA).
Research Profile

Venkat Anantharam, Professor. Communications & Networking (COMNET); Artificial Intelligence (AI); Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR); Security (SEC); Signal Processing (SP).
Research Profile

Murat Arcack, Professor. Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR); Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO).
Research Profile

Ana Claudia Arias, Associate Professor. Physical Electronics (PHY); Flexible and Printed Electronics; Energy (ENE).

Krste Asanovic, Professor. Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC); Integrated Circuits (INC); Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT);Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA).
Research Profile

Babak Ayazifar, Professor. Education (EDUC), Signal processing and system theory EDUCATION: Development of pedagogical techniques and assessment tools.; Signal Processing (SP), Graph signal processing.

Jonathan Bachrach, Adjunct Assistant Professor. Programming Systems (PS); Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC); Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA).

Ruzena Bajcsy, Professor. Artificial Intelligence (AI); Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO); Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR); Graphics (GR); Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), Computer vision; Bridging information technology to humanities and social sciences; Security (SEC).
Research Profile

Brian A. Barsky, Professor. Computer science, geometric design and modeling, computer graphics, computer aided cornea modeling and visualization, medical imaging, virtual environments for surgical simulation.
Research Profile

Peter L. Bartlett, Professor. Statistics, machine learning, statistical learning theory, adaptive control.
Research Profile

Alexandre M. Bayen, Professor. Transportation, modelling and control of distributed parameters systems, large scale infrastructure systems, water distribution.
Research Profile

Jeffrey Bokor, Professor. Physical Electronics (PHY); Nanotechnology.
Research Profile

Bernhard Boser, Professor. Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO); Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA); Integrated Circuits (INC);Physical Electronics (PHY).
Research Profile

Eric Brewer, Professor. Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT); Energy (ENE); Security (SEC); Developing regions; Programming languages.
Research Profile

Duncan Callaway, Associate Professor.

John Canny, Professor. Computer science, activity-based computing, livenotes, mechatronic devices, flexonics.
Research Profile

Jose M. Carmena, Professor. Brain-machine interfaces, neural ensemble computation, neuroprosthetics, sensorimotor learning and control.
Research Profile

Constance Chang-Hasnain, Professor. Microsystems and materials; Nano-Optoelectronic devices.

Alessandro Chiesa, Assistant Professor. Security (SEC); Theory (THY).

John Chuang, Professor. Computer networking, computer security, economic incentives, ICTD.
Research Profile

Phillip Colella, Professor in Residence.

Steven Conolly, Professor. Medical imaging instrumentation and control.
Research Profile

Thomas Courtade, Assistant Professor. Communications & Networking (COMNET).
Research Profile

David E. Culler, Professor. Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC); Energy (ENE); Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT);Programming Systems (PS); Security (SEC); Parallel architecture; High-performance networks; Workstation clusters.
Research Profile

Trevor Darrell, Professor in Residence. Artificial Intelligence (AI); Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR); Computer Vision.

James W. Demmel, Professor. Computer science, scientific computing, numerical analysis, linear algebra.
Research Profile

John DeNero, Assistant Teaching Professor. Artificial Intelligence (AI); Education (EDUC).

Anca Dragan, Assistant Professor. Artificial Intelligence (AI); Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR); Human-Computer Interaction (HCI).

Prabal Dutta, Associate Professor.

Alexei (Alyosha) Efros, Associate Professor. Computer Vision; Graphics (GR); Artificial Intelligence (AI).
Research Profile

Laurent El Ghaoui, Professor. Decision-making under uncertainty, convex optimization, robust solutions, semidefinite programming, exhaustive simulation.
Research Profile

Ronald S. Fearing, Professor. Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR); Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO).

Armando Fox, Professor. Programming systems (PS), Education (EDUC), Operating Systems and Networking (OSNT).
Research Profile

Michael Franklin, Adjunct Professor. Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT), AMPLab.

Gerald Friedland, Adjunct Assistant Professor.

+ Robert J. Full, Professor. Energetics, comparative biomechanics, arthropod, adhesion, comparative physiology, locomotion, neuromechanics, biomimicry, biological inspiration, reptile, gecko, amphibian, robots, artificial muscles.
Research Profile

Jack L. Gallant, Professor. Vision science, form vision, attention, fMRI, computational neuroscience, natural scene perception, brain encoding, brain decoding.
Research Profile

Dan Garcia, Teaching Professor. Education (EDUC); Computational Game Theory; Graphics (GR).

Sanjam Garg, Assistant Professor. Theory (THY); Security (SEC).
Research Profile

Ali Ghodsi, Adjunct Assistant Professor. Database Management Systems (DBMS); Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT).

Ken Goldberg, Professor. Robotics, art, social media, new media, automation.
Research Profile

Joseph Gonzalez, Assistant Professor. Artificial Intelligence (AI); Database Management Systems (DBMS).

Tom Griffiths, Associate Professor. Machine learning, computational models of human cognition, Bayesian statistics, cultural evolution.
Research Profile

Moritz Hardt, Assistant Profesor.

Bjoern Hartmann, Associate Professor. Human-Computer Interaction (HCI); Graphics (GR); Programming Systems (PS).

Marti A. Hearst, Professor. Information retrieval, human-computer interaction, user interfaces, information visualization, web search, search user interfaces, empirical computational linguistics, natural language processing, text mining, social media.
Research Profile

Joseph M. Hellerstein, Professor. Database Management Systems (DBMS); Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT).
Research Profile

Paul N. Hilfinger, Teaching Professor. Programming Systems (PS); Scientific Computing (SCI); Software engineering; Parallel programming techniques.
Research Profile

Joshua Hug, Assistant Teaching Professor. Education (EDUC); Computer Science education.

Ali Javey, Professor. Physical Electronics (PHY); Energy (ENE); Micro/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS); Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology.
Research Profile

Michael I. Jordan, Professor. Computer science, artificial intelligence, bioinformatics, statistics, machine learning, electrical engineering, applied statistics, optimization.
Research Profile

Anthony D. Joseph, Professor. Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT); Security (SEC); Computer and Network Security; Distributed systems; Mobile computing; Wireless networking; Software engineering, and operating systems.
Research Profile

+ Richard Karp, Professor. Computational molecular biology, genomics, DNA molecules, structure of genetic regulatory networks, combinatorial and statsitical methods.
Research Profile

Randy H. Katz, Professor. Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC); Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT); Distributed and networked systems design and implementation.

Kurt Keutzer, Professor. Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC); Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA); Scientific Computing (SCI).
Research Profile

Daniel Klein, Professor. Artificial Intelligence (AI); Natural Language Processing, Computational Linguistics, Machine Learning.
Research Profile

John D. Kubiatowicz, Professor. Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT); Security (SEC); Computer architecture; Quantum computer design; Internet-scale storage systems; Peer-to-peer networking.
Research Profile

Andreas Kuehlmann, Adjunct Professor. Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA).
Research Profile

Edward A. Lee, Professor. Embedded Software, Real-Time Systems, Cyber-Physical Systems, Concurrency; Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA); Programming Systems (PS);Signal Processing (SP).
Research Profile

Luke Lee, Professor. Biophotonics, biophysics, bionanoscience, molecular imaging, single cell analysis, bio-nano interfaces, integrated microfluidic devices (iMD) for diagnostics and preventive personalized medicine.
Research Profile

Sergey Levine, Assisstant Professor.

Chunlei Liu, Associate Professor.

Tsu-Jae King Liu, Professor. Physical Electronics (PHY); Micro/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS).
Research Profile

Michael Lustig, Associate Professor. Medical Imaging; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Signal Processing (SP); Scientific Computing (SCI); Physical Electronics (PHY); Communications & Networking (COMNET); Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO); Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR).

Michel Maharbiz, Professor. Neural interfaces, bioMEMS, microsystems, MEMS, microsystems for the life sciences.
Research Profile

Jitendra Malik, Professor. Artificial Intelligence (AI); Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO); Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR); Graphics (GR); Human-Computer Interaction (HCI); Signal Processing (SP);.
Research Profile

Elchanan Mossel, Professor. Applied probability, statistics, mathematics, finite markov chains, markov random fields, phlylogeny.
Research Profile

Rikky Muller, Assistant Professor. Integrated Circuits (INC); Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO); Micro/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS).

George Necula, Professor. Software engineering, programming systemsm, security, program analysis.
Research Profile

Ren Ng, Assistant Professor. Imaging Systems; Computational Photography;; Signal Processing (SP); Optics.

Clark Nguyen, Professor. Micro/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS); Integrated Circuits (INC); Physical Electronics (PHY); Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA).
Research Profile

Ali Niknejad, Professor. Integrated Circuits (INC), Microwave and mm-Wave Circuits and Systems; Physical Electronics (PHY); Signal Processing (SP); Applied Electromagnetics; Communications & Networking (COMNET); Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA).
Research Profile

Borivoje Nikolic, Professor. Integrated Circuits (INC); Communications & Networking (COMNET); Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA); Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC).
Research Profile

James O'Brien, Professor. Computer graphics, fluid dynamics, computer simulation, physically based animation, finite element simulation, human perception, image forensics, video forensics, computer animation, special effects for film, video game technology, motion capture.
Research Profile

Bruno Olshausen, Professor. Visual perception, computational neuroscience, computational vision.
Research Profile

Lior Pachter, Professor. Mathematics, applications of statistics, combinatorics to problems in biology.
Research Profile

Christos H. Papadimitriou, Professor. Economics, evolution., algorithms, game theory, networks, optimization, complexity.
Research Profile

Abhay Parekh, Adjunct Professor. Communications & Networking (COMNET).

Shyam Parekh, Adjunct Associate Professor. Communications & Networking (COMNET).

Eric Paulos, Associate Professor. Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), New Media arts.

Vern Paxson, Professor. Security (SEC); Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT).
Research Profile

Kristofer Pister, Professor. Micro/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS); Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Micro-robotics; Integrated Circuits (INC), Low-power circuits.
Research Profile

+ Kameshwar Poolla, Professor. Cybersecurity, modeling, control, renewable energy, estimation, integrated circuit design and manufacturing, smart grids.
Research Profile

Raluca Ada Popa, Assistant Professor. Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT); Security (SEC).

Jan M. Rabaey, Professor. Communications & Networking (COMNET); Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA); Energy (ENE); Integrated Circuits (INC); Signal Processing (SP); Computer architecture.
Research Profile

Jonathan Ragan-Kelley, Assistant Professor.

Prasad Raghavendra, Associate Professor. Theory (THY).

Ravi Ramamoorthi, Professor. Graphics (GR); Scientific Computing (SCI); Signal Processing (SP); Computer Vision.

Kannan Ramchandran, Professor. Communications & Networking (COMNET); Signal Processing (SP); Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR).
Research Profile

Gireeja Ranade, Assistant Professor.

Satish Rao, Professor. Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO); Theory (THY).
Research Profile

Sylvia Ratnasamy, Associate Professor. Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT).

Benjamin Recht, Associate Professor. Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR); Signal Processing (SP); Machine Learning (ML); Optimization (OPT).

Jaijeet Roychowdhury, Professor. Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA); Scientific Computing (SCI); Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO).

Stuart Russell, Professor. Artificial intelligence, computational biology, algorithms, machine learning, real-time decision-making, probabilistic reasoning.
Research Profile

Anant Sahai, Associate Professor. Communications & Networking (COMNET), Information Theory, Cognitive Radio and Spectrum Sharing; Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Distributed and Networked Control; Signal Processing (SP); Theory (THY), Information Theory.
Research Profile

Sayeef Salahuddin, Associate Professor. Physical Electronics (PHY); Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA); Energy (ENE); Scientific Computing (SCI).

Seth R. Sanders, Professor. Energy (ENE); Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR); Integrated Circuits (INC); Power and electronics systems.
Research Profile

Alberto L. Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, Professor. Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA), Embedded System Design; Design methodologies and tools; Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Hybrid systems; Design methodologies and tools; Communications & Networking (COMNET), Wireless sensor network design; Design methodologies and tools.
Research Profile

S. Shankar Sastry, Professor. Computer science, robotics, arial robots, cybersecurity, cyber defense, homeland defense, nonholonomic systems, control of hybrid systems, sensor networks, interactive visualization, robotic telesurgery, rapid prototyping.
Research Profile

Koushik Sen, Associate Professor. Programming Systems (PS), Software Engineering, Programming Languages, and Formal Methods: Software Testing, Verification, Model Checking, Runtime Monitoring, Performance Evaluation, and Computational Logic.; Security (SEC).
Research Profile

Sanjit Seshia, Professor. Electronic design automation, theory, computer security, program analysis, dependable computing, computational logic, formal methods.
Research Profile

Scott Shenker, Professor. Internet Architecture, Software-Defined Networks, Datacenter Infrastructure, Large-Scale Distributed Systems, Game Theory and Economics;Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT).
Research Profile

Jonathan Shewchuk, Professor. Scientific Computing (SCI); Theory (THY); Graphics (GR).
Research Profile

Alistair Sinclair, Professor. Theory (THY); Randomized algorithms; applied probability; statistical physics.
Research Profile

Dawn Song, Professor. Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT); Security (SEC); Programming Systems (PS).
Research Profile

Yun Song, Professor. Computational biology, population genomics, applied probability and statistics.
Research Profile

Costas J. Spanos, Professor. Energy (ENE); Integrated Circuits (INC); Physical Electronics (PHY); Semiconductor manufacturing; Solid-State Devices.
Research Profile

Ian Stoica, Professor. Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT); Security (SEC); Networking and distributed computer systems, Quality of Service (Q of S) and resources management, modeling and performance analysis.

Vladimir Stojanovic, Associate Professor. Integrated Circuits (INC); Micro/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS); Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC); Physical Electronics (PHY); Communications & Networking (COMNET); Integrated Photonics, Circuit design with Emerging-Technologies.
Research Profile

Bernd Sturmfels, Professor. Mathematics, combinatorics, computational algebraic geometry.
Research Profile

Vivek Subramanian, Professor. Physical Electronics (PHY); Energy (ENE); Integrated Circuits (INC).
Research Profile

Claire Tomlin, Professor. Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR); Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO); Control theory; hybrid and embedded systems; biological cell networks.
Research Profile

Luca Trevisan, Professor. Theory (THY), (Computational Complexity, Randomness in Computation, Combinatorial Optimization); Security (SEC).

Stavros Tripakis, Adjunct Associate Professor. Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA), Computer-Aided System Design, Formal Methods, Verification, Synthesis, Embedded and Cyber-Physical Systems; Programming Systems (PS).

David Tse, Adjunct Professor. Communications & Networking (COMNET).
Research Profile

Doug Tygar, Professor. Privacy, technology policy, computer security, electronic commerce, software engineering, reliable systems, embedded systems, computer networks, cryptography, cryptology, authentication, ad hoc networks.
Research Profile

Umesh Vazirani, Professor. Quantum computation, hamiltonian complexity, analysis of algorithms.
Research Profile

Alexandra von Meier, Adjunct Professor. Energy (ENE), Electric Grids, Power Distribution.

David Wagner, Professor. Security (SEC).
Research Profile

Martin Wainwright, Professor. Statistical machine learning, High-dimensional statistics, information theory, Optimization and algorithmss.
Research Profile

Laura Waller, Associate Professor. Physical Electronics (PHY); Signal Processing (SP); Computational imaging; Optics and Imaging; Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO); Graphics (GR).
Research Profile

Jean Walrand, Professor. Communications & Networking (COMNET), Performance evaluation; Game theory.
Research Profile

John Wawrzynek, Professor. Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC).
Research Profile

Adam Wolisz, Adjunct Professor. Communications & Networking (COMNET); Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC), System Performance Evaluation.

Ming C. Wu, Professor. Si photonics, optoelectronics, nanophotonics, optical MEMS, Optofluidics; Micro/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS); Physical Electronics (PHY).

Eli Yablonovitch, Professor. Optoelectronics Research Group, high speed optical communications, photonic crystals at optical and microwave frequencies, the milli-Volt switch, optical antennas and solar cells.; Physical Electronics (PHY).
Research Profile

Katherine A. Yelick, Professor. Programming Systems (PS); Scientific Computing (SCI); Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO); parallel programming techniques.
Research Profile

Nir Yosef, Assistant Professor. Computational biology.
Research Profile

Bin Yu, Professor. Neuroscience, remote sensing, networks, statistical machine learning, high-dimensional inference, massive data problems, document summarization.
Research Profile

Avideh Zakhor, Professor. Signal Processing (SP); Artificial Intelligence (AI); Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR); Graphics (GR).
Research Profile

Emeritus Faculty

David Attwood, Professor Emeritus. Short wavelength electromagnetics; Soft X-ray microscopy; Coherence; EUV lithography.
Research Profile

Elwyn R. Berlekamp, Professor Emeritus. Computer science, electrical engineering, mathematics, combinatorial game theory, algebraic coding theory.
Research Profile

Manuel Blum, Professor Emeritus. Recursive function, cryptographic protocols, program checking.

Robert K. Brayton, Professor Emeritus. Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA); Advanced methods in combinational and sequential logic synthesis and formal verification.
Research Profile

Robert W. Brodersen, Professor Emeritus. Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA); Integrated Circuits (INC); Signal Processing (SP).

Thomas F. Budinger, Professor Emeritus. Image processing, biomedical electronics, quantitative aging, cardiovascular physiology, bioastronautics, image reconstruction, nuclear magnetic resonance, positron emission, tomography, reconstruction tomography, inverse problem mathematics.
Research Profile

Leon O. Chua, Professor Emeritus. Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO); Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Cellular neural networks; Cellular automata; Complexity;; Nanoelectronics; Nonlinear circuits and systems; Nonlinear dynamics; Chaos;.
Research Profile

Mike Clancy, Professor Emeritus. Science education, cognitive development, educational software.
Research Profile

Richard J. Fateman, Professor Emeritus. Artificial Intelligence (AI); Scientific Computing (SCI), Computer algebra systems; Programming environments and systems; Programming languages and compilers; Symbolic mathematical computation; Document image analysis, multimodal input of mathematics.
Research Profile

Jerome A. Feldman, Professor Emeritus. Artificial Intelligence (AI); Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO); Security (SEC); cognitive science.
Research Profile

Domenico Ferrari, Professor Emeritus. UC Berkeley Unix Project, high-speed network testbeds and the design of real-time communication services and network protocols for multimedia traffic.

Susan L. Graham, Professor Emeritus. Graphics (GR); Human-Computer Interaction (HCI); Programming Systems (PS); Scientific Computing (SCI); Software development environments, software engineering.
Research Profile

Paul R. Gray, Professor Emeritus. Design, Modeling and Analysis (DMA); Integrated Circuits (INC).
Research Profile

T. Kenneth Gustafson, Professor Emeritus. Solid-State Devices; Basic electromagnetic and quantum applications.

Michael A. Harrison, Professor Emeritus. Multimedia; User interfaces; Software environments.

Brian K. Harvey, Professor Emeritus. Education (EDUC).
Research Profile

David A. Hodges, Professor Emeritus. Integrated Circuits (INC).

Chenming Hu, Professor Emeritus. Semiconductor Device Technologies.
Research Profile

William M. Kahan, Professor Emeritus. Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC); Scientific Computing (SCI); Computer architecture; Scientific computing; Numerical analysis.
Research Profile

Edward L. Keller, Professor Emeritus. Computational neuroscience; bioengineering; neurophysiology of the oculomotor system.

Kam Y. Lau, Professor Emeritus. Communications & Networking (COMNET); Optoelectronic devices; Microwave and millimeter wave signal transport over optical fiber links.
Research Profile

Edwin R. Lewis, Professor Emeritus.
Research Profile

Allan J. Lichtenberg, Professor Emeritus. Nano-Optoelectronics, Electromagnetics/Plasmas; Energy (ENE).
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Michael A. Lieberman, Professor Emeritus. Plasma-assisted materials processing; Energy (ENE).
Research Profile

Kenneth K. Mei, Professor Emeritus. Nano-Optoelectronics, Electromagnetics/Plasmas.

David G. Messerschmitt, Professor Emeritus. Communications & Networking (COMNET); Signal Processing (SP); Business and economics issues in the software industry.

Robert G. Meyer, Professor Emeritus. Integrated Circuits (INC).
Research Profile

Nelson Morgan, Professor Emeritus. Signal Processing (SP).

+ Richard Muller, Professor Emeritus. Astrophysics, geophysics, physics, elementary particle physics, cosmic micro wave background, supernovae for cosmology, origin of the earth's magnetic flips, Nemesis theory, glacial cycles, red sprites, lunar impacts, iridium measurement.
Research Profile

Andrew R. Neureuther, Professor Emeritus. Integrated Circuits (INC); Solid-State Devices.
Research Profile

William G. Oldham, Professor Emeritus. Integrated circuits; Semiconductor manufacturing.
Research Profile

Beresford N. Parlett, Professor Emeritus.

David A. Patterson, Professor Emeritus. Professor in the Graduate School: Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC), Computer Architecture and Systems: Parallel Computing performance, correctness, productivity;Biosystems & Computational Biology (BIO), Cancer tumor genomics; Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT).
Research Profile

Elijah Polak, Professor Emeritus. Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR), Numerical methods for engineering optimization.
Research Profile

Chittoor V. Ramamoorthy, Professor Emeritus. Software engineering.

Lawrence A. Rowe, Professor Emeritus. Multimedia Technology.
Research Profile

Steven E. Schwarz, Professor Emeritus. Solid-State Devices; Nano-Optoelectronics, Electromagnetics/Plasmas.

Carlo H. Sequin, Professor Emeritus. Geometric modeling, Artistic geometry, Mathematical visualizations.; Graphics (GR); Human-Computer Interaction (HCI); CAD tools.

Jerome R. Singer, Professor Emeritus.

Alan J. Smith, Professor Emeritus. Computer Architecture & Engineering (ARC); Operating Systems & Networking (OSNT); Computer System Performance Analysis, I/O Systems, Cache Memories, Memory Systems.

Michael Stonebraker, Professor Emeritus. Database Technology.

Aram J. Thomasian, Professor Emeritus.
Research Profile

Theodore Van Duzer, Professor Emeritus. Superconductor Electronics.
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Pravin Varaiya, Professor Emeritus. Communications & Networking (COMNET); Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics (CIR); Energy (ENE); Control; Networks; Power systems; Transportation.

William J. (Jack) Welch, Professor Emeritus. Nano-Optoelectronics, Electromagnetics/Plasmas.
Research Profile

Richard M. White, Professor Emeritus. Energy (ENE); Solid-State Devices.

Eugene Wong, Professor Emeritus. Communications & Networking (COMNET).
Research Profile

Felix F. Wu, Professor Emeritus. Electric power systems analysis; generation and transmission systems planning and investment; power system control and communications; electric energy industry restructuring.
Research Profile

Lotfi A. Zadeh, Professor Emeritus. Artificial intelligence, linguistics, control theory, logic, fuzzy sets, decision analysis, expert systems neural networks, soft computing, computing with words, computational theory of perceptions and precisiated natural language.
Research Profile

Contact Information

Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

253 Cory Hall

Phone: 510-642-3214

Fax: 510-643-7846

Visit Department Website

Department Chair

James Demmel, PhD

389 Soda Hall

Phone: 510-642-7699

demmel@cs.berkeley.edu

Vice-Chair, Undergraduate Matters

John DeNero, PhD

781 Soda Hall

Phone: 510-643-7354

denero@eecs.berkeley.edu

Executive Director, Center for Student Affairs

Susanne Kauer

221 Cory Hall

Phone: 510-642-3694

skauer@eecs.berkeley.edu

Director, EECS Undergraduate Affairs

TBA

203 Cory Hall

Phone: 510-664-7181

Student Services Adviser and EE Scheduler

Lydia Raya

205 Cory Hall

Phone: 510-642-1786

lraya@eecs.berkeley.edu

CS Enrollment Advisor

Cindy Conners

379 Soda Hall

Phone: 510-643-6002

csconners@eecs.berkeley.edu

CS Scheduler & Joint Major Project Analyst

Michael-David Sasson

379 Soda Hall

Phone: 510-643-6002

msasson@cs.berkeley.edu

Minor Adviser

Nicole McIntyre

205 Cory Hall

Phone: 510-642-7372

nicolemcintyre@berkeley.edu

Engineering Student Services

(ESS)

230 Bechtel Engin. Ctr.

Phone: 510-642-7594

http://engineering.berkeley.edu/ESS

ess@berkeley.edu

ESS Adviser

Bryan Jones

Phone: 510-642-7594

bkjones@berkeley.edu

ESS Adviser

Joey Wong

Phone: 510-642-7594

joeywong@berkeley.edu

ESS Adviser

Olivia Chan

Phone: 510-642-7594

oychan@berkeley.edu

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