Mechanical Engineering

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

Bachelor of Science (BS)

Mechanical engineers serve society by solving problems in transportation, energy, the environment, and human health. The activity of mechanical engineers extends from investigation of physical phenomena governing the behavior of our surroundings to the manufacture and evaluation of products. The technical domain of the mechanical engineering profession encompasses topic areas, including acoustics, automatic control, bioengineering, combustion, cryogenics, design, dynamics, energy conversion, engines, environment, heat transfer, lubrication, mass transfer, manufacturing and sustainability, materials processing, mechanics of solids and fluids, mechanisms, petroleum, plasma dynamics, propulsion, thermodynamics, vibration, and wave propagation.

The undergraduate program in mechanical engineering seeks to provide students with a broad education emphasizing an excellent foundation in scientific and engineering fundamentals. The objectives of the undergraduate program are to prepare undergraduate students for employment or advanced studies with four primary constituencies: industry, the national laboratories, state and federal agencies, and academia (graduate research programs).

Accreditation

Our programs are accredited by ABET, a non-profit and non-governmental accrediting agency for academic programs in the disciplines of applied science, computing, engineering, and engineering technology. ABET is a recognized accreditor in the United States (U.S.) by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. For information about how the program achieves ABET course outcomes, please see the Department's website.

Admission to the Major

Prospective undergraduates to the College of Engineering will apply for admission to a specific program in the college. For further information, please see the College of Engineering's website.

Admission to Engineering via a Change of College application for current UC Berkeley students is highly unlikely and very competitive as there few, if any, spaces that open in the college each year to students admitted to other colleges at UC Berkeley. For further information regarding a Change of College to Engineering, please see the College's website.

Five-Year BS/MS Program

This program is for Berkeley ME undergraduates who wish to broaden their education experiences at Berkeley. In contrast to the existing Berkeley Mechanical Engineering MS program, it is completely course-based. Students in the five-year BS/MS program are also able to take some courses in professional disciplines such as business or public policy. This two semester program is not intended for students with the desire to continue to the PhD. For further information regarding this option, please see the department's website.

Minor Program

The department offers a minor program in Mechanical Engineering. For admission to the minor, students must have a minimum overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 as well as a minimum 3.00 GPA in the prerequisite courses. For information regarding the prerequisites, please see the Minor Requirements tab on this page.

After completion of the prerequisite courses, students will need to complete and submit to the Mechanical Engineering Student Services Office (Room 6189/6193 Etcheverry) a Petition for Admission form which can be found here. The department will verify the completion of the minor and send the paperwork to the appropriate parties after final grades are available.

Joint Majors

The Department of Mechanical Engineering also offers two joint majors, with other departments in the College of Engineering. For further information on these programs, please click the links below:
Materials Science and Engineering/Mechanical Engineering (Department of Materials Science and Engineering)
Mechanical Engineering/Nuclear Engineering (Department of Nuclear Engineering)

Visit Department Website

Major Requirements

In addition to the University, campus, and college requirements, students must fulfill the below requirements specific to their major program.

General Guidelines

  1. All technical courses (courses in engineering, mathematics, chemistry, physics, statistics, biological sciences, and computer science) must be taken for a letter grade.

  2. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student’s major and minor programs.

  3. A minimum overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required for all work undertaken at UC Berkeley.

  4. A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required for all technical courses taken in satisfaction of major requirements.

For information regarding residence requirements and unit requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.

For a detailed plan of study by year and semester, please see the plan of study tab.

Lower Division Requirements

MATH 1ACalculus4
MATH 1BCalculus4
MATH 53Multivariable Calculus4
MATH 54Linear Algebra and Differential Equations4
CHEM 1A
1AL
General Chemistry
and General Chemistry Laboratory 1
4
or CHEM 4A General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis
PHYSICS 7APhysics for Scientists and Engineers4
PHYSICS 7BPhysics for Scientists and Engineers4
ENGIN 7Introduction to Computer Programming for Scientists and Engineers4
ENGIN 25Visualization for Design 22
ENGIN 26Three-Dimensional Modeling for Design 22
ENGIN 27Introduction to Manufacturing and Tolerancing 22
MEC ENG 40Thermodynamics3
MEC ENG C85Introduction to Solid Mechanics3
EL ENG 16ADesigning Information Devices and Systems I4
1

CHEM 4A is intended for students majoring in chemistry or a closely-related field.

2

All junior transfer admits are exempt from completing ENGIN 26. Junior transfer admits who have completed the equivalent of Engin 28 are exempt from completing the series (ENGIN 25ENGIN 26 and ENGIN 27), unless their transfer institution has articulated equivalents for the series.

Upper Division Requirements

MEC ENG 102AIntroduction to Mechanical Systems for Mechatronics4
MEC ENG 102BMechatronics Design4
MEC ENG 104Engineering Mechanics II3
MEC ENG 106Fluid Mechanics3
MEC ENG 107Mechanical Engineering Laboratory3
MEC ENG 108Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials4
MEC ENG 109Heat Transfer3
MEC ENG 132Dynamic Systems and Feedback3
Technical electives, minimum 18 units 1,2,318
Select at least one course from the design elective list:
Advanced Engineering Design Graphics 1
Introduction to Lean Manufacturing Systems
Introduction to Product Development
Structural Aspects of Biomaterials
Introduction to MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems)
Design of Planar Machinery
Design of Microprocessor-Based Mechanical Systems
Energy Conversion Principles
Ocean-Environment Mechanics
Orthopedic Biomechanics
Select at least one course from quantitative science elective list:
Methods of Engineering Analysis 1
Advanced Programming with MATLAB 1
Numerical Analysis 1
Computational Biomechanics Across Multiple Scales
Engineering Analysis Using the Finite Element Method
1

Technical electives: 18 units of technical electives are required, of which at least 12 units must be upper division mechanical engineering courses. Any upper division course taught by mechanical engineering faculty may be used as part of the 12 units of upper division mechanical engineering courses. In addition, ENGIN 117ENGIN 128, ENGIN 177 and MATH 128A can count toward the 12 unit upper division ME course requirement. Students may receive up to three units of technical elective credit for work on a research project in either MEC ENG 196 or MEC ENG H194.

2

Only one lower division course can be used toward the technical elective requirement. Approved lower division courses include: ASTRON 7A, ASTRON 7B, BIO ENG 10BIOLOGY 1ABIOLOGY 1B, CHEM 1B, CHEM 3A, CHEM 3B, CHEM 4B, CIV ENG 11CIV ENG 60CIV ENG 70CIV ENG 93, COMPSCI C8COMPSCI 61A, COMPSCI 61B, COMPSCI 61C, COMPSCI 70, DES INV 15, DES INV 22, DES INV 90E, EPS 50, EL ENG 16B, ENGIN 15ENGIN 45, INTEGBI 32MATH 55MCELLBI 32PHYSICS 7CSTAT 20, STAT 21.

3

Technical electives cannot include:

Minor Requirements

Minor programs are areas of concentration requiring fewer courses than an undergraduate major. These programs are optional but can provide depth and breadth to a UC Berkeley education. The College of Engineering does not offer additional time to complete a minor, but it is usually possible to finish within the allotted time with careful course planning. Students are encouraged to meet with their ESS adviser to discuss the feasibility of completing a minor program.

All the engineering departments offer minors. Students may also consider pursuing a minor in another school or college.

General Guidelines

  1. All courses taken to fulfill the minor requirements must be taken for graded credit.

  2. A minimum overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the prerequisite courses is required for acceptance into the minor program.

  3. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required for courses used to fulfill the minor requirements.

  4. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student’s major and minor programs.

  5. Completion of the minor program cannot delay a student’s graduation.

Requirements

Prerequisites
PHYSICS 7APhysics for Scientists and Engineers4
MEC ENG 40Thermodynamics3
MEC ENG 104Engineering Mechanics II3
MEC ENG C85Introduction to Solid Mechanics3
Upper Division Requirements
Select three additional upper division technical courses in mechanical engineering

College Requirements

Students in the College of Engineering must complete no fewer than 120 semester units with the following provisions: 

  1. Completion of the requirements of one engineering major program of study. 
  2. A minimum overall grade point average of 2.00 (C average) and a minimum 2.00 grade point average in upper division technical coursework required of the major. 
  3. The final 30 units and two semesters must be completed in residence in the College of Engineering on the Berkeley campus. 
  4. All technical courses (math, science and engineering), required of the major or not, must be taken on a letter graded basis (unless they are only offered P/NP). 
  5. Entering freshmen are allowed a maximum of eight semesters to complete their degree requirements. Entering junior transfers are allowed a maximum of four semesters to complete their degree requirements. (Note: junior transfers admitted missing three or more courses from the lower division curriculum are allowed five semesters.) Summer terms are optional and do not count toward the maximum. Students are responsible for planning and satisfactorily completing all graduation requirements within the maximum allowable semesters. 
  6. Adhere to all college policies and procedures as they complete degree requirements.
  7. Complete the lower division program before enrolling in upper division engineering courses. 

Humanities and Social Science (H/SS) Requirement

To promote a rich and varied educational experience outside of the technical requirements for each major, the College of Engineering has a six-course Humanities and Social Sciences breadth requirement, which must be completed to graduate. This requirement, built into all the engineering programs of study, includes two reading and composition courses (R&C), and four additional courses within which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. Follow these guidelines to fulfill this requirement:

  1. Complete a minimum of six courses from the  approved Humanities/Social Sciences (H/SS) lists
  2. Courses must be a minimum of 3 semester units (or 4 quarter units).
  3. Two of the six courses must fulfill the college's Reading and Composition (R&C) requirement. These courses must be taken for a letter grade (C- or better required) and must be completed by no later than the end of the sophomore year (fourth semester of enrollment). The first half of R&C, the “A” course, must be completed by the end of the freshman year; the second half of R&C, the “B" course, must be completed by no later than the end of the sophomore year. View a detailed lists of courses that fulfill Reading and Composition requirements, or use the College of Letters and Sciences search engine to view R&C courses offered in a given semester. 
  4. The four additional courses must be chosen within College of Engineering guidelines from the H/SS lists (see below). These courses may be taken on a Pass/Not Passed basis (P/NP).
  5. Two of the six courses must be upper division (courses numbered 100-196).
  6. One of the six courses must satisfy the campus American Cultures requirement. For detailed lists of courses that fulfill American Cultures requirements, visit the American Cultures site. 
  7. A maximum of two exams (Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, or A-Level) may be used toward completion of the H/SS requirement. View the list of exams that can be applied toward H/SS requirements.
  8. Courses may fulfill multiple categories. For example, if you complete CY PLAN 118AC that would satisfy the American Cultures requirement and one upper division H/SS requirement.
  9. No courses offered by any engineering department other than BIO ENG 100, COMPSCI C79, ENGIN 125, ENGIN 157AC, MEC ENG 191K and MEC ENG 191AC may be used to complete H/SS requirements.
  10. Foreign language courses may be used to complete H/SS requirements. View the list of language options.
  11. Courses numbered 97, 98, 99, or above 196 may not be used to complete any H/SS requirement
  12. The College of Engineering uses modified versions of five of the College of Letters and Science (L&S) breadth requirements lists to provide options to our students for completing the H/SS requirement. No courses on the L&S Biological Sciences or Physical Sciences breadth lists may be used to complete H/SS requirements. Within the guidelines above, choose courses from any of the lists below.

Class Schedule Requirements

  • Minimum units per semester: 12.0.
  • Maximum units per semester:  20.5.
  • Minimum technical courses: College of Engineering undergraduates must enroll each semester in no fewer than two technical courses (of a minimum of 3 units each) required of the major program of study in which the student is officially declared.  (Note: for most majors, normal progress will require enrolling in 3-4 technical courses each semester).
  • All technical courses (math, science, engineering), required of the major or not, must be taken on a letter graded basis (unless only offered as P/NP).
  • A student's proposed schedule must be approved by a faculty adviser (or on approval from the dean or a designated staff adviser) each semester prior to enrolling in courses.

Minimum Academic (Grade) Requirements

  • A minimum overall and semester grade point average of 2.00 (C average) is required of engineering undergraduates. A student will be subject to dismissal from the University if during any fall or spring semester their overall UC GPA falls below a 2.00, or their semester GPA is less than 2.00. 
  • Students must achieve a minimum grade point average of 2.00 (C average) in upper division technical courses required of the major curriculum each semester. A student will be subject to dismissal from the University if their upper division technical grade point average falls below 2.00. 
  • A minimum overall grade point average of 2.00, and a minimum 2.00 grade point average in upper division technical course work required of the major is needed to earn a Bachelor of Science in Engineering.

Unit Requirements

To earn a Bachelor of Science in Engineering, students must complete at least 120 semester units of courses subject to certain guidelines:

  • Completion of the requirements of one engineering major program of study. 
  • A maximum of 16 units of special studies coursework (courses numbered 97, 98, 99, 197, 198, or 199) is allowed towards the 120 units; a maximum of four is allowed in a given semester.
  • A maximum of 4 units of physical education from any school attended will count towards the 120 units.
  • Students may receive unit credit for courses graded P (including P/NP units taken through EAP) up to a limit of one-third of the total units taken and passed on the Berkeley campus at the time of graduation.

Normal Progress

Students in the College of Engineering must enroll in a full-time program and make normal progress each semester toward the bachelor's degree. The continued enrollment of students who fail to achieve minimum academic progress shall be subject to the approval of the dean. (Note: students with official accommodations established by the Disabled Students' Program, with health or family issues, or with other reasons deemed appropriate by the dean may petition for an exception to normal progress rules.) 

Plan of Study

For more detailed information regarding the courses listed below (e.g., elective information, GPA requirements, etc.), please see the College Requirements and Major Requirements tabs.

Freshman
FallUnitsSpringUnits
CHEM 4A or 1A and 1AL14MATH 1B4
MATH 1A4PHYSICS 7A4
ENGIN 2522ENGIN 74
Reading & Composition course from List A4Reading & Composition course from List B4
Optional Freshman Seminar or ENGIN 920-1Optional Freshman Seminar0-1
 14-15 16-17
Sophomore
FallUnitsSpringUnits
MATH 534MATH 544
PHYSICS 7B4MEC ENG 403
ENGIN 2622MEC ENG C853
ENGIN 2722Humanities/Social Sciences course3-4
Humanities/Social Sciences course3-4Free Elective1
 15-16 14-15
Junior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
MEC ENG 1043EL ENG 16A4
MEC ENG 1063MEC ENG 1093
MEC ENG 1084MEC ENG 1323
Technical Elective3,4,53Technical Elective3,4,53
Humanities/Social Sciences course3-4Humanities/Social Sciences course3-4
 16-17 16-17
Senior
FallUnitsSpringUnits
MEC ENG 102A4MEC ENG 102B4
Technical Electives3,4,56MEC ENG 1073
Free Elective3-4Technical Electives3,4,56
 Free Elective3
 13-14 16
Total Units: 120-127
1

CHEM 4A is intended for students majoring in chemistry or a closely-related field.

2

All junior transfer admits are exempt from completing ENGIN 26. Junior transfer admits who have completed the equivalent of Engin 28 are exempt from completing the series (ENGIN 25, ENGIN 26 and ENGIN 27), unless their transfer institution has articulated equivalents for the series.

3

Technical electives: 18 units of technical electives are required, of which at least 12 units must be upper division mechanical engineering courses. 

Of these 12 units, 3 units must be a design course selected from the following: ENGIN 128MEC ENG 101MEC ENG 110MEC ENG C117MEC ENG 119MEC ENG 130MEC ENG 135MEC ENG 146MEC ENG 165MEC ENG C176.

Also, one of the technical elective courses must be selected from the quantitative science list: ENGIN 117ENGIN 177MATH 128AMEC ENG 120MEC ENG C180.

Any upper division course taught by mechanical engineering faculty may be used as part of the 12 units of upper division mechanical engineering courses. In addition, ENGIN 117ENGIN 128, ENGIN 177 and MATH 128A can count toward the 15 unit upper division ME course requirement.

Students may receive up to three units of technical elective credit for work on a research project in either MEC ENG 196 or MEC ENG H194.

4

Only one lower division course can be used toward the technical elective requirement. Approved lower division courses include: ASTRON 7AASTRON 7BBIO ENG 10BIOLOGY 1A plus BIOLOGY 1ALBIOLOGY 1BCHEM 1BCHEM 3A plus CHEM 3ALCHEM 3B plus CHEM 3BLCHEM 4BCIV ENG 11CIV ENG 60CIV ENG 70CIV ENG 93COMPSCI C8COMPSCI 61ACOMPSCI 61BCOMPSCI 61CCOMPSCI 70DES INV 15DES INV 22DES INV 90EEPS 50EL ENG 16BENGIN 15ENGIN 45INTEGBI 32MATH 55MCELLBI 32PHYSICS 7CSTAT 20STAT 21.

5

Technical electives cannot include:

Student Learning Goals

Learning Goals for the Major

The objectives of the Mechanical Engineering undergraduate program are to produce graduates who do the following:

  1. Vigorously engage in post-baccalaureate endeavors, whether in engineering graduate study, in engineering practice, or in the pursuit of other fields such as science, law, medicine, business or public policy.
  2. Apply their mechanical engineering education to address the full range of technical and societal problems with creativity, imagination, confidence and responsibility.
  3. Actively seek out positions of leadership within their profession and their community.
  4. Serve as ambassadors for engineering by exhibiting the highest ethical and professional standards, and by communicating the importance and excitement of this dynamic field.
  5. Retain the intellectual curiosity that motivates lifelong learning and allows for a flexible response to the rapidly evolving challenges of the 21st century.

Skills

The Department of Mechanical Engineering has adopted the ABET Outcomes as its Program Outcomes. Mechanical Engineering graduates have the following:

  1. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.
  2. An ability to design and conduct experiments as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  3. An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
  4. An ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams.
  5. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  6. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  7. An ability to communicate effectively.
  8. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.
  9. A recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
  10. A knowledge of contemporary issues.
  11. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Advising

Students in Mechanical Engineering have a number of advising options, listed in sequential order:

College of Engineering (COE)

All undergraduates have an adviser at the College referred to as the Engineering Student Services (ESS) Adviser. ESS advisers assist students in a variety of ways including course selection (primarily for freshmen, sophomores and transfer students), explaining graduation requirements and college policies, monitoring progress toward the degree, suggesting enrichment opportunities, and providing support (or referrals to campus resources) to help students reach their academic goals. They are also the first stop for students who wish to file a petition. Advising assignments are made alphabetically. Students who are unsure of who their adviser is should refer to the COE's undergraduate advising information page.

ME Student Services Office

This office is students' primary source of department-specific administrative information.

ME Faculty Adviser

Faculty advisers for new students will be assigned by the beginning of October and a listing will be available online. Faculty are great sources for information regarding classes, research opportunities, and career planning. Furthermore, all ME students are required to see their faculty advisers (or go to drop-in advising) to get their advising codes before signing up for the next semester's courses.

Vice Chair for Undergraduate Matters

The vice chair handles all undergraduate student petitions and can serve as a liaison between students and their respective advisers as well as students and the ME chair. He is also responsible for the ME undergraduate curriculum and heads the Committee on Undergraduate Study.

Department Chair

In rare instances when issues cannot be resolved by the vice chair, the ME chair may become involved.

Advising Staff and Hours

Undergraduate Student Services Adviser
Shareena Samson
shareena@me.berkeley.edu
6193 Etcheverry Hall
510-642-4094
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday: 9 to noon and 1 to 4 p.m.
Thursday: 1 to 4 p.m.

Courses

Mechanical Engineering

MEC ENG 24 Freshman Seminars 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester.

Freshman Seminars: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 40 Thermodynamics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Spring 2017
This course introduces the fundamentals of energy storage, thermophysical properties of liquids and gases, and the basic principles of thermodynamics which are then applied to various areas of engineering related to energy conversion and air conditioning.

Thermodynamics: Read More [+]

MEC ENG C85 Introduction to Solid Mechanics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Spring 2017
A review of equilibrium for particles and rigid bodies. Application to truss structures. The concepts of deformation, strain, and stress. Equilibrium equations for a continuum. Elements of the theory of linear elasticity. The states of plane stress and plane strain. Solution of elementary elasticity problems (beam bending, torsion of circular bars). Euler buckling in elastic beams.

Introduction to Solid Mechanics: Read More [+]

MEC ENG W85 Introduction to Solid Mechanics 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2016, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2015 10 Week Session, Summer 2015 8 Week Session
A review of equilibrium for particles and rigid bodies. Application to truss structures. The concepts of deformation, strain, and stress. Equilibrium equations for a continuum. Elements of the theory of linear elasticity. The states of plane stress and plane strain. Solution of elementary elasticity problems (beam bending, torsion of circular bars). Euler buckling in elastic beams.

Introduction to Solid Mechanics: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 98 Supervised Independent Group Studies 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Spring 2016
Organized group study on various topics under the sponsorship and direction of a member of the Mechanical Engineering faculty.

Supervised Independent Group Studies: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 101 Introduction to Lean Manufacturing Systems 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Fundamentals of lean manufacturing systems including manufacturing fundamentals, unit operations and manufacturing line considerations for work in process (WIP), manufacturing lead time (MLT), economics, quality monitoring; high mix/low volume (HMLV) systems fundamentals including just in time (JIT), kanban, buffers and line balancing; class project/case studies for design and analysis of competitive manufacturing systems.

Introduction to Lean Manufacturing Systems: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 102A Introduction to Mechanical Systems for Mechatronics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
The objectives of this course are to introduce students to modern experimental techniques for mechanical engineering, and to improve students' written and oral communication skills. Students will be provided exposure to, and experience with, a variety of sensors used in mechatronic systems including sensors to measure temperature, displacement, velocity, acceleration and strain. The role of error and uncertainty in measurements and analysis will
be examined. Students will also be provided exposure to, and experience with, using commercial software for data acquisition and analysis. The role and limitations of spectral analysis of digital data will be discussed.
Introduction to Mechanical Systems for Mechatronics: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 102B Mechatronics Design 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Introduction to design and realization of mechatronics systems. Micro computer architectures. Basic computer IO devices. Embedded microprocessor systems and control, IO programming such as analogue to digital converters, PWM, serial and parallel outputs. Electrical components such as power supplies, operational amplifiers, transformers and filters. Shielding and grounding. Design of electric, hydraulic and pneumatic actuators. Design of sensors.
Design of power transmission systems. Kinematics and dynamics of robotics devices. Basic feedback design to create robustness and performance.
Mechatronics Design: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 103 Experimentation and Measurements 4 Units

Terms offered: Not yet offered
This course introduces students to modern experimental techniques for mechanical engineering, and improves students’ teamwork and communication skills. Students will work in a laboratory setting on systems ranging in complexity from desktop experiments with only a few instruments up to systems such as an internal combustion engine with a wide variety of sensors. State-of-the-art software for data acquisition and analysis will be introduced and used throughout
the course. The role of error and uncertainty, and uncertainty propagation, in measurements and analysis will be examined. Design of experiments will be addressed through examples and homework. The role and limitations of spectral analysis of digital data will be discussed.
Experimentation and Measurements: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 104 Engineering Mechanics II 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
This course is an introduction to the dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. The material, based on a Newtonian formulation of the governing equations, is illustrated with numerous examples ranging from one-dimensional motion of a single particle to planar motions of rigid bodies and systems of rigid bodies.

Engineering Mechanics II: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 106 Fluid Mechanics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Spring 2017
This course introduces the fundamentals and techniques of fluid mechanics with the aim of describing and controlling engineering flows.

Fluid Mechanics: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 107 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Experimental investigation of engineering systems and of phenomena of interest to mechanical engineers. Design and planning of experiments. Analysis of data and reporting of experimental results.

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 108 Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
This course covers elastic and plastic deformation under static and dynamic loads. Failure by yielding, fracture, fatigue, wear, and environmental factors are also examined. Topics include engineering materials, heat treatment, structure-property relationships, elastic deformation and multiaxial loading, plastic deformation and yield criteria, dislocation plasticity and strengthening mechanisms, creep, stress concentration effects, fracture,
fatigue, and contact deformation.
Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 109 Heat Transfer 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Spring 2017
This course covers transport processes of mass, momentum, and energy from a macroscopic view with emphasis both on understanding why matter behaves as it does and on developing practical problem solving skills. The course is divided into four parts: introduction, conduction, convection, and radiation.

Heat Transfer: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 110 Introduction to Product Development 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Spring 2017, Summer 2016 10 Week Session
The course provides project-based learning experience in innovative new product development, with a focus on mechanical engineering systems. Design concepts and techniques are introduced, and the student's design ability is developed in a design or feasibility study chosen to emphasize ingenuity and provide wide coverage of engineering topics. Relevant software will be integrated into studio sessions, including
solid modeling and environmental life cycle analysis. Design optimization and social, economic, and political implications are included.
Introduction to Product Development: Read More [+]

MEC ENG C115 Molecular Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of the Cell 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
This course applies methods of statistical continuum mechanics to subcellar biomechanical phenomena ranging from nanoscale (molecular) to microscale (whole cell and cell population) biological processes at the interface of mechanics, biology, and chemistry.

Molecular Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of the Cell: Read More [+]

MEC ENG C117 Structural Aspects of Biomaterials 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2013, Spring 2012
This course covers the structure and mechanical functions of load bearing tissues and their replacements. Natural and synthetic load-bearing biomaterials for clinical applications are reviewed. Biocompatibility of biomaterials and host response to structural implants are examined. Quantitative treatment of biomechanical issues and constitutive relationships of tissues are covered in order to design biomaterial replacements for structural function.
Material selection for load bearing applications including reconstructive surgery, orthopedics, dentistry, and cardiology are addressed. Mechanical design for longevity including topics of fatigue, wear, and fracture are reviewed. Case studies that examine failures of devices are presented.
Structural Aspects of Biomaterials: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 118 Introduction to Nanotechnology and Nanoscience 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
This course introduces engineering students (juniors and seniors) to the field of nanotechnology and nanoscience. The course has two components: (1) Formal lectures. Students receive a set of formal lectures introducing them to the field of nanotechnology and nanoscience. The material covered includes nanofabrication technology (how one achieves the nanometer length scale, from "bottom up" to "top down" technologies),
the interdisciplinary nature of nanotechnology and nanoscience (including areas of chemistry, material science, physics, and molecular biology), examples of nanoscience phenomena (the crossover from bulk to quantum mechanical properties), and applications (from integrated circuits, quantum computing, MEMS, and bioengineering). (2) Projects. Students are asked to read and present a variety of current journal papers to the class and lead a discussion on the various works.
Introduction to Nanotechnology and Nanoscience: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 119 Introduction to MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2013
Fundamentals of microelectromechanical systems including design, fabrication of microstructures; surface-micromachining, bulk-micromachining, LIGA, and other micro machining processes; fabrication principles of integrated circuit device and their applications for making MEMS devices; high-aspect-ratio microstructures; scaling issues in the micro scale (heat transfer, fluid mechanics and solid mechanics); device design, analysis, and mask layout.

Introduction to MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems): Read More [+]

MEC ENG 120 Computational Biomechanics Across Multiple Scales 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
This course applies the methods of computational modeling and continuum mechanics to biomedical phenomena spanning various length scales ranging from molecular to cellular to tissue and organ levels. The course is intended for upper level undergraduate students who have been exposed to undergraduate continuum mechanics (statics and strength of materials.)

Computational Biomechanics Across Multiple Scales: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 122 Processing of Materials in Manufacturing 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Fundamentals of manufacturing processes (metal forming, forging, metal cutting, welding, joining, and casting); selection of metals, plastics, and other materials relative to the design and choice of manufacturing processes; geometric dimensioning and tolerancing of all processes.

Processing of Materials in Manufacturing: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 130 Design of Planar Machinery 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Synthesis, analysis, and design of planar machines. Kinematic structure, graphical, analytical, and numerical analysis and synthesis. Linkages, cams, reciprocating engines, gear trains, and flywheels.

Design of Planar Machinery: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 131 Vehicle Dynamics and Control 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Physical understanding of automotive vehicle dynamics including simple lateral, longitudinal, and ride quality models. An overview of active safety systems will be introduced including the basic concepts and terminology, the state-of-the-art development, and basic principles of systems such as ABS, traction control, dynamic stability control, and roll stability control. Passive, semi-active, and active suspension systems will be analyzed.
Concepts of autonomous vehicle technology including drive-by-wire and steer-by-wire systems, adaptive cruise control, and lane keeping systems. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to follow the literature on these subjects and perform independent design, research, and development work in this field.
Vehicle Dynamics and Control: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 132 Dynamic Systems and Feedback 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Spring 2017
Physical understanding of dynamics and feedback. Linear feedback control of dynamic systems. Mathematical tools for analysis and design. Stability. Modeling systems with differential equations. Linearization. Solution to linear, time-invariant differential equations.

Dynamic Systems and Feedback: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 133 Mechanical Vibrations 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
An introduction to the theory of mechanical vibrations including topics of harmonic motion, resonance, transient and random excitation, applications of Fourier analysis and convolution methods. Multidegree of freedom discrete systems including principal mode, principal coordinates and Rayleigh's principle.

Mechanical Vibrations: Read More [+]

MEC ENG C134 Feedback Control Systems 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Analysis and synthesis of linear feedback control systems in transform and time domains. Control system design by root locus, frequency response, and state space methods. Applications to electro-mechanical and mechatronics systems.

Feedback Control Systems: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 135 Design of Microprocessor-Based Mechanical Systems 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course provides preparation for the conceptual design and prototyping of mechanical systems that use microprocessors to control machine activities, acquire and analyze data, and interact with operators. The architecture of microprocessors is related to problems in mechanical systems through study of systems, including electro-mechanical components, thermal components and a variety of instruments. Laboratory exercises lead through studies
of different levels of software.
Design of Microprocessor-Based Mechanical Systems: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 136 Introduction to Control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 1998, Fall 1996
This course introduces students to the control of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The course will cover modeling and dynamics of aerial vehicles, and common control strategies. Laboratory exercises allow students to apply knowledge on a real system, by programming a microcontroller to control a UAV.

Introduction to Control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 138 Introduction to Micro/Nano Mechanical Systems Laboratory 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2013
This hands-on laboratory course focuses on the mechanical engineering principles that underlie the design, fabricaton, and operation of micro/nanoscale mechanical systems, including devices made by nanowire/nanotube syntheses; photolithography/soft lithography; and molding processes. Each laboratory will have different focuses for basic understanding of MEMS/NEMS systems from prototype constructions to experimental testings using mechanical, electrical
, or optical techniques.
Introduction to Micro/Nano Mechanical Systems Laboratory: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 140 Combustion Processes 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Fundamentals of combustion, flame structure, flame speed, flammability, ignition, stirred reaction, kinetics and nonequilibrium processes, pollutant formation. Application to engines, energy production and fire safety.

Combustion Processes: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 146 Energy Conversion Principles 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course covers the fundamental principles of energy conversion processes, followed by development of theoretical and computational tools that can be used to analyze energy conversion processes. The course also introduces the use of modern computational methods to model energy conversion performance characteristics of devices and systems. Performance features, sources of inefficiencies, and optimal design strategies are explored for a variety
of applications, which may include conventional combustion based and Rankine power systems, energy systems for space applications, solar, wind, wave, thermoelectric, and geothermal energy systems.
Energy Conversion Principles: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 150A Solar-Powered Vehicles: Analysis, Design and Fabrication 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2015 10 Week Session, Summer 2014 10 Week Session, Spring 2014
This course addresses all aspects of design, analysis, construction and economics of solar-powered vehicles. It begins with an examination of the fundamentals of photovoltaic solar power generation, and the capabilities and limitations that exist when using this form of renewable energy. The efficiency of energy conversion and storage will be evaluated across an entire system, from the solar energy that is
available to the mechanical power that is ultimately produced. The structural and dynamic stability, as well as the aerodynamics, of vehicles will be studied. Safety and economic concerns will also be considered. Students will work in teams to design, build and test a functioning single-person vehicle capable of street use.
Solar-Powered Vehicles: Analysis, Design and Fabrication: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 151 Advanced Heat Transfer 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2014, Spring 2008
Basic principles of heat transfer and their application. Subject areas include steady-state and transient system analyses for conduction, free and forced convection, boiling, condensation and thermal radiation.

Advanced Heat Transfer: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 163 Engineering Aerodynamics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
Introduction to the lift, drag, and moment of two-dimensional airfoils, three-dimensional wings, and the complete airplane. Calculations of the performance and stability of airplanes in subsonic flight.

Engineering Aerodynamics: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 164 Marine Statics and Structures 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2009
Terminology and definition of hull forms, conditions of static equilibrium and stability of floating submerged bodies. Effects of damage on stability. Structural loads and response. Box girder theory. Isotropic and orthotropic plate bending and bucking.

Marine Statics and Structures: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 165 Ocean-Environment Mechanics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Spring 2014
Ocean environment. Physical properties and characteristics of the oceans. Global conservation laws. Surface-waves generation. Gravity-wave mechanics, kinematics, and dynamics. Design consideration of ocean vehicles and systems. Model-testing techniques. Prediction of resistance and response in waves--physical modeling and computer models.

Ocean-Environment Mechanics: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 167 Microscale Fluid Mechanics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Phenomena of physical, technological, and biological significance in flows of gases and liquids at the microscale. The course begins with familiar equations of Newtonian fluid mechanics, then proceeds to the study of essentially 1-D flows in confined geometries with the lubrication equations. Next is a study of the flow of thin films spreading under gravity or surface tension gradients. Lubrication theory of compressible gases leads to consideration
of air bearings. Two- and 3-D flows are treated with Stokes' equations. Less familiar physical phenomena of significance and utility at the microscale are then considered: intermolecular forces in liquids, slip, diffusion and bubbles as active agents. A review of relevant aspects of electricity and magnetism precedes a study of electrowetting and electrokinetically driven liquid flows.
Microscale Fluid Mechanics: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 168 Mechanics of Offshore Systems 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course covers major aspects of offshore engineering including ocean environment, loads on offshore structures, cables and mooring, underwater acoustics and arctic operations.

Mechanics of Offshore Systems: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 170 Engineering Mechanics III 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2014
This course builds upon material learned in 104, examining the dynamics of particles and rigid bodies moving in three dimensions. Topics include non-fixed axis rotations of rigid bodies, Euler angles and parameters, kinematics of rigid bodies, and the Newton-Euler equations of motion for rigid bodies. The course material will be illustrated with real-world examples such as gyroscopes, spinning tops, vehicles, and satellites. Applications
of the material range from vehicle navigation to celestial mechanics, numerical simulations, and animations.
Engineering Mechanics III: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 173 Fundamentals of Acoustics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2013, Spring 2011
Plane and spherical sound waves. Sound intensity. Propagation in tubes and horns. Resonators. Standing waves. Radiation from oscillating surface. Reciprocity. Reverberation and diffusion. Electro-acoustic loud speaker and microphone problems. Environmental and architectural acoustics. Noise measurement and control. Effects on man.

Fundamentals of Acoustics: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 175 Intermediate Dynamics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
This course introduces and investigates Lagrange's equations of motion for particles and rigid bodies. The subject matter is particularly relevant to applications comprised of interconnected and constrained discrete mechanical components. The material is illustrated with numerous examples. These range from one-dimensional motion of a single particle to three-dimensional motions of rigid bodies and systems of rigid bodies.

Intermediate Dynamics: Read More [+]

MEC ENG C176 Orthopedic Biomechanics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Statics, dynamics, optimization theory, composite beam theory, beam-on-elastic foundation theory, Hertz contact theory, and materials behavior. Forces and moments acting on human joints; composition and mechanical behavior of orthopedic biomaterials; design/analysis of artificial joint, spine, and fracture fixation prostheses; musculoskeletal tissues including bone, cartilage, tendon, ligament, and muscle; osteoporosis and fracture-risk predication
of bones; and bone adaptation. MATLAB-based project to integrate the course material.
Orthopedic Biomechanics: Read More [+]

MEC ENG C178 Designing for the Human Body 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017
The course provides project-based learning experience in understanding product design, with a focus on the human body as a mechanical machine. Students will learn the design of external devices used to aid or protect the body. Topics will include forces acting on internal materials (e.g., muscles and total replacement devices), forces acting on external materials (e.g., prothetics and crash pads), design/analysis of devices aimed to improve or fix the human body, muscle
adaptation, and soft tissue injury. Weekly laboratory projects will incorporate EMG sensing, force plate analysis, and interpretation of data collection (e.g., MATLAB analysis) to integrate course material to better understand contemporary design/analysis/problems.
Designing for the Human Body: Read More [+]

MEC ENG C180 Engineering Analysis Using the Finite Element Method 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This is an introductory course on the finite element method and is intended for seniors in engineering and applied science disciplines. The course covers the basic topics of finite element technology, including domain discretization, polynomial interpolation, application of boundary conditions, assembly of global arrays, and solution of the resulting algebraic systems. Finite element formulations for several important field equations are
introduced using both direct and integral approaches. Particular emphasis is placed on computer simulation and analysis of realistic engineering problems from solid and fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and electromagnetism. The course uses FEMLAB, a multiphysics MATLAB-based finite element program that possesses a wide array of modeling capabilities and is ideally suited for instruction. Assignments will involve both paper- and computer-based exercises. Computer-based assignments will emphasize the practical aspects of finite element model construction and analysis.
Engineering Analysis Using the Finite Element Method: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 185 Introduction to Continuum Mechanics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Kinematics of deformation, the concept of stress, conservation of mass and balance of linear momentum, angular momentum and energy. Mechanical constitutive equations for ideal fluid, linear elastic solid.

Introduction to Continuum Mechanics: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 190K Professional Communication for Mechanical Engineers 1 Unit

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
The course emphasizes understanding of and performance in professional speaking situations, including presentations, meetings, interviews, and informal business conversations. It emphasizes collaborative projects with distance partners. It combines theory and practice, integrating extensive speaking practice and individual critiques from instructor and students. The purpose is to advance students' ability to collaborate and communicate effectively in a variety of
professional environments.
Professional Communication for Mechanical Engineers: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 190L Practical Control System Design: A Systematic Loopshaping Approach 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2014, Fall 2012
After a review of basic loopshaping, we introduce the loopshaping design methodology of McFarlane and Glover, and learn how to use it effectively. The remainder of the course studies the mathematics underlying the new method (one of the most prevalent advanced techniques used in industry) justifying its validity.

Practical Control System Design: A Systematic Loopshaping Approach: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 190M Model Predictive Control 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Fall 2009
Basics on optimization and polyhedra manipulation. Analysis and design of constrained predictive controllers for linear and nonlinear systems.

Model Predictive Control: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 190Y Practical Control System Design: A Systematic Optimization Approach 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2010, Spring 2009
The Youla-parametrization of all stabilizing controllers allows certain time-domain and frequency-domain closed-loop design objectives to be cast as convex optimizations, and solved reliably using off-the-shelf numerical optimization codes. This course covers the Youla parametrization, basic elements of convex optimization, and finally control design using these techniques.

Practical Control System Design: A Systematic Optimization Approach: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 191AC Cases and Conflicts in Engineering Ethics 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2011 10 Week Session, Summer 2011 8 Week Session
Engineering is challenged by issues of security, poverty and under-development, and environmental sustainability. These issues intersect with those of race, class, and culture in U.S. society. This course focuses on engineering ethics case studies as they apply to issues of workplace diversity, sustainable practices, economic impacts on neighborhoods and nations, and issues of security and identity. The goal of this course
is to broaden the understanding of engineering ethics from individual and business-based practices to those affecting communities and nations. This class cannot be used to satisfy any Engineering requirement (technical electives, engineering units, or courses).
Cases and Conflicts in Engineering Ethics: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 191K Professional Communication 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session
This course is designed to enhance students' written and oral communication skills. Written work consists of informal documents--correspondence, internal reports, and reviews--and formal work--proposals, conference papers, journal articles, and websites. Presentations consist of informal and formal reports, including job and media interviews, phone interviews, conference calls, video conferences, progress
reports, sales pitches, and feasibility studies.
Professional Communication: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 193A Special Topics in Biomechanical Engineering 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017
This 193 series covers current topics of research interest in biomechanical engineering. The course content may vary semester to semester. Check with the department for current term topics.

Special Topics in Biomechanical Engineering: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 193B Special Topics in Controls 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This 193 series covers current topics of research interest in controls. The course content may vary semester to semester. Check with the department for current term topics.

Special Topics in Controls: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 193C Special Topics in Design 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016
This 193 series covers current topics of research interest in design. The course content may vary semester to semester. Check with the department for current term topics.

Special Topics in Design: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 193D Special Topics in Dynamics 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This 193 series covers current topics of research interest in dynamics. The course content may vary semester to semester. Check with the department for current term topics.

Special Topics in Dynamics: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 193E Special Topics in Energy Science and Technology 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017
This 193 series covers current topics of research interest in energy science and technology. The course content may vary semester to semester. Check with the department for current term topics.

Special Topics in Energy Science and Technology: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 193F Special Topics in Fluids 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This 193 series covers current topics of research interest in fluids. The course content may vary semester to semester. Check with the department for current term topics.

Special Topics in Fluids: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 193G Special Topics in Manufacturing 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This 193 series covers current topics of research interest in manufacturing. The course content may vary semester to semester. Check with the department for current term topics.

Special Topics in Manufacturing: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 193H Special Topics in Materials 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This 193 series covers current topics of research interest in materials. The course content may vary semester to semester. Check with the department for current term topics.

Special Topics in Materials: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 193I Special Topics in Mechanics 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This 193 series covers current topics of research interest in mechanics. The course content may vary semester to semester. Check with the department for current term topics.

Special Topics in Mechanics: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 193J Special Topics in MEMS/Nano 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This 193 series covers current topics of research interest in MEMS/nano. The course content may vary semester to semester. Check with the department for current term topics.

Special Topics in MEMS/Nano: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 193K Special Topics in Ocean Engineering 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This 193 series covers current topics of research interest in ocean engineering. The course content may vary semester to semester. Check with the department for current term topics.

Special Topics in Ocean Engineering: Read More [+]

MEC ENG H194 Honors Undergraduate Research 2 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Final report required. Students who have completed a satisfactory number of advanced courses may pursue original research under the direction of one of the members of the faculty. A maximum of three units of H194 may be used to fulfill technical elective requirements in the Mechanical Engineering program (unlike 198 or 199, which do not satisfy technical elective requirements). Students can use a maximum of three units of graded research
units (H194 or 196) towards their technical elective requirement.
Honors Undergraduate Research: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 196 Undergraduate Research 2 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Students who have completed a satisfactory number of advanced courses may pursue original research under the direction of one of the members of the staff. A maximum of three units of 196 may be used to fulfill technical elective requirements in the Mechanical Engineering program (unlike 198 or 199, which do not satisfy technical elective requirements). Students can use a maximum of three units of graded research units (H194 or 196) towards
their technical elective requirement. Final report required.
Undergraduate Research: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 197 Undergraduate Engineering Field Studies 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Summer 2015 10 Week Session
Supervised experience relative to specific aspects of practice in engineering. Under guidance of a faculty member, the student will work in industry, primarily in an internship setting or another type of short-time status. Emphasis is to attain practical experience in the field.

Undergraduate Engineering Field Studies: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 198 Directed Group Studies for Advanced Undergraduates 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Group study of a selected topic or topics in Mechanical Engineering. Credit for 198 or 199 courses combined may not exceed 4 units in any single term. See College for other restrictions.

Directed Group Studies for Advanced Undergraduates: Read More [+]

MEC ENG 199 Supervised Independent Study 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Spring 2017, Summer 2016 8 Week Session
Supervised independent study. Enrollment restrictions apply; see the introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.

Supervised Independent Study: Read More [+]

Faculty and Instructors

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

Alice M. Agogino, Professor. New product development, computer-aided design & databases, theory & methods, intelligent learning systems, information retrieval & data mining, digital libraries, multiobjective & strategic product, nonlinear optimization, probabilistic modeling, supervisory.
Research Profile

M. Reza Alam, Assistant Professor. Theoretical Fluid Dynamics, Nonlinear Wave Mechanics, Ocean and Coastal Waves Phenomena, Ocean Renewable Energy (Wave, Tide and Offshore Wind Energy), Nonlinear Dynamical Systems, Fluid Flow Control, ocean renewable energy.
Research Profile

Francesco Borrelli, Associate Professor. Automotive control systems, distributed and robust constrained control, manufacturing control systems, energy efficient buildings, model predictive control.
Research Profile

Van P. Carey, Professor. Mechanical engineering, non-equilibirum thermodynamics, statistical thermodynamics, microscale thermophysics, biothermodynamics, computer aided thermal design, thermodynamic analysis of green manufacturing.
Research Profile

James Casey, Professor. Continuum mechanics, finite elasticity, continuum thermodynamics, plasticity, theories of elastic-plastic materials, history of mechanics, dynamics.
Research Profile

Jyh-Yuan Chen, Professor. Computational modeling of reactive systems, turbulent flows, combustion chemical kinetics.
Research Profile

Chris Dames, Associate Professor.
Research Profile

David A. Dornfeld, Professor. Precision manufacturing processes, green and sustainable manufacturing, intelligent sensors and signal processing, mechanical engineering design, flexible/lean manufacturing systems, process modeling.
Research Profile

Carlos Fernandez-Pello, Professor. Biofuels, heat transfer, fire, combustion, ignition and fire spread, wildland fire spotting, smoldering and flaming, small scale energy generation.
Research Profile

Michael Frenklach, Professor. Silicon carbide, chemical kinetics; computer modeling; combustion chemistry; pollutant formation (NOx, soot); shock tube; chemical vapor deposition of diamond films; homogeneous nucleation of silicon, diamond powders; interstellar dust formation.
Research Profile

Costas P. Grigoropoulos, Professor. Heat transfer, laser materials processing, nano-manufacturing, energy systems and technology.
Research Profile

J. Karl Hedrick, Professor. Nonlinear control, automotive control systems, aircraft control.
Research Profile

Roberto Horowitz, Professor. Adaptive control, learning and nonlinear control, control of robot manipulators, computer mechatronics systems, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), intelligent vehicle, highways systems.
Research Profile

George C. Johnson, Professor. X-rays, plasticity, elasticity, instrumentation, sensors, acoustoelasticity, materials behavior, materials characterization, texture analysis, thin shells deformation, ultrasonic stress analysis.
Research Profile

Homayoon Kazerooni, Professor. Robotics, bioengineering, design, control systems, mechatronics, automated manufacturing, human-machine systems.
Research Profile

Tony M. Keaveny, Professor. Biomechanics of bone, orthopaedic biomechanics, design of artificial joints, osteoporosis, finite element modeling, clinical biomechanics.
Research Profile

Kyriakos Komvopoulos, Professor. Contact mechanics, fracture and fatigue of engineering materials, finite element modeling of surface contact and machining, thin-film processing and characterization, adhesion and fatigue of MEMS devices, plasma-assisted surface functionalization of biomaterials, surface patterning for cell adhesion and growth control, mechanics & tribology of magnetic recording devices, mechanotransduction effects in natural cartilage, microfibrous scaffolds for tissue engineering, surface nanoengineering techniques, tribology and mechanics of artificial joints.
Research Profile

Dorian Liepmann, Professor. Bioengineering, mechanical engineering, bioMEMS, biosensors, microfluid dynamics, experimental biofluid dynamics, hemodynamics, valvular heart disease, cardiac flows, arterial flows.
Research Profile

+ Dennis K. Lieu, Professor. Actuators, magnetics, acoustics, electromechanical devices, rolling elements, spindle motors, structural mechanics.
Research Profile

Liwei Lin, Professor. Nanotechnology, MEMS (microelectromechanical systems), NEMS (nanoelectromechanical systems), design and manufacturing of microsensors, microactuators, development of micromachining processes, silicon surface/bulk micromachining, micromolding process.
Research Profile

Fai Ma, Professor. Dynamical systems with inherent uncertainties, vibration, stochastic simulation.
Research Profile

Simo Aleksi Makiharju, Assistant Professor.

Samuel Mao, Associate Adjunct Professor. Mechanical engineering, processing, materials, energy transport, conversion and storage, nano, micro and meso scale, phenomena and devices, laser-material interactions, nonlinear science.
Research Profile

Philip Marcus, Professor. Algorithms, fluid mechanics, nonlinear dynamics, atmospheric flows, convection, ocean flows, numerical analysis, turbulence, planet formation, internal gravity waves, inertial waves, desalination.
Research Profile

Sara Mcmains, Associate Professor. Geometric and solid modeling, general purpose computation on the GPU (GPGPU), CAD/CAM, computational geometry, layered manufacturing, computer graphics and visualization, virtual prototyping, virtual reality.
Research Profile

Mohammad Mofrad, Professor. Nuclear pore complex and nucleocytoplasmic transport, mechanobiology of disease, cellular mechanotransduction, integrin-mediated focal adhesions.
Research Profile

Stephen Morris, Professor. Continuum mechanics, micro mechanics of solid-solid phase changes, interfacial phenomena (evaporating thin films), electroporation.
Research Profile

Grace O'Connell, Assistant Professor. Tissue engineering, biomechanics, intervertebral disc, cartilage.
Research Profile

+ Oliver O'Reilly, Professor. Continuum mechanics, vibrations, dynamics.
Research Profile

+ Andrew Packard, Professor. Design, robustness issues in control analysis, linear algebra, numerical algorithms in control problems, applications of system theory to aerospace problems, flight control, control of fluid.
Research Profile

Panayiotis Papadopoulos, Professor. Continuum mechanics, computational mechanics, contact mechanics, computational plasticity, materials modeling, solid mechanics, applied mathematics, dynamics of pseudo-rigid bodies.
Research Profile

+ Kameshwar Poolla, Professor. Cybersecurity, modeling, control, renewable energy, estimation, integrated circuit design and manufacturing, smart grids.
Research Profile

+ Lisa Pruitt, Professor. Tissue biomechanics, biomaterial science, fatigue and fracture micromechanisms, orthopedic polymers for total joint replacement, cardiovascular biomaterials, synthetic cartilage, acrylic bone cements, tribology of diamond and DLCs.
Research Profile

Robert O. Ritchie, Professor. Structural materials, mechanical behavior in biomaterials, creep, fatigue and fracture of advanced metals, intermetallics, ceramics.
Research Profile

S. Shankar Sastry, Professor. Computer science, robotics, arial robots, cybersecurity, cyber defense, homeland defense, nonholonomic systems, control of hybrid systems, sensor networks, interactive visualization, robotic telesurgery, rapid prototyping.
Research Profile

Omer Savas, Professor. Fluid mechanics.
Research Profile

Shawn Shadden, Associate Professor.

Lydia Sohn, Professor. Micro-nano engineering.
Research Profile

David Steigmann, Professor. Finite elasticity, mechanics, continuum, shell theory, variational methods, stability, surface stress, capillary phenomena, mechanics of thin films.
Research Profile

Andrew Szeri, Professor. Biomedical engineering, fluid dynamics, dynamical systems.
Research Profile

Hayden Taylor, Assistant Professor. Manufacturing, microfabrication, nanofabrication, semiconductor manufacturing, computational mechanics, nanoimprint lithography.
Research Profile

Masayoshi Tomizuka, Professor. Mechatronics, control systems theory, digital control, dynamic systems, mechanical vibrations, adaptive and optimal control, motion control.
Research Profile

Paul K. Wright, Professor. Mechanical and electrical engineering design, 3D-printing, manufacturing, energy systems, wireless sensor networks, sensors/MEMS/NEMS, IT systems, automated manufacturing & inspection.
Research Profile

Kazuo Yamazaki, Professor. Etc., micro custom diamond tool design and fabrication system, CNC machine tool control software and hardware system, ultrasonic milling, intelligent manufacturing systems, mechatronics control hardware and software for manufacturing processes and equipment, computer aided manufacturing system for five axis, milling - turning integrated machining process, nano/micro mechanical machining processes and equipment, precision metrology for nano/micro mechanical machining, Non-traditional manufacturing processes such as electric discharge machining, laser machining and electron beam finishing.
Research Profile

Ronald W. Yeung, Professor. Mathematical modeling, hydromechanics, naval architecture, numerical fluid mechanics, offshore mechanics, ocean processes, separated flows, wave-vorticity interaction, vortex-induced vibrations, stratified fluid flow, ocean energy, green ships, tidal energy, multi-hull flow physics, Helmholtz resonance, ship motion instabilities, tank resonance.
Research Profile

Xiang Zhang, Professor. Mechanical engineering, rapid prototyping, semiconductor manufacturing, photonics, micro-nano scale engineering, 3D fabrication technologies, microelectronics, micro and nano-devices, nano-lithography, nano-instrumentation, bio-MEMS.
Research Profile

Tarek Zohdi, Professor. Finite element methods, computational methods for advanced manufacturing, micro-structural/macro-property inverse problems involving optimization and design of new materials, modeling and simulation of high-strength fabric, modeling and simulation of particulate/granular flows, modeling and simulation of multiphase/composite electromagnetic media, modeling and simulation of the dynamics of swarms.
Research Profile

Lecturers

George Anwar, Lecturer.

+ Sara Beckman, Senior Lecturer SOE. Business, innovation, management, product development, operations strategy, environmental supply chain management.
Research Profile

Ayyana M. Chakravartula, Lecturer.

Robert Hennigar, Lecturer.

Marcel Kristel, Lecturer.

Chris Mccoy, Lecturer.

Christopher Layne Myers, Lecturer.

David B. Rich, Lecturer.

Michael Shiloh, Lecturer.

Julie Sinistore, Lecturer.

Kourosh (Ken) Youssefi, Lecturer.

Visiting Faculty

Shaochen Chen, Visiting Professor.

Emeritus Faculty

David M. Auslander, Professor Emeritus. Control systems, simulation, mechatronics, real time software, energy management, satellite attitude control, demand response, machine control.
Research Profile

David B. Bogy, Professor Emeritus. Fluid mechanics, mechanics in computer technology, tribology in hard-disk drives, laser measurement systems, numerical simulations, static and dynamic problems in solid mechanics.
Research Profile

Gilles M. Corcos, Professor Emeritus.

Hari Dharan, Professor Emeritus. Mechanical behavior, composite materials structures, manufacturing processes.
Research Profile

Robert W. Dibble, Professor Emeritus. Mechanical engineering, laser diagnostics.
Research Profile

Ralph Greif, Professor Emeritus. Heat and mass transfer, micro scale transport, fuel cells, cooling at the chip level, semiconductor wafers, materials processing, laser surface interactions, nuclear reactor safety, phase change, buoyancy transport, bio heat transfer, reacting flows.
Research Profile

Frank E. Hauser, Professor Emeritus. Mechanical engineering.
Research Profile

George Leitmann, Professor Emeritus. Economics, planning, dynamics systems, control theory, optimal control, dynamic games, & robust control, applications engineering, mechanical systems, business administrations, biological systems.
Research Profile

Alaa E. Mansour, Professor Emeritus. Structural reliability, safety, probabilistic dynamics of marine structures, strength of ship, offshore structures, development of design criteria.
Research Profile

C. D. Jr. Mote, Professor Emeritus.

Patrick J. Pagni, Professor Emeritus. Fire safety engineering, fire physics, fire modeling, post earthquake fires.
Research Profile

Boris Rubinsky, Professor Emeritus. Medical imaging, biotechnology, biomedical engineering, low temperature biology, micro and nano bionic technologies, electrical impedance tomography, bio-electronics, biomedical devices biomedical numerical analysis, bio-heat and mass transfer, electroporation light imaging.
Research Profile

Robert F. Sawyer, Professor Emeritus. Regulatory policy, air pollutant formation and control, motor vehicle emissions, combustion chemistry, motor fuels, health effects of air pollution.
Research Profile

Wilbur H. Somerton, Professor Emeritus.

Benson H. Tongue, Professor Emeritus. Nonlinear dynamics, acoustics, vibrations, modal analysis, numerical modeling.
Research Profile

George J. Trezek, Professor Emeritus.

Kent S. Udell, Professor Emeritus. Contaminated aquifer restoration, enhanced petroleum recovery, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, mass transfer, multiphase transport in porous media, microscale heat transfer.
Research Profile

Contact Information

Department of Mechanical Engineering

6141 Etcheverry Hall

Phone: 510-642-1338

Fax: 510-642-6163

Visit Department Website

Department Chair

Roberto Horowitz, PhD

6143 Etcheverry Hall

Phone: 510-643-7013

horowitz@berkeley.edu

Vice Chair of Undergraduate Instruction

Chris Dames, PhD

6181 Etcheverry Hall

Phone: (510) 643-2582

cdames@berkeley.edu

Director of Academic and Student Affairs

Donna Craig

6187 Etcheverry Hall

Phone: 510-642-5085

dcraig@me.berkeley.edu

Departmental Student Affairs Adviser

Shareena Samson

6193 Etcheverry Hall

Phone: 510-642-4094

shareena@me.berkeley.edu

Engineering Student Services Adviser

Chaniqua Butscher

chaniqua@berkeley.edu

Engineering Student Services Adviser

Kathy Barrett

kbarrett@berkeley.edu

Engineering Student Services

(ESS)

230 Bechtel Engineering Center

Phone: 510-642-7594

http://engineering.berkeley.edu/ESS

ess@berkeley.edu

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