Integrative Biology

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Students who major in Integrative Biology (IB) will gain a broad and deep knowledge in the biological sciences as well as an excellent foundation in the biology of organisms, populations, and communities. This program may be of particular interest to students who wish to pursue graduate studies in any of these research areas. It also provides superb training for students interested in health-related professions (medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, physical therapy, nursing, pharmacy, optometry, etc.) or careers incorporating biology (psychology, sociobiology, forestry, wildlife conservation, environmental and resource management, law, etc.).

The department's broad range of experts includes behaviorists, ecologists, evolutionary biologists, geneticists, morphologists, paleontologists, physiologists, and systematists. 

Course of Study Overview

Students majoring in Integrative Biology choose one of two emphases: Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology (Emphasis 1) or Integrative Human Biology (Emphasis 2). The lower division requirements are the same for all IB students, regardless of the emphasis. The upper division requirements differ slightly for the two emphases, but all students take lecture and lab or field lab classes from IB's three groups: Evolution and Genetics; Ecology, Behavior, and Biodiversity; Structure, Function, and Human Health. For detailed information, please see the Major Requirements tab.

Declaring the Major

In order to declare Integrative Biology as a major, students must have completed certain prerequisites. For information regarding these courses, please see the Major Requirements tab. Students must have at least a 2.0 GPA (1.) overall, (2.) in all courses for the major, and (3.) in all upper-division courses for the major. All declaring students must meet with a staff adviser and a faculty adviser as part of the declaration process.

At the time of declaration, students must have completed:

AND be enrolled in or have completed:

For transfer students, it is recommended that lower division courses be completed before arriving at Berkeley. All declaring students must be able to complete the major requirements in a timely manner.

Please see the department's website for detailed instructions to declare the IB major.

Honors Program

Students with minimum grade point averages (GPA) of 3.3 overall and in the major are encouraged to participate in the honors program. Interested students must identify an appropriate faculty sponsor who agrees to advise them on an original research project and enroll in two consecutive semesters of the honors thesis course (INTEGBI H196A and INTEGBI H196B). Honors students must present the results of their work in the form of a written honors thesis and a poster presentation at Cal Day. In order to graduate with honors, students must maintain the minimum required GPAs.

Minor Program

There is no minor program in Integrative Biology.

Visit Department Website

Major Requirements

In addition to the university, campus, and college requirements, listed on the College Requirements tab, students must fulfill the below requirements specific to their major program.

General Guidelines

  1. All major requirements must be taken for a letter grade.
  2. Standardized test credit (e.g., Advanced Placement) cannot be used to satisfy any major requirements.
  3. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student's major and minor programs. Double majors and simultaneous degrees are limited to a two course overlap. 
  4. Students must maintain a minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least a 2.0 overall, a 2.0 GPA in the required major coursework (lower and upper division), and a 2.0 GPA in the upper division coursework for the major.
  5. A maximum of two upper division courses may be taken from outside the Department of Integrative Biology. This includes study abroad courses, as well as non-IB courses, even if they are on the approved electives list.

For information regarding breadth, residence requirements, and unit requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.

Lower Division Requirements, Both Emphases

Calculus (choose one series)
MATH 1A
MATH 1B
Calculus
and Calculus
8
MATH 10A
MATH 10B
Methods of Mathematics: Calculus, Statistics, and Combinatorics
and Methods of Mathematics: Calculus, Statistics, and Combinatorics
8
Chemistry
CHEM 1A
1AL
General Chemistry
and General Chemistry Laboratory 1
5
CHEM 3A
3AL
Chemical Structure and Reactivity
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
5
CHEM 3B
3BL
Chemical Structure and Reactivity
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
5
Biology
BIOLOGY 1A
1AL
General Biology Lecture
and General Biology Laboratory
5
BIOLOGY 1BGeneral Biology Lecture and Laboratory4
INTEGBI 77AIntegrative Human Biology1
or INTEGBI 77B Integrative Human Biology
Physics
PHYSICS 8AIntroductory Physics 24
PHYSICS 8BIntroductory Physics 24

Upper Division Requirements, Emphasis 1: Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology (24 units minimum)

Group Requirements (see course lists below)
One course from Group A: Evolution and Genetics
Two courses from Group B: Ecology, Behavior, and Diversity
One course from Group C: Structure, Function, and Human Health
Two upper division lab courses. One must be field-based (LF).
Electives
Select additional approved courses, as needed, from the group, lab, and elective lists to total at least 24 upper division units.
Optional: Research or Honors
3 units of research credit in INTEGBI 191, INTEGBI H196A, or INTEGBI H196B can be counted as an elective.

Upper Division Requirements, Emphasis 2: Integrative Human Biology (24 units minimum)

Group Requirements (see course lists below)
One course from Group A: Evolution and Genetics
One course from Group B: Ecology, Behavior, and Diversity
Two courses from Group C: Structure, Function, and Human Health. One must be INTEGBI 131 or INTEGBI 132.
Two upper division lab courses
Electives
Select additional approved courses, as needed, from the group, lab, and elective lists to total at least 24 upper division units.
Optional: Research or Honors
3 units of research credit in INTEGBI 191, INTEGBI H196A, or INTEGBI H196B can be counted as an elective.

Requirement Group A: Evolution and Genetics 

INTEGBI 141Human Genetics3
INTEGBI 160Evolution4
INTEGBI 161Population and Evolutionary Genetics4
INTEGBI 162Ecological Genetics4
INTEGBI 164Human Genetics and Genomics4
INTEGBI 167Evolution and Earth History: From Genes to Fossils4
INTEGBI 169Evolutionary Medicine4
INTEGBI 172Coevolution: From Genes to Ecosystems4

Requirement Group B: Ecology, Behavior, and Diversity

INTEGBI 102LFIntroduction to California Plant Life with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI 103LFInvertebrate Zoology with Laboratory ++5
INTEGBI 104LFNatural History of the Vertebrates with Laboratory ++5
INTEGBI/PLANTBI C107LPrinciples of Plant Morphology with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI 108Marine Biology4
INTEGBI/PLANTBI C110LBiology of Fungi with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI 113LPaleobiological Perspectives on Ecology and Evolution ++4
INTEGBI 114Infectious Disease Dynamics4
INTEGBI C144/ESPM C126Animal Behavior4
INTEGBI C145/ESPM C156Animal Communication3
INTEGBI 146LFBehavioral Ecology with Laboratory ++5
INTEGBI 151Plant Physiological Ecology4
INTEGBI 153Ecology3
INTEGBI 154Plant Ecology3
INTEGBI C156/ESPM C103Principles of Conservation Biology4
INTEGBI 157LFEcosystems of California ++4
INTEGBI 158LF/ESPM C107Biology and Geomorphology of Tropical Islands ++13
INTEGBI 159The Living Planet: Impact of the Biosphere on the Earth System3
INTEGBI 162Ecological Genetics4
INTEGBI 167Evolution and Earth History: From Genes to Fossils4
INTEGBI 168LSystematics of Vascular Plants with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI 170LFMethods in Population and Community Ecology ++3
INTEGBI C171/ESPM C115AFreshwater Ecology3
INTEGBI 173LFMammalogy with Laboratory ++5
INTEGBI 174LFOrnithology with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI 175LFHerpetology with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI C176L/ESPM 115CFish Ecology ++3
INTEGBI 181LPaleobotany - The 500-Million Year History of a Greening Planet ++4
INTEGBI C185L/ANTHRO C100Human Paleontology ++5

Requirement Group C: Structure, Function, and Human Health 

INTEGBI 114Infectious Disease Dynamics4
INTEGBI 116LMedical Parasitology ++4
INTEGBI 117Medical Ethnobotany2
INTEGBI 118Host-Microbe Interactions4
INTEGBI 123ALExercise and Environmental Physiology with Laboratory ++5
INTEGBI 128Sports Medicine3
INTEGBI C129L/PHYS ED C129Human Physiological Assessment ++3
INTEGBI 130LComparative Vertebrate Anatomy & Functional Morphology ++4
INTEGBI 131General Human Anatomy3
INTEGBI 132Survey of Human Physiology4
INTEGBI 137Human Endocrinology4
INTEGBI 138Comparative Endocrinology4
INTEGBI 139The Neurobiology of Stress4
INTEGBI 140Biology of Human Reproduction4
INTEGBI C142L/ANTHRO C103Introduction to Human Osteology ++6
INTEGBI C143A/PSYCH C113Biological Clocks: Physiology and Behavior3
INTEGBI C143B/PSYCH C116Hormones and Behavior3
INTEGBI 148Comparative Animal Physiology3
INTEGBI 150Evolutionary Environmental Physiology3
INTEGBI 151Plant Physiological Ecology4
INTEGBI 184LMorphology of the Vertebrate Skeleton with Laboratory ++4

Approved Lab and Field-Lab (LF) Courses 

INTEGBI 102LFIntroduction to California Plant Life with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI 103LFInvertebrate Zoology with Laboratory ++5
INTEGBI 104LFNatural History of the Vertebrates with Laboratory ++5
INTEGBI/PLANTBI C107LPrinciples of Plant Morphology with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI/PLANTBI C110LBiology of Fungi with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI 113LPaleobiological Perspectives on Ecology and Evolution ++4
INTEGBI 116LMedical Parasitology ++4
INTEGBI 117LFMedical Ethnobotany Laboratory2
INTEGBI 123ALExercise and Environmental Physiology with Laboratory ++5
INTEGBI C129L/PHYS ED C129Human Physiological Assessment ++3
INTEGBI 130LComparative Vertebrate Anatomy & Functional Morphology ++4
INTEGBI 131LGeneral Human Anatomy Laboratory2
INTEGBI 132LMammalian Physiology Laboratory2
INTEGBI C142L/ANTHRO C103Introduction to Human Osteology ++6
INTEGBI 146LFBehavioral Ecology with Laboratory ++5
INTEGBI 151LPlant Physiological Ecology Laboratory2
INTEGBI 154LPlant Ecology Laboratory2
INTEGBI 157LFEcosystems of California ++4
INTEGBI 158LF/ESPM C107Biology and Geomorphology of Tropical Islands ++13
INTEGBI 168LSystematics of Vascular Plants with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI 170LFMethods in Population and Community Ecology ++3
INTEGBI 173LFMammalogy with Laboratory ++5
INTEGBI 174LFOrnithology with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI 175LFHerpetology with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI C176L/ESPM C115CFish Ecology ++3
INTEGBI 181LPaleobotany - The 500-Million Year History of a Greening Planet ++4
INTEGBI 184LMorphology of the Vertebrate Skeleton with Laboratory ++4
INTEGBI C185L/ANTHRO C100Human Paleontology ++5

College Requirements

Undergraduate students must fulfill the following requirements in addition to those required by their major program.

For detailed lists of courses that fulfill college requirements, please review the College of Letters & Sciences page in this Guide. For College advising appointments, please visit the L&S Advising Pages. 

University of California Requirements

Entry Level Writing

All students who will enter the University of California as freshmen must demonstrate their command of the English language by fulfilling the Entry Level Writing requirement. Fulfillment of this requirement is also a prerequisite to enrollment in all reading and composition courses at UC Berkeley. 

American History and American Institutions

The American History and Institutions requirements are based on the principle that a US resident graduated from an American university, should have an understanding of the history and governmental institutions of the United States.

Berkeley Campus Requirement

American Cultures

All undergraduate students at Cal need to take and pass this course in order to graduate. The requirement offers an exciting intellectual environment centered on the study of race, ethnicity and culture of the United States. AC courses offer students opportunities to be part of research-led, highly accomplished teaching environments, grappling with the complexity of American Culture.

College of Letters & Science Essential Skills Requirements

Quantitative Reasoning

The Quantitative Reasoning requirement is designed to ensure that students graduate with basic understanding and competency in math, statistics, or computer science. The requirement may be satisfied by exam or by taking an approved course.

Foreign Language

The Foreign Language requirement may be satisfied by demonstrating proficiency in reading comprehension, writing, and conversation in a foreign language equivalent to the second semester college level, either by passing an exam or by completing approved course work.

Reading and Composition

In order to provide a solid foundation in reading, writing, and critical thinking the College requires two semesters of lower division work in composition in sequence. Students must complete parts A & B reading and composition courses by the end of their second semester and a second-level course by the end of their fourth semester.

College of Letters & Science 7 Course Breadth Requirements

Breadth Requirements

The undergraduate breadth requirements provide Berkeley students with a rich and varied educational experience outside of their major program. As the foundation of a liberal arts education, breadth courses give students a view into the intellectual life of the University while introducing them to a multitude of perspectives and approaches to research and scholarship. Engaging students in new disciplines and with peers from other majors, the breadth experience strengthens interdisciplinary connections and context that prepares Berkeley graduates to understand and solve the complex issues of their day.

Unit Requirements

  • 120 total units

  • Of the 120 units, 36 must be upper division units

  • Of the 36 upper division units, 6 must be taken in courses offered outside your major department
Residence Requirements

For units to be considered in "residence," you must be registered in courses on the Berkeley campus as a student in the College of Letters & Science. Most students automatically fulfill the residence requirement by attending classes here for four years. In general, there is no need to be concerned about this requirement, unless you go abroad for a semester or year or want to take courses at another institution or through UC Extension during your senior year. In these cases, you should make an appointment to meet an adviser to determine how you can meet the Senior Residence Requirement.

Note: Courses taken through UC Extension do not count toward residence.

Senior Residence Requirement

After you become a senior (with 90 semester units earned toward your BA degree), you must complete at least 24 of the remaining 30 units in residence in at least two semesters. To count as residence, a semester must consist of at least 6 passed units. Intercampus Visitor, EAP, and UC Berkeley-Washington Program (UCDC) units are excluded.

You may use a Berkeley Summer Session to satisfy one semester of the Senior Residence requirement, provided that you successfully complete 6 units of course work in the Summer Session and that you have been enrolled previously in the college.

Modified Senior Residence Requirement

Participants in the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP), Berkeley Summer Abroad, or the UC Berkeley Washington Program (UCDC) may meet a Modified Senior Residence requirement by completing 24 (excluding EAP) of their final 60 semester units in residence. At least 12 of these 24 units must be completed after you have completed 90 units.

Upper Division Residence Requirement

You must complete in residence a minimum of 18 units of upper division courses (excluding UCEAP units), 12 of which must satisfy the requirements for your major.

Plan of Study

The sample plans below show four-year plans for completing the major in Integrative Biology, taking classes only during fall and spring semesters. All lower division major requirements, except IB 77, are also offered during the summer. Peer and academic advisers are available to help customize a plan to the student's specific situation.

Please note that the sample plans below include only courses required for the major. For more detailed information regarding other requirements, including unit minimums per semester, Letters & Science breadth requirements, Reading and Composition (R&C), and the American Cultures (AC) requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.

Sample 4-Year Plan, Emphasis 1: Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology

Freshman
FallUnitsSpringUnits
MATH 10A or 1A4MATH 10B or 1B4
CHEM 1A
1AL
5CHEM 3A
3AL
5
INTEGBI 77A (Only one of INTEGBI 77A or 77B is required)1INTEGBI 77B (Only one of INTEGBI 77A or 77B is required)1
 10 10
Sophomore
FallUnitsSpringUnits
CHEM 3B
3BL
5BIOLOGY 1A
1AL
5
BIOLOGY 1B4PHYSICS 8A4
 9 9
Junior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
IB Group A4IB Group B with Field Lab4-5
PHYSICS 8B4IB Elective3-5
 8 7-10
Senior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
IB Group B with Lab4-5IB Group C3-5
IB Elective3-5IB Elective3-5
 7-10 6-10
Total Units: 66-76

Sample 4-Year Plan, Emphasis 2: Integrative Human Biology

Freshman
FallUnitsSpringUnits
MATH 10A or 1A4MATH 10B or 1B4
CHEM 1A
1AL
5CHEM 3A
3AL
5
INTEGBI 77A (Only one of INTEGBI 77A or 77B is required)1INTEGBI 77B (Only one of INTEGBI 77A or 77B is required)1
 10 10
Sophomore
FallUnitsSpringUnits
CHEM 3B
3BL
5BIOLOGY 1A
1AL
5
PHYSICS 8A4PHYSICS 8B4
 9 9
Junior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
BIOLOGY 1B4IB Group A3-4
IB Group C3-5IB Group B3-5
 IB Elective3-4
 7-9 9-13
Senior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
IB Elective4-5IB Lab3-5
IB Group C with Lab3-5IB Elective3-5
 7-10 6-10
Total Units: 67-80

Sample 4-Year Plan, Spring Start

Example of a program beginning at Berkeley in spring semester of freshman year (e.g., FPF, Global Edge).

Freshman
FallUnitsSpringUnits
MATH 10A or 1A4MATH 10B or 1B4
 CHEM 1A
1AL
5
 INTEGBI 77B (Only one of INTEGBI 77A or 77B is required)1
 4 10
Sophomore
FallUnitsSpringUnits
CHEM 3A
3AL
5CHEM 3B
3BL
5
BIOLOGY 1B4PHYSICS 8A4
INTEGBI 77A (Only one of INTEGBI 77A or 77B is required)1 
 10 9
Junior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
BIOLOGY 1A
1AL
5IB Group B4
PHYSICS 8B4IB Elective4
 9 8
Senior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
IB Group A4IB Group B or C with Lab4
IB Group C with Lab4IB Elective4
 8 8
Total Units: 66

Sample 2-Year Plan, Transfer Students

It is highly recommended for transfer students to complete all lower division coursework before enrolling at Berkeley. 

Junior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
IB Group C (Lab optional)3-5IB Group B (with Field Lab if Emphasis 1)3-5
IB Group B or Elective3-5IB Group C or Elective3-5
INTEGBI 77A (Only one of INTEGBI 77A or 77B is required)1INTEGBI 77B (Only one of INTEGBI 77A or 77B is required)1
 7-11 7-11
Senior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
IB Group A4IB Elective3-5
IB Group B or Elective3-5IB Lab or Elective3-5
 7-9 6-10
Total Units: 27-41

Accelerated Program Plans

For students considering graduating in less than four years, it's important to acknowledge the reasons to undertake such a plan of study. While there are advantages to pursuing a three-year degree plan, such as reducing financial burdens, it can significantly restrict participation in co-curricular activities, depth of study, and research internships. Please consult with an academic adviser before pursuing an accelerated degree plan.

Student Learning Goals

Learning Goals for the Major

  1. Describe the principles of evolution and genetics that underlie all biology.
  2. Demonstrate a broad and integrated understanding of species origins, biological and organismal diversity, how to characterize, understand and protect this diversity, and interactions with the environment.
  3. Demonstrate a fundamental understanding of the relationships between structure and function in animal (human) health.
  4. Describe the basic principles of scientific inquiry and the importance of scientific study in integrative biology.
  5. Illustrate the process of data collection, statistical analysis, and graphing including basic principles of experimental and sampling design.
  6. Critically evaluate data, develop hypotheses, and interpret biological experiments.
  7. Communicate effectively in the oral and written presentation of scientific results.

Advising

Integrative Biology offers three types of undergraduate advising: staff advisers, faculty advisers, and peer advisers. The advising office, located in 3060 Valley Life Sciences Building, is part of Biosciences Divisional Services (BDS), providing support for the Department of Integrative Biology and the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology.

BDS Student Services Mission Statement
We partner with faculty, staff, and students to create an inclusive academic community that offers holistic advising and innovative services to support educational success. 

Staff Advisers

Staff academic advisers are trained to support students and assist them in successfully completing their IB major. They are excellent resources for questions concerning administration and academics or finding out about other available services. Students should see a staff advisor for the following:

  • Questions about major requirements
  • Advice about schedule planning
  • Declaring the IB major
  • Information about research opportunities, graduate and professional schools, career opportunities, scholarships, and internships
  • Scheduling conflicts or registration holds
  • Information and registration assistance for independent research credit
  • General assistance or advice
  • Information about upcoming events and programs

Staff advisers are available for drop-in advising during open hours, found on the advising website: http://ib.berekeley.edu/undergrad. Complex issues such as probation, academic difficulty, readmission, and major declaration are best discussed in an appointment. Continuing students can schedule an appointment via Cal Central.

The general advising email address is ibusso@berkeley.edu. This email is checked daily, Monday through Friday, so students will receive a timely answer to their questions.

Faculty Advisers

Faculty advisers are IB professors assigned to advise students about the IB department, courses, research, and other academic issues. Students meet with a faculty advisor when they declare the IB major. Students should see a faculty adviser for the following:

  • Guidance toward achieving academic and career goals
  • Questions about the content of IB courses
  • Questions about biological research and biology in general
  • Recommendations on graduate training

For a list of faculty advisers and their office hours, please speak with a staff advisor in 3060 VLSB or visit our website: http://ib.berkeley.edu/undergrad/advising.php. Faculty advisers are not available for office hours during instructional breaks, including summer break. Students may refer to staff drop-in advising hours during summer sessions and non-instructional periods.

Peer Advisers

Peer advisers are junior and senior IB students who volunteer their time to complement the advising services by sharing their knowledge of and experience with lower division requirements and upper division classes, experience with student groups on campus, preparation for life beyond Cal, and use of various campus resources. To see the schedule and more information about who the peer advisers are and which courses they have taken, visit their webpage: https://ib.berkeley.edu/undergrad/ibpeers.

Courses

Integrative Biology

Faculty and Instructors

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

David D. Ackerly, Professor. California biodiversity, climate change, adaptation.
Research Profile

Doris Bachtrog, Associate Professor. Evolution of sex and recombination, Y degeneration, dosage compensation, sexually antagonistic variation.
Research Profile

Bruce G. Baldwin, Professor. Biology, systematics and evolution of vascular plants, floristics, conservation biology, evolutionary processes, historical biogeography, evolutionary ecology.
Research Profile

George Bentley, Associate Professor. Hormones and behavior, neuroendocrinology of reproduction.
Research Profile

Michael Robert John Boots, Professor. Ecology and epidemiology, evolution of infectious disease.
Research Profile

+ Rauri C. K. Bowie, Associate Professor. Ornithology, Africa, evolutionary biology.
Research Profile

George A. Brooks, Professor. Exercise and environmental physiology, metabolism, lactate shuttle, crossover concept, lactate, lactic acidosis, traumatic brain injury, obesity, diabetes, the Warburg Effect in cancer, aging biology, isotope tracer technology, arterial-venous difference measurements, clamp technology, muscle biopsies, cell culture, mitochondrial biogenesis, energy substrate partitioning, carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, fatty acid reesterification, menopause.
Research Profile

Thomas J. Carlson, Teaching Professor. Ethnobotany, evolutionary medicine, human biology.
Research Profile

Todd Dawson, Professor. Physiological plant ecology, evolutionary plant ecology, ecosystem processes, adaptations of plants, carbon, water, nitrogen.
Research Profile

Robert Dudley, Professor. Metabolism, biomechanics, butterflies, energetics, flight, gliding, hummingbirds, insects, paleophysiology.
Research Profile

Ivo Duijnstee, Assistant Adjunct Professor.

Paul V. A. Fine, Associate Professor. Speciation, plant ecology, plant evolutionary biology, floristics and phytogeography.
Research Profile

Seth Finnegan, Associate Professor. Biophysics, evolutionary dynamics, soft matter, statistical physics, theory and experiments.
Research Profile

+ Robert J. Full, Professor. Energetics, comparative biomechanics, arthropod, adhesion, comparative physiology, locomotion, neuromechanics, biomimicry, biological inspiration, reptile, gecko, amphibian, robots, artificial muscles.
Research Profile

Oskar Hallatschek, Assistant Professor.

+ Tyrone Hayes, Professor. Genetics, amphibians, developmental endocrinology, steroid hormones, metamorphosis, sex differentiation, hormonal differentiation, African clawed frog, Japnanes Kajika, Pine Barrens treefrog.
Research Profile

Leslea Hlusko, Associate Professor. Primate evolution, paleontology, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, mammalian evolution, quantitative genetics, dental evolution, tooth development.
Research Profile

John P. Huelsenbeck, Professor. Computational biology, evolutionary biology, phylogenetics.
Research Profile

Daniela Kaufer, Associate Professor. Neuroscience, stress, neural stem cells, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury, blood brain barrier, prosocial behavior.
Research Profile

Britt Koskella, Assistant Professor. Bacteriophage, microbiome, plant-pathogen interactions, disease ecology.
Research Profile

+ Eileen A. Lacey, Associate Professor. Evolutionary biology, population, mammals, behavioral ecology, vertebrates, molecular genetics, subterranean rodents, Argentina, Chile.
Research Profile

Cindy Looy, Associate Professor. Paleoecology, paleobotany, palynology.
Research Profile

Charles Marshall, Professor. Paleontology.
Research Profile

Jimmy Mcguire, Associate Professor. Historical biogeography, evolutionary biology, Southeast Asia, population genetics, hummingbirds, functional morphology, vertebrate systematics, phylogenetic analysis, life history evolution, Bayesian methods, Southeast Asian flying lizards.
Research Profile

Brent D. Mishler, Professor. Evolutionary biology, development, ecology, systematics, phylogeny, comparative genomics, green plants, bryophytes, mosses, reproductive biology, phylogenetics, chloroplast DNA, classification, species concepts, biodiversity, Darwin.
Research Profile

Michael Nachman, Professor. Population genetics, evolution, genomics, mammalian evolution.
Research Profile

Rasmus Nielsen, Professor. Statistical and computational aspects of evolutionary theory and genetics.
Research Profile

Kevin Padian, Professor. Evolutionary biology, paleontology, systematics, functional morphology, Mesozoic vertebrate paleontology, terrestrial vertebrate fauna, pterosaurs, Mesozoic era, bones of extinct reptiles.
Research Profile

Nipam Patel, Professor. Genetics, evolution, crustaceans, insects, arthropods, homeotic (Hox) genes, segmentation, embryonic pattern formation, neural patterning.
Research Profile

Mary E. Power, Professor. Freshwater ecology, food webs, trophic dynamics, northern California rivers, watersheds.
Research Profile

Carl Rothfels, Assistant Professor. Evolutionary biology, phylogenetic methods, plant evolutionary biology.
Research Profile

Michael Shapira, Associate Professor. Molecular biology, aging, host-pathogen interactions.
Research Profile

Ellen L. Simms, Professor. Evolution, plant ecology, microbial ecology, ecological genetics, symbiosis, herbivores, pathogens, mutualists.
Research Profile

Yun S. Song, Professor. Computational biology, population genomics, applied probability and statistics.
Research Profile

Wayne Sousa, Professor. Community ecology, estuarine host-parasite interactions, canopy gaps, Caribbean coast of Panama.
Research Profile

Jonathon Stillman, Associate Adjunct Professor. Marine environmental physiology, global change biology, functional genomics.
Research Profile

Peter Sudmant, Assistant Professor. Genomics, genetics, computational biology, structural variation, RNA, diversity, aging, population genetics.
Research Profile

Rebecca Tarvin, Assistant Professor.

Jose Pablo Vazquez-Medina, Assistant Professor. Marine mammals, pre-clinical models of disease.
Research Profile

Tim White, Professor. Anthropology, Africa, paleontology, paleoanthropology, human evolution, human osteology, taphonomy, zooarchaeology, cannibalism, American Southwest, Ethiopia.
Research Profile

Noah Whiteman, Associate Professor. Evolutionary biology, genomics, host-parasite interactions, adaptation and rates of evolution, population genetics.
Research Profile

Caroline Margaret Williams, Assistant Professor. Evolution, physiology, ecophysiology, metabolism, insect, winter, adaptation, thermal biology.
Research Profile

Lecturers

Kelly Agnew, Lecturer.

Christopher Hobbs, Lecturer.

Stephen Lew, Lecturer.

Stefania Mambelli, Lecturer.

Lisa A. Margerum, Lecturer.

Tim Markowitz, Lecturer.

Michael S. Park, Lecturer.

Helian Joel Ratsirarson, Lecturer.

Andrew C. Rush, Lecturer.

Christopher Schmitt, Lecturer.

Emeritus Faculty

Anthony D. Barnosky, Professor Emeritus. Conservation biology, ecology, climate change, paleontology, paleobiology, paleoecology, evolution, macroecology, global change, mammals, extinction, biogeography.
Research Profile

Roy L. Caldwell, Professor Emeritus. Ecology, evolution, Invertebrates, animal behavior, behavioral ecology, marine biology, stomatopods, crustaceans, cephalopods, octopus, mating systems, communication, sensory ecology, aggressive behavior, coral reef restoration.
Research Profile

William A. Clemens, Professor Emeritus. Evolution of mesozoic, cenozoic terrestrial biotas, mesozoic mammals, phylogenetic interrelationships, locomotor evolution, evolutionary diversification.
Research Profile

+ Marian C. Diamond, Professor Emeritus. Environment, neuroanatomy, immune functions, hormones, mammalian forebrain structures, Cambodian orphanage, cerebral neocortex.
Research Profile

Carole S. Hickman, Professor Emeritus. Systematics, evolutionary paleobiology, morphology, molluscs, macroevolutionary trends and patterns, Cenozoic Era, fossil record, evolutionary history and structure.
Research Profile

Mimi A. R. Koehl, Professor Emeritus. Biomechanics, insects, invertebrate functional morphology, fluid dynamics, aerodynamics, marine animals, filtration, gliding vertebrates.
Research Profile

Steven L. Lehman, Professor Emeritus. Motor control, stroke patients, cells, muscles, muscle fatigue, repetitive motion disorders.
Research Profile

Paul Licht, Professor Emeritus. Steroid hormones, comparative endocrinology, endocrine system, steroidal metabolism of tissues, thyroid, vitamin D, binding proteins.
Research Profile

William Z. Lidicker, Professor Emeritus. Conservation biology, ecology, mammalogy.
Research Profile

David R. Lindberg, Professor Emeritus. Developmental biology, evolutionary biology, ecology, comparative morphology, phylogenetic studies, molecular techniques, patellogastropoda, evolution in patellacean faunas, California land snail taxa, gastropoda.
Research Profile

Jere Lipps, Professor Emeritus. Ecology, paleontology, molecular phylogenetics, evolution of marine biotas, paleoenvironments, coral reef, Antarctic habitats, seismic histories, astrobiology, Charles Darwin.
Research Profile

Charles S. Nicoll, Professor Emeritus. Cancer, mammals, hormones, growth regulation, diabetic subjects, insulin, reproductive cycles of women, non-human primates.
Research Profile

+ James L. Patton, Professor Emeritus. Evolutionary biology, North America, biogeography, South America, morphology, mammalogy, phylogenesis, speciation, populations, genome structure, molecular divergence, gopher population dynamics.
Research Profile

Thomas M. (Zack) Powell, Professor Emeritus. Aquatic ecology, fish, Invertebrates, oceanography, lakes, estuaries, ocean, planktonic ecosystems, climate, remote sensing.
Research Profile

Thelma Rowell, Professor Emeritus.

Rudolf Schmid, Professor Emeritus. Botany, plant science.
Research Profile

Montgomery Slatkin, Professor Emeritus. Evolutionary theory, genetic evolution, natural populations of plants and animals populations, human populations, natural selection structure genomes.
Research Profile

Glenys Thomson, Professor Emeritus.

James Valentine, Professor Emeritus.

David Wake, Professor Emeritus. Evolutionary and conservation biology.
Research Profile

Marvalee H. Wake, Professor Emeritus. Development, evolution, systematics, amphibians, reproductive biology, vertebrate evolutionary morphology, fishes, reptiles, comparative analysis, biodiversity issues.
Research Profile

Donald P. Weston, Professor Emeritus. Pesticides, invertebrate ecology, ecotoxicology, pollutant exposure, bioaccumulation, management of contaminated sediments, environmental effects of antibiotics, deposit-feeding invertebrates.
Research Profile

Contact Information

Department of Integrative Biology

3040 Valley Life Sciences Building

Phone: 510-642-3281

Fax: 510-643-6264

Visit Department Website

Department Chair

Robert Dudley, PhD

5018 Valley Life Sciences Building

Phone: 510-642-1555

http://ib.berkeley.edu/people/faculty/dudleyr

wings@berkeley.edu

Undergraduate Advising

Undergraduate Affairs Office

3060 Valley Life Sciences Building

Phone: 510-643-1667

http://ib.berkeley.edu/undergrad

ibusso@berkeley.edu

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