Integrative Biology

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Students who major in Integrative Biology (IB) will gain a broad and deep knowledge in the biological sciences as well as an excellent foundation in the biology of organisms, populations, and communities. This program may be of particular interest to students who wish to pursue graduate studies in any of these subdisciplines or related emerging research areas. It also provides superb training for students interested in health-related professions (medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, physical therapy, nursing, pharmacy, optometry, etc.) or allied careers in biology (psychology, sociobiology, forestry, wildlife conservation, environmental and resource management, law, etc.).

The department's broad range of experts includes behaviorists, ecologists, evolutionary biologists, geneticists, morphologists, paleontologists, physiologists, and systematists. 

Course of Study Overview

Students majoring in Integrative Biology choose one of two tracks: Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology (Track 1) or Human Biology and Health Sciences (Track 2). The lower division requirements are the same for all IB majors, regardless of the track. The upper division requirements differ for the two tracks. For detailed information, please see the Major Requirements tab.

Declaring the Major

In order to declare Integrative Biology as a major, students must have completed certain prerequisites. For information regarding these courses, please see the Major Requirements tab. The grade point averages (GPA) in (1.) courses for the major and (2.) any upper-division major requirements must each be at least 2.0. All declaring students must meet with a staff adviser and a faculty adviser as part of the declaration process.

At the time of declaration, students must have completed:

AND be enrolled in or have completed:

For transfer students, it is recommended that lower division courses be completed before arriving at Berkeley. Before declaring, transfer students should have completed at least one semester at Berkeley, with a GPA of at least 2.0 in all courses taken for the major, and they should have completed all lower division courses except the Physics series.

For detailed instructions on the process for declaring the major, please see the department's website.

Honors Program

Students with minimum grade point averages (GPA) of 3.3 overall, in the major, and in all upper-division major requirements are encouraged to participate in the honors program. Interested students must identify an appropriate faculty sponsor who agrees to advise them on an original research project and enroll in two consecutive semesters of the honors thesis course (INTEGBI H196A and INTEGBI H196B). Honors students must present the results of their work in the form of a written honors thesis and a poster presentation at Cal Day. In order to graduate with honors, students must maintain the minimum required GPAs.

Minor Program

There is no minor program in Integrative Biology.

Visit Department Website

Major Requirements

In addition to the university, campus, and college requirements, listed on the College Requirements tab, students must fulfill the below requirements specific to their major program.

General Guidelines

  1. All courses taken to fulfill the major requirements below must be taken for letter-graded credit.
  2. Standardized test credit (e.g., Advanced Placement) cannot be used to satisfy any major requirements.
  3. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student's major and minor programs, with the exception of minors offered outside of the College of Letters & Science. Double majors and simultaneous degrees are limited to a two course overlap. 
  4. Students must maintain a minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least a 2.0 GPA overall, a 2.0 GPA in the required major coursework (lower and upper division), and a 2.0 GPA in the upper division coursework for the major.
  5. A maximum of two elective courses may be taken from outside of the Department of Integrative Biology. This includes study abroad courses, as well as non-IB courses, even if they are on the approved electives list.

For information regarding breadth, residence,  requirements and unit requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.

Lower Division Requirements, Both Tracks

Calculus Series (choose one)
MATH 1A
MATH 1B
Calculus
and Calculus
8
MATH 10A
MATH 10B
Methods of Mathematics: Calculus, Statistics, and Combinatorics
and Methods of Mathematics: Calculus, Statistics, and Combinatorics
8
Other Lower Division Requirements
CHEM 1A
1AL
General Chemistry
and General Chemistry Laboratory 1
4
CHEM 3A
3AL
Chemical Structure and Reactivity
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
5
CHEM 3B
3BL
Chemical Structure and Reactivity
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
5
BIOLOGY 1A
1AL
General Biology Lecture
and General Biology Laboratory
5
BIOLOGY 1BGeneral Biology Lecture and Laboratory4
PHYSICS 8AIntroductory Physics 24
PHYSICS 8BIntroductory Physics 24
INTEGBI 77AIntegrative Human Biology 31
or INTEGBI 77B Integrative Human Biology
1

CHEM 4A can be substituted for Chem 1A/1AL.

2

PHYSICS 7A & PHYSICS 7B can be substituted for these courses.

3

 Students declaring IB in Fall 2017 or later must take either INTEGBI 77A or INTEGBI 77B; only one is required.

Upper Division Requirements, Track 1: Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology (24 units minimum)

Group Requirements (see lists below)
One course from Group A: Evolution and Genetics
Two courses from Group B: Ecology, Behavior, and Diversity
One course from Group C: Structure, Function, and Human Health
Two upper division lab courses; one must be field-based (LF)
Electives
Select additional approved courses, as needed, from the group, lab, and elective lists to total at least 24 upper division units.
Optional: Research or Honors
Up to 3 units of research credit in INTEGBI 191, INTEGBI H196A, or INTEGBI H196B

Upper Division Requirements, Track 2: Human Biology and Health Sciences (24 units minimum)

Group Requirements (see lists below)
One course from Group A: Evolution and Genetics
One course from Group B: Ecology, Behavior, and Diversity
Two courses from Group C: Structure, Function, and Human Health. One must be INTEGBI 131 or INTEGBI 132.
Two upper division lab courses
Electives
Select additional approved courses, as needed, from the group, lab, and elective lists to total at least 24 upper division units.
Optional: Research or Honors
Up to 3 units of research credit in INTEGBI 191, INTEGBI H196A, or INTEGBI H196B

Requirement Group A: Evolution and Genetics 

INTEGBI 141Human Genetics3
INTEGBI 160Evolution4
INTEGBI 161Population and Evolutionary Genetics4
INTEGBI 162Ecological Genetics4
INTEGBI 163Molecular and Genomic Evolution3
INTEGBI 164Human Genetics and Genomics4
INTEGBI 167Evolution and Earth History: From Genes to Fossils4
INTEGBI 169Evolutionary Medicine4
INTEGBI 172Coevolution: From Genes to Ecosystems4

Requirement Group B: Ecology, Behavior, and Diversity

INTEGBI 102LFIntroduction to California Plant Life with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI 103LFInvertebrate Zoology with Laboratory ++5
INTEGBI 104LFNatural History of the Vertebrates with Laboratory ++5
INTEGBI/PLANTBI C107LPrinciples of Plant Morphology with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI/PLANTBI C110LBiology of Fungi with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI 113LPaleobiological Perspectives on Ecology and Evolution ++4
INTEGBI 114Infectious Disease Dynamics4
INTEGBI C144/ESPM C126Animal Behavior4
INTEGBI 146LFBehavioral Ecology with Laboratory ++5
INTEGBI 151Plant Physiological Ecology4
INTEGBI 152Environmental Toxicology4
INTEGBI 153Ecology3
INTEGBI 154Plant Ecology3
INTEGBI C155/ANTHRO C129DHolocene Paleoecology: How Humans Changed the Earth3
INTEGBI C156/ESPM C103Principles of Conservation Biology4
INTEGBI 157LFEcosystems of California ++4
INTEGBI 158LF/ESPM C107Biology and Geomorphology of Tropical Islands ++13
INTEGBI 159The Living Planet: Impact of the Biosphere on the Earth System3
INTEGBI 162Ecological Genetics4
INTEGBI 166Evolutionary Biogeography4
INTEGBI 167Evolution and Earth History: From Genes to Fossils4
INTEGBI 168LSystematics of Vascular Plants with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI 170LFMethods in Population and Community Ecology ++3
INTEGBI C171Freshwater Ecology3
INTEGBI 173LFMammalogy with Laboratory ++5
INTEGBI 174LFOrnithology with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI 175LFHerpetology with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI C176LFish Ecology ++3
INTEGBI 181LPaleobotany - The 500-Million Year History of a Greening Planet ++4
INTEGBI 183LEvolution of the Vertebrates with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI C185L/ANTHRO C100Human Paleontology ++5
INTEGBI C187/ANTHRO C124CHuman Biogeography of the Pacific3
++

These courses can be used to fulfill one group AND one lab requirement.

Requirement Group C: Structure, Function, and Human Health 

INTEGBI 114Infectious Disease Dynamics4
INTEGBI 115Introduction to Systems in Biology and Medicine4
INTEGBI 116LMedical Parasitology ++4
INTEGBI 117Medical Ethnobotany2
INTEGBI 118Host-Pathogen Interactions: A Trans-Discipline Outlook4
INTEGBI 123ALExercise and Environmental Physiology with Laboratory ++5
INTEGBI C125L/PHYS ED C165Introduction to the Biomechanical Analysis of Human Movement ++4
INTEGBI 128Sports Medicine3
INTEGBI C129L/PHYS ED C129Human Physiological Assessment ++3
INTEGBI 131General Human Anatomy3
INTEGBI 132Survey of Human Physiology4
INTEGBI 135The Mechanics of Organisms4
INTEGBI 136The Biology of Sex4
INTEGBI 137Human Endocrinology4
INTEGBI 138Comparative Endocrinology4
INTEGBI 139The Neurobiology of Stress4
INTEGBI 140Biology of Human Reproduction4
INTEGBI C142L/ANTHRO C103Introduction to Human Osteology ++6
INTEGBI C143A/PSYCH C113Biological Clocks: Physiology and Behavior3
INTEGBI C143B/PSYCH C116Hormones and Behavior3
INTEGBI 148Comparative Animal Physiology3
INTEGBI 150Evolutionary Environmental Physiology3
INTEGBI 151Plant Physiological Ecology4
INTEGBI 184LMorphology of the Vertebrate Skeleton with Laboratory ++4
++

These courses can be used to fulfill one group AND one lab requirement.

Approved Lab and Field-Lab (LF) Courses 

INTEGBI 102LFIntroduction to California Plant Life with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI 103LFInvertebrate Zoology with Laboratory ++5
INTEGBI 104LFNatural History of the Vertebrates with Laboratory ++5
INTEGBI/PLANTBI C107LPrinciples of Plant Morphology with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI C110LBiology of Fungi with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI 113LPaleobiological Perspectives on Ecology and Evolution ++4
INTEGBI 116LMedical Parasitology ++4
INTEGBI 117LFMedical Ethnobotany Laboratory2
INTEGBI 123ALExercise and Environmental Physiology with Laboratory ++5
INTEGBI C125L/PHYS ED C165Introduction to the Biomechanical Analysis of Human Movement ++4
INTEGBI C129L/PHYS ED C129Human Physiological Assessment ++3
INTEGBI 131LGeneral Human Anatomy Laboratory2
INTEGBI 132LMammalian Physiology Laboratory2
INTEGBI C135L/EL ENG C145O/BIO ENG C136LLaboratory in the Mechanics of Organisms3
INTEGBI C142L/ANTHRO C103Introduction to Human Osteology ++6
INTEGBI 146LFBehavioral Ecology with Laboratory ++5
INTEGBI 151LPlant Physiological Ecology Laboratory2
INTEGBI 154LPlant Ecology Laboratory2
INTEGBI 157LFEcosystems of California ++4
INTEGBI 158LF/ESPM C107Biology and Geomorphology of Tropical Islands ++13
INTEGBI 168LSystematics of Vascular Plants with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI 170LFMethods in Population and Community Ecology ++3
INTEGBI 173LF/ESPM C107Mammalogy with Laboratory ++5
INTEGBI 174LFOrnithology with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI 175LFHerpetology with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI C176L/ESPM C115CFish Ecology ++3
INTEGBI 181LPaleobotany - The 500-Million Year History of a Greening Planet ++4
INTEGBI 183LEvolution of the Vertebrates with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI 184LMorphology of the Vertebrate Skeleton with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI C185L/ANTHRO C100Human Paleontology ++5
++

These courses can be used to fulfill one group AND one lab requirement.

College Requirements

Undergraduate students in the College of Letters & Science must fulfill the following requirements in addition to those required by their major program.

For detailed lists of courses that fulfill college requirements, please review the College of Letters & Sciences page in this Guide.

Entry Level Writing

All students who will enter the University of California as freshmen must demonstrate their command of the English language by fulfilling the Entry Level Writing requirement. Fulfillment of this requirement is also a prerequisite to enrollment in all reading and composition courses at UC Berkeley. 

American History and American Institutions

The American History and Institutions requirements are based on the principle that a US resident graduated from an American university, should have an understanding of the history and governmental institutions of the United States.

American Cultures

American Cultures is the one requirement that all undergraduate students at Cal need to take and pass in order to graduate. The requirement offers an exciting intellectual environment centered on the study of race, ethnicity and culture of the United States. AC courses offer students opportunities to be part of research-led, highly accomplished teaching environments, grappling with the complexity of American Culture.

Quantitative Reasoning

The Quantitative Reasoning requirement is designed to ensure that students graduate with basic understanding and competency in math, statistics, or computer science. The requirement may be satisfied by exam or by taking an approved course.

Foreign Language

The Foreign Language requirement may be satisfied by demonstrating proficiency in reading comprehension, writing, and conversation in a foreign language equivalent to the second semester college level, either by passing an exam or by completing approved course work.

Reading and Composition

In order to provide a solid foundation in reading, writing, and critical thinking the College requires two semesters of lower division work in composition in sequence. Students must complete a first-level reading and composition course by the end of their second semester and a second-level course by the end of their fourth semester.

Breadth Requirements

The undergraduate breadth requirements provide Berkeley students with a rich and varied educational experience outside of their major program. As the foundation of a liberal arts education, breadth courses give students a view into the intellectual life of the University while introducing them to a multitude of perspectives and approaches to research and scholarship. Engaging students in new disciplines and with peers from other majors, the breadth experience strengthens interdisciplinary connections and context that prepares Berkeley graduates to understand and solve the complex issues of their day.

Unit Requirements

  • 120 total units, including at least 60 L&S units

  • Of the 120 units, 36 must be upper division units

  • Of the 36 upper division units, 6 must be taken in courses offered outside your major department

Residence Requirements

For units to be considered in "residence," you must be registered in courses on the Berkeley campus as a student in the College of Letters & Science. Most students automatically fulfill the residence requirement by attending classes here for four years. In general, there is no need to be concerned about this requirement, unless you go abroad for a semester or year or want to take courses at another institution or through UC Extension during your senior year. In these cases, you should make an appointment to meet an adviser to determine how you can meet the Senior Residence Requirement.

Note: Courses taken through UC Extension do not count toward residence.

Senior Residence Requirement

After you become a senior (with 90 semester units earned toward your BA degree), you must complete at least 24 of the remaining 30 units in residence in at least two semesters. To count as residence, a semester must consist of at least 6 passed units. Intercampus Visitor, EAP, and UC Berkeley-Washington Program (UCDC) units are excluded.

You may use a Berkeley Summer Session to satisfy one semester of the Senior Residence requirement, provided that you successfully complete 6 units of course work in the Summer Session and that you have been enrolled previously in the college.

Modified Senior Residence Requirement

Participants in the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP) or the UC Berkeley Washington Program (UCDC) may meet a Modified Senior Residence requirement by completing 24 (excluding EAP) of their final 60 semester units in residence. At least 12 of these 24 units must be completed after you have completed 90 units.

Upper Division Residence Requirement

You must complete in residence a minimum of 18 units of upper division courses (excluding EAP units), 12 of which must satisfy the requirements for your major.

Plan of Study

The sample plans below show a four-year plan for completing the major in Integrative Biology, taking classes only during fall and spring semesters. All of the lower division classes are offered during the summer as well. Please consult the sample plan appropriate to your track. Peer and academic advisers are available to help customize a plan to the student's specific situation.

Please note that the sample plans below include only courses required for the major. For more detailed information regarding other requirements, including unit minimums per semester, Letters & Science Breadth requirements, Reading and Composition (R & C), and the American Cultures (AC) requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.

Sample 4-Year Plan, Track 1: Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology

Freshman
FallUnitsSpringUnits
MATH 10A or 1A4MATH 10B or 1B4
CHEM 1A
1AL
4CHEM 3A
3AL
5
INTEGBI 77A (Only one of INTEGBI 77A or 77B is required)1INTEGBI 77B (Only one of INTEGBI 77A or 77B is required)1
 9 10
Sophomore
FallUnitsSpringUnits
CHEM 3B
3BL
5BIOLOGY 1A
1AL
5
BIOLOGY 1B4PHYSICS 8A4
 9 9
Junior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
IB Requirement: Group A3-4IB Requirement: Group B w/ field lab4-5
PHYSICS 8B4IB Requirement: Elective3-5
 7-8 7-10
Senior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
IB Requirement: Group B3-5IB Requirement: Elective4-5
IB Requirement: Group C with Lab4-6IB Requirement: Elective3-5
 7-11 7-10
Total Units: 65-76

Sample 4-Year Plan, Track 2: Human Biology and Health Sciences

Freshman
FallUnitsSpringUnits
MATH 10A or 1A4MATH 10B or 1B4
CHEM 1A
1AL
4CHEM 3A
3AL
5
INTEGBI 77A (Only one of INTEGBI 77A or 77B is required)1INTEGBI 77B (Only one of INTEGBI 77A or 77B is required)1
 9 10
Sophomore
FallUnitsSpringUnits
CHEM 3B
3BL
5BIOLOGY 1B4
PHYSICS 8A4PHYSICS 8B4
 9 8
Junior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
IB Requirement: Group C3-5IB Requirement: Group A3-4
BIOLOGY 1A
1AL
5IB Requirement: Group B3-5
 IB Requirement: Elective3-4
 8-10 9-13
Senior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
IB Requirement: Elective4-5IB Requirement: Lab2-5
IB Requirement: Group C with Lab3-5IB Requirement: Elective3-5
 7-10 5-10
Total Units: 65-79

Sample 4-Year Plan, Spring Start

Freshman
FallUnitsSpringUnits
MATH 10A or 1A4MATH 10B or 1B4
 CHEM 1A
1AL
4
 INTEGBI 77B (Only one of INTEGBI 77A or 77B is required)1
 4 9
Sophomore
FallUnitsSpringUnits
CHEM 3A
3AL
5CHEM 3B
3BL
5
BIOLOGY 1B4PHYSICS 8A4
INTEGBI 77A (Only one of INTEGBI 77A or 77B is required)1 
 10 9
Junior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
BIOLOGY 1A
1AL
5IB Requirement: Group B3-5
PHYSICS 8B4IB Requirement: Elective3-4
 9 6-9
Senior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
IB Requirement: Group A3-4IB Requirement: Lab or Field Lab2-5
IB Requirement: Group C with Lab4-5IB Requirement: Group B or C3-5
IB Requirement: Elective3-5IB Requirement: Elective3-5
 10-14 8-15
Total Units: 65-79

Sample 4-Year Plan, Transfer Students

It is highly recommended for transfer students to complete all lower division coursework before enrolling at UC Berkeley. 

Junior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
IB Group C w/lab4-5IB Group B (with Field Lab if Track 1)3-5
IB Group B or Elective3-5IB Group C or Elective2-5
INTEGBI 77A (Only one of INTEGBI 77A or 77B is required)1INTEGBI 77B (Only one of INTEGBI 77A or 77B is required)1
 8-11 6-11
Senior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
IB Group A3-4IB Elective4-5
IB Elective3-5IB Lab (if track 2)2-4
 6-9 6-9
Total Units: 26-40

Accelerated Program Plans

For students considering graduating in less than four years, it's important to acknowledge the reasons to undertake such a plan of study. While there are advantages to pursuing a three-year degree plan, such as reducing financial burdens, they can significantly restrict participation in co-curricular activities, depth of study, and research internships. Please consult with an academic adviser before pursuing an accelerated degree plan.

Student Learning Goals

Learning Goals for the Major

  1. Describe the principles of evolution and genetics that underlie all biology.
  2. Demonstrate a broad and integrated understanding of species origins, biological and organismal diversity, how to characterize, understand and protect this diversity, and interactions with the environment.
  3. Demonstrate a fundamental understanding of the relationships between structure and function in animal (human) health.
  4. Describe the basic principles of scientific inquiry and the importance of scientific study in integrative biology.
  5. Illustrate the process of data collection, statistical analysis, and graphing including basic principles of experimental and sampling design.
  6. Critically evaluate data, develop hypotheses, and interpret biological experiments.
  7. Communicate effectively in the written presentation of scientific results.

Advising

IB offers three types of undergraduate advising: staff advisers, faculty advisers, and peer advisers.

Staff Advisers

Staff academic advisers are trained to support students and assist them in successfully completing their IB major. They are excellent resources for questions concerning administration and academics or finding out about other available services. Students should see a staff advisor for the following:

  • Questions about major requirements
  • Advice about schedule planning
  • Declare the IB major
  • Information about research opportunities, graduate and professional schools, career opportunities, scholarships, and internships
  • Scheduling conflicts or registration holds
  • Information and registration assistance for independent research credit
  • General assistance, advice or information
  • Information about upcoming events and programs

Staff advisers are primarily available for drop-in advising, though limited appointments are available for more complex issues such as probation, academic difficulty, and readmission. Students who would like to schedule an appointment should call 510-643-1667 during drop-in advising hours. Current hours can be found on the advising website: http://ib.berekeley.edu/undergrad.

The general email address is ibusso@berkeley.edu. This email is checked daily, Monday through Friday, so students will receive a timely answer to their questions.

Faculty Advisers

Faculty advisers are IB professors assigned to advise students about the IB department, courses, research, and other academic issues. Students meet with a faculty advisor when they declare the IB major. Students should see a faculty advisers for the following:

  • Guidance toward achieving academic and career goals
  • Questions about the content of IB courses
  • Exceptions to IB major requirements and policies after having previously met with a staff adviser
  • Questions about biological research and biology in general
  • Recommendations on graduate training

For a list of faculty advisers and their office hours, please see speak with a staff advisor in 3060 VLSB. Faculty advisers are not available for office hours during instructional breaks, including summer break. Students may refer to staff drop-in advising hours during summer sessions and non-instructional periods.

Peer Advisers

Peer advisers are junior and senior IB students who volunteer their time to complement the advising services by sharing their knowledge of and experience with lower division requirements and upper division classes, experience with student groups on campus, preparation for life beyond Cal, and use of various campus resources. To see the schedule and more information about who the peer advisers are and which courses they have taken, click here.

Courses

Integrative Biology

INTEGBI C13 Origins: from the Big Bang to the Emergence of Humans 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
This course will cover our modern scientific understanding of origins, from the Big Bang to the formation of planets like Earth, evolution by natural selection, the genetic basis of evolution, and the emergence of humans. These ideas are of great intrinsic scientific importance and also have far reaching implications for other aspects of people's lives (e.g., philosophical, religious, and political). A major theme will be the scientific method
and how we know what we know.
Origins: from the Big Bang to the Emergence of Humans: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 24 Freshman Seminars 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester.

Freshman Seminars: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 31 The Ecology and Evolution of Animal Behavior 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2014
Principles of evolution biology as they relate to animal behavior and behavioral ecology with broad coverage of animal groups. Special attention will be paid to the emerging discipline of behavioral ecology.

The Ecology and Evolution of Animal Behavior: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C32 Bioinspired Design 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017
Bioinspired design views the process of how we learn from Nature as an innovation strategy translating principles of function, performance and aesthetics from biology to human technology. The creative design process is driven by interdisciplinary exchange among engineering, biology, art, architecture and business. Diverse teams of students will collaborate on, create, and present original bioinspired design projects. Lectures discuss biomimicry, challenges
of extracting principles from Nature, scaling, robustness, and entrepreneurship through case studies highlighting robots that run, fly, and swim, materials like gecko-inspired adhesives, artificial muscles, medical prosthetic devices, and translation to start-ups.
Bioinspired Design: Read More [+]

INTEGBI N33 Topics in Paleontology: The Age of Dinosaurs 2 Units

Terms offered: Summer 1996 10 Week Session
Open without prerequisite to all students and designed for those not specializing in paleontology. Evolution history, and ecology of the dinosaurs and their world, including the earliest mammals and birds.

Topics in Paleontology: The Age of Dinosaurs: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 35AC Human Biological Variation 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Fall 2016
This course addresses modern human biological variation from historical, comparative, evolutionary, biomedical, and cultural perspectives. It is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of comparative biology, evolutionary theory, and genetics.

Human Biological Variation: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 37 Topics in Paleontology: The Antecedents of Man 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
. Open without prerequisite toall students and designed for those not specializing in paleontology. Survey the evolution, ecology, and history of the primate order. Special emphasis will be given to primate origins, geographic distribution, and the evolution of the human lineage.

Topics in Paleontology: The Antecedents of Man: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 39C Topics in Integrative Biology 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2012, Spring 2011
Reading and discussion of the literature on particular topics in the field of integrative biology. Term paper and oral presentation. Section topics will vary from semester to semester. Students should check with department secretary for each semester's offerings.

Topics in Integrative Biology: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 41 Marine Mammals 2 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
A survey of marine mammal evolution, biology, behavior, ecology, and politics with a concentration on those species found in the North Pacific. Coverage would include: origin and evolution of cetaceans, pinnipeds, sirenians, and sea otters; basic biology and anatomy of marine mammal groups, and North Pacific species in particular; ecological interactions and role in nearshore and pelagic marine communities; and interactions between
humans and marine mammals.
Marine Mammals: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 42 Primate Biology 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 1996 10 Week Session
An introduction to the order of mammals of which we are members. The niches of primates in modern ecosystems, their anatomical and behavorial specialization, and their role as indicator species in conservation. The mechanisms and variety of primate social organization compared with that of other animals.

Primate Biology: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 77A Integrative Human Biology 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017
Each week a different Integrative Biology faculty member will give a one hour lecture on how their research field contributes to our understanding of human biology. The integration of the disciplines of evolution, ecology, paleontology, comparative physiology, and comparative anatomy in the study of how humans function in ecosystems illuminates our understanding of human biology. During each presentation, the faculty member will also inform students about IB courses
they teach, research in their lab, and which Berkeley Natural History Museum they may be affiliated with. This course gives undergraduates an opportunity to learn about the spectrum of research and courses offered by the different IB faculty.
Integrative Human Biology: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 77B Integrative Human Biology 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2018
Each week a different Integrative Biology faculty member will give a one hour lecture on how their research field contributes to our understanding of human biology. The integration of the disciplines of evolution, ecology, paleontology, comparative physiology, and comparative anatomy in the study of how humans function in ecosystems illuminates our understanding of human biology. During each presentation, the faculty member will also inform students about IB courses
they teach, research in their lab, and which Berkeley Natural History Museum they may be affiliated with. This course gives undergraduates an opportunity to learn about the spectrum of research and courses offered by the different IB faculty.
Integrative Human Biology: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C82 Oceans 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course offers multidisciplinary approach to begin answering the question "Why are oceans important to us?" Upon a physical, chemical, and geologic base, we introduce the alien world of sea life, the importance of the ocean to the global carbon cycle, and the principles of ecology with a focus on the important concept of energy flow through food webs. Lectures expand beyond science to include current topics as diverse as music, movies
, mythology, biomechanics, policy, and trade.
Oceans: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 84 Sophomore Seminar 1 or 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2014
Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses offered by faculty members in departments all across the campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for close, regular intellectual contact between faculty members and students in the crucial second year. The topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sophomores.

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INTEGBI 87 Introduction to Research Methods in Biology 2 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2014 8 Week Session, Summer 2013 8 Week Session, Summer 2012 8 Week Session
This course provides a functional understanding of hypothesis/data driven research and exposure to current approaches and methods in biological science. The lectures address foundational concepts of the scientific method, research ethics, scientific communication, and how to understand scientific literature. The labs provide exposure to faculty research and experimental methods. The course is geared
to incoming freshmen, sophomores, and transfer students interested in learning more about research.
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INTEGBI 88 Leadership Communications for Biology Scholars 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2009, Fall 2008, Fall 2007
Leadership skills and abilities such as communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and resourcefulness are critical to academic, professional, and personal success. The need for enlightened leaders is evident in every aspect of health and science such as designing innovative health programs, obtaining funding, conducting cutting-edge research, developing and gaining support to implement policy solutions. This course provides an understanding
of the principles of leadership and communications for students in the Biology Scholars Program. Students will nurture those traits in themselves and apply those principles in situations specifically related to the health and science sectors.
Leadership Communications for Biology Scholars: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 95 Special Research Project in Biology 1B 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Students enrolled in Biology 1B can participate in special field research in addition to attending regular laboratory sections. Students work independently with minimal supervision. Students will learn how to develop a project, collect and record data, conduct and analyze experiments, write a report, and make an oral presentation. Project may require traveling to off-campus sites, and may include night or weekend work.

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INTEGBI 95B Lawrence Hall of Science Teaching Assistant 1 - 2 Units

Terms offered: Not yet offered
Enrollment into this course is for students interested in teaching science to children under the guidance of the Lawrence Hall of Science Instructors and Staff. As a LHS Teaching Assistant (TA), you will have the opportunity to assist with workshops serving grade school-aged children and to lead small discussion groups. The workshops consist of organismal biology related materials. You will undergo training in the Hall’s Animal Discovery Room to ensure that you
are prepared to support school and public programs scheduled in that space. There will also be opportunities to travel to nearby school districts to give presentations on the materials you work with.
Lawrence Hall of Science Teaching Assistant: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C96 Studying the Biological Sciences 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Freshmen will be introduced to the "culture" of the biological sciences, along with an in-depth orientation to the academic life and the culture of the university as they relate to majoring in biology. Students will learn concepts, skills, and information that they can use in their major course, and as future science professionals. Restricted to freshmen in the biology scholars program.

Studying the Biological Sciences: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 98 Directed Group Study 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Lectures and small group discussions focusing on topics of interest, varying from semester to semester.

Directed Group Study: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 99 Supervised Independent Study and Research 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Fall 2013
Lower division independent study and research intended for the academically superior student. Enrollment only with prior approval of faculty adviser directing the research.

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INTEGBI 100B Principles of Biodiversity 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012, Spring 2002, Spring 2001
Biogeographic, temporal, and historical patterns of change in biological diversity; phylogenetics and systematics; processes involved in origin and extinction of taxa and floras/faunas; population structure and demography (including human populations); community processes and maintenance of diversity; ecosystem function; global change; human uses of and effects on biodiversity; conservation biology.

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INTEGBI C100 Communicating Ocean Science 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
For undergraduates interested in improving their ability to communicate their scientific knowledge by teaching ocean science in elementary schools or science centers/aquariums. The course will combine instruction in inquiry-based teaching methods and learning pedagogy with six weeks of supervised teaching experience in a local school classroom or the Lawrence Hall of Science with a partner. Thus, students will practice communicating scientific
knowledge and receive mentoring on how to improve their presentations.
Communicating Ocean Science: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 101 Introduction to Scientific Writing 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 1997
This course will introduce students to concepts and techniques for effective communication of scientific findings, both within the scientific community and to the general public. Students will be exposed to a variety of formats, including systematic observations in field journals, proposals, conference presentations, seminars, journal articles, popular science writing, and interviews. Students can expect to gain a sense of confidence in writing and public
speaking about research. Direct language is valued in scientific writing, but creative approaches to style and structure will be emphasized.
Introduction to Scientific Writing: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 102LF Introduction to California Plant Life with Laboratory 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
The relationship of the main plant groups and the plant communities of California to climate, soils, vegetation, geological and recent history, and conservation. Laboratory will also include at least two Saturday field trips and focus on main plant groups and major plant families in California, and use of keys to identify introduced and especially native pteridophytes, conifers, and flowering plants of the state.

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INTEGBI 103LF Invertebrate Zoology with Laboratory 5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016, Spring 2014
Introductory survey of the biology of invertebrates, stressing comparative functional morphology, phylogeny, natural history, and aspects of physiology and development. Laboratory study of invertebrate diversity and functional morphology, and field study of the natural history of local marine invertebrates.

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INTEGBI 104LF Natural History of the Vertebrates with Laboratory 5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Biology of the vertebrates, exclusive of fish. Laboratory and field study of local vertebrates exclusive of fish.

Natural History of the Vertebrates with Laboratory: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C105 Natural History Museums and Biodiversity Science 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
(1) survey of museum resources, including strategies for accession, conservation, collecting and acquiring material, administration, and policies; (2) strategies for making collections digitally available (digitization, databasing, georeferencing, mapping); (3) tools and approaches for examining historical specimens (genomics, isotopes, ecology, morphology, etc); and (4) data integration and inference. The final third of the course will involve
individual projects within a given museum.
Natural History Museums and Biodiversity Science: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 106A Physical and Chemical Environment of the Ocean 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2012, Spring 2010, Spring 2008
The biological implications of marine physics and chemistry. History and properties of seawater. Geophysical fluids. Currents and circulations. Deep sea. Waves, tides, and bottom boundary layers. The coastal ocean; estuaries. Air/sea interaction. Mixing. Formation of water masses. Modeling biological and geochemical processes. Ocean and climate change.

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INTEGBI C107L Principles of Plant Morphology with Laboratory 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
An analysis of the structural diversity of land plants plants with emphasis on the developmental mechanisms responsible for this variation in morphology and the significance of this diversity in relation to adaptation and evolution.

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INTEGBI C109 Evolution and Ecology of Development 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016
From the seahorse’s body to the venus flytrap’s jaws to the human brain, nature abounds with amazing adaptations. This interdisciplinary course explores how and why such biodiversity evolves as well as what limits diversity. Lectures and case studies will focus on core concepts, recent advances, and integrative approaches, placing special emphasis on the interplay between gene regulatory networks, the environment, and population genetics.

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INTEGBI C110L Biology of Fungi with Laboratory 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014
Selected aspects of fungi: their structure, reproduction, physiology, ecology, genetics and evolution; their role in plant disease, human welfare, and industry. Offered even fall semesters.

Biology of Fungi with Laboratory: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 112 Horticultural Methods in the Botanical Garden 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2015
An introduction to horticultural techniques utilizing the diverse collections of the University Botanical Garden.

Horticultural Methods in the Botanical Garden: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 113L Paleobiological Perspectives on Ecology and Evolution 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
This course will center around answering the following questions: What do the fossil and geologic records have to tell us about the nature of ecological and evolutionary processes? What do they teach us that cannot be learned from the living world alone? In answering these questions, the course will provide an introduction to the analysis of key problems in paleobiology, with an emphasis on how evolutionary and ecological processes operate
on geologic timescales.
Paleobiological Perspectives on Ecology and Evolution: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 114 Infectious Disease Dynamics 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017
Many of the challenges of managing infectious disease are essentially ecological and evolutionary problems. Disease follows the rules of species interactions as it spreads through host populations while resistance to antibiotics occurs through the rules of evolutionary biology. The key aim of the module is to teach ecological and evolutionary principles in the light of infectious diseases affecting human populations and societies as well as agriculture and wildlife.
This is applied ecology and applied evolution writ large.
Infectious Disease Dynamics: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 115 Introduction to Systems in Biology and Medicine 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Fall 2013
This course is aimed at students wishing to understand the general principles of how biological systems operate. Topics include feedback regulation; competition and cooperation; genetic switches and circuits; random processes; chaos; mechanisms for error correction; and the properties of networks. Examples are selected from many fields including medicine, physiology, ecology, biochemistry, cell biology, and genetics. Students will learn to
conceptualize and quantify interactions within biological systems using simple mathematical models and computer programs. No previous experience in programming is required.
Introduction to Systems in Biology and Medicine: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 116L Medical Parasitology 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 First 6 Week Session
This course includes the biology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of various medically important parasitic infections. Life cycles of parasitic helminths and protozoa, the biological aspects of the host-parasite relationship, the epidemiology of the infection, and the interplay of social, economical, and ecological factors which contribute to the disease will
be covered in both lectures and videos.
Medical Parasitology: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 117 Medical Ethnobotany 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Biological diversity and ethno-linguistic diversity sustain traditional botanical medicine systems of the world. Major topics covered in this course include cultural origins of medicinal plant knowledge on plant-derived pharmaceuticals and phytomedicines; field research methods in ethnobotany and ethnopharmacology; examples of how traditional botanical medicines provide safe, effective, affordable, and sustainable primary health care to tropical
countries; human physiology, human diseases, and mechanisms of action of plant-derived drugs.
Medical Ethnobotany: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 117LF Medical Ethnobotany Laboratory 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Laboratory will focus on studying medicinal plants from the major ecosystems and geographical regions of the world. Students will learn common names, scientific names, plant families, field identification, habitats, and ethnomedical uses of medicinal plants. How the medicinal plant is prepared, administered, and used as a phytomedicine will also be discussed. There will be reference to the phylogenetic relationships between the plant families and
genera represented by the medicinal plants.
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INTEGBI 118 Host-Pathogen Interactions: A Trans-Discipline Outlook 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The second half of the 20th century is marked by great strides in the battle against infectious diseases. However, the forces that drive pathogen evolution continue to pose new challenges for science and medicine. In this course we will cover various aspects relating to host-pathogen interactions, focusing on animals and their bacterial pathogens. We will address the ecology of host-pathogen interactions, their shaping by co-evolution, examine
prominent molecular mechanisms taking part in this warfare and learn how ancient mechanisms are used and reused through millions of years of evolution. The course will examine how better understanding of host-pathogen interactions can suggest new strategies for fighting infectious diseases.

Host-Pathogen Interactions: A Trans-Discipline Outlook: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 119 Evaluating Scientific Evidence in Medicine 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Fall 2014, Spring 2013
A course in critical analysis of medical reports and studies using recent controversial topics in medicine. Course will focus on information gathering, hypothesis testing, evaluating study design, methodological problems, mechanisms of bias, interpretation of results, statistics, and attribution of causation. Students participate in a mock trial as a way to demonstrate their abilities to gather, critically analyze, and present scientific and
medical evidence.
Evaluating Scientific Evidence in Medicine: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 123AL Exercise and Environmental Physiology with Laboratory 5 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Discussion of how chemical energy is captured within cells and how potential chemical energy is converted to muscular work. Energetics, direct and indirect calorimetry, pathways of carbon flow in exercise, ventilation, circulation, skeletal muscle fiber types. Laboratory component of the course is to obtain practical experience in the measurement of physiological parameters and to be able to compile, compare, contrast, and interpret physiological
data. Laboratory demonstrations and exercises will explain lecture content.
Exercise and Environmental Physiology with Laboratory: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C125L Introduction to the Biomechanical Analysis of Human Movement 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
Basic biomechanical and anatomical concepts of human movement and their application to fundamental movement patterns, exercise, and sport skills.

Introduction to the Biomechanical Analysis of Human Movement: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 127L Motor Control with Laboratory 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
Neural control of movement in humans and other animals. Lectures introduce basic theories of information and control, analyze motor control at the spinal level, survey anatomy and physiology of motor systems of the brain, and synthesize theory and physiology to understand control systems that regulate posture, locomotion, and voluntary movements. In laboratories, students learn theory and motor physiology hands-on, and design and perform independent
investigations.
Motor Control with Laboratory: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 128 Sports Medicine 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2015 First 6 Week Session
Survey course of sports medicine including topics of athletic injury (cause, evaluation, and treatment options), exercise physiology, exercise and health, fitness testing, issues specific to female athletes, drug abuse in sports, environmental issues (heat, altitude, sun exposure), nutrition, careers in sports medicine, introduction to clinical research.

Sports Medicine: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C129L Human Physiological Assessment 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Principles and theories of human physiological assessment in relation to physical activity and conditioning. Performance of laboratory procedures in the measurement and interpretation of physiological fitness (cardiorespiratory endurance, body composition, musculoskeletal fitness).

Human Physiological Assessment: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 131 General Human Anatomy 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Fall 2016
The functional anatomy of the human body as revealed by gross and microscopic examination. Designed to be taken concurrently with 131L.

General Human Anatomy: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 131A Applied Anatomy 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
A series of 15 lectures by former students of 131 who have become successful physicians and surgeons. The purpose is to provide the practical applications of anatomy, e.g., plastic surgeons, neurosurgeons, vascular surgeons, pathologists, etc.

Applied Anatomy: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 131L General Human Anatomy Laboratory 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session
Prepared human dissections, models, and microscopic slides.

General Human Anatomy Laboratory: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 132 Survey of Human Physiology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Spring 2017
Mechanisms by which key physiological priorities are maintained in healthy humans. From a basis in elementary theories of information and control, we develop an understanding of homeostasis of cellular composition, structure, and energy metabolism. We then study neural and endocrine signaling in humans, and develop the key concepts of control and homeostasis in all the major organ and multi-organ systems, including cardiovascular
, respiratory, renal, metabolic, reproductive, and immune systems, growth and development, and sensory and motor systems.
Survey of Human Physiology: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 132L Mammalian Physiology Laboratory 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Summer 2016 8 Week Session
In the laboratory component of Integrative Biology 132, students gain hands-on experience measuring physiological parameters, interpreting physiological data, designing experiments, and communicating ideas in writing and orally. Guided investigations include measurements of membrane potentials, responses of skeletal muscle to electrical stimulation, electromyography, pulmonary and cardiovascular measurements in humans, contractility
and regulation of the frog heart, human electrocardiography, and renal control of body fluids. In two independent investigations, students identify their own questions, develop hypotheses, design and perform experiments, and present their studies in symposia. Background in elementary statistics, data analysis and oral presentation are also provided.
Mammalian Physiology Laboratory: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 133 Anatomy Enrichment Program 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Spring 2010, Spring 2009
The purpose of the course is for University students to teach human anatomy to grades K-7 in the public schools. The UCB students work in groups of 2-3 to plan their presentations of the systems of the body and then enter the school rooms to teach what they have learned in 131.

Anatomy Enrichment Program: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 135 The Mechanics of Organisms 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2013, Fall 2011
Organism design in terms of mechanical principles; basics of fluid and solid mechanics with examples of their biological implications, stressing the dependence of mechanical behavior and locomotion on the structure of molecules, tissues, structural elements, whole organisms, and habitats.

The Mechanics of Organisms: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C135L Laboratory in the Mechanics of Organisms 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
Introduction to laboratory and field study of the biomechanics of animals and plants using fundamental biomechanical techniques and equipment. Course has a series of rotations involving students in experiments demonstrating how solid and fluid mechanics can be used to discover the way in which diverse organisms move and interact with their physical environment. The laboratories emphasize sampling methodology, experimental design
, and statistical interpretation of results. Latter third of course devoted to independent research projects. Written reports and class presentation of project results are required.
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INTEGBI 136 The Biology of Sex 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Summer 1991 10 Week Session
The ability to reproduce is a defining characteristic of life, and of great interest to biologists as well as humanity in general. What is sex, and why did it develop? Why do we have sexual reproduction, whereas some animals do not? This course will provide a comprehensive overview on the biology of sex from an evolutionary perspective with an emphasis on humans in comparison to other species. The course will consist of two lectures each
week, and a lab where we discuss a paper, watch videos, or have discussion sections on specific topics that were covered in class.
The Biology of Sex: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 137 Human Endocrinology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Course will address the role of hormones in physiology with a focus on humans. Regulation of hormone secretion and mechanisms of hormone action will be discussed. Physiological processes to be addressed include reproduction, metabolism, water balance, growth, fetal development. Experimental and clinical aspects will be addressed.

Human Endocrinology: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 138 Comparative Endocrinology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
The primary goal of this course is to provide students with a broad understanding of the evolution of hormonal systems. A comparative approach allows us to envisage how the complex mammalian endocrine system presumably evolved from that of more primitive vertebrates. Students will learn about endocrine pathways and endocrine-based behaviors of jawless fishes, fishes, amphibia, reptiles, birds, and mammals. In addition, students will gain
an understanding of the experimental methods used in endocrine research. The class teaches students how to read and interpret the primary scientific literature; thus it encourages the critical thinking that is a fundamental skill for any scientist.
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INTEGBI 139 The Neurobiology of Stress 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course is designed to be an interdisciplinary course. It will adopt a broad-based approach to explore the concepts of stress, health, and disease, with a particular focus on current primary literature. The course will cover multiple dimensions in the study of stress, which employ genetic, epigenetic, molecular, cellular, physiological, and cognitive approaches, especially in the context of endocrine and neuroscience research. We will analyze
the individual response to stress, how genetic and environmental factors play a role in it, how it translates to physiological and mental health and well-being vs. pathological conditions, and put that in a public health perspective.

The Neurobiology of Stress: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 140 Biology of Human Reproduction 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Course focuses on biological and cultural aspects of human reproduction including conception, embryology, pregnancy, labor, delivery, lactation, infant/child development, puberty, and reproductive aging. This includes study of factors that diminish and factors that enhance fertility, reproduction, and maternal-child health. We explore evolutionary, ecological, environmental, cultural, ethnobiological, and nutritional determinants of fertility
, reproductive rate, infant survival, and population growth.
Biology of Human Reproduction: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 141 Human Genetics 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 8 Week Session
Principles of inheritance, especially as applied to human traits, including molecular aspects of genetics, the genetic constitutions of populations, and questions of heredity/environment.

Human Genetics: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C142L Introduction to Human Osteology 6 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016, Spring 2014
An intensive study of the human skeleton, reconstruction of individual and population characteristics, emphasizing methodology and analysis of human populations from archaeological and paleontological contexts, taphonomy, and paleopathology.

Introduction to Human Osteology: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C143A Biological Clocks: Physiology and Behavior 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2012, Fall 2010
A consideration of the biological clocks that generate daily, lunar, seasonal and annual rhythms in various animals including people. Emphasis on neuroendocrine substrates, development and adaptive significance of estrous cycles, feeding rhythms, sleep-wakefulness cycles, reproductive and hibernation cycles, body weight and migratory cycles.

Biological Clocks: Physiology and Behavior: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C143B Hormones and Behavior 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
This course provides a comprehensive overview of behavorial endocrinology beginning with hormone production and actions on target issues and continuing with an exploration of a variety of behaviors and their hormonal regulation/consequences. The course uses a comparative approach to examine the reciprocal interactions between the neuroendocrine system and behavior, considering the effects of hormone on development and adult behavior in addition
to how behavior regulates endocrine physiology. While much of the course focuses on non-human vertebrate species, the relevance to humans is explored where appropriate. Topics include sexual differentiation and sex differences in behavior, reproductive, parental, and aggressive behaviors, and hormonal and behavioral homeostatic regulation.
Hormones and Behavior: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C144 Animal Behavior 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
An introduction to comparative animal behavior and behavioral physiology in an evolutionary context, including but not limited to analysis of behavior, genetics and development, learning, aggression, reproduction, adaptiveness, and physiological substrates.

Animal Behavior: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C145 Animal Communication 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018
Communication is central to the lives of most, if not all animals. How and why animals communicate is thus central to understanding the ecology, behavior, neurobiology, and evolution of animal systems. This course will focus on understanding the basic principles driving the communication system of a species, drawing together topics ranging from the physical properties of the environment, physiology of sensory systems, animal behavior and ecology, using examples from
classic and recent publications.
Animal Communication: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 146LF Behavioral Ecology with Laboratory 5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
An in-depth examination of the ecological and evolutionary bases for behavioral diversity. Topics covered include behavior as an adaptive response, sexual selection, animal mating systems, group living, and cooperative and competitive interactions. Current conceptual approaches to these topics are explored, with an emphasis upon rigorous testing of hypotheses drawn from primary literature. Hands-on laboratory training in the methods of experimental
design, data collection, and data analysis.
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INTEGBI 147 Biology of Aging 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This course will focus on studying the molecular mechanisms of aging and the age-related changes that take place in cells and tissues. It introduces animal models used for the study of the genetics and biochemistry of aging as well as discusses the similarities and differences in aging mechanisms across species. Students will learn the age-related changes taking place in the major physiological systems in humans. Special attention will be given to differentiating
normal aging processes from diseases that normally affect the elderly.
Biology of Aging: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 148 Comparative Animal Physiology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2012
Comparative study of physiological systems among animal phyla. General physiological principles will be illustrated by examining variation in neural, muscular, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, and osmoregulatory systems. Students will read original literature and give a group presentation in a symposium.

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INTEGBI C149 Molecular Ecology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2010, Spring 2008, Spring 2005
This course focuses on the use of molecular genetic information in ecology. Applications and techniques covered range from analysis of parentage and relatedness (DNA fingerprinting and multilocus genetic analysis) through gene flow, biogeographic history and community composition (comparative DNA sequencing) to analysis of diet and trophic interactions (biological isotopes). Grades are based on one final exam, problem sheets, and a critique
of a recent research paper.
Molecular Ecology: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 150 Evolutionary Environmental Physiology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Evolutionary physiology studies how physiological traits arise and are modified during adaptation to the environment. An integrative understanding of the origin and maintenance of physiological traits, encompassing levels of biological hierarchy from molecular to ecological and biogeographic, is essential for improving human health and stewarding the natural world through the current era of rapid environmental change. This course consists
of three parts: 1) big questions in evolutionary physiology and how they are addressed; 2) a student-led exploration of how environmental factors have shaped physiological evolution; and 3) predicting responses to global change using evolutionary physiology.
Evolutionary Environmental Physiology: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 151 Plant Physiological Ecology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
This course focuses on a survey of physiological approaches to understanding plant-environment interactions from the functional perspective. Lectures cover physiological adaptation; limiting factors; resources acquisition/allocation; photosynthesis, carbon, energy balance; water use and relations; nutrient relations; linking physiology; stable isotope applications in ecophysiology; stress physiology; life history and physiology; evolution
of physiological performance; physiology population, community, and ecosystem levels.
Plant Physiological Ecology: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 151L Plant Physiological Ecology Laboratory 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
The laboratory is focused on instructing you on observational and experimental approaches and methods used in plant physiological ecology. Students are introduced to a wide range of techniques and will make measurements on different plant species growing in the field or greenhouse (weeks 1-7). A group research project is required (weeks 9-12).

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INTEGBI 152 Environmental Toxicology 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
The environmental fate and effect of toxic substances from human activities, with emphasis on aquatic systems, including their biological effects from the molecular to the community level. Course will review pollutant types, principal sources, impacts on aquatic organisms, monitoring approaches, and regulatory issues.

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INTEGBI 153 Ecology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Principles of microbial, animal, and plant population ecology, illustrated with examples from marine, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats. Consideration of the roles of physical and biological processes in structuring natural communities. Observational, experimental, and theoretical approaches to population and community ecology will be discussed. Topics will include quantitative approaches relying on algebra, graph analysis, and elementary calculus.
Discussion section will review recent literature in ecology.
Ecology: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 154 Plant Ecology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2013
An introduction to ecology of plants, covering individuals, populations, communities, and global processes. Topics include: form and function, population ecology, life histories, community structure and dynamics, disturbance and succession, diversity and global change.

Plant Ecology: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 154L Plant Ecology Laboratory 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2013, Spring 2005
Field and laboratory class in plant ecology. Laboratory exercises covering plant functional morphology, dispersal ecology, spatial dispersion in plant populations, environmental gradients and plant distributions, population dynamics simulations, and restoration ecology. Small-group independents projects, with write-ups and presentations. Concurrent enrollment in Integrative Biology 154 is required.

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INTEGBI C155 Holocene Paleoecology: How Humans Changed the Earth 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2011, Spring 1998
Since the end of the Pleistocene and especially with the development of agriculturally based societies humans have had cumulative and often irreversible impacts on natural landscapes and biotic resources worldwide. Thus "global change" and the biodiversity crisis are not exclusively developments of the industrial and post-industrial world. This course uses a multi-disciplinary approach, drawing upon methods and data from archaeology
, palynology, geomorphology, paleontology, and historical ecology to unravel the broad trends of human ecodynamics over the past 10,000 years.
Holocene Paleoecology: How Humans Changed the Earth: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C156 Principles of Conservation Biology 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Fall 2016
A survey of the principles and practices of conservation biology. Factors that affect the creation, destruction, and distribution of biological diversity at the level of the gene, species, and ecosystem are examined. Tools and management options derived from ecology and evolutionary biology that can recover or prevent the loss of biological diversity are explored.

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INTEGBI 157LF Ecosystems of California 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
The ecosystems of California are studied from both an ecological and historical biogeographical perspective with a focus on terrestrial plant communities. Students learn how to identify about 150 species of native plants (mostly trees, but also other dominant plants from the non-forest biomes). Field trips occur each Friday and over several weekends. Students conduct group projects that involve plant inventories and data collection as well as how
to collect plant specimens and use the Herbarium.
Ecosystems of California: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 158LF Biology and Geomorphology of Tropical Islands 13 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Natural history and evolutionary biology of island terrestrial and freshwater organisms, and of marine organisms in the coral reef and lagoon systems will be studied, and the geomorphology of volcanic islands, coral reefs, and reef islands will be discussed. Features of island biogeography will be illustrated with topics linked to subsequent field studies on the island of Moorea (French Polynesia).

Biology and Geomorphology of Tropical Islands: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 159 The Living Planet: Impact of the Biosphere on the Earth System 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2011
Earth is a complex dynamic system. Interplay between its components (solid earth, oceans, and atmosphere) governs conditions on the planet's outside that we and other biota inhabit. In turn, life asserts a vast influence on the abiotic components; in fact, the biosphere itself is a crucial system component. We will explore the effect that 3.5 billion years of evolving biosphere had on System Earth and vice versa (e.g., in terms of climate), including
the recent human impact on the system.
The Living Planet: Impact of the Biosphere on the Earth System: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 160 Evolution 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
An analysis of the patterns and processes of organic evolution. History and philosophy of evolutionary thought; the different lines of evidence and fields of inquiry that bear on the understanding of evolution. The major features and processes of evolution through geologic times; the generation of new forms and new lineages; extinction; population processes of selection, adaptation, and other forces; genetics, genomics, and the molecular basis
of evolution; evolutionary developmental biology; sexual selection; behavorial evolution; applications of evolutionary biology to medical, agricultural, conservational, and anthropological research.
Evolution: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 161 Population and Evolutionary Genetics 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
Population genetics provides the theoretical foundation for modern evolutionary thinking. It also provides a basis for understanding genetic variation within populations. We will study population genetic theory and use it to illuminate a number of different topics, including the existence of sex, altruism and cooperation, genome evolution speciation, and human genetic variation and evolution.

Population and Evolutionary Genetics: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 162 Ecological Genetics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2010
This course integrates ecology, genetics, and evolutionary biology. It presents contemporary approaches to studying evolution in natural populations, including analyzing heritability of ecologically important traits, using molecular techniques to decompose genotypes, documenting and measuring the magnitude of selection in natural systems, and using models to predict evolution in natural populations. Case studies are used to examine evolutionary
effects of ecological interactions among organisms, the importance of population size and structure, and interactions among populations through migration and dispersal.
Ecological Genetics: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 163 Molecular and Genomic Evolution 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
This course will introduce undergraduates to the study of evolution using molecular and genomic methods. Topics included will be rates of evolution, evolution of sex chromosomes, insertions and deletions of DNA sequences, evolution of regulatory genetic elements, methods of phylogenetic inference, gene duplication, multigene families, transposons, genome organization, gene transfer, and DNA polymorphism within species.

Molecular and Genomic Evolution: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 164 Human Genetics and Genomics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course will introduce students to basic principles of genetics, including transmissions genetics, gene regulation, pedigree analysis, genetic mapping, population genetics, and the principles of molecular evolution. The course will also introduce students to recent developments in genomics as applied to problems in human genetic diseases, human history, and the relationship between humans and their closest relatives.

Human Genetics and Genomics: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 166 Evolutionary Biogeography 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Spring 2012
The goals of the course are to (a) examine how geographically-linked characteristics of species influence their potential for evolution and extinction; (b) provide an overview of approaches for studying the interplay between geographic ranges, environment, evolution, and extinction; and (c) examine how human impacts over-ride the biogeographic processes and patterns that prevailed before people dominated the planet.



Evolutionary Biogeography: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C166 Biogeography 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018
The course will provide a historical background for the field of biogeography and the ecological foundations needed to understand the distribution and abundance of species and their changes over time. It will also discuss developing technologies (including genomic tools and environmental models) together with the availability of big data and increasingly sophisticated analytical tools to examine the relevance of the field to global change biology, conservation, and
invasion biology, as well as sustainable food systems and ecosystem services.,Terms offered: Not yet offered
The course will provide a historical background for the field of biogeography and the ecological foundations needed to understand the distribution and abundance of species and their changes over time. It will also discuss developing technologies (including genomic tools and environmental models) together with the availability of big data and increasingly sophisticated analytical tools to examine the relevance of the field to global change biology, conservation, and invasion biology, as well as sustainable food systems and ecosystem services.

Biogeography: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C166 Biogeography 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018
The course will provide a historical background for the field of biogeography and the ecological foundations needed to understand the distribution and abundance of species and their changes over time. It will also discuss developing technologies (including genomic tools and environmental models) together with the availability of big data and increasingly sophisticated analytical tools to examine the relevance of the field to global change biology, conservation, and
invasion biology, as well as sustainable food systems and ecosystem services.,Terms offered: Not yet offered
The course will provide a historical background for the field of biogeography and the ecological foundations needed to understand the distribution and abundance of species and their changes over time. It will also discuss developing technologies (including genomic tools and environmental models) together with the availability of big data and increasingly sophisticated analytical tools to examine the relevance of the field to global change biology, conservation, and invasion biology, as well as sustainable food systems and ecosystem services.

Biogeography: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C166 Biogeography 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018
The course will provide a historical background for the field of biogeography and the ecological foundations needed to understand the distribution and abundance of species and their changes over time. It will also discuss developing technologies (including genomic tools and environmental models) together with the availability of big data and increasingly sophisticated analytical tools to examine the relevance of the field to global change biology, conservation, and
invasion biology, as well as sustainable food systems and ecosystem services.,Terms offered: Not yet offered
The course will provide a historical background for the field of biogeography and the ecological foundations needed to understand the distribution and abundance of species and their changes over time. It will also discuss developing technologies (including genomic tools and environmental models) together with the availability of big data and increasingly sophisticated analytical tools to examine the relevance of the field to global change biology, conservation, and invasion biology, as well as sustainable food systems and ecosystem services.

Biogeography: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C166 Biogeography 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018
The course will provide a historical background for the field of biogeography and the ecological foundations needed to understand the distribution and abundance of species and their changes over time. It will also discuss developing technologies (including genomic tools and environmental models) together with the availability of big data and increasingly sophisticated analytical tools to examine the relevance of the field to global change biology, conservation, and
invasion biology, as well as sustainable food systems and ecosystem services.,Terms offered: Not yet offered
The course will provide a historical background for the field of biogeography and the ecological foundations needed to understand the distribution and abundance of species and their changes over time. It will also discuss developing technologies (including genomic tools and environmental models) together with the availability of big data and increasingly sophisticated analytical tools to examine the relevance of the field to global change biology, conservation, and invasion biology, as well as sustainable food systems and ecosystem services.

Biogeography: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 167 Evolution and Earth History: From Genes to Fossils 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016, Spring 2014
The diversity of life is the product of evolutionary changes. This course will integrate fossil and molecular data to consider some of the outstanding questions in the study of evolution. Major topics covered include the origin and early evolution of life, the expansion of the biosphere through time, the generation of variation and the mechanisms of natural selection, genetics and developmental evolution, and the relationships between microevolution
and macroevolution.


Evolution and Earth History: From Genes to Fossils: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 168 Systematics of Vascular Plants 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2010, Spring 2009, Spring 2007
A discussion of the philosophy, principles, techniques, and history of botanical systemics. An outline of the major group of vascular plants and their evolution.

Systematics of Vascular Plants: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 168L Systematics of Vascular Plants with Laboratory 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2014
A discussion of the philosophy, principles, techniques, and history of botanical systemics. An outline of the major group of vascular plant and their evolution. Laboratory course devoted to a survey on a world-wide basis of the diversity of vascular plant families.

Systematics of Vascular Plants with Laboratory: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 169 Evolutionary Medicine 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
This course explores the ways that evolutionary theory, natural selection, drift, genetics, and epigenetics can illuminate our understanding of human health and disease. The course begins with an overview of primate and hominid evolution and human genetic variation. We then evaluate reproductive biology and maternal/child health through an evolutionary lens. We explore how human ecosystem interactions influence diet, metabolic adaptations
, hematological adaptions, human microbiome, and human pathogens. We examine evolutionary concepts related to aging, senescence and development of cancer. Finally we study psychology, behavior, and social/cultural organization through an evolutionary perspective.
Evolutionary Medicine: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 170LF Methods in Population and Community Ecology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015
This course is a hands-on introduction to common research methods in population and community ecology. Each method and its application are first presented in a lecture session, illustrated with published examples. The method is then practiced in a subsequent group field exercise, conducted in a local terrestrial, aquatic, or marine habitat. The course focuses on sampling methods, experimental designs, and statistical analyses used to investigate patterns
of species distribution and abundance, interspecific associations, and local species diversity. Graded assignments include write-ups of field exercise results, and an in-depth review paper and oral in-class presentation on an ecological method of particular interest to the student.
Methods in Population and Community Ecology: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C171 Freshwater Ecology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018
Lakes, rivers, wetlands, and estuaries are biologically rich, dynamic, and among the most vital and the most vulnerable of Earth’s ecosystems. Lectures will introduce general topics including the natural history of freshwater biota and habitats, ecological interactions, and ecosystem linkages and dynamics. Broad principles will be illustrated with results from selected recent research publications. Factors affecting resilience or vulnerability of freshwater ecosystems
to change will be examined. Course requirements: two exams and a short synthesis paper projecting the future states of a freshwater or estuarine ecosystem of the student's choice under plausible scenarios of local, regional, or global change.
Freshwater Ecology: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 172 Coevolution: From Genes to Ecosystems 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017
The biological world is shaped by interactions among species. These inter-specific interactions, such as between predators and prey, plants and pollinators, or hosts and pathogens, have led to an impressive array of adaptations, helping to explain the incredible organismal and genetic diversity on Earth. Our understanding of coevolution (the responses to reciprocal selection acting on two interacting populations) has been greatly facilitated in the last few years
by conceptual advancements, new methods allowing direct tests of theory, next generation sequencing technology, and the advance of ‘omics’ approaches.
Coevolution: From Genes to Ecosystems: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 173LF Mammalogy with Laboratory 5 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Spring 2014
An advanced course in the biology of mammals. Topics covered include elements of modern mammalian biology such as morphology, physiology, ecology, and behavior. For all topics, the traits that define mammals are emphasized, as is the variation on these themes evident within modern mammalian lineages. Laboratory and field explore the biology of modern mammals. Laboratories use the extensive collections of the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology to introduce
students to mammalian diversity in a phylogenetic context.
Mammalogy with Laboratory: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 174LF Ornithology with Laboratory 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
An advanced course in the biology of birds. Laboratory: an introduction to the diversity, morphology, and general ecology of birds of the world.

Ornithology with Laboratory: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 175LF Herpetology with Laboratory 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
Lectures will introduce students to the diversity of amphibians and reptiles on a world-wide basis, with an emphasis on systematics, ecology, morphology, and life history. Laboratories will teach students the diagnostic characteristics and some functional attributes of amphibians and reptiles on a world-wide basis. Field trips will acquaint students with techniques for collecting, preserving, identifying, and studying amphibians and rept
iles.
Herpetology with Laboratory: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C176L Fish Ecology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2015
Introduction to fish ecology, with particular emphasis on the identification and ecology of California's inland fishes. This course will expose students to the diversity of fishes found in California, emphasizing the physical (e.g., temperature, flow), biotic (e.g., predation, competition), and human-related (e.g., dams, fisheries) factors that affect the distribution, diversity, and abundance of these fishes.

Fish Ecology: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 177LF Ichthyology 4 Units

Terms offered: Not yet offered
We will study the anatomy, physiology, life history, diversity, evolution, behavior, biogeography and ecology of the fishes, the most diverse of all vertebrate groups and the dominant group of vertebrates in aquatic habitats. Aside from serving as a comprehensive introduction to the science of ichthyology, the course will provide a solid foundation in anatomy, physiology, evolution, life history, and ecology and will prepare you well for careers in fisheries science
, ichthyology, aquaculture, oceanography or vertebrate biology.
Ichthyology: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 181L Paleobotany - The 500-Million Year History of a Greening Planet 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2016, Fall 2014
Introduction to the evolution of plants and terrestrial
ecosystems through time. From the invasion of land to the present, we will follow the
evolution of major plant groups through important moments of the Phanerozoic eon (the past
540 million years). By studying fossilized plant assemblages, we will interpret how major
environmental changes unfolded across landscapes in the past and how plants have influenced
the
shaping of our planet. Lectures will be complemented by an interactive laboratory covering
paleobotanical research techniques, study of fossil and living plant form and function in the lab
and field, and analysis of peer-reviewed literature.

Paleobotany - The 500-Million Year History of a Greening Planet: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 183L Evolution of the Vertebrates with Laboratory 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2013, Spring 2011
Introduction to vertebrate paleontology, focusing on the history and phylogeny of vertebrates ranging from fishes to humans. Emphasis: evolution, taxonomy, functional morphology, faunas through time, problems in vertebrate history, including diversity through time and extinction. Laboratory: vertebrate fossils, focusing on demonstration and study of problems related to taxonomy, evolution, functional morphology, structures, preservation of
fossil vertebrates, and their faunas through time.
Evolution of the Vertebrates with Laboratory: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 184L Morphology of the Vertebrate Skeleton with Laboratory 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Fall 2012, Fall 2010
Lectures on comparative osteology of vertebrates, with emphasis on selected groups of terrestrial vertebrates considered in paleoecological, paleoclimatological, and biostratigraphic analyses. Laboratory: comparative osteology of vertebrates, with emphasis on selected groups of vertebrates. Structure, anatomy, morphology, function, and development of the vertebrate skeleton.

Morphology of the Vertebrate Skeleton with Laboratory: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C185L Human Paleontology 5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
Origin and relationships of the extinct forms of mankind.

Human Paleontology: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C187 Human Biogeography of the Pacific 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2013
This course examines the history of human dispersal across Oceania from the perspectives of biogeography and evolutionary ecology. H. sapiens faced problems of dispersal, colonization, and extinction, and adapted in a variety of ways to the diversity of insular ecosystems. A dual evolutionary model takes into account cultural evolution and transmission, as well as biological evolution of human populations. This course also explores the impacts of human
populations on isolated and fragile insular ecosystems, and the reciprocal effects of anthropogenic change on human cultures.
Human Biogeography of the Pacific: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 190 Seminar for Integrative Biology Majors 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
This upper-division undergraduate course will allow students to pursue specialized topics in biology in a seminar format. The specific content of the course will vary based on the topic and the instructor. In general, weekly meetings will provide a forum for extended discussion of selected aspects of evolutionary biology. Supplementary readings and assignments will provide critical background information and keep students engaged in relevant
topics between weekly meetings.
Seminar for Integrative Biology Majors: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 191 Directed Undergraduate Research 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Summer 2015 10 Week Session
This course is intended for advanced undergraduates wishing to pursue independent research projects under the mentorship of an IB faculty member. Research projects will be rigorous and will provide significant training in the methods of evoluntionary research. A project proposal is required to enroll and students are expected to porduce a substantial written summary of their work.

Directed Undergraduate Research: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 194 Undergraduate Student Instructor for Integrative Biology Courses 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
UGSI will work under supervision of instructor and/or GSI. The UGSI will attend any mandatory preparatory and review meetings, be available in the classroom (discussion or laboratory) to respond to student questions, facilitate lesson plans, perform other tasks as assigned. UGSIs do not evaluate students' work or assign grades.

Undergraduate Student Instructor for Integrative Biology Courses: Read More [+]

INTEGBI C195 Introduction to Global Health Disparities Research 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
This course is designed to prepare trainees in the UC Berkeley "Minority Health/Global Health" (MH/GH) program to conduct a ten-week infectious disease research project in a disease-endemic country. The course provides a background in neglected tropical disease research, international research ethics, and the conduct of health research in low-resource settings.

Introduction to Global Health Disparities Research: Read More [+]

INTEGBI H196A Thesis Course 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
Individual study and research for at least one academic year on a special problem to be chosen in consultation with a member of the staff; preparation of the thesis on broader aspects of this work.

Thesis Course: Read More [+]

INTEGBI H196B Thesis Course 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Fall 2013, Spring 2013
Individual study and research for at least one academic year on a special problem to be chosen in consultation with a member of the staff; preparation of the thesis on broader aspects of this work.

Thesis Course: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 197 Supervised Internship 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Supervised experience relevant to specific topics of biology in off-campus organizations. Written report and evaluation from internship supervisor required.

Supervised Internship: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 198 Supervised Group Study and Research By Upper Division Students 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Undergraduate research by small groups.

Supervised Group Study and Research By Upper Division Students: Read More [+]

INTEGBI 199 Supervised Independent Study and Research 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Spring 2014
Enrollment restrictions apply; see department.

Supervised Independent Study and Research: Read More [+]

Faculty and Instructors

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

David D. Ackerly, Professor. California biodiversity, climate change, adaptation.
Research Profile

Doris Bachtrog, Associate Professor. Evolution of sex and recombination, Y degeneration, dosage compensation, sexually antagonistic variation.
Research Profile

Bruce G. Baldwin, Professor. Biology, systematics and evolution of vascular plants, floristics, conservation biology, evolutionary processes, historical biogeography, evolutionary ecology.
Research Profile

Anthony D. Barnosky, Professor. Conservation biology, ecology, climate change, paleontology, paleobiology, paleoecology, evolution, macroecology, global change, mammals, extinction, biogeography.
Research Profile

George Bentley, Associate Professor. Hormones and behavior, neuroendocrinology of reproduction.
Research Profile

Jeffrey L. Boore, Adjunct Professor. Molecular biology, genetics, biology, conservation biology, genomics, evolution, genomes, DNA sequencing, systematics, population genetics, phylogeny.
Research Profile

Michael Robert John Boots, Professor.

+ Rauri C. K. Bowie, Associate Professor.

George A. Brooks, Professor. Exercise & environmental physiology, metabolism, lactate shuttle, crossover concept, lactate, lactic acidosis, traumatic brain injury, obesity, diabetes, the Warburg Effect in cancer, aging biology, isotope tracer technology, arterial-venous difference measurements, clamp technology, muscle biopsies, cell culture, mitochondrial biogenesis, energy substrate partitioning, carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, fatty acid reesterification, menopause.
Research Profile

Todd Dawson, Professor. Physiological plant ecology, evolutionary plant ecology, ecosystem processes, adaptations of plants, carbon, water, nitrogen.
Research Profile

Robert Dudley, Professor. Metabolism, biomechanics, butterflies, energetics, flight, gliding, hummingbirds, insects, paleophysiology.
Research Profile

Ivo Duijnstee, Assistant Adjunct Professor.

Michael B. Eisen, Professor. Genomics, genome sequencing, bioinformatics, animal development.
Research Profile

Paul V. A. Fine, Associate Professor. Speciation, plant ecology, plant evolutionary biology, floristics and phytogeography.
Research Profile

Seth Finnegan, Assistant Professor.

+ Robert J. Full, Professor. Energetics, comparative biomechanics, arthropod, adhesion, comparative physiology, locomotion, neuromechanics, biomimicry, biological inspiration, reptile, gecko, amphibian, robots, artificial muscles.
Research Profile

Oskar Hallatschek, Assistant Professor.

+ Tyrone Hayes, Professor. Genetics, amphibians, developmental endocrinology, steroid hormones, metamorphosis, sex differentiation, hormonal differentiation, African clawed frog, Japnanes Kajika, Pine Barrens treefrog.
Research Profile

Leslea Hlusko, Associate Professor. Primate evolution, paleontology, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, mammalian evolution, quantitative genetics, dental evolution, tooth development.
Research Profile

John P. Huelsenbeck, Professor. Computational biology, evolutionary biology, phylogenetics.
Research Profile

Daniela Kaufer, Associate Professor. Neuroscience, stress, neural stem cells, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury, blood brain barrier, prosocial behavior.
Research Profile

Mimi A. R. Koehl, Professor. Biomechanics, insects, invertebrate functional morphology, fluid dynamics, aerodynamics, marine animals, filtration, gliding vertebrates.
Research Profile

Britt Koskella, Assistant Professor.

+ Eileen A. Lacey, Associate Professor. Evolutionary biology, population, mammals, behavioral ecology, vertebrates, molecular genetics, subterranean rodents, Argentina, Chile.
Research Profile

Cindy Looy, Assistant Professor. Paleoecology, paleobotany, palynology.
Research Profile

Charles Marshall, Professor.

Jimmy Mcguire, Associate Professor. Historical biogeography, evolutionary biology, Southeast Asia, population genetics, hummingbirds, functional morphology, vertebrate systematics, phylogenetic analysis, life history evolution, Bayesian methods, Southeast Asian flying lizards.
Research Profile

Brent D. Mishler, Professor. Evolutionary biology, development, ecology, systematics, phylogeny, comparative genomics, green plants, bryophytes, mosses, reproductive biology, phylogenetics, chloroplast DNA, classification, species concepts, biodiversity, Darwin.
Research Profile

Michael Nachman, Professor. Population genetics, evolution, genomics, mammalian evolution.
Research Profile

Rasmus Nielsen, Professor. Statistical and computational aspects of evolutionary theory and genetics.
Research Profile

Kevin Padian, Professor. Evolutionary biology, paleontology, systematics, functional morphology, Mesozoic vertebrate paleontology, terrestrial vertebrate fauna, pterosaurs, Mesozoic era, bones of extinct reptiles.
Research Profile

Nipam Patel, Professor. Genetics, evolution, crustaceans, insects, arthropods, homeotic (Hox) genes, segmentation, embryonic pattern formation, neural patterning.
Research Profile

Mary E. Power, Professor. Freshwater ecology, food webs, trophic dynamics, northern California rivers, watersheds.
Research Profile

Carl Rothfels, Assistant Professor.

Michael Shapira, Assistant Professor in Residence. Molecular biology, aging, host-pathogen interactions.
Research Profile

Ellen L. Simms, Professor. Evolution, plant ecology, microbial ecology, ecological genetics, symbiosis, herbivores, pathogens, mutualists.
Research Profile

Wayne Sousa, Professor. Community ecology, estuarine host-parasite interactions, canopy gaps, Caribbean coast of Panama.
Research Profile

Chelsea Specht, Associate Professor. Molecular evolution, adaptation, plant systematics, evolution of development (evo-devo), evolution of form and function, plant morphology, comparative phylogenetics, floral developmental evolution, diversification rates.
Research Profile

Jonathon Stillman, Assistant Adjunct Professor. Marine environmental physiology, global change biology, functional genomics.
Research Profile

Tim White, Professor. Anthropology, Africa, paleontology, paleoanthropology, human evolution, human osteology, taphonomy, zooarchaeology, cannibalism, American Southwest, Ethiopia.
Research Profile

Caroline Margaret Williams, Assistant Professor. Evolution, physiology, ecophysiology, metabolism, insect, winter, adaptation, thermal biology.
Research Profile

Lecturers

Kelly Agnew, Lecturer.

Thomas J. Carlson, Lecturer SOE. Molecular biology, ethnobotany, Africa, North America, ecology, medicine, systematics, evolution of human disease, ethnoecology, ethnoepidemiology, Asia, Pacific Islands, South America, nutritional ethnobotany, pharmacology, ecosystem management.
Research Profile

Christopher Hobbs, Lecturer.

Stephen Lew, Lecturer.

Stefania Mambelli, Lecturer.

Lisa A. Margerum, Lecturer.

Tim Markowitz, Lecturer.

Michael S. Park, Lecturer.

Helian Joel Ratsirarson, Lecturer.

Andrew C. Rush, Lecturer.

Christopher Schmitt, Lecturer.

Emeritus Faculty

Roy L. Caldwell, Professor Emeritus. Ecology, evolution, Invertebrates, animal behavior, behavioral ecology, marine biology, stomatopods, crustaceans, cephalopods, octopus, mating systems, communication, sensory ecology, aggressive behavior, coral reef restoration.
Research Profile

William A. Clemens, Professor Emeritus. Evolution of mesozoic, cenozoic terrestrial biotas, mesozoic mammals, phylogenetic interrelationships, locomotor evolution, evolutionary diversification.
Research Profile

+ Marian C. Diamond, Professor Emeritus. Environment, neuroanatomy, immune functions, hormones, mammalian forebrain structures, Cambodian orphanage, cerebral neocortex.
Research Profile

Carole S. Hickman, Professor Emeritus. Systematics, evolutionary paleobiology, morphology, molluscs, macroevolutionary trends and patterns, Cenozoic Era, fossil record, evolutionary history and structure.
Research Profile

Steven L. Lehman, Professor Emeritus. Motor control, stroke patients, cells, muscles, muscle fatigue, repetitive motion disorders.
Research Profile

Paul Licht, Professor Emeritus. Steroid hormones, comparative endocrinology, endocrine system, steroidal metabolism of tissues, thyroid, vitamin D, binding proteins.
Research Profile

William Z. Lidicker, Professor Emeritus. Conservation biology, ecology, mammalogy.
Research Profile

David R. Lindberg, Professor Emeritus. Developmental biology, evolutionary biology, ecology, comparative morphology, phylogenetic studies, molecular techniques, patellogastropoda, evolution in patellacean faunas, California land snail taxa, gastropoda.
Research Profile

Jere Lipps, Professor Emeritus. Ecology, paleontology, molecular phylogenetics, evolution of marine biotas, paleoenvironments, coral reef, Antarctic habitats, seismic histories, astrobiology, Charles Darwin.
Research Profile

Charles S. Nicoll, Professor Emeritus. Cancer, mammals, hormones, growth regulation, diabetic subjects, insulin, reproductive cycles of women, non-human primates.
Research Profile

+ James L. Patton, Professor Emeritus. Evolutionary biology, North America, biogeography, South America, morphology, mammalogy, phylogenesis, speciation, populations, genome structure, molecular divergence, gopher population dynamics.
Research Profile

Thomas M. (Zack) Powell, Professor Emeritus. Aquatic ecology, fish, Invertebrates, oceanography, lakes, estuaries, ocean, planktonic ecosystems, climate, remote sensing.
Research Profile

Thelma Rowell, Professor Emeritus.

Rudolf Schmid, Professor Emeritus. Botany, plant science.
Research Profile

Montgomery Slatkin, Professor Emeritus. Evolutionary theory, genetic evolution, natural populations of plants and animals populations, human populations, natural selection structure genomes.
Research Profile

Glenys Thomson, Professor Emeritus.

James Valentine, Professor Emeritus.

David Wake, Professor Emeritus. Evolutionary and conservation biology.
Research Profile

Marvalee H. Wake, Professor Emeritus. Development, evolution, systematics, amphibians, reproductive biology, vertebrate evolutionary morphology, fishes, reptiles, comparative analysis, biodiversity issues.
Research Profile

Donald P. Weston, Professor Emeritus. Pesticides, invertebrate ecology, ecotoxicology, pollutant exposure, bioaccumulation, management of contaminated sediments, environmental effects of antibiotics, deposit-feeding invertebrates.
Research Profile

Contact Information

Department of Integrative Biology

3040 Valley Life Sciences Building

Phone: 510-642-3281

Fax: 510-643-6264

Visit Department Website

Department Chair

Robert Dudley, PhD

5018 Valley Life Sciences Building

Phone: 510-642-1555

http://ib.berkeley.edu/people/faculty/dudleyr

wings@berkeley.edu

Undergraduate Advising

Undergraduate Affairs Office

3060 Valley Life Sciences Building

Phone: 510-643-1667

http://ib.berkeley.edu/undergrad

ibusso@berkeley.edu

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