Media Studies

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

The Media Studies major is an undergraduate interdisciplinary group major in the Office of Undergraduate and Interdisciplinary Studies in the Division of Undergraduate Studies in the College of Letters and Science. It applies a range of disciplines in the social sciences and humanities to the understanding of contemporary mass media, their structure, history, content, consequences, and policy implications. The emphasis in the UC Berkeley program is not on media production but rather on the central role that media plays in modern society with special emphasis on political and cultural life.

The program is not a preprofessional course of study but a liberal arts discipline that weds traditions from communication, anthropology, sociology, political science, and journalism with contemporary critical and cultural studies theory to analyze and assess the role and impact of media in contemporary society.

Declaring the Major

Students planning to declare a major in Media Studies are advised to read the Media Studies website in its entirety and then contact the student academic adviser as early as possible to discuss their academic program plans. Applications are accepted during fall and spring semesters during periods listed on the program's website.

Students who wish to declare the major in Media Studies:

  • Must have completed at least 30 units of college coursework before applying to the program.
  • Must have completed at least three of the major prerequisites, including MEDIAST 10.
  • Must be currently enrolled in any remaining prerequisite at the time of application (see list of approved major prerequisites on the Major Requirements tab).
  • Must have a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.2 in courses relevant to the major. This includes the lower division prerequisite courses and the equivalency of transferred coursework as well as any lower or upper division courses already completed for the major.
  • Should declare the major no later than the semester in which they complete the 70th unit. (Junior transfer students should contact the major adviser for Media Studies concerning their eligibility and the equivalency of transferred coursework.)

Students who meet the above criteria are eligible for admission to the major. Students who do not meet the above criteria but wish to declare Media Studies as their major should submit a letter of appeal and a graded paper from a prerequisite course along with a completed application.

More information regarding declaring the major is available on the Media Studies website. The application dates and a link to the application are available on the home page.

Honors Program

To be admitted to the honors program, a student must have attained at least a 3.5 grade point average (GPA) overall in the University and a 3.5 GPA in the major. In order to be granted honors, a student must write a thesis which in the judgment of the thesis director and the adviser is characterized by superior distinction (MEDIAST H195). For further information on the honors program, please see the program's website.

Minor Program

There is no minor program in Media Studies.

Visit Program Website

Major Requirements

In addition to the University, campus, and college requirements, listed on the College Requirements tab, students must fulfill the below requirements specific to their major program.

General Guidelines

  1. All courses taken to fulfill the major requirements below must be taken for graded credit (letter grade).
  2. Students must complete a minimum of 30 upper division units in approved courses for the Media Studies major.
  3. Students may not take more than two courses from any single outside department or program for the Media Studies major.
  4. No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student's major and minor programs.
  5. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 must be maintained in both upper and lower division courses used to fulfill the major requirements.

For information regarding residence requirements and unit requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.

Summary of Major Requirements

Prerequisites: Four courses
Media Studies core courses: Four courses
Methods: One course
Upper Division Electives: Four courses

Prerequisites

MEDIAST 10Introduction to Media Studies 14
or MEDIAST N10 Introduction to Media Studies
POL SCI 1Introduction to American Politics 14
Select one of the following:
Introduction to the History of the United States: The United States from Civil War to Present 1
The Recent United States: The United States from the Late 19th Century to the Eve of World War II
The Recent United States: The United States from World War II
Social History of the United States: Creating Modern American Society: From the End of the Civil War to the Global Age
Select one of the following:
Introduction to Social/Cultural Anthropology (American Cultures)
Introduction to Economics 1
Introduction to Economics--Lecture Format 1
General Psychology 1
Principles of Psychology 1
Introduction to Sociology 1
Principles of Sociology: American Cultures
1

Or course equivalents, as recognized by assist.org.

Media Studies Core Courses

MEDIAST 101Visual Communications4
MEDIAST 102Effects of Mass Media4
MEDIAST C103Understanding Journalism4
Select one of the following:
Freedom of Speech and the Press
The History of Journalism
MEDIAST C104C
Course Not Available
Privacy in the Digital Age

Methods

Select one lower or upper division course from the following:
Research Methods in Media Studies
Introduction to Empirical Analysis and Quantitative Methods
Research and Data Analysis in Psychology
Evaluation of Evidence
The Power of Numbers: Quantitative Data in Social Sciences
Research Design and Sociological Methods

Upper Division Electives

Select four courses from the following list. Students may not take more than two courses from any single outside department or program.

All of the courses listed below are approved electives. This list is updated annually. Additionally, prior to enrolling each term, Media Studies publishes a list of Current Courses. This list may include other courses that have been approved—on a one-time basis—as electives for that semester only. The online archive will serve as a record of these course approvals.

Students wishing to have any other course reviewed as a possible media studies elective must submit a copy of the course syllabus to a faculty adviser.

AFRICAM C134Information Technology and Society4
AFRICAM 142AThird World Cinema4
AFRICAM 142ACRace and American Film4
AMERSTD C112AAmerican Cultural Landscapes, 1600 to 19004
AMERSTD C112BAmerican Cultural Landscapes, 1900 to Present4
AMERSTD C134Information Technology and Society4
AMERSTD C172History of American Business3
AMERSTD 180DRace and American Humor1
AMERSTD 181BVisual Culture in American Society: Photography and Art1
AMERSTD 184IRace and American Film1
ANTHRO C136KWho Owns the Past? Cultural Heritage in a Digital Age4
ANTHRO 138AHistory and Theory of Ethnographic Film4
ANTHRO 139Controlling Processes4
ANTHRO 149Psychological Anthropology4
ANTHRO 150Utopia: Art and Power in Modern Times4
ANTHRO 155Modernity4
ANTHRO 156BCulture and Power4
ANTHRO 160ACForms of Folklore4
ANTHRO 162Topics in Folklore4
ANTHRO 166Language, Culture, and Society4
ASAMST 138Topics in Asian Popular Culture4
ASAMST 171Asian Americans in Film and Video4
CHICANO 135ALatino Narrative Film: to the 1980s4
CHICANO 135BLatino Narrative Film Since 19904
CHICANO 135CLatino Documentary Film4
CHINESE 172Contemporary Chinese Language Cinema4
DEMOG 161Population Apocalypse in Film and Science3
DUTCH 171ACFrom New Amsterdam to New York: Race, Culture, and Identity in New Netherland4
ENGLISH 173The Language and Literature of Films4
ENGLISH N173The Language and Literature of Films3
ENGLISH 176Literature and Popular Culture4
ENGLISH N176Literature and Popular Culture3
ENV DES C169BAmerican Cultural Landscapes, 1900 to Present4
ETH STD 122ACEthnicity and Race in Contemporary American Films4
FILM 108Special Topics in Film Genre4
FILM 128Documentary4
FILM 129History of Avant-Garde Film4
FILM 140Special Topics in Film4
FILM 151Auteur Theory4
FILM 160National Cinema4
GWS 125Women and Film4
GWS 140Feminist Cultural Studies4
GWS C146ACultural Representations of Sexualities: Queer Literary Culture4
GEOG C152Course Not Available4
GEOG C160BAmerican Cultural Landscapes, 1900 to Present4
HISTORY 122ACAntebellum America: The Advent of Mass Society4
HISTORY 134AThe Age of the City: The Age of the City, 1825-19334
INFO 141Search Engines: Technology, Society, and Business2
INFO 146Course Not Available
ISF 100HIntroduction to Media and International Relations4
ISF C145Course Not Available4
ITALIAN 170The Italian Cinema: History, Genres, Authors4
ITALIAN 175Film and Literature (in English)4
JAPAN 185Introduction to Japanese Cinema4
JOURN 111Social Media and Journalism3
KOREAN 187History and Memory in Korean Cinema4
KOREAN 188Cold War Culture in Korea: Literature and Film4
LGBT C146ACultural Representations of Sexualities: Queer Literary Culture4
L & S C180UWealth and Poverty4
L & S C180WWho Owns the Past? Cultural Heritage in a Digital Age4
LINGUIS 150Sociolinguistics3
MEDIAST 140Media and Politics4
MEDIAST 150Topics in Film4
MEDIAST 160International Media4
MEDIAST 165Internet and Culture4
MEDIAST 170Cultural History of Advertising4
MEDIAST 180Television Studies4
MEDIAST 190Special Topics in Media Studies2-4
NATAMST 158Native Americans and the Cinema4
POL SCI 106AAmerican Politics: Campaign Strategy - Media4
POL SCI 161Public Opinion, Voting and Participation4
POL SCI 164APolitical Psychology and Involvement4
PSYCH 160Social Psychology3
PSYCH N160Social Psychology3
PSYCH 166ACCultural Psychology3
PUB POL C103Wealth and Poverty4
RHETOR 114Rhetoric of New Media4
RHETOR 130Novel into Film4
RHETOR 132TAuteur in Film4
RHETOR 138Television Criticism4
SOCIOL 110Organizations and Social Institutions4
SOCIOL 111Sociology of the Family4
SOCIOL 111ACSociology of the Family4
SOCIOL 113ACSociology of Education4
SOCIOL 133Sociology of Gender4
SOCIOL 140Politics and Social Change4
SOCIOL 150Social Psychology4
SOCIOL 160Sociology of Culture4
SOCIOL 166Society and Technology4
SOCIOL 167Virtual Communities/Social Media4
UGBA 106Marketing3
UGBA 160Consumer Behavior3
UGBA 165Advertising Strategy3
UGBA C172History of American Business3

Transfer Students

Transfer students may complete MEDIAST 10 at Berkeley, but are urged to complete other major prerequisite courses before arriving on campus. New transfers should see the major faculty adviser on arrival in order to have transfer prerequisites approved. Transfers may need assistance in adding Media Studies 10 to their schedules.

College Requirements

Undergraduate students in the College of Letters & Science must fulfill the following requirements in addition to those required by their major program.

For detailed lists of courses that fulfill college requirements, please review the College of Letters & Sciences page in this Guide.

Entry Level Writing

All students who will enter the University of California as freshmen must demonstrate their command of the English language by fulfilling the Entry Level Writing requirement. Fulfillment of this requirement is also a prerequisite to enrollment in all reading and composition courses at UC Berkeley. 

American History and American Institutions

The American History and Institutions requirements are based on the principle that a US resident graduated from an American university should have an understanding of the history and governmental institutions of the United States.

American Cultures

American Cultures is the one requirement that all undergraduate students at Cal need to take and pass in order to graduate. The requirement offers an exciting intellectual environment centered on the study of race, ethnicity and culture of the United States. AC courses offer students opportunities to be part of research-led, highly accomplished teaching environments, grappling with the complexity of American Culture.

Quantitative Reasoning

The Quantitative Reasoning requirement is designed to ensure that students graduate with basic understanding and competency in math, statistics, or computer science. The requirement may be satisfied by exam or by taking an approved course.

Foreign Language

The Foreign Language requirement may be satisfied by demonstrating proficiency in reading comprehension, writing, and conversation in a foreign language equivalent to the second semester college level, either by passing an exam or by completing approved course work.

Reading and Composition

In order to provide a solid foundation in reading, writing and critical thinking the College requires two semesters of lower division work in composition in sequence. Students must complete a first-level reading and composition course by the end of their second semester and a second-level course by the end of their fourth semester.

Breadth Requirements

The undergraduate breadth requirements provide Berkeley students with a rich and varied educational experience outside of their major program. As the foundation of a liberal arts education, breadth courses give students a view into the intellectual life of the University while introducing them to a multitude of perspectives and approaches to research and scholarship. Engaging students in new disciplines and with peers from other majors, the breadth experience strengthens interdisciplinary connections and context that prepares Berkeley graduates to understand and solve the complex issues of their day.

Unit Requirements

  • 120 total units, including at least 60 L&S units

  • Of the 120 units, 36 must be upper division units

  • Of the 36 upper division units, 6 must be taken in courses offered outside your major department

Residence Requirements

For units to be considered in "residence," you must be registered in courses on the Berkeley campus as a student in the College of Letters & Science. Most students automatically fulfill the residence requirement by attending classes here for four years. In general, there is no need to be concerned about this requirement, unless you go abroad for a semester or year or want to take courses at another institution or through UC Extension during your senior year. In these cases, you should make an appointment to meet an adviser to determine how you can meet the Senior Residence Requirement.

Note: Courses taken through UC Extension do not count toward residence.

Senior Residence Requirement

After you become a senior (with 90 semester units earned toward your BA degree), you must complete at least 24 of the remaining 30 units in residence in at least two semesters. To count as residence, a semester must consist of at least 6 passed units. Intercampus Visitor, EAP, and UC Berkeley-Washington Program (UCDC) units are excluded.

You may use a Berkeley Summer Session to satisfy one semester of the Senior Residence requirement, provided that you successfully complete 6 units of course work in the Summer Session and that you have been enrolled previously in the college.

Modified Senior Residence Requirement

Participants in the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP) or the UC Berkeley Washington Program (UCDC) may meet a Modified Senior Residence requirement by completing 24 (excluding EAP) of their final 60 semester units in residence. At least 12 of these 24 units must be completed after you have completed 90 units.

Upper Division Residence Requirement

You must complete in residence a minimum of 18 units of upper division courses (excluding EAP units), 12 of which must satisfy the requirements for your major.

Plan of Study

Students are encouraged to familiarize themselves with the Media Studies major requirements before making a program plan. For more detailed information regarding the courses listed below (e.g., elective information, GPA requirements, etc.), see the College Requirements and Major Requirements tabs. Below is a sample four-year program plan:

First Year
FallUnitsSpringUnits
Reading & Composition A4Reading & Composition B4
POL SCI 1 (Social and Behavioral Sciences Breadth)4Introduction to Social Sciences Prerequisite3-4
Alternate Major Prerequisite4HISTORY 7B (Historical Studies Breadth)4
L & S 10 (or L&S Elective)1Alternate Major Prerequisite4
Freshman Seminar or L&S Elective1Freshman Seminar or L&S Elective1
 14 16-17
Second Year
FallUnitsSpringUnits
MEDIAST 10 (pending instructor approval)4MEDIAST 101 (pending instructor approval)4
Alternate Major Prerequisite4Media Studies Upper Division Elective #1 (one that could work for alternate major if possible)4
L&S Breadth4L&S Elective3
L&S Elective3L&S Breadth4
 15 15
Third Year
FallUnitsSpringUnits
MEDIAST 1024MEDIAST C1034
Media Studies Upper Division Elective #24Media Studies Upper Division Elective #34
American Cultures Requirement3L&S Breadth4
L&S Breadth4URAP or L&S Elective3
Internship or L&S Elective1 
 16 15
Fourth Year
FallUnitsSpringUnits
MEDIAST 130 (or other approved option)4Media Studies 104 - see approved options3-4
Media Studies Upper Division Elective #44MEDIAST H195 (if eligible or L&S Elective)3
L&S Breadth4L&S Elective4
Upper Division Elective (outside of Media Studies), if needed3Upper Division Elective, outside Media Studies, if needed3
Internship or L&S Elective1 
 16 13-14
Total Units: 120-122

Notes

Each student’s plan will vary, depending on interests and class offerings. Plan on consulting your Letters & Science adviser and your major adviser on a regular basis or at least once a semester, especially if you are interested in applying for graduate school, studying abroad, attending summer school, pursuing a minor or second major, or have any concerns or questions about your major classes or your degree progress.

Note: students must complete a minimum of 13 units per term to be considered full-time, with a total of 120 units needed to graduate. 

For more detailed information regarding the courses listed above (e.g., elective information, GPA requirements, etc.), please see the Major Requirements tab.

For a sample four-year plan that includes studying abroad or in Washington, D.C., see 4 Year Plan with EAP or UCDC Option

Accelerated Program Plans

For students considering graduating in less than four years, it's important to acknowledge the reasons to undertake such a plan of study. While there are advantages to pursuing a three-year degree plan such as reducing financial burdens, they are not for everyone and do involve sacrifices; especially with respect to participating in co-curricular activities, depth of study, and summer internships, which typically lead to jobs upon graduation. All things considered, please see the tables for three and three and a half year degree options.

3.5 Year Plan

3 Year Plan

Student Learning Goals

Mission

The Media Studies major at the University of California at Berkeley is an undergraduate interdisciplinary group major in the Office of Undergraduate and Interdisciplinary Studies (UGIS). Faculty members come from a variety of disciplines, bringing the perspectives and methods of their fields to bear on the analysis of the mass media. The emphasis in the major is analytical and historical. The program is largely concerned with developing in students the ability to assess the roles and impact of the major mass media on American life. Media Studies is not a preprofessional course of study but a liberal arts discipline that weds traditions from communication, anthropology, sociology, political science, and journalism with contemporary critical and cultural studies theory.

The four core courses examine media history, institutions, and policy as well as theory and criticism. Students learn to analyze the impact of the media on public policy and to explore the role of media and popular culture in contemporary society.

In addition to the core courses, students must take an approved methods course in the social sciences and at least four approved elective courses. In the elective courses offered by the Media Studies program, whether students focus on film, television, international media, or political discourse, they are asked to develop critical thinking and analytical skills. Students may also choose to take approved electives offered by other disciplines on campus including anthropology, English, history, linguistics, journalism, political science, and sociology to name a few.

Critical analysis in media studies involves identifying and evaluating evidence, understanding theoretical concepts and being able to apply them to new media materials or situations, and examining the relationships between words and images.

Learning Goals for the Major

Visit Learning Initiative on the Media Studies website.

Courses

Media Studies

MEDIAST 10 Introduction to Media Studies 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
The objective of this class is to enhance students' knowledge of media's industrial and cultural functions by introducing them to key perspectives and methods of study that stress a) how media systems have and continue to develop in the United States and across the globe as well as b) how we use and make meaning with media as part of our everyday lived experiences. To consider media's social, economic, political, and cultural impact, the course
will investigate a number of ways of understanding its production, form, reception, and influence, being careful to recognize how these approaches relate to each other and to a wide array of diverse case studies in television, film, recorded music, print, video games, and online.
Introduction to Media Studies: Read More [+]

MEDIAST N10 Introduction to Media Studies 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 8 Week Session
The objective of this class is to enhance students' knowledge of media's industrial and cultural functions by introducing them to key perspectives and methods of study that stress a) how media systems have and continue to develop in the United States and across the globe as well as b) how we use and make meaning with media as part of our everyday lived experiences. To consider media's social,
economic, political, and cultural impact, the course will investigate a number of ways of understanding its production, form, reception, and influence, being careful to recognize how these approaches relate to each other and to a wide array of diverse case studies in television, film, recorded music, print, video games, and online.
Introduction to Media Studies: Read More [+]

MEDIAST 24 Freshman Seminar 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
The Freshman Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 freshmen.

Freshman Seminar: Read More [+]

MEDIAST 84 Sophomore Seminar 1 or 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2013
Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses offered by faculty members in departments all across the campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for close, regular intellectual contact between faculty members and students in the crucial second year. The topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sophomores.

Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

MEDIAST 101 Visual Communications 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course aims to promote a critical understanding of visual culture from a critical theory perspective. It is designed to foster a critical understanding of media images, inviting students to question and critique the many and multiple messages at work within visual culture. It is organized around the different cultural and social theoretical approaches used to analyze visual images and explain the role of visual media in today's society.

Visual Communications: Read More [+]

MEDIAST 102 Effects of Mass Media 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course examines the often contentious history of communication theory concerning media effects. At issue among scholars working within different research traditions are core disagreements about what should be studied (institutions, texts, audiences, technologies), how it should be studied, and even what constitutes an “effect.” Empirical and critical/cultural research and theory are examined with an emphasis on the social, political, and historical
contexts surrounding them.
Effects of Mass Media: Read More [+]

MEDIAST 103 Understanding Journalism 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017
In this course, students learn why sound journalism is so important to a healthy, working democracy. Journalism is rapidly changing. The class will give a context to those changes and provide an overview of comtemporary journalistic institutions. Students will examine how news is made, who decides what news is, who makes it, who profits by it, and what rules guide how reporters and editors work. Central issues affecting journalism, such as bias and professionalism
, will be discussed. The class is not specifically intended for future journalists, but students will learn why pursuing a career in journalism can be so fulfilling and thrilling, as well as becoming better consumers of the news.
Understanding Journalism: Read More [+]

MEDIAST C103 Understanding Journalism 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
In this course, students learn why sound journalism is so important to a healthy, working democracy. Journalism is rapidly changing. The class will give a context to those changes and provide an overview of comtemporary journalistic institutions. Students will examine how news is made, who decides what news is, who makes it, who profits by it, and what rules guide how reporters and editors work. Central issues affecting journalism, such as
bias and professionalism, will be discussed. The class is not specifically intended for future journalists, but students will learn why pursuing a career in journalism can be so fulfilling and thrilling, as well as becoming better consumers of the news.
Understanding Journalism: Read More [+]

MEDIAST 104A Freedom of Speech and the Press 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
The course considers the history and contemporary meaning of the First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and the press. Emphasizing the real world implications of major Supreme Court decisions, the course examines restrictions on speech and press imposed by national security, libel, injurious speech, and privacy, as well as issues of access to information and government regulation of new media.

Freedom of Speech and the Press: Read More [+]

MEDIAST 104B The History of Journalism 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
The history of journalism is a broad subject--far broader than can comprehensively be covered in a single course. So necessarily, this course takes an idiosyncratic approach. This course examines how news has been defined, discovered, and communicated from its early modern origins to the present. It will also focus on particular areas of journalism. The class will take a critical look at how wars get reported on, including the current war in Iraq.
The class will examine the role of journalists in the rise of the Cold War more than half a century ago. It will also examine the importance of media barons, by studying two highly readable biographies, one of William Randolph Hearst, the other of Katherine Graham. And finally, the class will look at the role journalists played in unseating President Nixon.
The History of Journalism: Read More [+]

MEDIAST 104D Privacy in the Digital Age 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course examines issues of privacy in contemporary society, with an emphasis on how privacy is affected by technological change. After an introduction to features of the American legal system and the theoretical underpinnings of privacy law, we will consider privacy in the context of law enforcement and national security investigations; government records and databases; commercial enterprises; and the freedoms of speech and press.

Privacy in the Digital Age: Read More [+]

MEDIAST 130 Research Methods in Media Studies 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This course is intended to familiarize students with some of the primary quantitative and qualitative research methods used to study media texts and audiences. In addition to reading and critiquing prior research employing various methodologies, students will gain practical hands-on experience using these methods in sample research projects.

Research Methods in Media Studies: Read More [+]

MEDIAST 140 Media and Politics 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
This course will examine the influence of consumer marketing trends and techniques on presidential campaigns, and on political culture more broadly. How much truth is there to the idea that selling politicians is like "selling soap"? What is the difference between the psychology of the citizen and the psychology of the consumer? How are the political process and democratic discourse being transformed, for better or worse, by the use
of such techniques?
Media and Politics: Read More [+]

MEDIAST 150 Topics in Film 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Fall 2012, Spring 2012
Topics in film employs theory to examine different film genres, historical periods, and topics.

Topics in Film: Read More [+]

MEDIAST 160 International Media 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course offers an introduction to international communication and globalization theory, examines media industries abroad (focusing on one or more of the following: film, television, music, news, magazines, advertising, and/or new media), and explores content produced within those industries through specific case studies. Possible topics include alternatives to Hollywood film (Bollywood and Nollywood), television format sales and programming
, the globalization of popular cultures (e.g., Korean Wave and Swedish music), diasporic communities, and global networks and fandoms.
International Media: Read More [+]

MEDIAST 165 Internet and Culture 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
This class uses the approaches of media studies and cultural studies to critically consider how historical and emerging new media technologies—as well as the behaviors and forms of cultural production associated with them—influence and are themselves influenced by our everyday practices and lived experiences. It focuses particularly on concerns of identity, community, access, citizenship, industry, and regulation as these relate to social networking
, collective endeavor, and public speech.
Internet and Culture: Read More [+]

MEDIAST 170 Cultural History of Advertising 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course examines the place and impact of advertising in the rise of consumer culture within the United States from the late 19th century to present. The course explores the functions and purposes of advertising and employs rhetorical/visual analysis and semiotic theory to analyze advertising themes and images from different historical periods.

Cultural History of Advertising: Read More [+]

MEDIAST 180 Television Studies 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course examinines contemporary approaches to the study of television, investigating televison's social, political, commercial, and cultural dimensions. Readings and assignments require students to apply critical perspectives to television programming and to the analysis of individual television texts.

Television Studies: Read More [+]

MEDIAST 190 Special Topics in Media Studies 2 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Normally open only to Media Studies majors who have already completed 12 units of upper division work in the major. Advanced study in Media Studies with topics to be announced each semester.

Special Topics in Media Studies: Read More [+]

MEDIAST H195 Honors Colloquium 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Under the supervision of the instructor, students will work toward preparing scholarly theses in the field, basing their work on theoretical considerations and, where applicable, analyzing empirical data.

Honors Colloquium: Read More [+]

MEDIAST C196A UCDC Core Seminar 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course is the UCDC letter-graded core seminar for 4 units that complements the P/NP credited internship course UGIS C196B. Core seminars are designed to enhance the experience of and provide an intellectual framework for the student's internship. UCDC core seminars are taught in sections that cover various tracks such as the Congress, media, bureaucratic organizations and the Executive Branch, international relations, public
policy and general un-themed original research.
UCDC Core Seminar: Read More [+]

MEDIAST C196B UCDC Internship 6.5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course provides a credited internship for all students enrolled in the UCDC and Cal in the Capital Programs. It must be taken in conjunction with the required academic core course C196A. C196B requires that students work 3-4 days per week as interns in settings selected to provide them with exposure to and experienc in government, public policy, international affairs, media, the arts or other areas or relevance to their major
fields of study.
UCDC Internship: Read More [+]

MEDIAST C196W Special Field Research 10.5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2014
Students work in selected internship programs approved in advance by the faculty coordinator and for which written contracts have been established between the sponsoring organization and the student. Students will be expected to produce two progress reports for their faculty coordinator during the course of the internship, as well as a final paper for the course consisting of at least 35 pages. Other restrictions
apply; see faculty adviser.
Special Field Research: Read More [+]

MEDIAST 198 Directed Group Study for Advanced Undergraduates 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Seminars for the group study of selected topics not covered by regularly scheduled courses. Topics will vary from year to year.

Directed Group Study for Advanced Undergraduates: Read More [+]

MEDIAST 199 Supervised Independent Study for Advanced Undergraduates 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Independent study and research by arrangement with faculty.

Supervised Independent Study for Advanced Undergraduates: Read More [+]

Faculty

Media Studies Faculty
 

Thomas GoldsteinProgram Director On Leave 2016-17 and Professor. (Journalism and Media Studies). Journalism, mass communications, press practices, press history, writer, reporter, editor.

Jean Retzinger, Acting Director 2016-17 and Lecturer. (Media Studies). Environmental communication, particularly agriculture and food issues in advertising, television, film, and digital media.

Paul Duguid, Adjunct Professor. (School of Information). Trademark, information, communities of practice.

Josh Jackson, Lecturer and Faculty Adviser. (Media Studies). Digital and new media, television, media and culture, convergence, media industries and production cultures, media history.

Geoffrey King, Lecturer (Media Studies). Freedoms of speech, press, petition and assembly; citizen journalism; Internet policy; privacy; technology; online surveillance and censorship; open government.

Geoffrey Nunberg, Adjunct Professor (School of Information). Theory, history, and cultural implications of information and information technologies.

Ed Timke, Lecturer (Media Studies). Advertising; international and intercultural communication; media, culture, and society; media history; photojournalism; and Transatlantic media flows, especially between the United States and France.

William Turner, Lecturer (Media Studies). Freedom of speech and the press.

Contact Information

Media Studies Program

235 Evans Hall

Phone: 510-642-2363

mediastudies@berkeley.edu

Visit Program Website

Acting Program Director, Lecturer and Faculty Adviser

Jean Retzinger, PhD

jpretz@berkeley.edu

Program Director and Professor

Tom Goldstein, PhD

On Leave 2016-17

Lecturer and Faculty Adviser

Josh Jackson, PhD

joshjackson@berkeley.edu

Lecturer and Faculty Adviser

Ed Timke, PhD

etimke@berkeley.edu

Student Academic Adviser

Laura Demir

235 Evans Hall

Phone: 510-642-2363

mediastudies@berkeley.edu

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