Chemical Engineering

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

Bachelor of Science (BS)

The College of Chemistry offers a major in Chemical Engineering leading to the Bachelor of Science (BS) degree, through the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. The program equips the student for professional work in development, design, and operation of chemical processes and of process equipment. Students with high scholastic attainment are well prepared to enter graduate programs. The curriculum is accredited by ABET.

Admission to the Major

For information on admission to the major, please see the College of Chemistry Admissions tab in this Guide.

Minor Program

The Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering offers an undergraduate minor in Chemical Engineering. For information regarding how to declare the minor, please contact the department. Please be sure to consult with your college or school for information on rules regarding overlap of courses between majors and minors.

Joint Major Programs with the College of Engineering

Chemical Engineering/Materials Science and Engineering: BS
Chemical Engineering/Nuclear Engineering: BS

Visit Department Website

Major Requirements

In addition to the University, campus, and college requirements, listed in the College Requirements tab, students must fulfill the below requirements specific to their major program.

General Guidelines

  1. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 must be maintained in all courses undertaken at UC Berkeley, including those from UC Summer Sessions, UC Education Abroad Program, UC Berkeley in Washington Program, and XB courses from University Extension.
  2. A minimum GPA of 2.0 in all courses taken in the college is required in order to advance and continue in the upper division.
  3. A minimum GPA of 2.0 in all upper division courses taken at the University is required to satisfy major requirements.
  4. Students in the College of Chemistry who receive a grade of D+ or lower in a chemical and biomolecular engineering or chemistry course for which a grade of C- or higher is required must repeat the course at UC Berkeley.

For information regarding grade requirements in specific courses, please see the notes sections below.

For information regarding residence requirements and unit requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.

Lower Division Requirements

CHEM 4AGeneral Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis4
CHEM 4BGeneral Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis4
CHM ENG 40Introduction to Chemical Engineering Design2
ENGIN 7Introduction to Computer Programming for Scientists and Engineers 14
MATH 1ACalculus4
MATH 1BCalculus4
MATH 53Multivariable Calculus4
MATH 54Linear Algebra and Differential Equations4
PHYSICS 7APhysics for Scientists and Engineers4
PHYSICS 7BPhysics for Scientists and Engineers4
BIOLOGY 1AGeneral Biology Lecture3
Students in the Biotechnology concentration are required to take MCELLBI 102 or CHEM 135 in place of BIOLOGY 1A

Notes

  1. Students should take CHEM 4A and CHEM 4B during their freshman year, and CHEM 112A and CHEM 112B during their sophomore year.
  2. A grade of C- or better is required in CHEM 4A before taking CHEM 4B, in CHEM 4B before taking more advanced courses, and in CHEM 112A before taking CHEM 112B.
  3. A grade of C- or better is required in CHEM 112A before taking BIOLOGY 1A or CHEM 112B.
  4. All freshmen are required to complete CHM ENG 40 during their first semester.
  5. A grade of C- or better in CHM ENG 140 is required before enrolling in any other chemical engineering courses.
  6. ENGIN W7 may be substituted for ENGIN 7.
  7. ENGIN 7 must be taken before or concurrently with CHM ENG 140 and before CHM ENG 150B.
  8. Students should start MATH 1A in the first semester of their freshman year.
  9. Students should start PHYSICS 7A in the second semester of the freshman year.

Upper Division Requirements

CHEM 112AOrganic Chemistry5
CHEM 120APhysical Chemistry3-4
or PHYSICS 137A Quantum Mechanics
CHM ENG 140Introduction to Chemical Process Analysis4
CHM ENG 141Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics4
CHM ENG 142Chemical Kinetics and Reaction Engineering4
CHM ENG 150ATransport Processes4
CHM ENG 150BTransport and Separation Processes4
CHM ENG 154Chemical Engineering Laboratory4
CHM ENG 160Chemical Process Design4
CHM ENG 162Dynamics and Control of Chemical Processes4
CHM ENG 185Technical Communication for Chemical Engineers3
ENGIN 45Properties of Materials3
4 units engineering electives chosen from the Lower Division Engineering Electives List OR the Upper Division Engineering Electives List4
Electives and Concentrations: Select one of the following: 1
Open Elective Program: 12 units (see below for details)
Concetration (see below for details)
1

 A course used toward satisfaction of the open elective program or a concentration cannot also be used toward satisfaction of another college or major requirement.

A maximum of 6 units of research can be applied toward electives.

Open Elective Program

Students who do not choose a concentration must complete the following requirements for the open elective program:

One science elective, selected from physical and biological sciences electives list (see below)3
CBE elective 13
Engineering electives, selected from the engineering electives list 26
1

 CHM ENG 196 may not be used to fulfill this elective requirement.

2

  Other engineering courses may be approved by the CBE Department.

Physical and Biological Sciences Electives List

ANTHRO 1Introduction to Biological Anthropology4
ANTHRO C100Human Paleontology5
ANTHRO C103Introduction to Human Osteology6
ANTHRO 107Evolution of the Human Brain4
ANTHRO 134Analysis of the Archaeological Record4
ANTHRO 135Paleoethnobotany: Archaeological Methods and Laboratory Techniques4
ASTRON 3Introduction to Modern Cosmology2
ASTRON 7AIntroduction to Astrophysics4
ASTRON 7BIntroduction to Astrophysics4
ASTRON 10Introduction to General Astronomy4
ASTRON C10Introduction to General Astronomy4
ASTRON C12The Planets3
ASTRON C162Planetary Astrophysics4
BIOLOGY 1BGeneral Biology Lecture and Laboratory4
CHEM 103Inorganic Chemistry in Living Systems3
CHEM 104AAdvanced Inorganic Chemistry3
CHEM 104BAdvanced Inorganic Chemistry3
CHEM 105Instrumental Methods in Analytical Chemistry4
CHEM 108Inorganic Synthesis and Reactions4
CHEM 112BOrganic Chemistry5
CHEM 113Advanced Mechanistic Organic Chemistry3
CHEM 114Advanced Synthetic Organic Chemistry3
CHEM 115Organic Chemistry--Advanced Laboratory Methods4
CHEM 120BPhysical Chemistry3
CHEM 122Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy3
CHEM 125Physical Chemistry Laboratory3
CHEM C130Biophysical Chemistry: Physical Principles and the Molecules of Life4
CHEM 135Chemical Biology3
CHEM 143Nuclear Chemistry2
CHEM 146Radiochemical Methods in Nuclear Technology and Forensics3
CHEM C150Introduction to Materials Chemistry3
CHEM C182Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Laboratory3
CHEM C191Quantum Information Science and Technology3
CHEM 192Individual Study for Advanced Undergraduates1-3
CHEM H194Research for Advanced Undergraduates2-4
CHEM 196Special Laboratory Study2-4
CIV ENG C106Air Pollution3
CIV ENG C116Chemistry of Soils3
COG SCI C102Scientific Approaches to Consciousness3
COG SCI C126Perception3
COG SCI C127Cognitive Neuroscience3
EPS 3The Water Planet3
EPS C12The Planets3
EPS 20Earthquakes in Your Backyard3
EPS C20Earthquakes in Your Backyard3
EPS 50The Planet Earth4
EPS 80Environmental Earth Sciences3
EPS C82Oceans3
EPS 100AMinerals: Their Constitution and Origin4
EPS 103Introduction to Aquatic and Marine Geochemistry4
EPS 108Geodynamics4
EPS 117Geomorphology4
EPS C129Biometeorology3
EPS 130Strong Motion Seismology3
EPS C146Geological Oceanography4
EPS C162Planetary Astrophysics4
EPS C180Air Pollution3
EPS C181Atmospheric Physics and Dynamics3
EPS C182Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Laboratory3
ENGLISH C77Introduction to Environmental Studies4
ESPM 2The Biosphere3
ESPM 15Introduction to Environmental Sciences3
ESPM C10Environmental Issues4
ESPM C11Americans and the Global Forest4
ESPM C12Introduction to Environmental Studies4
ESPM 40Insects and Human Society3
ESPM 42Natural History of Insects2
ESPM 44Biological Control2
ESPM 100Environmental Problem Solving4
ESPM 102ATerrestrial Resource Ecology4
ESPM 102BNatural Resource Sampling2
ESPM 102CResource Management4
ESPM C103Principles of Conservation Biology4
ESPM 106American Wildlife: Identification and Conservation3
ESPM C107Biology and Geomorphology of Tropical Islands13
ESPM 108ATrees: Taxonomy, Growth, and Structures3
ESPM 108BEnvironmental Change Genetics3
ESPM 110Primate Ecology4
ESPM 112Microbial Ecology3
ESPM 113Insect Ecology3
ESPM 114Wildlife Ecology3
ESPM 115BBiology of Aquatic Insects2
ESPM 117Urban Garden Ecosystems4
ESPM 118Agricultural Ecology3
ESPM 119Chemical Ecology2
ESPM 120Soil Characteristics3
ESPM C128Chemistry of Soils3
ESPM C129Biometeorology3
ESPM C130Terrestrial Hydrology4
ESPM 131Soil Microbial Ecology3
ESPM 134Fire, Insects, and Diseases in Forest Ecosystems3
ESPM 137Landscape Ecology3
ESPM C138Introduction to Comparative Virology4
ESPM 140General Entomology4
ESPM 142Insect Behavior3
ESPM 144Insect Physiology3
ESPM C148Pesticide Chemistry and Toxicology3
ESPM C149Molecular Ecology4
ESPM 152Global Change Biology3
ESPM 172Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing3
ESPM 174Design and Analysis of Ecological Research4
ESPM C180Air Pollution3
ESPM 185Applied Forest Ecology4
ESPM 186Management and Conservation of Rangeland Ecosystems4
ESPM 187Restoration Ecology4
ENV SCI 10Introduction to Environmental Sciences3
ENV SCI 125Environments of the San Francisco Bay Area3
GEOG 1Global Environmental Change4
GEOG 35Global Ecology and Development4
GEOG 40Introduction to Earth System Science4
GEOG C82Oceans3
GEOG C136Terrestrial Hydrology4
GEOG 137Top Ten Global Environmental Problems4
GEOG 140APhysical Landscapes: Process and Form4
GEOG 143Global Change Biogeochemistry3
GEOG 144Principles of Meteorology3
GEOG C145Geological Oceanography4
GEOG 148Biogeography4
GEOG 171Special Topics in Physical Geography3
INTEGBI 31The Ecology and Evolution of Animal Behavior3
INTEGBI 32Course Not Available
INTEGBI 41Marine Mammals2
INTEGBI C82Oceans3
INTEGBI 102LFIntroduction to California Plant Life with Laboratory4
INTEGBI 103LFInvertebrate Zoology with Laboratory5
INTEGBI 104LFNatural History of the Vertebrates with Laboratory5
INTEGBI 106APhysical and Chemical Environment of the Ocean4
INTEGBI C107LPrinciples of Plant Morphology with Laboratory4
INTEGBI 115Introduction to Systems in Biology and Medicine4
INTEGBI 117Medical Ethnobotany2
INTEGBI 118Host-Pathogen Interactions: A Trans-Discipline Outlook4
INTEGBI 123ALExercise and Environmental Physiology with Laboratory5
INTEGBI 131General Human Anatomy3
INTEGBI 135The Mechanics of Organisms4
INTEGBI 137Human Endocrinology4
INTEGBI C142LIntroduction to Human Osteology6
INTEGBI C143ABiological Clocks: Physiology and Behavior3
INTEGBI C143BHormones and Behavior3
INTEGBI 148Comparative Animal Physiology3
INTEGBI C149Molecular Ecology4
INTEGBI 151Plant Physiological Ecology4
INTEGBI 152Environmental Toxicology4
INTEGBI 153Ecology3
INTEGBI 154Plant Ecology3
INTEGBI 154LPlant Ecology Laboratory2
INTEGBI C156Principles of Conservation Biology4
INTEGBI 158LFBiology and Geomorphology of Tropical Islands13
INTEGBI 159The Living Planet: Impact of the Biosphere on the Earth System3
INTEGBI 161Population and Evolutionary Genetics4
INTEGBI 162Ecological Genetics4
INTEGBI 164Human Genetics and Genomics4
INTEGBI 168Systematics of Vascular Plants2
INTEGBI 168LSystematics of Vascular Plants with Laboratory4
INTEGBI 169Evolutionary Medicine4
INTEGBI 174LFOrnithology with Laboratory4
INTEGBI 183LEvolution of the Vertebrates with Laboratory4
INTEGBI 184LMorphology of the Vertebrate Skeleton with Laboratory4
INTEGBI C185LHuman Paleontology5
INTEGBI C187Human Biogeography of the Pacific3
L & S C30UAmericans and the Global Forest4
L & S C30VEnvironmental Issues4
L & S C70TThe Planets3
L & S C70UIntroduction to General Astronomy4
L & S C70WPhysics and Music3
L & S C70YEarthquakes in Your Backyard3
MAT SCI C150Introduction to Materials Chemistry3
MCELLBI 32Introduction to Human Physiology3
MCELLBI 41Genetics and Society3
MCELLBI 50The Immune System and Disease3
MCELLBI C61Brain, Mind, and Behavior3
MCELLBI C62Drugs and the Brain3
MCELLBI C100ABiophysical Chemistry: Physical Principles and the Molecules of Life4
MCELLBI 100BBiochemistry: Pathways, Mechanisms, and Regulation4
MCELLBI 102Survey of the Principles of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology4
MCELLBI C103Bacterial Pathogenesis3
MCELLBI 104Genetics, Genomics, and Cell Biology4
MCELLBI C112General Microbiology4
MCELLBI C114Introduction to Comparative Virology4
MCELLBI C116Microbial Diversity3
MCELLBI 132Biology of Human Cancer4
MCELLBI 133LPhysiology and Cell Biology Laboratory4
MCELLBI 135ATopics in Cell and Developmental Biology: Molecular Endocrinology3
MCELLBI 136Physiology4
MCELLBI 140General Genetics4
MCELLBI 140LGenetics Laboratory4
MCELLBI 141Developmental Biology4
MCELLBI 143Evolution of Genomes, Cells, and Development3
MCELLBI C148Microbial Genomics and Genetics4
MCELLBI 150Molecular Immunology4
MCELLBI 160LNeurobiology Laboratory4
MCELLBI 166Biophysical Neurobiology3
NUSCTX 10Introduction to Human Nutrition3
NUSCTX 11Introduction to Toxicology3
NUSCTX 108AIntroduction and Application of Food Science3
NUSCTX 110Toxicology4
NUSCTX 160Metabolic Bases of Human Health and Diseases4
NUSCTX 171Nutrition and Toxicology Laboratory4
PHYSICS 7CPhysics for Scientists and Engineers4
PHYSICS C21Physics and Music3
PHYSICS 105Analytic Mechanics4
PHYSICS 110AElectromagnetism and Optics4
PHYSICS 110BElectromagnetism and Optics4
PHYSICS 112Introduction to Statistical and Thermal Physics4
PHYSICS 129Particle Physics4
PHYSICS 130Quantum and Nonlinear Optics3
PHYSICS 137BQuantum Mechanics4
PHYSICS 138Modern Atomic Physics3
PHYSICS 141ASolid State Physics4
PHYSICS 177Principles of Molecular Biophysics3
PLANTBI 10Plants, Agriculture, and Society2
PLANTBI 40The (Secret) Life of Plants3
PLANTBI C103Bacterial Pathogenesis3
PLANTBI C107LPrinciples of Plant Morphology with Laboratory4
PLANTBI C112General Microbiology4
PLANTBI C114Introduction to Comparative Virology4
PLANTBI C116Microbial Diversity3
PLANTBI 120Biology of Algae2
PLANTBI 120LLaboratory for Biology of Algae2
PLANTBI 122Bioenergy2
PLANTBI 135Physiology and Biochemistry of Plants3
PLANTBI C148Microbial Genomics and Genetics4
PLANTBI 150Plant Cell Biology3
PLANTBI 160Plant Molecular Genetics3
PLANTBI 170Modern Applications of Plant Biotechnology2
PLANTBI 180Environmental Plant Biology2
PSYCH 110Introduction to Biological Psychology3
PSYCH C113Biological Clocks: Physiology and Behavior3
PSYCH 114Biology of Learning3
PSYCH C116Hormones and Behavior3
PSYCH 117Human Neuropsychology3
PSYCH 122Introduction to Human Learning and Memory3
PSYCH C126Perception3
PSYCH C127Cognitive Neuroscience3
PSYCH C129Scientific Approaches to Consciousness3
PB HLTH C102Bacterial Pathogenesis3
PB HLTH 162APublic Health Microbiology3

Lower Division Engineering Electives List

CHM ENG 90Science and Engineering of Sustainable Energy3
EL ENG 16ADesigning Information Devices and Systems I4
EL ENG 16BDesigning Information Devices and Systems II4

Upper Division Engineering Electives List

BIO ENG 100Ethics in Science and Engineering3
BIO ENG 101Instrumentation in Biology and Medicine4
BIO ENG 102Biomechanics: Analysis and Design4
BIO ENG 103Engineering Molecules 24
BIO ENG 104Biological Transport Phenomena4
BIO ENG 110Biomedical Physiology for Engineers4
BIO ENG 111Functional Biomaterials Development and Characterization4
BIO ENG 112Course Not Available
BIO ENG 113Stem Cells and Technologies4
BIO ENG C112Molecular Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of the Cell4
BIO ENG 115Cell Biology for Engineers4
BIO ENG 116Cell and Tissue Engineering4
BIO ENG C117Structural Aspects of Biomaterials4
BIO ENG C118Biological Performance of Materials4
BIO ENG C119Orthopedic Biomechanics4
BIO ENG 121BioMEMS and Medical Devices4
BIO ENG 121LBioMems and BioNanotechnology Laboratory4
BIO ENG 124Basic Principles of Drug Delivery3
BIO ENG C125Introduction to Robotics4
BIO ENG 131Introduction to Computational Molecular and Cell Biology4
BIO ENG 132Genetic Devices4
BIO ENG 135Frontiers in Microbial Systems Biology4
BIO ENG C136LLaboratory in the Mechanics of Organisms3
BIO ENG 140LSynthetic Biology Laboratory4
BIO ENG 143Computational Methods in Biology4
BIO ENG C145LIntroductory Electronic Transducers Laboratory3
BIO ENG C145MIntroductory Microcomputer Interfacing Laboratory3
BIO ENG 147Principles of Synthetic Biology4
BIO ENG 148Bioenergy and Sustainable Chemical Synthesis: Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology Approaches3
BIO ENG 150Introduction of Bionanoscience and Bionanotechnology4
BIO ENG 151Micro/Nanofluidics for Bioengineering and Lab-On-A-Chip4
BIO ENG 163Principles of Molecular and Cellular Biophotonics4
BIO ENG 163LMolecular and Cellular Biophotonics Laboratory4
BIO ENG 164Optics and Microscopy4
BIO ENG C165Medical Imaging Signals and Systems4
BIO ENG 168LPractical Light Microscopy3
BIO ENG C181The Berkeley Lectures on Energy: Energy from Biomass3
CHM ENG 170ABiochemical Engineering3
CHM ENG 170BBiochemical Engineering3
CHM ENG C170LBiochemical Engineering Laboratory3
CHM ENG 171Transport Phenomena3
CHM ENG 176Principles of Electrochemical Processes3
CHM ENG C178Polymer Science and Technology3
CHM ENG 179Process Technology of Solid-State Materials Devices3
CHM ENG 180Chemical Engineering Economics3
CHM ENG H194Research for Advanced Undergraduates2-4
CHM ENG C195AThe Berkeley Lectures on Energy: Energy from Biomass (may be repeated for credit when the topic changes)3
CHM ENG 196Special Laboratory Study2-4
CHEM C138The Berkeley Lectures on Energy: Energy from Biomass3
CIV ENG 101Fluid Mechanics of Rivers, Streams, and Wetlands3
CIV ENG 103Introduction to Hydrology3
CIV ENG 105Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydrology3
CIV ENG C106Air Pollution3
CIV ENG 107Climate Change Mitigation3
CIV ENG 110Water Systems and Society3
CIV ENG 111Environmental Engineering3
CIV ENG 111LWater and Air Quality Laboratory1
CIV ENG 112Environmental Engineering Design3
CIV ENG 113NCourse Not Available
CIV ENG 114Environmental Microbiology3
CIV ENG 115Water Chemistry3
CIV ENG C116Chemistry of Soils3
CIV ENG 120Structural Engineering3
CIV ENG 121Structural Analysis3
CIV ENG 122LStructural Steel Design Project1
CIV ENG 122NDesign of Steel Structures3
CIV ENG 123LStructural Concrete Design Project1
CIV ENG 123NDesign of Reinforced Concrete Structures3
CIV ENG 124Structural Design in Timber3
CIV ENG 130NMechanics of Structures3
CIV ENG C133Engineering Analysis Using the Finite Element Method3
CIV ENG 153Transportation Facility Design3
CIV ENG 155Transportation Systems Engineering3
CIV ENG 156Infrastructure Planning and Management3
CIV ENG 167Engineering Project Management3
CIV ENG 171Rock Mechanics3
CIV ENG 173Groundwater and Seepage3
CIV ENG 175Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering3
CIV ENG 176Environmental Geotechnics3
CIV ENG C178Applied Geophysics3
CIV ENG 180Life-Cycle Design and Construction4
CIV ENG 186Design of Cyber-Physical Systems3
CIV ENG 191Civil and Environmental Engineering Systems Analysis3
CIV ENG 193Engineering Risk Analysis3
COMPSCI C149Introduction to Embedded Systems4
COMPSCI 161Computer Security4
COMPSCI 162Operating Systems and System Programming4
EL ENG 100Course Not Available4
EL ENG 105Microelectronic Devices and Circuits4
EL ENG C106AIntroduction to Robotics4
EL ENG C106BRobotic Manipulation and Interaction4
EL ENG 113Power Electronics4
EL ENG 118Introduction to Optical Engineering3
EL ENG 127Course Not Available
EL ENG 137AIntroduction to Electric Power Systems4
EL ENG 137BIntroduction to Electric Power Systems4
EL ENG 130Integrated-Circuit Devices4
EL ENG 134Fundamentals of Photovoltaic Devices4
EL ENG 140Linear Integrated Circuits4
EL ENG 142Integrated Circuits for Communications4
EL ENG 143Microfabrication Technology4
EL ENG C145BMedical Imaging Signals and Systems4
EL ENG C145LIntroductory Electronic Transducers Laboratory3
EL ENG C145OLaboratory in the Mechanics of Organisms3
EL ENG 147Introduction to Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS)3
EL ENG C149Introduction to Embedded Systems4
ENGIN 117Methods of Engineering Analysis3
ENGIN 120Principles of Engineering Economics3
IND ENG 160Nonlinear and Discrete Optimization3
IND ENG 153Logistics Network Design and Supply Chain Management3
IND ENG 162Linear Programming and Network Flows3
IND ENG 166Decision Analytics3
IND ENG 170Industrial Design and Human Factors3
MAT SCI 112Corrosion (Chemical Properties)3
MAT SCI 102Bonding, Crystallography, and Crystal Defects3
MAT SCI 104Materials Characterization4
MAT SCI 111Properties of Electronic Materials4
MAT SCI 113Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials3
MAT SCI 117Properties of Dielectric and Magnetic Materials3
MAT SCI C118Biological Performance of Materials4
MAT SCI 120Materials Production3
MAT SCI 121Metals Processing3
MAT SCI 122Ceramic Processing3
MAT SCI 123ELECTRONIC MATERIALS PROCESSING4
MAT SCI 125Thin-Film Materials Science3
MAT SCI 136Materials in Energy Technologies4
MAT SCI 140Nanomaterials for Scientists and Engineers3
MAT SCI 151Polymeric Materials3
MEC ENG 102AIntroduction to Mechanical Systems for Mechatronics4
MEC ENG 102BMechatronics Design4
MEC ENG 104Engineering Mechanics II3
MEC ENG 106Fluid Mechanics3
MEC ENG 107Mechanical Engineering Laboratory3
MEC ENG 108Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials4
MEC ENG 109Heat Transfer3
MEC ENG 110Introduction to Product Development3
MEC ENG C115Molecular Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of the Cell4
MEC ENG C117Structural Aspects of Biomaterials4
MEC ENG 119Introduction to MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems)3
MEC ENG 122Processing of Materials in Manufacturing3
MEC ENG 127Course Not Available3
MEC ENG 130Design of Planar Machinery3
MEC ENG 131Vehicle Dynamics and Control3
MEC ENG 133Mechanical Vibrations3
MEC ENG 135Design of Microprocessor-Based Mechanical Systems4
MEC ENG 138Introduction to Micro/Nano Mechanical Systems Laboratory3
MEC ENG 140Combustion Processes3
MEC ENG 146Energy Conversion Principles3
MEC ENG 150ASolar-Powered Vehicles: Analysis, Design and Fabrication3
MEC ENG 151Advanced Heat Transfer3
MEC ENG 163Engineering Aerodynamics3
MEC ENG 164Marine Statics and Structures3
MEC ENG 165Ocean-Environment Mechanics3
MEC ENG 167Microscale Fluid Mechanics3
MEC ENG 170Engineering Mechanics III3
MEC ENG 171Course Not Available3
MEC ENG 173Fundamentals of Acoustics3
MEC ENG 175Intermediate Dynamics3
MEC ENG C176Orthopedic Biomechanics4
MEC ENG C180Engineering Analysis Using the Finite Element Method3
MEC ENG 185Introduction to Continuum Mechanics3
MEC ENG 190ACourse Not Available
NUC ENG 100Introduction to Nuclear Engineering3
NUC ENG 101Nuclear Reactions and Radiation4
NUC ENG 102Nuclear Reactions and Radiation Laboratory3
NUC ENG 120Nuclear Materials4
NUC ENG 130Analytical Methods for Non-proliferation4
NUC ENG 124Radioactive Waste Management3
NUC ENG 150Introduction to Nuclear Reactor Theory4
NUC ENG 155Introduction to Numerical Simulations in Radiation Transport3
NUC ENG 161Nuclear Power Engineering4
NUC ENG 162Radiation Biophysics and Dosimetry3
NUC ENG 167Risk-Informed Design for Advanced Nuclear Systems3
NUC ENG 175Methods of Risk Analysis3
NUC ENG 180Introduction to Controlled Fusion3
PLANTBI C124The Berkeley Lectures on Energy: Energy from Biomass3

Concentrations

The concentrations are biotechnology, chemical processing, environmental technology, materials science and technology, and applied physical science. Students who plan to declare a concentration must do so no later than the end of their junior year. Double concentrations are not permitted.

Biotechnology

CHEM 112BOrganic Chemistry4-5
or MCELLBI C112 General Microbiology
or MCELLBI 104 Genetics, Genomics, and Cell Biology
CHM ENG 170ABiochemical Engineering3
Choose two from the following, such that at least 3 units come from an engineering course (CHM ENG or BIO ENG)
Biochemical Engineering
Biochemical Engineering Laboratory
Protein Engineering
Biomolecular Engineering
Functional Biomaterials Development and Characterization
Cell and Tissue Engineering
Bioenergy and Sustainable Chemical Synthesis: Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology Approaches
Fluid Mechanics of Biological Systems
Molecular Immunology
Research for Advanced Undergraduates (Use of CHM ENG H194 or 196 toward the concentration for undergraduate research in a biotechnology research laboratory will be considered. Requires approval from the faculty. Send requests for approval to the Director of Undergraduate Education. )
Special Laboratory Study (Use of CHM ENG H194 or 196 toward the concentration for undergraduate research in a biotechnology research laboratory will be considered. Requires approval from the faculty. Send requests for approval to the Director of Undergraduate Education. )
Students in the Biotechnology concentration are required to take MCELLBI 102 or CHEM 135 in place of BIOLOGY 1A

Chemical Processing

CHEM 104AAdvanced Inorganic Chemistry3-5
or CHEM 112B Organic Chemistry
Select 6 units from the following:
Biochemical Engineering
Biochemical Engineering
Biochemical Engineering Laboratory
Transport Phenomena
Polymer Science and Technology
Process Technology of Solid-State Materials Devices
Chemical Engineering Economics
Research for Advanced Undergraduates (up to 4 units)
Select 3 units from the following:
Introduction to Solid Mechanics
Environmental Engineering
Environmental Microbiology
Groundwater and Seepage
Properties of Electronic Materials
Corrosion (Chemical Properties)
Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials
Biological Performance of Materials
Materials Production
Metals Processing
Ceramic Processing
ELECTRONIC MATERIALS PROCESSING
Combustion Processes
Advanced Heat Transfer

Energy and Environment

Select at least 3 units from the following:
Organic Chemistry
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Nuclear Chemistry
Physics for Scientists and Engineers
Select 9 units from the following:
Biochemical Engineering
Principles of Electrochemical Processes
Polymer Science and Technology
Process Technology of Solid-State Materials Devices
The Berkeley Lectures on Energy: Energy from Biomass
Or other approved CHM ENG 195 courses with energy or environment topics as the main focus, including Carbon Capture and Sequestration
Nuclear Reactions and Radiation
Introduction to Nuclear Reactor Theory
Nuclear Power Engineering
Environmental Engineering
CIV ENG 113N
Course Not Available
Chemistry of Soils
Groundwater and Seepage
Combustion Processes
Energy Conversion Principles

Materials Science and Technology

Select one of the following:
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Inorganic Synthesis and Reactions
Organic Chemistry
Select 3 units from the following:
Principles of Electrochemical Processes
Polymer Science and Technology
Process Technology of Solid-State Materials Devices
Select 6 units from the following:
Introduction to Solid Mechanics
Integrated-Circuit Devices
Microfabrication Technology
Bonding, Crystallography, and Crystal Defects
Phase Transformations and Kinetics
Properties of Electronic Materials
Corrosion (Chemical Properties)
Materials Production
Metals Processing
Ceramic Processing
ELECTRONIC MATERIALS PROCESSING
Thin-Film Materials Science
Processing of Materials in Manufacturing 1
MEC ENG 127
Course Not Available
1

Students may take MEC ENG 122 without the prerequisites of CIV ENG 130N and MEC ENG 108.

Business and Management

CHM ENG 180Chemical Engineering Economics3
3 units of science electives selected from the list of physical and biological science electives 3
3 units of engineering electives selected from the list of engineering electives3
3 units chosen from the following:
Introduction to Financial Accounting
Perspectives on Entrepreneurship
Principles of Business
Fundamentals of Business
Upper division preferred.

Applied Physical Science

6 units chosen from physical and biological sciences List6
3 units of CHM ENG electives (excluding CHM ENG 196)3
3 units chosen from engineering electives list3

Minor Requirements

Students who have a strong interest in an area of study outside their major often decide to complete a minor program. These programs have set requirements and are noted officially on the transcript in the memoranda section but are not noted on diplomas.

General Guidelines

  1. All courses taken to fulfill the minor requirements below must be taken for graded credit.
  2. A minimum of three of the upper division courses taken to fulfill the minor requirements must be completed at UC Berkeley.
  3. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required for courses used to fulfill the minor requirements.
  4. Students must consult with their college/school for information regarding overlap of courses between their majors and minors.

Requirements

Upper Division
CHM ENG 140Introduction to Chemical Process Analysis4
CHM ENG 141Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 14
CHM ENG 150ATransport Processes 14
Select two of the following:
CHM ENG 142Chemical Kinetics and Reaction Engineering4
CHM ENG 150BTransport and Separation Processes4
CHM ENG 162Dynamics and Control of Chemical Processes4
CHM ENG 170ABiochemical Engineering3
CHM ENG 170BBiochemical Engineering3
CHM ENG 171Transport Phenomena3
CHM ENG 176Principles of Electrochemical Processes3
CHM ENG C178Polymer Science and Technology3
CHM ENG 179Process Technology of Solid-State Materials Devices3
CHM ENG 180Chemical Engineering Economics3
CHM ENG 185Technical Communication for Chemical Engineers3
CHM ENG C195AThe Berkeley Lectures on Energy: Energy from Biomass3
1

Students who have completed courses in other departments at Berkeley that are essentially equivalent to CHM ENG 141 and CHM ENG 150A can substitute other courses from the above list.

College Requirements

Undergraduate students in the College of Chemistry must fulfill the following requirements in addition to those required by the major program.  

For detailed lists of courses that fulfill college requirements, please see the College of Chemistry page in this Guide. 

Entry Level Writing

All students who will enter the University of California as freshmen must demonstrate their command of the English language by fulfilling the Entry Level Writing Requirement. Fulfillment of this requirement is also a prerequisite to enrollment in all reading and composition courses at UC Berkeley.

American History and American Institutions

The American History and Institutions requirements are based on the principle that a US resident graduated from an American university should have an understanding of the history and governmental institutions of the United States.

American Cultures

American Cultures is the one requirement that all undergraduate students at Cal need to take and pass in order to graduate. The requirement offers an exciting intellectual environment centered on the study of race, ethnicity and culture of the United States. AC courses offer students opportunities to be part of research-led, highly accomplished teaching environments, grappling with the complexity of American Culture.

Foreign Language

Applies to Chemistry and Chemical Biology majors only.

The Foreign Language requirement may be satisfied with one foreign language, in one of the following ways:

  • By completing in high school the third year of one foreign language with minimum grades of C-.

  • By completing at Berkeley the second semester of a sequence of courses in one foreign language, or the equivalent at another institution. Only foreign language courses that include reading and composition as well as conversation are accepted in satisfaction of this requirement. Foreign language courses may be taken on a Pass/No Pass basis.

  • By demonstrating equivalent knowledge of a foreign language through examination, including a College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) Advanced Placement Examination with a score of 3 or higher (if taken before admission to college), an SAT II: Subject Test with a score of 590 or higher, or a proficiency examination offered by some departments at Berkeley or at another campus of the University of California.

Reading and Composition

In order to provide a solid foundation in reading, writing and critical thinking the College requires lower division work in composition.

  • Chemical Engineering majors – A-level R&C course (e.g., English R1A) by end of freshman year

  • Chemical Biology and Chemistry majors – A- and B-level courses by end of sophomore year

Humanities and Social Sciences Breadth Requirement – Chemistry & Chemical Biology majors

  • 15 units total; includes Reading & Composition (R1A + R1B) and American Cultures courses

  • Remaining units must come from the College of Chemistry’s lists of approved humanities and social science courses

  • Breadth courses may be taken on a Pass/No Pass basis (excluding R&C)

  • AP, IB, and GCE A-level exam credit may be used to satisfy the breadth requirement

Humanities and Social Sciences Breadth Requirement – Chemical Engineering major

  • 19 unit total; includes Reading & Composition (R1A only) and American Cultures courses

  • Breadth Series requirement: As part of the 19 units, students must complete two courses, at least one being upper division, in the same or very closely allied humanities or social science department(s).  AP credit may be used to satisfy the lower division aspect of the requirement.

  • Breadth Series courses and all remaining units must come from the College of Chemistry’s lists of approved humanities and social science courses

  • Breadth courses may be taken on a Pass/No Pass basis (excluding R&C)

  • AP, IB, and GCE A-level exam credit may be used to satisfy the breadth requirement

Class Schedule Requirements

Minimum units per semester – 13

Maximum units per semester – 19.5

12 units of course work each semester must satisfy degree requirements.

Chemical engineering freshmen and Chemistry majors are required to enroll in a minimum of one chemistry course each semester.

After the freshman year, Chemical Engineering majors must enroll in a minimum of one chemical and biomolecular engineering course each semester.

Semester Limit

  • Students who entered as freshmen – 8 semesters

  • Chemistry & Chemical Biology majors who entered as transfer students – 4 semesters

  • Chemical Engineering majors who entered as transfer students – 5 semesters

Summer sessions are excluded when determining the limit on semesters. Students who wish to delay graduation to complete a minor, a double major, or simultaneous degrees must request approval for delay of graduation before what would normally be their final two semesters. The College of Chemistry does not have a rule regarding maximum units that a student can accumulate.

Senior Residence

After 90 units toward the bachelor’s degree have been completed, at least 24 of the remaining units must be completed in residence in the College of Chemistry, in at least two semesters (the semester in which the 90 units are exceeded, plus at least one additional semester).

To count as a semester of residence for this requirement, a program must include at least 4 units of successfully completed courses. A summer session can be credited as a semester in residence if this minimum unit requirement is satisfied.

Juniors and seniors who participate in the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP) for a full year may meet a modified senior residence requirement. After 60 units toward the bachelor’s degree have been completed, at least 24 (excluding EAP) of the remaining units must be completed in residence in the College of Chemistry, in at least two semesters. At least 12 of the 24 units must be completed after the student has already completed 90 units. Undergraduate Dean’s approval for the modified senior residence requirement must be obtained before enrollment in the Education Abroad Program.

Minimum Total Units

A student must successfully complete at least 120 semester units in order to graduate.

Minimum Academic Requirements

Grades

A student must earn at least a C average (2.0 GPA) in all courses undertaken at UC, including those from UC Summer Sessions, UC Education Abroad Program, and UC Berkeley Washington Program, as well as XB courses from University Extension.

Minimum Course Grade Requirements

Students in the College of Chemistry who receive a grade of D+ or lower in a chemical and biomolecular engineering or chemistry course for which a grade of C- or higher is required must repeat the course at Berkeley.

Students in the College of Chemistry must achieve:

  • C- or higher in CHEM 4A before taking CHEM 4B

  • C- or higher in CHEM 4B before taking more advanced courses

  • C- or higher in CHEM 112A before taking CHEM 112B GPA of at least 2.0 in all courses taken in the college in order to advance to and continue in the upper division

Chemistry or chemical biology majors must also achieve:

Chemical engineering students must also achieve:

  • C- or higher in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (CBE) 140 before taking any other CBE courses

  • C- or higher in CHM ENG 150A to be eligible to take any other course in the 150 series

  • 2.0 GPA in all upper division courses taken at the University to satisfy major requirements

Chemical engineering students who do not achieve a grade of C- or higher in CHM ENG 140 on their first attempt are advised to change to another major. If the course is not passed with a grade of C- or higher on the second attempt, continuation in the Chemical Engineering program is normally not allowed.

Minimum Progress

To make normal progress toward a degree, undergraduates must successfully complete 30 units of coursework each year. The continued enrollment of students who do not maintain normal progress will be subject to the approval of the Undergraduate Dean. To achieve minimum academic progress, the student must meet two criteria:

  1. Completed no fewer units than 15 multiplied by the number of semesters, less one, in which the student has been enrolled at Berkeley. Summer sessions do not count as semesters for this purpose.

  2. A student’s class schedule must contain at least 13 units in any term, unless otherwise authorized by the staff adviser or the Undergraduate Dean.

Student Learning Goals

Mission

The mission of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering is:

  • To educate people for careers of leadership and innovation in chemical engineering and related fields.
  • .To expand the base of engineering knowledge through original research and by developing technology to serve the needs of society.
  • To benefit the public through service to industry, government, and the engineering profession.

Fulfillment of this mission is achieved in part by the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering's accredited undergraduate degree program in chemical engineering. The undergraduate curriculum comprises both a technical curriculum and breadth requirements.

The goals of chemical engineering breadth requirements are to teach the arts of writing clearly and persuasively, to develop the skills to read carefully and evaluate evidence effectively, and to instill an awareness of humanity in historical and social contexts. The Berkeley American Cultures requirement affirms the value of diversity in acquiring knowledge.

The technical curriculum in chemical engineering seeks to provide students with a broad education emphasizing an excellent foundation in scientific and engineering fundamentals.

Learning Goals for the Major

  1. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.
  2. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  3. An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
  4. An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.
  5. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  6. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  7. An ability to communicate effectively.
  8. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.
  9. A recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
  10. A knowledge of contemporary issues.
  11. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Courses

Chemical Engineering

CHM ENG 24 Freshman Seminars 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Fall 2014, Spring 2014
The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester.

Freshman Seminars: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 40 Introduction to Chemical Engineering Design 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Design and analysis of processes involving chemical change. Strategies for design, such as creative thinking and (re)definition of the design goal. Methods for analyzing designs, such as mathematical modeling, empirical analysis by graphics, and dynamic scaling by dimensional analysis. Design choices in light of process efficiency, product quality, economics, safety, and environmental issues.

Introduction to Chemical Engineering Design: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 84 Sophomore Seminar 1 or 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2012, Spring 2010
Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses offered by faculty members in departments all across the campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for close, regular intellectual contact between faculty members and students in the crucial second year. The topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sophomores.

Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 90 Science and Engineering of Sustainable Energy 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
An introduction is given to the science and technologies of producing electricity and transportation fuels from renewable energy resources (biomass, geothermal, solar, wind, and wave). Students will be introduced to quantitative calculations and comparisions of energy technologies together with the economic and political factors affecting the transition from nonrenewable to sustainable energy resources. Mass and energy balances are used to
analyze the conversion of energy resources.
Science and Engineering of Sustainable Energy: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 98 Directed Group Studies for Lower Division Undergraduates 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Supervised research on a specific topic.

Directed Group Studies for Lower Division Undergraduates: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 98W Directed Group Study 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Directed group study consisting of supplementary problem sets, review sessions, and discussions related to chemical engineering. Topics vary with instructor.

Directed Group Study: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 140 Introduction to Chemical Process Analysis 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Material and energy balances applied to chemical process systems. Determination of thermodynamic properties needed for such calculations. Sources of data. Calculation procedures.

Introduction to Chemical Process Analysis: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 141 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Thermodynamic behavior of pure substances and mixtures. Properties of solutions, phase equilibria. Thermodynamic cycles. Chemical equilibria for homogeneous and heterogeneous systems.

Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 142 Chemical Kinetics and Reaction Engineering 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Analysis and prediction of rates of chemical conversion in flow and nonflow processes involving homogeneous and heterogeneous systems.

Chemical Kinetics and Reaction Engineering: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 143 Computational Methods in Chemical Engineering 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016
The purpose of Chemical Engineering Modeling and Computations in Chemical Engineering is to teach students the methodologies used in setting up mathematical models of simple chemical processes and operations, and the numerical techniques used to simulate them. Included are techniques to obtain physical properties of mixtures/solutions using equations of state. This is followed by simple processes such as vapor liquid equilibrium, separation operations such as distillation
, heat transfer, and chemical reactions in ideal reactors such as stirred tank and plug flow. Later on, real chemical process equipment and processes are modeled and simulated, using many of the techniques learned earlier. Programming languages such as Matlab and...
Computational Methods in Chemical Engineering: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 150A Transport Processes 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Principles of fluid mechanics and heat transfer with application to chemical processes. Laminar and turbulent flow in pipes and around submerged objects. Flow measurement. Heat conduction and convection; heat transfer coefficients.

Transport Processes: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 150B Transport and Separation Processes 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Fall 2016, Summer 2016 8 Week Session
Principles of mass transfer with application to chemical processes. Diffusion and convection. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer; mass transfer coefficients. Design of staged and continuous separations processes.

Transport and Separation Processes: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 154 Chemical Engineering Laboratory 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Experiments in physical measurements, fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, kinetics, and separation processes. Emphasis on investigation of basic relationships important in engineering. Experimental design, analysis of results, and preparation of engineering reports are stressed.

Chemical Engineering Laboratory: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 160 Chemical Process Design 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Fall 2016, Summer 2016 8 Week Session
Design principles of chemical process equipment. Design of integrated chemical processes with emphasis upon economic considerations.

Chemical Process Design: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 161S Industrial Chemical Process Design 6 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Design of chemical processes and equipment, with an emphasis on industry-sponsored and/or industry-tailored processes

Industrial Chemical Process Design: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 162 Dynamics and Control of Chemical Processes 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Analysis of the dynamic behavior of chemical processes and methods and theory of their control. Implementation of computer control systems on process simulations.

Dynamics and Control of Chemical Processes: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 170A Biochemical Engineering 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
This course intends to introduce chemical engineers to the basic concepts of biochemical engineering. The course focuses on the use of chemical engineering skills and principles in the analysis and design of biologically-based processes. The main emphasis will be on biochemical kinetics, heat and mass transfer, thermodynamics, and transport phenomena as they apply to enzyme catalysis, microbial growth and metabolism, fermentation and bioreactor
design, product recovery and downstream processing. Fundamental topics in biological sciences will be introduced as necessary throughout the course.
Biochemical Engineering: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 170B Biochemical Engineering 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
The second of a two-semester sequence intended to introduce chemical engineers to the basic concepts of biochemical engineering. The course focuses on the use of chemical engineering skills and principles in the analysis and design of biologically-based processes. The emphasis will be on biochemical kinetics, protein engineering, cell growth and metabolism, bioreactor design, downstream processing, pharmacokinetics, drug delivery, and ethics.

Biochemical Engineering: Read More [+]

CHM ENG C170L Biochemical Engineering Laboratory 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
Laboratory techniques for the cultivation of microorganisms in batch and continuous reactions. Enzymatic conversion processes. Recovery of biological products.

Biochemical Engineering Laboratory: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 171 Transport Phenomena 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Spring 2009, Spring 2008
Study of momentum, energy, and mass transfer in laminar and turbulent flow.

Transport Phenomena: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 176 Principles of Electrochemical Processes 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Spring 2012
Principles and application of electrochemical equilibria, kinetics, and transport processes. Technical electrolysis and electrochemical energy conversion.

Principles of Electrochemical Processes: Read More [+]

CHM ENG C178 Polymer Science and Technology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
An interdisciplinary course on the synthesis, characterization, and properties of polymer materials. Emphasis on the molecular origin of properties of polymeric materials and technological applications. Topics include single molecule properties, polymer mixtures and solutions, melts, glasses, elastomers, and crystals. Experiments in polymer synthesis, characterization, and physical properties.

Polymer Science and Technology: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 179 Process Technology of Solid-State Materials Devices 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Chemical processing and properties of solid-state materials. Crystal growth and purification. Thin film technology. Application of chemical processing to the manufacture of semiconductors and solid-state devices.

Process Technology of Solid-State Materials Devices: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 180 Chemical Engineering Economics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Optimal design of chemical processes and unit operations, emphasizing the interactions between technical and economic considerations. Analysis of process risks. Chemical and biomolecular process design in the presence of uncertainties. Interest rate determinants and their effects on chemical process feasibility and choices. Relationships between structure and behavior of firms in the chemical processing industries. Multivariable input-output analyses.

Chemical Engineering Economics: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 185 Technical Communication for Chemical Engineers 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Development of technical writing and oral presentation skills in formats commonly used by chemical engineers.

Technical Communication for Chemical Engineers: Read More [+]

CHM ENG H193 Senior Honors Thesis 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
A senior honors thesis is written in consultation with the student's faculty research advisor. This is a required course for students wishing to graduate with honors in Chemical Engineering.

Senior Honors Thesis: Read More [+]

CHM ENG H194 Research for Advanced Undergraduates 2 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Original research under direction of one of the members of the staff.

Research for Advanced Undergraduates: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 195 Special Topics 2 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Lectures and/or tutorial instruction on special topics.

Special Topics: Read More [+]

CHM ENG C195A The Berkeley Lectures on Energy: Energy from Biomass 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
After an introduction to the different aspects of our global energy consumption, the course will focus on the role of biomass. The course will illustrate how the global scale of energy guides the biomass research. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of the biological aspects (crop selection, harvesting, storage and distribution, and chemical composition of biomass) with the chemical aspects to convert biomass to energy. The course aims to
engage students in state-of-the-art research.
The Berkeley Lectures on Energy: Energy from Biomass: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 196 Special Laboratory Study 2 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Special laboratory or computational work under direction of one of the members of the staff.

Special Laboratory Study: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 197 Field Study in Chemical Engineering 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Supervised experience in off-campus organizations relevant to specific aspects and applications of chemical engineering. Written report required at the end of the term. Course does not satisfy unit or residence requirements for the bachelor's degree.

Field Study in Chemical Engineering: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 198 Directed Group Study for Undergraduates 1 - 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
Supervised research on a specific topic. Enrollment is restricted; see Introduction to Courses and Curricula section in the General Catalog.

Directed Group Study for Undergraduates: Read More [+]

CHM ENG 199 Supervised Independent Study and Research 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2017 8 Week Session, Spring 2017, Fall 2016

Supervised Independent Study and Research: Read More [+]

Faculty and Instructors

+ Indicates this faculty member is the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award.

Faculty

Keith Alexander, Adjunct Professor. New Product Development; Technology Commercialization.

Nitash P. Balsara, Professor. Chemical engineering, synthesis and characterization of soft microstructured polymer materials, nucleation, neutron scattering, depolarized light scattering.
Research Profile

Alexis T. Bell, Professor. Understanding the fundamental relationships between the structure and composition of heterogeneous catalysts and their performance.
Research Profile

Elton J. Cairns, Professor. Electrochemistry and electrocatalysis.
Research Profile

Carlo Carraro, Adjunct Professor.

Douglas S. Clark, Professor. Biochemical engineering and biocatalysis.

David B. Graves, Professor. Plasma processing and electronic materials.
Research Profile

Teresa Head-Gordon, Professor. Computational chemistry, biophysics, bioengineering, biomolecules, materials, computational science.
Research Profile

Enrique Iglesia, Professor. Chemical engineering, catalytic materials, heterogeneous catalysis, chemical reaction engineering, methane and biomass coversion processes, refining processes, hydrogen generation, alkane activation deoxygenatiion and desulfurization catalysis, zeolites.
Research Profile

Alexander Katz, Assistant Professor. Chemical engineering, nanoengineering, catalytic imprinted silicas, catalysts in biological systems, catalysis, chemical sensing.
Research Profile

Jay Keasling, Professor. Microorganism metabolic engineering for environmentally friendly product.
Research Profile

Sanjay Kumar, Professor. Biomaterials, molecular and cellular bioengineering, stem cells, cancer biology, translational medicine.
Research Profile

Markita Landry, Assistant Professor.

Jeffrey R. Long, Professor. Inorganic and solid state chemistry, synthesis of inorganic clusters and solids, controlling structure, tailoring physical properties, intermetal bridges, high-spin metal-cyanide clusters, magnetic bistability.
Research Profile

Roya Maboudian, Professor. Surface and interfacial science and engineering, thin-film science and technology, micro-/nano-systems technology, harsh-environment sensors, silicon carbide, biologically-inspired materials synthesis.
Research Profile

Brian Maiorella, Adjunct Professor.

Kranthi K. Mandadapu, Assistant Professor. Statistical Mechanics, Continuum Mechanics — Polycrystalline Materials, Biological Membranes, Bacterial Motility.

Bryan D. McCloskey, Assistant Professor. Electrochemical energy storage, electrocatalysis, molecular and ionic transport through polymers.

Ali Mesbah, Assistant Professor. Process Systems and Control.
Research Profile

Susan J. Muller, Professor. Chemical engineering, fluid mechanics, Rheology, complex fluids, microfabrication processes, Genetic Engineering of Protein Polymers, Finite Element Modeling of Bubbles, Stress Fluids, Taylor-Couette instabilities.
Research Profile

John M. Prausnitz, Professor. Molecular thermodynamics of phase equilibria.
Research Profile

+ Clayton J. Radke, Professor. Surface and colloid science technology.
Research Profile

+ Jeffrey A. Reimer, Professor. Materials chemistry, applied spectroscopy, alternative energy, nuclear spintronics.
Research Profile

David Schaffer, Professor. Neuroscience, biomolecular engineering, bioengineering, stem cell biology, gene therapy.
Research Profile

Berend Smit, Professor.

Wenjun Zhang, Assistant Professor. Natural product biosynthesis and engineering for health and bioenergy applications.

Lecturers

Joanna Bechtel Dahl, Lecturer.

Colin Cerretani, Lecturer.

Shannon Ciston, Lecturer.

Dean C. Draemel, Lecturer.

Gregory R. Schoofs, Lecturer.

Steve Sciamanna, Lecturer.

Ravi Upadhye, Lecturer.

P. Henrik Wallman, Lecturer.

Marjorie Went, Lecturer.

Emeritus Faculty

Harvey W. Blanch, Professor Emeritus. Biochemical Engineering.
Research Profile

Morton Denn, Professor Emeritus.

Jean M. J. Frechet, Professor Emeritus. Materials chemistry, catalysis, drug delivery, analytical chemistry, organic synthesis, polymer science, macromolecules, chiral recognition, control of molecular architecture at the nanometer scale, reactive surfaces.
Research Profile

Simon Goren, Professor Emeritus.

C. Judson King, Professor Emeritus. Separation processes, spray drying, and higher education.
Research Profile

Scott Lynn, Professor Emeritus.

John S. Newman, Professor Emeritus. Chemical engineering, electrochemical systems, lithium batteries, industrial electrochemical processes, methanol fuel cells.
Research Profile

+ Michael C. Williams, Professor Emeritus.

Contact Information

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

201 Gilman Hall

Phone: 510-642-2291

Visit Department Website

Department Chair

Jeffrey Reimer, PhD

Phone: 510-643-3951

cbechair@berkeley.edu

Freshman Adviser

Maura Daly

121 Gilman Hall

Phone: 510-643-0550

mdaly@berkeley.edu

Adviser, Continuing Students A-R

Monica Jackson

121 Gilman Hall

Phone: 510-642-3451

majt@berkeley.edu

Adviser, Continuing Students S-Z

Shamaya Pellum

121 Gilman Hall

Phone: 510-643-1745

sbeattie@berkeley.edu

College Transfer Adviser

Joey Wong

121 Gilman Hall

Phone: 510-642-7919

joeywong@berkeley.edu

Director of Undergraduate Education

Shannon Ciston

101-A Gilman Hall

Phone: 510-643-8544

sciston@berkeley.edu

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